Ependymoma: Glioma derived from EPENDYMOGLIAL CELLS that tend to present as malignant intracranial tumors in children and as benign intraspinal neoplasms in adults. It may arise from any level of the ventricular system or central canal of the spinal cord. Intracranial ependymomas most frequently originate in the FOURTH VENTRICLE and histologically are densely cellular tumors which may contain ependymal tubules and perivascular pseudorosettes. Spinal ependymomas are usually benign papillary or myxopapillary tumors. (From DeVita et al., Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, p2018; Escourolle et al., Manual of Basic Neuropathology, 2nd ed, pp28-9)Search Engine: Software used to locate data or information stored in machine-readable form locally or at a distance such as an INTERNET site.Apudoma: A general term collectively applied to tumors associated with the APUD CELLS series, irrespective of their specific identification.Wilms Tumor: A malignant kidney tumor, caused by the uncontrolled multiplication of renal stem (blastemal), stromal (STROMAL CELLS), and epithelial (EPITHELIAL CELLS) elements. However, not all three are present in every case. Several genes or chromosomal areas have been associated with Wilms tumor which is usually found in childhood as a firm lump in a child's side or ABDOMEN.Araliaceae: The ginseng plant family of the order Apiales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida. Leaves are generally alternate, large, and compound. Flowers are five-parted and arranged in compound flat-topped umbels. The fruit is a berry or (rarely) a drupe (a one-seeded fruit). It is well known for plant preparations used as adaptogens (immune support and anti-fatigue).Brain Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.Tuberculosis, Multidrug-Resistant: Tuberculosis resistant to chemotherapy with two or more ANTITUBERCULAR AGENTS, including at least ISONIAZID and RIFAMPICIN. The problem of resistance is particularly troublesome in tuberculous OPPORTUNISTIC INFECTIONS associated with HIV INFECTIONS. It requires the use of second line drugs which are more toxic than the first line regimens. TB with isolates that have developed further resistance to at least three of the six classes of second line drugs is defined as EXTENSIVELY DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS.Silver Proteins: Compounds of silver and proteins used as topical anti-infective agents.Drug Resistance, Viral: The ability of viruses to resist or to become tolerant to chemotherapeutic agents or antiviral agents. This resistance is acquired through gene mutation.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Embryonic Stem Cells: Cells derived from the BLASTOCYST INNER CELL MASS which forms before implantation in the uterine wall. They retain the ability to divide, proliferate and provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Karyotyping: Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.Teratoma: A true neoplasm composed of a number of different types of tissue, none of which is native to the area in which it occurs. It is composed of tissues that are derived from three germinal layers, the endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm. They are classified histologically as mature (benign) or immature (malignant). (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1642)Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Pluripotent Stem Cells: Cells that can give rise to cells of the three different GERM LAYERS.Cell Culture Techniques: Methods for maintaining or growing CELLS in vitro.Trisomy: The possession of a third chromosome of any one type in an otherwise diploid cell.Abducens Nerve: The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.Abducens Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the sixth cranial (abducens) nerve or its nucleus in the pons. The nerve may be injured along its course in the pons, intracranially as it travels along the base of the brain, in the cavernous sinus, or at the level of superior orbital fissure or orbit. Dysfunction of the nerve causes lateral rectus muscle weakness, resulting in horizontal diplopia that is maximal when the affected eye is abducted and ESOTROPIA. Common conditions associated with nerve injury include INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ISCHEMIA; and INFRATENTORIAL NEOPLASMS.Abducens Nerve Injury: Traumatic injury to the abducens, or sixth, cranial nerve. Injury to this nerve results in lateral rectus muscle weakness or paralysis. The nerve may be damaged by closed or penetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA or by facial trauma involving the orbit.Neurilemmoma: A neoplasm that arises from SCHWANN CELLS of the cranial, peripheral, and autonomic nerves. Clinically, these tumors may present as a cranial neuropathy, abdominal or soft tissue mass, intracranial lesion, or with spinal cord compression. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, highly vascular, and composed of a homogenous pattern of biphasic fusiform-shaped cells that may have a palisaded appearance. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp964-5)Horner Syndrome: A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)Cranial Nerve Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms that arise from one or more of the twelve cranial nerves.Diplopia: A visual symptom in which a single object is perceived by the visual cortex as two objects rather than one. Disorders associated with this condition include REFRACTIVE ERRORS; STRABISMUS; OCULOMOTOR NERVE DISEASES; TROCHLEAR NERVE DISEASES; ABDUCENS NERVE DISEASES; and diseases of the BRAIN STEM and OCCIPITAL LOBE.Cavernous Sinus: An irregularly shaped venous space in the dura mater at either side of the sphenoid bone.Esthesioneuroblastoma, Olfactory: A malignant olfactory neuroblastoma arising from the olfactory epithelium of the superior nasal cavity and cribriform plate. It is uncommon (3% of nasal tumors) and rarely is associated with the production of excess hormones (e.g., SIADH, Cushing Syndrome). It has a high propensity for multiple local recurrences and bony metastases. (From Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3rd ed, p1245; J Laryngol Otol 1998 Jul;112(7):628-33)Cranial Nerve Diseases: Disorders of one or more of the twelve cranial nerves. With the exception of the optic and olfactory nerves, this includes disorders of the brain stem nuclei from which the cranial nerves originate or terminate.Receptor, IGF Type 1: A protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is closely related in structure to the INSULIN RECEPTOR. Although commonly referred to as the IGF-I receptor, it binds both IGF-I and IGF-II with high affinity. It is comprised of a tetramer of two alpha and two beta subunits which are derived from cleavage of a single precursor protein. The beta subunit contains an intrinsic tyrosine kinase domain.Insulin-Like Growth Factor I: A well-characterized basic peptide believed to be secreted by the liver and to circulate in the blood. It has growth-regulating, insulin-like, and mitogenic activities. This growth factor has a major, but not absolute, dependence on GROWTH HORMONE. It is believed to be mainly active in adults in contrast to INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR II, which is a major fetal growth factor.Receptors, Somatomedin: Cell surface receptors that bind somatomedins and trigger intracellular changes which influence the behavior of cells. Studies have disclosed two types of receptors for this family of peptide hormones. The type I receptor is homologous to the insulin receptor and has tyrosine kinase activity. The type II receptor is identical to the mannose-6-phosphate receptor which is important in trafficking of lysosomal enzymes.Insulin-Like Growth Factor II: A well-characterized neutral peptide believed to be secreted by the LIVER and to circulate in the BLOOD. It has growth-regulating, insulin-like and mitogenic activities. The growth factor has a major, but not absolute, dependence on SOMATOTROPIN. It is believed to be a major fetal growth factor in contrast to INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR I, which is a major growth factor in adults.Maximum Tolerated Dose: The highest dose of a biologically active agent given during a chronic study that will not reduce longevity from effects other than carcinogenicity. (from Lewis Dictionary of Toxicology, 1st ed)Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Somatomedins: Insulin-like polypeptides made by the liver and some fibroblasts and released into the blood when stimulated by SOMATOTROPIN. They cause sulfate incorporation into collagen, RNA, and DNA synthesis, which are prerequisites to cell division and growth of the organism.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Drug Administration Schedule: Time schedule for administration of a drug in order to achieve optimum effectiveness and convenience.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous: An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Infratentorial Neoplasms: Intracranial tumors originating in the region of the brain inferior to the tentorium cerebelli, which contains the cerebellum, fourth ventricle, cerebellopontine angle, brain stem, and related structures. Primary tumors of this region are more frequent in children, and may present with ATAXIA; CRANIAL NERVE DISEASES; vomiting; HEADACHE; HYDROCEPHALUS; or other signs of neurologic dysfunction. Relatively frequent histologic subtypes include TERATOMA; MEDULLOBLASTOMA; GLIOBLASTOMA; ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; CRANIOPHARYNGIOMA; and choroid plexus papilloma (PAPILLOMA, CHOROID PLEXUS).Neoplastic Stem Cells: Highly proliferative, self-renewing, and colony-forming stem cells which give rise to NEOPLASMS.Carcinoma, Lobular: A infiltrating (invasive) breast cancer, relatively uncommon, accounting for only 5%-10% of breast tumors in most series. It is often an area of ill-defined thickening in the breast, in contrast to the dominant lump characteristic of ductal carcinoma. It is typically composed of small cells in a linear arrangement with a tendency to grow around ducts and lobules. There is likelihood of axillary nodal involvement with metastasis to meningeal and serosal surfaces. (DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1205)Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Neoplasms, Neuroepithelial: Neoplasms composed of neuroepithelial cells, which have the capacity to differentiate into NEURONS, oligodendrocytes, and ASTROCYTES. The majority of craniospinal tumors are of neuroepithelial origin. (From Dev Biol 1998 Aug 1;200(1):1-5)Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Carotid-Cavernous Sinus Fistula: An acquired or spontaneous abnormality in which there is communication between CAVERNOUS SINUS, a venous structure, and the CAROTID ARTERIES. It is often associated with HEAD TRAUMA, specifically basilar skull fractures (SKULL FRACTURE, BASILAR). Clinical signs often include VISION DISORDERS and INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION.Brain Stem Neoplasms: Benign and malignant intra-axial tumors of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; or MEDULLA OBLONGATA of the BRAIN STEM. Primary and metastatic neoplasms may occur in this location. Clinical features include ATAXIA, cranial neuropathies (see CRANIAL NERVE DISEASES), NAUSEA, hemiparesis (see HEMIPLEGIA), and quadriparesis. Primary brain stem neoplasms are more frequent in children. Histologic subtypes include GLIOMA; HEMANGIOBLASTOMA; GANGLIOGLIOMA; and EPENDYMOMA.Glioma: Benign and malignant central nervous system neoplasms derived from glial cells (i.e., astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and ependymocytes). Astrocytes may give rise to astrocytomas (ASTROCYTOMA) or glioblastoma multiforme (see GLIOBLASTOMA). Oligodendrocytes give rise to oligodendrogliomas (OLIGODENDROGLIOMA) and ependymocytes may undergo transformation to become EPENDYMOMA; CHOROID PLEXUS NEOPLASMS; or colloid cysts of the third ventricle. (From Escourolle et al., Manual of Basic Neuropathology, 2nd ed, p21)Arteriovenous Fistula: An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.Embolization, Therapeutic: A method of hemostasis utilizing various agents such as Gelfoam, silastic, metal, glass, or plastic pellets, autologous clot, fat, and muscle as emboli. It has been used in the treatment of spinal cord and INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS, renal arteriovenous fistulas, gastrointestinal bleeding, epistaxis, hypersplenism, certain highly vascular tumors, traumatic rupture of blood vessels, and control of operative hemorrhage.Exophthalmos: Abnormal protrusion of both eyes; may be caused by endocrine gland malfunction, malignancy, injury, or paralysis of the extrinsic muscles of the eye.ArchivesNeurology: A medical specialty concerned with the study of the structures, functions, and diseases of the nervous system.Carotid Artery, Internal: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the anterior part of the brain, the eye and its appendages, the forehead and nose.Tectum Mesencephali: The dorsal portion or roof of the midbrain which is composed of two pairs of bumps, the INFERIOR COLLICULI and the SUPERIOR COLLICULI. These four colliculi are also called the quadrigeminal bodies (TECTUM MESENCEPHALI). They are centers for visual sensorimotor integration.IndiaTreatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Brain Stem: The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein: An intermediate filament protein found only in glial cells or cells of glial origin. MW 51,000.DNA Nucleotidylexotransferase: A non-template-directed DNA polymerase normally found in vertebrate thymus and bone marrow. It catalyzes the elongation of oligo- or polydeoxynucleotide chains and is widely used as a tool in the differential diagnosis of acute leukemias in man. EC 2.7.7.31.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Astrocytoma: Neoplasms of the brain and spinal cord derived from glial cells which vary from histologically benign forms to highly anaplastic and malignant tumors. Fibrillary astrocytomas are the most common type and may be classified in order of increasing malignancy (grades I through IV). In the first two decades of life, astrocytomas tend to originate in the cerebellar hemispheres; in adults, they most frequently arise in the cerebrum and frequently undergo malignant transformation. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2013-7; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1082)In Situ Nick-End Labeling: An in situ method for detecting areas of DNA which are nicked during APOPTOSIS. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase is used to add labeled dUTP, in a template-independent manner, to the 3 prime OH ends of either single- or double-stranded DNA. The terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase nick end labeling, or TUNEL, assay labels apoptosis on a single-cell level, making it more sensitive than agarose gel electrophoresis for analysis of DNA FRAGMENTATION.Astrocytes: A class of large neuroglial (macroglial) cells in the central nervous system - the largest and most numerous neuroglial cells in the brain and spinal cord. Astrocytes (from "star" cells) are irregularly shaped with many long processes, including those with "end feet" which form the glial (limiting) membrane and directly and indirectly contribute to the BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER. They regulate the extracellular ionic and chemical environment, and "reactive astrocytes" (along with MICROGLIA) respond to injury.Microglia: The third type of glial cell, along with astrocytes and oligodendrocytes (which together form the macroglia). Microglia vary in appearance depending on developmental stage, functional state, and anatomical location; subtype terms include ramified, perivascular, ameboid, resting, and activated. Microglia clearly are capable of phagocytosis and play an important role in a wide spectrum of neuropathologies. They have also been suggested to act in several other roles including in secretion (e.g., of cytokines and neural growth factors), in immunological processing (e.g., antigen presentation), and in central nervous system development and remodeling.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.

Selective innervation of retinorecipient brainstem nuclei by retinal ganglion cell axons regenerating through peripheral nerve grafts in adult rats. (1/149)

The pattern of axonal regeneration, specificity of reinnervation, and terminal arborization in the brainstem by axotomized retinal ganglion cell axons was studied in rats with peripheral nerve grafts linking the retina with ipsilateral regions of the brainstem, including dorsal and lateral aspects of the diencephalon and lateral aspect of the superior colliculus. Four to 13 months later, regenerated retinal projections were traced using intraocular injection of cholera toxin B subunit. In approximately one-third of the animals, regenerated retinal axons extended into the brainstem for distances of up to 6 mm. Although axons followed different patterns of ingrowth depending on their site of entry to the brainstem, within the pretectum, they innervated preferentially the nucleus of the optic tract and the olivary pretectal nucleus in which they formed two types of terminal arbors. Within the superior colliculus, axons extended laterally and formed a different terminal arbor type within the stratum griseum superficiale. In the remaining two-thirds of the animals, retinal fibers formed a neuroma-like structure at the site of entry into the brainstem, or a few fibers extended for very short distances within the neighboring neuropil. These experiments suggest that regenerated retinal axons are capable of a highly selective reinnervation pattern within adult denervated retinorecipient nuclei in which they form well defined terminal arbors that may persist for long periods of time. In addition, these studies provide the anatomical correlate for our previous functional study on the re-establishment of the pupillary light reflex in this experimental paradigm.  (+info)

Radiation therapy and high-dose tamoxifen in the treatment of patients with diffuse brainstem gliomas: results of a Brazilian cooperative study. Brainstem Glioma Cooperative Group. (2/149)

PURPOSE: The efficacy of radiation therapy (RT) combined with tamoxifen (TX) was tested in patients diagnosed with diffuse brainstem gliomas in a multicenter trial. PATIENTS AND METHODS: TX was administered orally (maintenance dose: 200 mg/m(2) per day) along with conventional local RT and then continued for 52 additional weeks. Survival, tumoral radiologic response, and toxicity were evaluated. Compliance was assessed using pharmacokinetic measurements. RESULTS: Of 29 patients, 27 completed RT (median dose, 54 Gy). Of 22 assessable patients, 11 (50%) had an objective radiologic response. The mean TX steady-state serum level was 2.44 micromol/L +/- 1.02 micromol/L. Only three patients completed the entire course of treatment without tumoral progression or significant toxicity. Common side effects included nausea and vomiting. Hepatotoxicity (five patients), neurotoxicity (two patients), venous thrombosis (one patient), bilateral ovarian cysts (two patients), and transient neutropenia (one patient) were also observed. Median survival was 10.3 months. Only four patients remain alive without tumoral progression. The 1-year survival rate (mean +/- SD) was 37.0% +/- 9.5%. CONCLUSION: This treatment combination produced no significant change in the overall poor prognosis of these patients. Most tumors responded initially to treatment but recurred as the study progressed. A minority of patients seemed to benefit from the extended use of TX. Generally, treatment was well tolerated, with good patient compliance, but we recommend continuous close monitoring for side effects. Based on our poor results, we recommend that alternative treatments be tested in patients with this type of tumor.  (+info)

Intramedullar stimulation of the facial and hypoglossal nerves: estimation of the stimulated site. (3/149)

AIM: To determine the stimulation site of both facial and hypoglossal nerves after transcranial magnetic stimulation. METHODS: After surgical exposure of the brainstem in 22 patients with intrinsic pontine (n=9) or medullary (n=13) tumors, the facial colliculus and the hypoglossal triangle were electrically stimulated. The EMG responses were recorded with flexible wire electrodes from the orbicularis oculi/orbicularis oris muscles, and genioglossal muscles. Patients had no preoperative deficit of the nerves. RESULTS: The EMG mean latencies of the unaffected facial nerve were 5.2+/-0.6 ms for the orbicularis oculi, and 5.2+/-0.5 ms for the orbicularis oris muscle. After the stimulation of 18 possibly affected facial nerves, the EMG mean latencies were 5.3+/-0.3 ms for the orbicularis oculi (p=0.539, unpaired Student's t-test), and 5.4+/-0.2 ms for the orbicularis oris (p=0.122). The EMG mean latency of the unaffected hypoglossal nerve was 4.1+/-0.6 ms for the genioglossal muscle. After the stimulation of 26 possibly affected hypoglossal nerves, the EMG mean latency for the genioglossal muscle was 5.3+/-0.3 ms. There was a significant difference (p<0.001) in latency for genioglossal EMG responses between the patients with pontine and those with medullary tumors. CONCLUSION: Shorter EMG mean latencies of unaffected facial nerves obtained after direct stimulation of the facial colliculi confirm that magnetic stimulation is most likely to occur closer to the nerve's exit from the brainstem than to its entrance into the internal auditory meatus. The hypoglossal nerve seems to have the site of excitation at the axon hillock of the hypoglossal motor neurons.  (+info)

Intra-axial tumors of the medullocervical junction: diagnosis and microsurgical treatment. (4/149)

OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical features, operative methods and postoperative management of the intra-axial tumors of medullocervical junction, and to make differential diagnosis for different subtypes. METHODS: Fifteen patients with intra-axial tumors of medullocervical junction were treated from August 1988 to June 1997. The diagnoses were confirmed by MRI and histological examinations. The tumors were divided into two subtypes according to the clinical features and the main body of the tumor. The distinctive points of the two subtypes and the appropriate surgical methods of different pathological type tumors were expounded. RESULTS: Tumors were totally removed in 10 patients and subtotally in 5. There was no death caused by operation. Postoperative complications included respiratory disturbance in six cases, upper digestive tract bleeding in one, depressed cough reflex in two, most of which recovered after proper treatment. On discharge, the nervous system status was improved in 11 cases, stable in 2 and worsened in 2. CONCLUSIONS: The intra-axial tumors of medullocervical junction can be divided into cervicomedullary and medullocervical subtypes. The MRI examination is decisive in the distinction of the diagnosis, and is important in the determination of the nature of the medullar cystic lesions and the guidance of the resection of tumor extent. The cervicomedullary tumors are more amenable to an aggressive surgical treatment, during which the surgeon should remove the tumors first in the cervical spinal cord area, then in the medullar area with the tumor resection expanding rostrally. It can make the operation safer to remove the tumors using appropriate techniques varied with pathological types of the tumors. Managing postoperative respiratory disturbances without delay is one of the important points in improving the therapeutic effect.  (+info)

Paroxysmal alternating skew deviation and nystagmus after partial destruction of the uvula. (5/149)

A patient with suspected brain stem glioma involving the area of the left vestibular nuclei and cerebellar peduncle, developed paroxysmal alternating skew deviation and direction changing nystagmus after biopsy of the inferior cerebellar vermis resulting in destruction of the uvula. Between attacks she had right over left skew deviation with asymptomatic right beating horizontal nystagmus. Slow phases of the resting nystagmus showed increasing velocity, similar to congenital nystagmus. At intervals of 40-50 seconds, paroxysmal reversal of her skew deviation occurred, accompanied by violent left beating horizontal torsional nystagmus lasting 10-12 seconds and causing severe oscillopsia. It is proposed that this complex paroxysmal eye movement disorder results from (1) a lesion in the left vestibular nuclei causing right over left skew and right beating resting nystagmus and (2) a disruption of cerebellar inhibition of vestibular nuclei, causing alternating activity in the vestibular system with intermittent reversal of the skew deviation and paroxysmal nystagmus towards the side of the lesion.  (+info)

Perfusion-sensitive MR imaging of gliomas: comparison between gradient-echo and spin-echo echo-planar imaging techniques. (6/149)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The different sensitivities to vessel size of gradient-echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) and spin-echo EPI (SE-EPI) might indicate the relative cerebral blood volumes (rCBVs) of different tumor sizes. The techniques of GE-EPI and SE-EPI were compared for detecting low- versus high-grade gliomas. METHODS: Six patients with low-grade gliomas and 19 patients with high-grade gliomas underwent two perfusion-sensitive MR procedures, one produced by a GE- and the other by an SE-EPI technique. Maximum rCBV ratios normalized with rCBV of contralateral white matter were calculated for evaluation. P <.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Maximum rCBV ratios of high-grade gliomas obtained with the GE-EPI technique (mean, 5.0 +/- 2.9) were significantly higher than those obtained with the SE-EPI technique (mean, 2.9 +/- 2.3) (P =.02). Maximum rCBV ratios of low-grade gliomas obtained with the GE-EPI technique (mean, 1.2 +/- 0.7) were almost equal to those obtained with the SE-EPI technique (mean, 1.2 +/- 0.6), and there was no significant difference (P =.66). The difference in the maximum rCBV ratios between the low- and high-grade gliomas reached significance when obtained with the GE-EPI technique (P =.01). CONCLUSION: The GE-EPI technique seems more useful for detecting low- versus high-grade gliomas than the SE-EPI technique.  (+info)

The causes of dysphagia in carcinoma of the lung. (7/149)

Dysphagia occurs in only a small percentage of patients with lung cancer, but the frequency of this cancer means that large numbers are affected. Non-quantitative analysis of a large Scottish series of lung cancer cases indicates the following eight broad categories of dysphagia according to underlying mechanisms: mediastinal disease; cervical lymphadenopathy; brainstem lesions; gastrointestinal tract metastases; associated systemic disorders; second primaries; oropharyngeal and oesophageal infections; and radiation-induced oesophageal toxicity.  (+info)

Brainstem gliomas in adults: prognostic factors and classification. (8/149)

In contrast to childhood brainstem gliomas, adult brainstem gliomas are rare and poorly understood. The charts of 48 adults suffering from brainstem glioma were reviewed in order to determine prognostic factors, evaluate the effect of treatment and propose a classification of these tumours. Mean age at onset was 34 years (range 16-70 years). The main presenting symptoms were gait disturbance (61%), headache (44%), weakness of the limbs (42%) and diplopia (40%). Four patterns were identified on MRI, representing non-enhancing, diffusely infiltrative tumours (50%), contrast-enhancing localized masses (31%), isolated tectal tumours (8%) and other patterns (11%). Treatment consisted of partial resection (8%), radiotherapy (94%) and chemotherapy (56%). Overall median survival was 5.4 years. On univariate analysis, the following favourable prognostic factors were identified (P< 0.01): age of onset <40 years, duration of symptoms before diagnosis >3 months, Karnofski performance status >70, low-grade histology, absence of contrast enhancement and 'necrosis' on MRI. On multivariate analysis, the duration of symptoms, the appearance of 'necrosis' on MRI and the histological grade of the tumour remained significant and independent prognostic factors (P< 0.05). Eighty-five percent of the tumours could be classified into one of the following three groups on the basis of clinical, radiological and histological features. (i) Diffuse intrinsic low-grade gliomas (46%) usually occurred in young adults with a long clinical history before diagnosis and a diffusely enlarged brainstem on MRI that did not show contrast enhancement. These patients were improved by radiotherapy in 62% of cases and had a long survival time (median 7.3 years). Anaplastic transformation (appearance of contrast enhancement, 27%) and relentless growth without other changes (23%) were the main causes of death. (ii) Malignant gliomas (31%) occurred in elderly patients with a short clinical history. Contrast enhancement and necrosis were the rule on MRI. These tumours were highly resistant to treatment and the patients had a median survival time of 11.2 months. (iii) Focal tectal gliomas (8%) occurred in young patients and were often revealed by isolated hydrocephalus. The course was indolent and the projected median survival period exceeded 10 years. In conclusion, adult brainstem gliomas are different from the childhood forms and resemble supratentorial gliomas in adults. Low-grade tumours have a clinicoradiological pattern that is so characteristic that the need for a potentially harmful biopsy is debatable. The optimum timing of treatment for supratentorial low-grade tumours remains unclear. In high-grade gliomas, the prognosis remains extremely poor despite aggressive treatment with radiotherapy and chemotherapy.  (+info)

*List of diseases (B)

... syndrome Braddock-Jones-Superneau syndrome Bradykinesia Brain cavernous angioma Brain neoplasms Brain stem neoplasms Branchial ... Black piedra Bladder neoplasm Blamronesis Blaichman syndrome Blastoma Blastomycosis Blepharitis Blepharo cheilo dontic syndrome ... craniosynostosis proptosis hydrocephalus Bone marrow failure neurologic abnormalities Bone marrow failure Bone neoplasms Bone ...

*List of MeSH codes (C10)

... brain stem neoplasms MeSH C10.228.140.211.500.200 --- cerebellar neoplasms MeSH C10.228.140.211.692 --- neurocytoma MeSH ... brain stem neoplasms MeSH C10.551.240.250.400.300 --- cerebellar neoplasms MeSH C10.551.240.250.550 --- neurocytoma MeSH ... brain infarction MeSH C10.228.140.300.301.200.100 --- brain stem infarctions MeSH C10.228.140.300.301.200.100.500 --- lateral ... brain hemorrhage, traumatic MeSH C10.228.140.199.275.200 --- brain stem hemorrhage, traumatic MeSH C10.228.140.199.275.300 --- ...

*Parinaud's syndrome

It is caused by lesions of the upper brain stem and is named for Henri Parinaud (1844-1905), considered to be the father of ... trauma and brainstem toxoplasmosis infection. Neoplasms and giant aneurysms of the posterior fossa have also been associated ... Classically, it has been associated with three major groups: Young patients with brain tumors in the pineal gland or midbrain: ... Women in their 20s-30s with multiple sclerosis Older patients following stroke of the upper brainstem However, any other ...

*Shlomi Constantini

"Surgical Indication and Technical Considerations in the Management of Benign Brain Stem Gliomas" Muszynski, Constantini, ... "Intraspinal Intramedullary Neoplasms" International Federation of Neuro-endoscopy Internal Society of Pediatric Neurosurgery ...

*List of MeSH codes (C04)

... brain stem neoplasms MeSH C04.588.614.250.195.411.211 --- cerebellar neoplasms MeSH C04.588.614.250.195.648 --- neurocytoma ... mammary neoplasms, experimental MeSH C04.588.614.250 --- central nervous system neoplasms MeSH C04.588.614.250.195 --- brain ... nose neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.656 --- orbital neoplasms MeSH C04.588.149.721.828 --- skull base neoplasms MeSH C04.588. ... anal gland neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.476.411.445 --- duodenal neoplasms MeSH C04.588.274.476.411.501 --- ileal neoplasms MeSH ...

*Neurooncology

4. Brain Stem Gliomas Brain stem glioma is a distinct category of central nervous system tumor because of its unique location ... Neuro-oncology is the study of brain and spinal cord neoplasms, many of which are (at least eventually) very dangerous and life ... and brain stem tumors are among the many examples of these). Among the malignant brain cancers, gliomas of the brainstem and ... The histology of brain stem gliomas spans the spectrum of gliomas located elsewhere in the central nervous system. The cause of ...

*Astroblastoma

Neoplasm Neuroepithelial cell Astrocytes Glial cells Brain cancer REDIRECT Template:Curlie From a page move: This is a redirect ... This specific genetic makeup lends to self-renewal, differentiation, and propagation of neural stem cells in the brain. However ... and brain stem. The most defining physical symptom of astroblastoma, regardless of location, is elevated intracranial pressure ... often mistaking astroblastoma with glial neoplasms, high-grade astrocytes, and embryonal neoplasms. However, the "bubbly" ...

*Intraparenchymal hemorrhage

... or confusion Brain stem - Tetraparesis, facial weakness, decreased level of consciousness, gaze paresis, ocular bobbing, miosis ... Hemorrhagic neoplasms are more complex, heterogeneous bleeds often with associated edema. These hemorrhages are related to ... A CT scan is the best test to look for bleeding in or around your brain. In some hospitals, a perfusion CT scan may be done to ... In some hospitals, a perfusion MRI scan may be done to see where the blood is flowing and not flowing in your brain. Angiogram ...

*ICD-10 Chapter II: Neoplasms

Brain stem (C71.8) Overlapping lesion of brain (C71.9) Brain, unspecified (C72) Malignant neoplasm of spinal cord, cranial ... Benign neoplasm of eye and adnexa (D32) Benign neoplasm of meninges (D33) Benign neoplasm of brain and other parts of central ... Neoplasms. (C00) Malignant neoplasm of lip (C01) Malignant neoplasm of base of tongue (C02) Malignant neoplasm of other and ... Malignant neoplasm of breast (C51) Malignant neoplasm of vulva (C52) Malignant neoplasm of vagina (C53) Malignant neoplasm of ...

*Stem cell marker

"Stem cell marker expression in the Bergmann glia population of the adult mouse brain". Brain Research. 1099 (1): 8-17. doi: ... Misago N, Narisawa Y (September 2006). "Cytokeratin 15 expression in neoplasms with sebaceous differentiation". Journal of ... Stem cell markers are genes and their protein products used by scientists to isolate and identify stem cells. Stem cells can ... 2005). "Somatic stem cell marker prominin-1/CD133 is expressed in embryonic stem cell-derived progenitors". Stem Cells. 23 (6 ...

*Brain tumor

... some elements do not apply to primary neoplasms of the brain: Primary brain tumors rarely metastasize to other organs; some ... "Brain Stem Gliomas in Childhood". Childhoodbraintumor.org. Archived from the original on 9 March 2012. Retrieved 17 February ... known as brain metastasis tumors. All types of brain tumors may produce symptoms that vary depending on the part of the brain ... and can damage the brain. Brain tumors or intracranial neoplasms can be cancerous (malignant) or non-cancerous (benign). ...

*Neuronatin

... (Nnat) is a protein coding gene involved in mammalian brain development. It is located on Chromosome 20 in humans ... Neuronatin begins the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into cells with a neural fate by increasing their calcium ... The loss of methylation within these areas triggers an irregular cell growth, resulting in embryonic neoplasms. Numata, Shusuke ... It is also expressed in several tissues outside of the brain. For example, expression in skin cells controls the ...

*PDGFRB

Primary familial brain calcification (see Fahr's syndrome) is a rare disease involving bilateral calcifications in the brain, ... This continuous signaling, it is presumed, leads to the development of myeloid and/or lymphoid neoplasms that commonly include ... the ability to continuously stimulate the growth and proliferation of hematological stem cells; and c) the ability to cause ... It is proposed that signal transduction through PDGFRB maintains blood-brain barrier integrity and that loss of the PDGFRB ...

*CD133

Cheng JX, Liu BL, Zhang X (2009). "How powerful is CD133 as a cancer stem cell marker in brain tumors?". Cancer Treat. Rev. 35 ... "CD133 expression pattern distinguishes intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms from ductal adenocarcinomas of the pancreas". ... CD133 is expressed in hematopoietic stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, glioblastoma, neuronal and glial stem cells, ... "Cancerous stem cells can arise from pediatric brain tumors". Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 100 (25): 15178-15183. doi:10.1073/pnas. ...

*Teratoma

Saito K, Katsumata Y, Hirabuki T, Kato K, Yamanaka M (2007). "Fetus-in-fetu: parasite or neoplasm? A study of two cases". Fetal ... Teratomas derived from embryonic cells usually occur on the subject's midline: in the brain, elsewhere in the skull, in the ... In light of the ethical issues surrounding the source of human stem cells, teratomas are being looked at as an alternative ... Rarely more complicated body parts such as teeth, brain matter, eyes, or torso may occur. Concerning the origin of teratomas, ...

*Altered level of consciousness

... such as brain herniation. Mass lesions in the brain stem normally cause coma due to their effects on the reticular formation. ... Neoplasms within the intracranial cavity can also affect consciousness, as can epilepsy and post-seizure states. A decreased ... Normally, stupor and coma are produced by interference with the brain stem, such as can be caused by a lesion or indirect ... A pH outside of the range the brain can tolerate will also alter LOC. Exposure to drugs (e.g. alcohol) or toxins may also lower ...

*Leukemia

Uncommon neurological symptoms like migraines, seizures, or coma can occur as a result of brain stem pressure. All symptoms ... a form of chronic eosinophilic leukemia or various forms of myeloid neoplasms, lymphoid neoplasms, myelofibrosis, or the ... Identifying stem cells that cause different types of leukaemia is also being researched. Leukemia is rarely associated with ... These can potentially show leukemia's effects on such body parts as bones (X-ray), the brain (MRI), or the kidneys, spleen, and ...

*National University Cancer Institute, Singapore

International FACT Accreditation for Stem Cell Transplant Programme Operational since July 2013, the NCIS is located at levels ... Myelodysplastic and Myeloprofilerative Neoplasms (MDS / MPN) Lymphoma Multiple Myeloma Breast Colorectal Gynaecologic Head & ... Lung/Thoracic Prostate/Urology Upper Gastrointestinal Paediatric Haematological Malignancies Brain Cancer Musculoskeletal/ ... Hepatology Gynaecologic Oncology Endocrinology Paediatric Haematology-Oncology Palliative Medicine Bone Marrow and Stem Cell ...

*List of MeSH codes (C21)

... brain hemorrhage, traumatic MeSH C21.866.915.300.200.175.200 --- brain stem hemorrhage, traumatic MeSH C21.866.915.300.200.175. ... neoplasms, radiation-induced MeSH C21.866.733.579 --- osteoradionecrosis MeSH C21.866.733.720 --- radiation injuries, ... brain hemorrhage, traumatic MeSH C21.866.915.300.490.150.200 --- brain stem hemorrhage, traumatic MeSH C21.866.915.300.490.150. ... brain hemorrhage, traumatic MeSH C21.866.260.118.175.150 --- brain stem hemorrhage, traumatic MeSH C21.866.260.118.175.300 --- ...

*Somatic evolution in cancer

... until a stem cell arose that generated either small polyps (which may be benign neoplasms) or else a malignant neoplasm (cancer ... In gliomas, a form of brain cancer, radiation therapy appears to select for stem cells, though it is unclear if the tumor ... Cancer stem cell arises by clonal evolution as a result of selection for the cell with the highest fitness in the neoplasm. ... The first malignant cell, that gives rise to the tumor, is often labeled a cancer stem cell. The cancer stem-cell hypothesis ...

*Chordoma

The proximity of chordomas to vital neurological structures such as the brain stem and nerves limits the dose of radiation that ... Chordoma is a rare slow-growing neoplasm thought to arise from cellular remnants of the notochord. The evidence for this is the ...

*Glioblastoma

Hematology/oncology and stem cell therapy. 1 (1): 3-13. doi:10.1016/s1658-3876(08)50054-9. PMID 20063522. Celldex Brain Tumor ... "A systematic review of inhaled intranasal therapy for central nervous system neoplasms: an emerging therapeutic option". ... Many drugs cannot cross the blood-brain barrier to act on the tumor. Treatment of primary brain tumors and brain metastases ... The brain is susceptible to damage due to conventional therapy. The brain has a very limited capacity to repair itself. ...

*Neuronal lineage marker

Hence, a neural stem cell can give rise to another neural stem cell, or to any of the differentiated cell types found in the ... To localize mRNA in brain tissue, one can use a fragment of DNA or RNA as a neuronal lineage marker, a hybridization probe that ... In pathological conditions was also reported that glial neoplasms and reactive glial cells expressed this marker. Calretinin is ... Neural stem cells are an example of somatic stem cell found in various tissues, both during development and in the adult. They ...

*ICD-10 Chapter IX: Diseases of the circulatory system

Intracerebral haemorrhage in brain stem (I61.4) Intracerebral haemorrhage in cerebellum (I61.5) Intracerebral haemorrhage, ... Neoplasms (C00-D49) Symptoms, signs, and abnormal clinical and laboratory findings, NEC (R00-R94) Systemic connective tissue ...

*Cyclophosphamide

The main use of cyclophosphamide is with other chemotherapy agents in the treatment of lymphomas, some forms of brain cancer, ... Myeloproliferative neoplasms, including acute leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and multiple myeloma, occurred in 5 of 119 ... "Aldehyde dehydrogenase activity as the basis for the relative insensitivity of murine pluripotent hematopoietic stem cells to ... Bernatsky S, Clarke AE, Suissa S (February 2008). "Hematologic malignant neoplasms after drug exposure in rheumatoid arthritis ...

*Laboratory rat

Comparison of Neoplasms in Six Sources of Rats Jared M. Diamond (January 2006). Collapse: How Societies Choose to Fail Or ... Laboratory rats are frequently subject to dissection or microdialysis to study internal effects on organs and the brain, such ... which lend themselves better to the embryonic stem cell techniques typically used for genetic manipulation. Many investigators ... The Lewis rat suffers from several spontaneous pathologies: first, they can suffer from high incidences of neoplasms, with the ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Liquid biopsy for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. T2 - An update. AU - Lu, Victor M.. AU - Power, Erica A.. AU - Zhang, Liang. AU - Daniels, David J.. PY - 2019/1/1. Y1 - 2019/1/1. N2 - Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), otherwise known as diffuse midline glioma with H3K27M mutation, is a devastating brainstem glioma without a cure. Efforts are currently underway to better optimize molecular diagnoses through biological sampling, which today remains largely limited to surgical biopsy sampling. Surgical intervention is not without its risks, and therefore a preference remains for a less invasive modality that can provide biological information about the tumor. There is emerging evidence to suggest that a liquid biopsy, targeting biofluids such as CSF and blood plasma, presents an attractive alternative for brain tumors in general. In this update, the authors provide a summary of the progress made to date regarding the use of liquid biopsy to diagnose and monitor DIPG, and ...
Due to the poor prognosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas, the limited therapy options, the relevant portion of EGFR expression and the unexpected good response to the therapy with OSAG 101 in the phase II study, a phase III study was planned in newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas in children and adolescents. A phase II study in patients of recurrence/resistance high grade glioma in childhood or adolescence showed that, in particular, a part of the intrinsic pontine glioma response to the monotherapy with OSAG 101 resulting in a reduction in the size of the tumour or stabilisation in the growth of the tumour. Together with clinical improvement, stabilisation lasted markedly over 6 months in two thirds of the patients. The current phase III study was scheduled to provide evidence of the effectiveness in the case of newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine glioma. In this study, OSAG 101 will be given concomitantly to the only standard therapy for this kind of tumour, i.e. the ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Radiosensitization by histone H3 demethylase inhibition in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. AU - Katagi, Hiroaki. AU - Louis, Nundia. AU - Unruh, Dusten. AU - Sasaki, Takahiro. AU - He, Xingyao. AU - Zhang, Ali. AU - Ma, Quanhong. AU - Piunti, Andrea. AU - Shimazu, Yosuke. AU - Lamano, Jonathan B.. AU - Carcaboso, Angel M.. AU - Tian, Xiao. AU - Seluanov, Andrei. AU - Gorbunova, Vera. AU - Laurie, Kathryn L.. AU - Kondo, Akihide. AU - Wadhwani, Nitin R.. AU - Lulla, Rishi. AU - Goldman, Stewart. AU - Venneti, Sriram. AU - Becher, Oren J.. AU - Zou, Lihua. AU - Shilatifard, Ali. AU - Hashizume, Rintaro. PY - 2019/9/15. Y1 - 2019/9/15. N2 - Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) has long been and remains the only treatment option for diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). However, all patients show evidence of disease progression within months of completing RT. No further clinical benefit has been achieved using alternative radiation strategies. Here, we tested the hypothesis that histone ...
For 45 years, clinicians around the nation have been offering the parents of pediatric patients diagnosed with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) the same grim prognosis. Now, researchers at Children’s National are seizing the opportunity to change that narrative, by exploring the genetic mutations associated with this disease to unlock the possibility of new therapies.
Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is the deadliest central nervous system tumor in children. The survival of affected children has remained poor despite treatment with radiation therapy (RT) wit
We collated data from 157 unpublished cases of pediatric high-grade glioma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma and 20 publicly available datasets in an integrated analysis of ,1,000 cases. We identified co-segregating mutations in histone-mutant subgroups including loss of FBXW7 in H3.3G34R/V, TOP3A rearrangements in H3.3K27M, and BCOR mutations in H3.1K27M. Histone wild-type subgroups are refined by the presence of key oncogenic events or methylation profiles more closely resembling lower-grade tumors. Genomic aberrations increase with age, highlighting the infant population as biologically and clinically distinct. Uncommon pathway dysregulation is seen in small subsets of tumors, further defining the molecular diversity of the disease, opening up avenues for biological study and providing a basis for functionally defined future treatment stratification ...
This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of panobinostat in treating younger patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma that is growing,
Brain Stem Glioma Treatment, Brain Stem Glioma Treatment India, Brain Stem Glioma Treatment Cost In India Info On Cost Brain Stem Glioma Treatment Mumbai Delhi Bangalore India, Brain Stem Glioma Treatment Hospitals Center India, Brain Stem Glioma Treatment Doctors Surgeon India
Full Title A Phase I Study of Convection-Enhanced Delivery of 124I-Omburtomab for Patients with Non-Progressive Diffuse Pontine Gliomas Previously Treated with External Beam Radiation Therapy Purpose Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG, also known as brain stem glioma) is a cancer of the brain stem, most often in children, which is very difficult to treat successfully. Radiation treatment is usually the first form of therapy, followed by chemotherapy. While patients may respond to therapy initially, the tumor almost always returns.
The following data/materials will be collected:. Clinical: Demographic data, date of diagnosis, signs and symptoms at diagnosis, laboratory data, detailed treatment data (e.g. types and dates of surgeries (if any), chemotherapy, radiotherapy), best response to treatment, dates of progression, types of progression (local or metastatic), and follow-up data.. Imaging: All radiographic imaging obtained since diagnosis will be requested at the time of study entry.. Pathology Central Review: If glass slides (stained or unstained) or paraffin blocks of tumor tissue (from biopsy or autopsy) are available, they will be requested at the time of registry entry but are not mandatory for enrollment.. Bioinfomatics repository: Collection of existing molecular and/or genomic data or analysis that has been performed as well as prospective analysis of tissue from the registry will be submitted to a central bioinformatics repository and may be linked to clinical data housed in the DIPG registry.. Tissue ...
Comprehensive reviews of DIPG-specific clinical trials have previously been published, analyzing a total of 55 DIPG-specific trials covering the period from 1984 to March 2011 [10,11]. Despite the large number of clinical trials, no clear improvement in either the quality of life or length of survival has been demonstrated, and most studies are, in hindsight, complicated by the wide variance in the selection criteria and absence of accompanying genomic and molecular data. Additionally, a systematic clinical review from the Netherlands has emphasized the necessity of cross-national cooperation to prevent potential epidemiological bias [5]. The pharmacologic agents investigated to date are largely based on therapies proven to convey survival benefit in the treatment of adult gliomas. The only agents with activity against DIPG genomic targets which have been investigated are anti-EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and results to date are inconclusive, possibly owing to varied selection criteria. One ...
ISI Document Delivery No.: AG4XE Times Cited: 1 Cited Reference Count: 20 Taylor, Kathryn R. Mackay, Alan Truffaux, Nathalene Butterfield, Yaron S. Morozova, Olena Philippe, Cathy Castel, David Grasso, Catherine S. Vinci, Maria Carvalho, Diana Carcaboso, Angel M. de Torres, Carmen Cruz, Ofelia Mora, Jaume Entz-Werle, Natacha Ingram, Wendy J. Monje, Michelle Hargrave, Darren Bullock, Alex N. Puget, Stephanie Yip, Stephen Jones, Chris Grill, Jacques Cancer Research UK Genomics Initiative [A14078]; Stavros Niarchos Foundation; Abbies Army; Lyla Nsouli Foundation; Royal Marsden Hospital Childrens Department Fund; Fondo Alicia Pueyo; National Institutes of Neurological Disease and Stroke (NINDS) [K08NS070926]; Alexs Lemonade Stand Foundation; McKenna Claire Foundation; charity lEtoile de Martin; Agence National de la Recherche; Enfants et Sante; Fundacion Cientifica de la Asociacion Espanola Contra el Cancer; Childrens Health Foundation Queensland; Brainchild Foundation; Canada Foundation for ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
About 15 months ago I went on Facebook to see if a friend of mine, who lives in Raleigh, had a Facebook page. When I typed in her name, I was taken to a link to a prayer group for Ella Newmiller. Now I knew that Ella was my friends daughter (we do exchange holiday cards) and quite frankly, I was in shock. Ella, now 6, was diagnosed at the end of April 2008 with a DIPG (diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma), or brain-stem tumor. DIPG is a rare form of cancer (approximately 200 children per year are diagnosed with the disease), which sits in the brain stem, or pons region of the brain. Essentially every major function within the human body (with the exception of smell) must pass through the pons (e.g. consciousness, sight, the ability to swallow etc). The trouble with DIPG is that it is inoperable and for the most part, untreatable. The diagnosis remains grim. Approximately 90% of children diagnosed with the disease do not live longer than 18 months ...
As a researcher of The Morgan Adams Foundation Pediatric Brain Tumor Research Program at Childrens Hospital Colorado, she is working to find a cure for DIPG - diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma - which is 100% fatal. "I am currently working on identifying the genes that cause DIPG and to identify gene pathways that make the DIPG tumor aggressive after relapse from radiation treatment.". The typical treatment for DIPG patients is radiation, the only standard therapy so far. But, the tumor comes back after radiation, growing even more aggressively than the original tumor and becomes resistant to radiation therapy. At that point, there are no treatment options and parents are often told to take their child home to spend the limited time they have left away from the hospital.. DIPG affects children almost exclusively. Approximately 200-400 children in the United States are diagnosed with DIPG each year. "Since very little is known about DIPG tumor biology, I want to understand the biology of this ...
With the lag time between presentation at a meeting and publications often times things can just slip under the radar. For me, this was certainly true of this American Association for Cancer Research abstract presented last year in Philadelphia- "High-level activation of the Notch pathway in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma". The title doesnt immediately excite me. However, packed in this short abstract is a number of significant advancements in DIPG research. ...
Brain tumors are the most common solid cancer in children. Up to 12% of pediatric brain tumors are high-grade gliomas (HGGs). Typical management involves surgical removal, followed by chemotherapy and radiation treatment. However, despite ongoing research and a variety of treatment approaches, the five- year survival rate for children with high-grade glioma is only 20%, with the majority of children succumbing to their disease.. Approximately 15% of pediatric brain tumors arise in the brainstem, of which 80% are a subtype known as diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG). DIPG is an infiltrative, high-grade tumor, and has the highest mortality rate of all pediatric solid tumors. DIPG affects young children with onset between 6 and 9 years of age. Radiation therapy is the standard treatment, temporarily decreasing symptoms, yet DIPG continues to exhibit the highest mortality rate of all pediatric brain tumors with median survival less than 12 months and 5-year survival less than 5%. Despite almost ...
Brain stem gliomas are tumors found in the brain stem.. The brainstem is a very delicate location where many pathways from the brain to the spinal cord travel. Tumors in this location can be very challenging to treat. The majority of the tumors are located in the middle of the brainstem and cannot be surgically removed. A minority of brainstem tumors are more favorably located and can be treated with surgery.. Brain stem gliomas occur almost exclusively in children; the group most often affected is the school-age child. The child usually does not have increased intracranial pressure, but may have problems with double vision, movement of the face or one side of the body, or difficulty with walking and coordination. ...
Positron emission tomography (PET) scanning with [18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (18 F-FDG) is a useful diagnostic and prediction tool in brain tumors, but its value in childhood diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is still unclear. For interpretation of 18 F-FDG PET results in DIPG, uptake values of the normal pons of children of increasing ages are mandatory. The aim of this study was to determine 18 F-FDG standard uptake value ratios (SUVr) of the normal pons and to compare these to those of DIPG. We studied 36 subjects with a normal, non-affected pons (aged 5 to 23 years) and 6 patients with DIPG (aged 4 to 17 years) who underwent 18 F-FDG PET scanning. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was co-registered to define the regions of interest. SUVr and SUVrmax for the pons/cerebellum (SUVrp/c) and the pons/occipital lobe (SUVrp/o) were calculated. Independent-samples t tests and Mann-Whitney U tests were used to compare the mean SUVr and Pearsons test for correlations. For the normal pons, mean SUVrp/c and
Researchers at the University of Michigan have secured a federal grant for research into a potential treatment for Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG).
The outcome for children with high-grade gliomas (HGG) remains dismal, with a 2-year survival rate of only 10% to 30%. Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) comprise a subset of HGG that arise in the brainstem almost exclusively in children. Genome-wide analyses of copy number imbalances previously showed that platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) is the most frequent target of focal amplification in pediatric HGGs, including DIPGs. To determine whether PDGFRA is also targeted by more subtle mutations missed by copy number analysis, we sequenced all PDGFRA coding exons from a cohort of pediatric HGGs. Somatic-activating mutations were identified in 14.4% (13 of 90) of nonbrainstem pediatric HGGs and 4.7% (2 of 43) of DIPGs, including missense mutations and in-frame deletions and insertions not previously described. Forty percent of tumors with mutation showed concurrent amplification, whereas 60% carried heterozygous mutations. Six different mutations impacting different ...
Our young friend Cooper knew research was being done on rare types of kids brain tumors. He knew that research took money. So when doctors explained last April that his hope for remission was gone, the bright 12-year-old had an idea: he would use his life savings to find a cure. If only it were that simple. If only the dollars Cooper had saved for college could have made that happen. If only diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, or DIPG, werent the deadly pediatric brain cancer it is. If only the answers had been found before it claimed his life.. After Cooper passed, Sujatha Venkataraman, PhD - one of the researchers working closely with The Morgan Adams Foundation (MAF) - told his parents that targeting DIPG is her "only mission and focus in life." "I lost my own small son Rishi to cancer," Venkataraman reflects. "Kids should not go through these sufferings. DIPG is under-researched and it is always fatal. We are working hard to find a way to improve outcomes for these children." Childhood ...
Our young friend Cooper knew research was being done on rare types of kids brain tumors. He knew that research took money. So when doctors explained last April that his hope for remission was gone, the bright 12-year-old had an idea: he would use his life savings to find a cure. If only it were that simple. If only the dollars Cooper had saved for college could have made that happen. If only diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, or DIPG, werent the deadly pediatric brain cancer it is. If only the answers had been found before it claimed his life.. After Cooper passed, Sujatha Venkataraman, PhD - one of the researchers working closely with The Morgan Adams Foundation (MAF) - told his parents that targeting DIPG is her "only mission and focus in life." "I lost my own small son Rishi to cancer," Venkataraman reflects. "Kids should not go through these sufferings. DIPG is under-researched and it is always fatal. We are working hard to find a way to improve outcomes for these children." Childhood ...
Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) is a childhood brain cancer without cure. Children with this cancer die within a year of diagnosis. My research focuses on an innovative approach to find a cure for DIPG. This is currently the only research on DIPG in Australia where the tumor cells are collected from patients, grown and treated with drugs in search for an effective therapy. It is like finding a needle in a haystack. For some it is a hopeless end but for me it is an endless hope.. ...
Doctors told Giannina and Michael Gioe of Scranton that their daughter, Ava, had a rare brain stem tumor and there was nothing that could be done to save her life.. Its a death sentence, Mrs. Gioe said of the diagnosis, diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, that claimed Avas life at age 5 on July 20, 2012, after a 20-month battle.. That there was no hope given and so little known about the DIPG tumor was unacceptable to the couple, who established A Miracle For Ava Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation to raise awareness and fund research into the cause and treatment of the illness.. The foundation held its inaugural Golden Gala on Saturday at Genetti Manor in Dickson City. Organizers were hoping to raise $5,000 at the event.. The DIPG tumor, which causes children to lose their ability to speak, eat, walk and swallow, is so rare that there are only 150 to 200 cases diagnosed annually in the United States, they said.. Surgery is not an option because of the way the tumor entangles itself in the brain ...
The median overall survival for children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is less than one year. The majority of diffuse midline gliomas, including more than 70% of DIPGs, harbor an amino acid substitution from lysine (K) to methionine (M) at position 27 of histone 3 variant 3 (H3.3). From a CD8+ T cell clone established by stimulation of HLA-A2+ CD8+ T cells with synthetic peptide encompassing the H3.3K27M mutation, complementary DNA for T cell receptor (TCR) α- and β-chains were cloned into a retroviral vector. TCR-transduced HLA-A2+ T cells efficiently killed HLA-A2+H3.3K27M+ glioma cells in an antigen- and HLA-specific manner. Adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced T cells significantly suppressed the progression of glioma xenografts in mice. Alanine-scanning assays suggested the absence of known human proteins sharing the key amino acid residues required for recognition by the TCR, suggesting that the TCR could be safely used in patients. These data provide us with a strong basis ...
Highly recurrent mutations in H3F3A, which encodes the histone H3 variant H3.3, and HIST1H3B, which encodes the histone H3 variant H3.1, have recently been identified in pediatric gliomas. Remarkably, these mutations invariably occur at or near sites of key regulatory posttranslational modifications, namely Lys27 and Gly34, suggesting that these cancers may be driven by altered epigenetic states. Lewis and colleagues analyzed global levels of regulatory histone modifications in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) samples with H3.1 or H3.3 Lys27Met (K27M) mutations and specifically found decreased levels of H3K27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and increased H3K27 acetylation compared with non-K27M mutant DIPGs. The finding that H3K27me3 was globally reduced despite the low contribution of mutant histone variants to total cellular histone H3 levels indicated that K27M expression reduces methylation on wild-type H3 histones. Indeed, nucleosomes purified from K27M-expressing cells had markedly lower ...
Background and Purpose: Radiation therapy is the traditional and only therapy that offers benefits to patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) which are highly aggressive pediatric central nervous system tumors without known curative therapies. However, unfortunately, efficacy of radiation therapy is transient. Seneca Valley virus-001(SVV-001) is a novel non-pathogenic oncolytic piconavirus that can be systemically administered and pass through brain blood barrier (BBB). Phase I clinical trial of SVV has proven its efficacy in adults patients with cancers with neuroendocrine features and in pediatric patients with non-central nerve system (CNS) tumors. We sought to examine if combining ionizing radiation with an oncolytic virus SVV-001 would lead to synergistically enhanced tumor cell killing and significantly improve therapeutic efficacy in vivo in DIPG patient tumor-derived intra-brain stem orthotopic xenograft mouse models (PDOX).. Methods: By infecting PDOX derived tumor cells ...
Diffuse pontine gliomas are tumors on the pons portion of the brainstem. Their peak incidence is in children between 5 and 10 years old. Their location
Brain tumor news: A prospective study of temozolomide plus thalidomide during and after radiation therapy for pediatric diffuse pontine gliomas: preliminary results of the Korean Society for Pediatric Neuro-Oncology study.
DARIEN, Ill. -- In September of 2016, Joey Ventimiglia, who was 6 at the time, was diagnosed with DIPG. DIPG, Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma, is a brain tumor that rests in the pons of the brain.
Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is the deadliest brainstem cancer in children, and significant therapeutic progress has not been made in decades. DIPG is resistant to pro-apoptotic chemotherapeutics, exhibits a profile of oxidative stress, and has disrupted cellular metabolism. Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent form of cell death mediated by the accumulation of toxic
Alterations in the ACVR1 Gene can contribute to a Rare, typically Fatal Form of Childhood Brainstem Cancer called Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG). Reporter: Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN Nature Genetics studies by several independent research teams indicated that alterations in the ACVR1 gene can contribute to a rare, typically fatal form of childhood brainstem cancer…
Inclusion Criteria: - Disease Status: - Tissue diagnosis of H3K27M-mutated Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG) with radiographically evident tumor restricted to the brainstem, OR - Tissue diagnosis of H3K27M-mutated Diffuse Midline Glioma (DMG) of the spinal cord - Age: Greater than or equal to 2 year of age and less than or equal to 25 years of age Prior Therapy: - At least 6 weeks following completion of front line radiation therapy. - At least 3 weeks post chemotherapy or 5 half-lives, whichever is shorter must have elapsed since any prior systemic therapy, except for systemic inhibitory/stimulatory immune checkpoint therapy, which requires 5 half-lives. - Performance Status: Subjects , 16 years of age: Karnofsky ≥ 60% OR Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status of 0 or 1; Subjects ≤ 16 years of age: Lansky scale ≥ 60% (See section 13.1, Appendix A) - Normal Organ and Marrow Function (supportive care is allowed per institutional standards, i.e. filgrastim, ...
In October 2013, on her 6th birthday, Jennifer Kranz was diagnosed with an incurable brain tumor.. "That was the day we found out she likely wouldnt make it to 7," Jennifers mom, Libby Kranz, told me recently. Jennifer had an especially aggressive form of a deadly childhood cancer called diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma. Sadly, she died less than four months after being diagnosed.. During Jennifers illness, Libby and her husband, Tony Kranz, heard about the work of Stanford pediatric neurooncologist Michelle Monje, MD, PhD, who studies donated DIPG tumor tissue to understand how its biology might be targeted with new treatments. In their final appointment at Lucile Packard Childrens Hospital Stanford, the Kranzes asked if they could donate their daughters tumor for this research after her death.. "They said Yes, here is the paperwork, and we signed it," Libby said. Then she realized the donation form asked only for consent to study the tumor on Jennifers brainstem, making no mention of ...
Research shows that a tumor suppressor gene p16 is turned off by a histone mutation (H3.3K27M), which is found in up to 70 percent of childhood brain tumors called diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG).
MADISON COUNTY, N.C. -- Each day is a battle for 5-year-old Deion Douglas. He was diagnosed in August 2016 with a rare type of brain tumor known as Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma (DIPG). Deion was given between 9 and 12 months to live because there is currently no cure for this type of cancer.
Commitment, support and passion are hallmarks of organisations making a difference and this is even more significant when its to fight a devastating childhood cancer.. With very few treatment options and no cure yet, diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a devastating childhood cancer, that is highly aggressive and difficult to treat due to the location of the tumor. The only way is through expensive medical research.. At a gala event in Melbourne last Thursday, the national advocacy body, Research Australia awarded the QBE Foundation the Leadership in Corporate Giving Award for amazing support of The Kids Cancer Project to raise funds to find a way to beat this terrible disease.. Continue reading "Corporate Giving And Innovative Research Have The Greatest Impact". ...
Conditions: Central Nervous System Embryonal Tumor, Not Otherwise Specified; Malignant Glioma; Recurrent Atypical Teratoid/Rhabdoid Tumor; Recurrent Childhood Ependymoma; Recurrent Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma; Recurrent Medulloblastoma; Refractory Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine ...
On August 6, 2010, at the age of 4, our sweet Abby was diagnosed with Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma. Thank you for your prayers and love as she battled "the monster in her head". And please, if you know any other child battling a life-threatening illness, keep them in your thoughts and prayers ...
Tumors that arise along the brain stem which consists of the midbrain, pons, and medulla. Most brain stem gliomas occur in the pons and are called pontine gliomas. Tumors that arise in the midbrain are referred to as Midbrain/Medullary Gliomas.
Medical review and explanation of Brainstem Tumors. Courtesy of Farhad Limonaid MD, the top neurosurgeon specialist in the Palm Springs area of the Coachella Valley.Specializing in the treatment of brain tumors, back pain and neck pain.
Brainstem glioma is impossible to resect completely, and patients with this type of glioma show a poor prognosis. Therefore, a more effective adjuvant therapy is required to prolong survival. Bevacizumab is an endothelial growth factor monoclonal antibody with strong anti-vascular effects, which may suppress tumor progression. We performed a retrospective study of data from 6 patients with brainstem glioma showing malignant features who were treated with bevacizumab. Tumor-associated lesions, as evaluated by T2 weighted or fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery magnetic resonance imaging, were reduced in all patients, although the timing of the start of bevacizumab administration and pretreatment were not uniform ...
View details of top brainstem glioma hospitals in Gurgaon. Get guidance from medical experts to select best brainstem glioma hospital in Gurgaon
Primary brain tumors, including brain stem gliomas, are a diverse group of diseases that together constitute the most common solid tumor of childhood. Immunohistochemical analysis, cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings, and measures of mitotic activity are increasingly used in tumor diagnosis and classification...
ON THIS PAGE: You will learn about the different ways doctors use to treat children with brain stem glioma. To see other pages, use the menu on the side of your screen.. In general, tumors in children are uncommon, so it can be hard for doctors to plan treatments unless they know what has been most effective in other children. Thats why more than 60% of children are treated as part of a clinical trial. Clinical trials are research studies that compare standard treatments (the best known treatments available) with newer approaches to treatments that may be more effective. Clinical trials may test such approaches as a new drug, a new combination of standard treatments, or new doses of current therapies. Studying new treatments involves careful monitoring using scientific methods, and all participants are followed closely to track their health and progress.. To take advantage of these newer treatments, children should be treated at a specialized cancer center. Doctors at these centers have ...
Before treatment begins, talk with your childs doctor about possible side effects of each type of treatment your child will be receiving. Ask which side effects are most likely to happen, when they are likely to occur, and what can be done to prevent or relieve them.. And, ask about the level of caregiving your child may need during treatment and recovery, as family members and friends often play an important role in the care of a child with brain stem glioma. Learn more about caregiving.. In addition to physical side effects, there may be emotional and social effects as well. Patients and their families are encouraged to share their feelings with a member of their health care team who can help with coping strategies, including concerns about managing the cost of medical care. During and after treatment, be sure to tell the health care team about the side effects your child experiences, even if you feel they are not serious. Sometimes, side effects can last beyond the treatment period, called a ...
Brainstem glioma is a highly devastating disease, and any mass-like lesion in the brainstem can raise suspicion of this diagnosis. However, other inflammatory, demyelinating, or degenerative diseases can mimic brainstem glioma in clinical presentation and imaging features. Therefore, diagnosis based solely on imaging is often insufficient for brainstem lesions and may lead to incorrect diagnosis and treatment. This case report is the first description of central nervous system aquaporin-4 (AQP4) autoimmunity confined mainly to the brainstem. It demonstrates the wide spectrum of neuroinflammatory diseases in children and highlights the utility of surgical biopsy for suspicious brainstem lesions with atypical imaging features for glioma.
There is no role for hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of children with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic brainstem tumors: results of a Pediatric Oncology Group phase III trial comparing conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy.
A lot can change in four decades. Techniques for operating on the brain have advanced considerably, as have the tools for probing tumors at the molecular level. So, looking to turn the dogma about DIPGs on its head, Kieran haslaunched a clinical trial that aims to use advanced surgical and diagnostic tools to target and individualize DIPG treatment. Kieran points out that there have been 250 DIPG clinical trials conducted over the years, both here and elsewhere. But none have improved the tumors median survival time-nine months-or mortality-99 percent.. "Weve historically treated and studied DIPG based on imaging results, clinical symptoms and what we know about adult or other pediatric brain tumors," Kieran explains. "We need to take a targeted approach, but because we havent been able to collect samples of newly diagnosed tumors, we havent been able to conduct the kinds of molecular studies that have been used to pinpoint vulnerabilities in other tumors.". The new trial takes just that ...
Donaldson, S.S., Laningham, F. and Fisher, P.G. (2006) Advances toward an Understanding of Brainstem Gliomas. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 24, 1266-1272.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Role of surgery in brainstem gliomas. AU - Mohanty, Aaron. PY - 2009/7/1. Y1 - 2009/7/1. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=67651162170&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=67651162170&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.4103/0028-3886.53258. DO - 10.4103/0028-3886.53258. M3 - Article. C2 - 19587459. AN - SCOPUS:67651162170. VL - 57. SP - 231. EP - 232. JO - Neurology India. JF - Neurology India. SN - 0028-3886. IS - 3. ER - ...
Abstract:. We present a technique for extracting temporal diffusion MRI changes in tumor tissue called Serial functional Diffusion Mapping (SfDM). We are currently evaluating SfDM in biomarker extraction for pseudoprogression in pediatric brainstem tumors treated with immunotherapy.. Peptide-based immunotherapy works on the principle of introducing epitopes for antigens which are overly expressed in tumor cells, with the goal of triggering the patients own immune response against the tumor, while ideally sparing healthy tissue. As the desired result is an inflammatory response, a challenge in clinical management arises in the early identification of tumor pseudoprogression. Pseudoprogression is defined as any symptomatic change in tumor volume not attributed to tumor progression, and is thought to be indicative of immunotherapy treatment response. However, pseudoprogression can only be diagnosed retrospectively. As clinical protocol calls for a halt in the treatment with any observed ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - 18F-FDG PET and MR imaging associations across a spectrum of pediatric brain tumors. T2 - A report from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium. AU - Zukotynski, Katherine. AU - Fahey, Frederic. AU - Kocak, Mehmet. AU - Kun, Larry. AU - Boyett, James. AU - Fouladi, Maryam. AU - Vajapeyam, Sridhar. AU - Treves, Ted. AU - Poussaint, Tina Y.. PY - 2014/1/1. Y1 - 2014/1/1. N2 - The purpose of this study was to describe 18F-FDG uptake across a spectrum of pediatric brain tumors and correlate 18F-FDG PET with MR imaging variables, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). Methods: A retrospective analysis was conducted of children enrolled in phase I/II clinical trials through the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium from August 2000 to June 2010. PET variables were summarized within diagnostic categories using descriptive statistics. Associations of PET with MR imaging variables and PFS and OS by tumor types were evaluated. Results: Baseline 18F-FDG PET was available in 203 ...
Survive Brain Stem Glioma in Adults. New Hope Unlimited offers a unique combination of alternative, conventional, and holistic treatments to help restore the bodys disease-free condition. Contact us today at 480-666-1403.
The Laus decision to take Kaleigh to Mexico for experimental therapy is a powerful reminder of the lack of clinically proven, effective treatment options for young patients diagnosed with DIPG and the need for more research into the disease.. Children with DIPG survive for less than a year, on average, and only around one in ten survives for longer than two years.. We are delighted that Kaleigh appears to be responding positively to her treatment in Mexico and we would welcome the opportunity to learn more from the clinics medical team about the therapy regimes and progress of all of the children who are being treated there for DIPG.. She added that the charity is funding DIPG research at Great Ormond Street Hospital, Oxford University and the Institute of Cancer Research.. Kaleigh is back at home with her parents and brother Carson for the festive period, where even the smallest injury or ailment can leave her extremely vulnerable.. But with the support of the Bradley Lowery Foundation, ...
Lauren Bells is a three year old in Ohio who has been diagnosed with an inoperable brainstem tumor called DIPG (Diffuse Intristic Pontine Glioma).
Lauren Bells is a three year old in Ohio who has been diagnosed with an inoperable brainstem tumor called DIPG (Diffuse Intristic Pontine Glioma).
Adult, malignant brainstem gliomas are rare entities that often cause treatment conundrums due to the difficulty of surgical resection and, therefore, the absence of pathological diagnosis. This leads to a reliance on radiological imaging for diagnosis, which can often be unreliable. These shortcomings have made the treatment of brainstem gliomas challenging with unpredictable outcomes. The mainstay of treatment consists of chemotherapy and radiation; however, recurrence is inevitable. Predicting outcomes has been the major difficulty in treating these patients as adult malignant brainstem gliomas Grade II have a median survival between five to seven years while Grades III and IV are between 10-17 months (with some studies showing significantly longer survival in Grade III). Here, we present the case of a patient with the pathologic diagnosis of a right brachium pontis glioblastoma who had a remarkable survival of 73 months, whereas the expected median survival for these patients is 10-17 months.
The authors reviewed the cases of 49 children, ranging in age from 9 months to 15 years, who were diagnosed by computerized tomography (CT) as having brain-stem glioma. Four distinct groups of brain-stem gliomas were identified based on CT scan characteristics: Group I included isodense contrast-enhancing tumors that were dorsally exophytic into the fourth ventricle; Group II(a) included hypodense nonenhancing intrinsic tumors of the brain stem; Group II(b) included intrinsic tumors of the brain stem with hyperdense exophytic components extending ventrally and laterally into the cerebellopontine and prepontine cisterns; Group III included intrinsic cystic tumors with contrast-enhancing capsules; and Group IV included focally intrinsic tumors of the brain stem that were isodense and enhanced brightly on administration of contrast medium. The clinical presentation, efficacy of surgical intervention, pathology, and prognosis of these tumors were correlated within these groupings. Eleven patients ...
This project is supported by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (award #111062), Alberta Innovates - Health Solutions, and by The Metabolomics Innovation Centre (TMIC), a nationally-funded research and core facility that supports a wide range of cutting-edge metabolomic studies. TMIC is funded by Genome Alberta, Genome British Columbia, and Genome Canada, a not-for-profit organization that is leading Canadas national genomics strategy with funding from the federal government. Maintenance, support, and commercial licensing is provided by OMx Personal Health Analytics, Inc. Designed by Educe Design & Innovation Inc. ...
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Warren Katherine E, Gururangan Sri, Geyer J Russell, McLendon Roger E, Poussaint Tina Young, Wallace Dana, Balis Frank M, Berg Stacey L, Packer Roger J, Goldman Stewart, Minturn Jane E, Pollack Ian F, Boyett James M, Kun Larry E: A phase II study of O6-benzylguanine and temozolomide in pediatric patients with recurrent or progressive high-grade gliomas and brainstem gliomas: a Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium study. Journal of neuro-oncology 106(3): 643-9, Feb 2012 ...
I am a 29 year old, single mother, RN from Alabama & was "officially" diagnosed with a Low-grade Glioma on my brainstem on February 27, 2013. However we have gone back and found evidence that the tumor was there in 2007, however much smaller... Anywho.. My tumor is inoperable, due to its size and location on my brainstem... i believe it is throughout my medulla, pons, and working really dang hard & spreading on down my Cervical spine.. I resigned from the hopsital I was working at as a floor nurse and now My full-time job is doing whatever Ive gotta do to stay up & do whatever work & service I have left to to here.. Now... I say this & I dont feel sad or upset... not even disappointed, but I do not suffer myself by living based on what my "Prognosis" is... Ive seen first hand in the hospital & in my life that you cant live your life based on statistics.... Life is life. there is no rationalizing or explaining why cancer, tumor, illness, death... happens and hits us... but it does... and it ...
26-27 November - Neurosurgical trainees, new consultants, specialist nurses and AHPs with a role in neurosurgery are all welcome to attend. Highlights include: • Hydrocephalus - Programmable valve hands on workshops • Headache and the neurosurgical patient • Epilepsy • Medulloblastoma • Neurovascular • How I do it: - Brainstem tumours - Thalamic tumours
My name is Katie and I am 45 and live in the US. I was diagnosed with a brain stem glioma as well in March 2006. My tumor is very rare as well as is typical a pediatric tumor. But I am extremely lucky because mine is low grade. I have yearly MRIs and so far my tumor has not grown. My tumor is called a Tectal Glioma. It has the tendency to cause hydrocephalus which i do not have. I have found several adults with this tumor. Some have had growth some not. And I have found parents as well. My tumor can not biopsied or removed and there are limited treatment options. My tumor was found due to extreme migriane/headaches. The kept getting worse and became daily. I still have them daily and I am on a cocktail of meds, diet changes, as well as some other things. They are still 24/7 but a little better. I have also tried alternative meds for the headaches. I was told at first that the headaches are not caused by the tumor but every brain stem tumor survivor I find has had some headaches. At this point ...
Updates for oncologists and hematologists treating primary (astrocytoma, meningioma, medulloblastoma, ependymoma, brain stem glioma) and metastatic brain tumors.
Rachel Haanskorf needs your help today! Little Logans Journey - Five weeks ago, Logan Haanskorf, an eight-year-old highly energetic, loving and caring boy was diagnosed with every parents worst nightmare: Cancer. He was diagnosed with a brain stem glioma; a tumour on his brain stem in the centre of his brain. This terrible news was even harder for his famil...
Connect with Parijatak for Best Brain Stem Glioma Treatment in India Glioma is one of the psychological disorders characterized by […] ...
... I recently came across the story of Brianna Sharp, a young girl involved in brain stem glioma, brain tumor, Brianna sharp, Jennifer Sharp, Matthew, Pontine, Proton Radiation Therapy
EMMIS COMMUNICATIONS Talk WIBC/INDIANAPOLIS sports reporter JAKE QUERY made some wishes come true for MAKE-A-WISH child CAMERON HOLT. The seven -years-old was diagnosed last year with brain cancer -- specifically, brain stem glioma. Given 18 months to live, CAMERON has already lived past that. CAMERON was invited to THE INDIANAPOLIS 500 as part of the WAKE-A-WISH foundation; there he met QUERY, who does sports for the WIBC morning show with TERRI STACY. QUERY took CAMERON and his family ...
Dear Friends,. My name is Jennifer Bowers, and my husband, Rick, and I have three children-Abby (9 years), Will (5 years), and Jack (21 months). We live in Woodstock, GA, and I teach Talented and Gifted elementary school students in a nearby town. My husband worked as a freshwater mussel ecologist and taught part-time at Kennesaw State University on Saturdays. He was working on his PhD long-distance at Kent State University. He was also a member of a band and dabbled in his own music production company. As you have probably guessed, we led very busy lives. This past summer, my husband, who is NEVER sick, began to experience some vision problems, which progressed into ringing of the ears, speech problems, and numbness/weakness on the right side of his body. It took a couple of months, MANY tests, and finally a craniotomy, but my 34 year old husband was finally diagnosed with a brain stem glioma, which is a very rare and serious form of brain cancer. They have given him 3-5 years, but he is ...
Virtual running event, National DIPG Awareness Resolution, 51717, CureDIPG, RunforDIPG, Jacks Angels, Relay for Jack, Congressman Steve Knight, Run the Rocks
The study, published inNature Medicine, was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Department of Defense, and more than 25 nonprofit foundations devoted to finding cures for childhood brain cancer.. "Our results provide a glimmer of hope for treating this heartbreaking disease," said Michelle Monje, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of neurology and neurological sciences, Stanford University School of Medicine, California, a senior author of the study and a specialist in DIPG. "Caring for DIPG patients drives me to find new ways to treat them.". DIPG typically attacks children 4 to 9 years of age. Children progressively lose muscle control as the tumor rapidly attacks the pons, a region deep inside the brain that connects the brain to the spinal cord, and is difficult to reach and surgically remove. Despite radiation treatment, children usually survive for about nine months, and less than 1 percent survive longer than five years.. Six years ...
Of niece Lucys condition she adds: "Currently, treatment is limited to radiotherapy (of which there are several delivery methods) and chemotherapy on the NHS. There has been very little research into DIPG and therefore, comparatively little is known about this type of cancer.. "We know it only affects children and the cruel nature and location of the tumour means that DIPG children gradually lose control of their bodily functions. Our family is doing everything possible, amid the whirlwind of disbelief we find ourselves in, to find alternative therapies and options that may work either outside or alongside the NHS. Its our only hope of helping Lucy and if we have hope, we can keep going.". Paula and family have researched numerous treatments and therapies that may help Lucy, including one known as "intra-arterial chemotherapy treatment under Dr. Alberto Siller and Dr. Alberto Garcia in Monterrey, Mexico.". Paula says: "The treatments do come at a cost. For example, the treatment in Mexico is ...
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Despite painful symptoms, invasive treatments, frequent trips to the hospital and near-daily doctor appointments, Michael has demonstrated unbelievable courage and strength and never complains, Mark told HuffPost. But the 6-year-old did not improve over the course of his radiation treatments, and his symptoms worsened, leading to severe vision loss and increased difficulty speaking, as well as the loss of motor functions like the ability to walk and the use of his left (and dominant) hand. On top of these DIPG symptoms, Michael has also grappled with some difficult side effects to his medications, including weight gain, nausea and fatigue. ...
August 11, 2016. Maithili, a 12-year-old girl, gets diagnosed with DIPG, a very rare brain tumor. Its a harsh and painful disease that affects the nerves.
The Southern California Chapter of The Cure Starts Now was formed to honor the memory of Sarah Michelle Nelson. Sarah was an extraordinary kid, which in her short life, inspired others to face lifes challenges with a smile and with bravery. Throughout her journey Sarah touched so many with her caring and courageous spirit and taught us all what it is to be a true fighter. Sarah taught others to do what needed to be done, to not care what others thought, and to keep moving forward despite obstacles. She taught us life lessons that will never be forgotten. Sarah was diagnosed with DIPG just a month after turning 8 on June 12, 2012 and passed away in March 2013.. Sarahs journey started in when we noticed changes in her behavior. Sarah had always been very outspoken and difficult, but she had been taking it to another level, getting more upset lately with us, and being very emotional. We talked to her doctors, but it was decided it could be hormone changes. Around the end of May we noticed that ...
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TY - JOUR. T1 - Carotid cavernous fistula imitating brainstem glioma. AU - Clark, Stephen W.. AU - Dang, Toan. AU - Toth, Gabor. AU - Pride, Glenn L.. AU - Greenberg, Benjamin. AU - Warnack, Worthy. PY - 2011/2. Y1 - 2011/2. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79951537591&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79951537591&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1001/archneurol.2010.366. DO - 10.1001/archneurol.2010.366. M3 - Article. C2 - 21320994. AN - SCOPUS:79951537591. VL - 68. SP - 256. EP - 257. JO - Archives of Neurology. JF - Archives of Neurology. SN - 0003-9942. IS - 2. ER - ...
Childhood CNS germ cell tumors form in germ cells, which are cells that develop into sperm or ova (eggs). There are different types of childhood germ cell tumors. These include germinomas, embryonal yolk sac carcinomas, choriocarcinomas, and teratomas. A mixed germ cell tumor has two types of germ cell tumors in it. Germ cell tumors can be either benign or malignant.. Germ cell brain tumors usually form in the center of the brain, near the pineal gland. The pineal gland is a tiny organ in the brain that makes melatonin, which is a substance that helps control the sleeping and waking cycle. Germ cell tumors can spread to other parts of the brain and spinal cord.. ...
Phase I clinical trial of p28 in pediatric patients with Recurrent or Progressive CNS tumors. We recently completed a national, multi-center trial (9 institutions) Phase I a, b clinical trial of p28 (NSC7451040) in pediatric patients with recurrent or progressive CNS tumors supported by the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC-041) and NCI-DCT-CTEP.. ASCO 2015 Poster: Phase 1 Trial of p28 (NSC745104), A Non-HDM2 Mediated Peptide Inhibitor of p53 Ubiquitination in Children with Recurrent or Progressive CNS Tumors: A Final Report from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium Report Pediatric patients were administered p28 i.v. 3 times weekly for 4 consecutive weeks of a 6-week cycle at 4.16 mg/kg/dose (50 mg/kg/course) using a rolling 6 study design. Serum pharmacokinetics were established. A total of 18 patients were registered on the study, 12 patients with malignant glioma, choroid plexus carcinoma, medulloblastoma, pineoblastoma, DIPG and AT/RT completed the DLT period and were evaluable for ...
A glioma is a type of tumor that starts in the brain or spine. Gliomas arise from glial cells, which act as a supportive cell in the central nervous system. Gliomas are the second most common type of tumor after meningiomas.. There are three types of normal glial cells that can produce tumors. An astrocyte will produce astrocytomas (including glioblastomas), an oligodendrocyte will produce oligodendrogliomas, and ependymomas come from ependymal cells. Tumors that display a mixture of these different cells are called mixed gliomas. Tumors are also commonly identified by their specific locations (such as brain stem gliomas), not the tissue type from which they originate.. Gliomas are also categorized by grade, determined by pathologic evaluation of the tumor. Of numerous grading systems in use, the most common is the World Health Organization (WHO) grading system for astrocytoma, under which tumors are graded from I (least advanced disease / best prognosis) to IV (most advanced disease / worst ...
Original Research and Commentary on p28 CDG Therapeutics Lead Agent and Analogs. Binding of Amphipathic Cell Penetrating Peptide p28 to Wild Type and Mutated p53 as studied by Raman, Atomic Force and Surface Plasmon Resonance spectroscopies.. Signorelli S, Santini S, Yamada T, Bizzarri AR, Beattie CW, Cannistraro S.. Biochim Biophys Acta. 2017 Apr;1861(4):910-921.. Phase 1 trial of p28 (NSC745104), a non-HDM2-mediated peptide inhibitor of p53 ubiquitination in pediatric patients with recurrent or progressive central nervous system tumors: A Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium Study.. Lulla RR, Goldman S, Yamada T, Beattie CW, Bressler L, Pacini M, Pollack IF, Fisher PG, Packer RJ, Dunkel IJ, Dhall G, Wu S, Onar A, Boyett JM, Fouladi M.. Neuro Oncol., 2016 Sep;18(9):1319-25. p28-mediated Activation of p53 in G2/M Phase of the Cell Cycle Enhances the Efficacy of DNA Damaging and Antimitotic Chemotherapy.. Yamada T, Das Gupta TK, Beattie CW.. Cancer Res. 2016 Feb 26; 76(8): 2354-2365. Chirality ...
According to results from phase II studies conducted through the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium, a subtype of the brain stem tumor medulloblastoma may respond to vismodegib (Erivedge; Genentech)-approved for basal cell carcinomas-with less toxicity than current standard therapy. Both cancers arise from aberrant Sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway activity; vismodegib inhibits a key protein, Smoothened (SMO), in this signaling cascade.. Medulloblastomas SHH subtype (SHH-MB) occurs in about 60% of adult and 25% of pediatric patients. Initial treatment involves a combination of surgery, radiation, and cytotoxic therapy, with a 5-year overall survival of 70%. However, patients are often left with severe long-term side effects, and a grim prognosis if the tumor recurs.. "We need a therapy that is less toxic and better honed to its target," says corresponding author Giles Robinson, MD, a pediatric neuro-oncologist at St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital in Memphis, TN.. The studies enrolled 31 adults and ...
PURPOSE: To use multimodal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to quantify treatment-induced changes in the whole volume of diffuse infiltrating pontine gliomas and correlate them with progression-free survival (PFS). METHODS AND MATERIALS: This prospective study included 22 children aged 3.3 to 14.7 years (median, 5.9 years). Multimodal MRI was performed at 3 distinct time points: before treatment, the first week following radiation therapy (RT), and 2 months after RT. The imaging protocol included morphologic, multi b-value diffusion; arterial spin labeling; and dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced perfusion. Morphologic and multimodal data-lesion volume, diffusion coefficients, relative cerebral blood flow, and relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV)-were recorded at the 3 aforementioned time points. The Wilcoxon test was used to compare each individual parameter variation between time points, and its correlation with PFS was assessed by the Spearman test. RESULTS: Following RT, the tumors ...
Conditions: Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung; Thyroid Neoplasms; Sarcoma; Colorectal Neoplasms; Salivary Gland Neoplasms; Biliary Tract Neoplasms; Brain Neoplasm, Primary; Carcinoma, Ductal, Breast; Melanoma; Solid Tumors; Glioblastoma; Bile Duct Neoplasms; Astrocytoma; Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Pontine Glioma; Pancreatic Neoplasms; Ovarian Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Renal Cell; Cholangiocarcinoma; Carcinoma; Carcinoma, Bronchogenic; Bronchial Neoplasms; Lung Neoplasms; Respiratory Tract Neoplasms; Thoracic Neoplasms; Neoplasms, Nerve Tissue; Nevi and ...
The results of the study will be presented during a press conference today at the AACR Annual Meeting 2012 in Chicago.. The study, led by Ian F. Pollack, M.D., F.A.C.S., F.A.A.P., chief, Pediatric Neurosurgery at Childrens Hospitals Brain Care Institute and co-director of UPCIs Brain Tumor Program, and Dr. Regina I. Jakacki, M.D., director of Pediatric Neuro-Oncology, enrolled 27 children with gliomas, including 16 with newly diagnosed brainstem gliomas, five with newly diagnosed cerebral high-grade gliomas and six with recurrent gliomas. Each child received serial doses of a peptide vaccine, which stimulates an immune response to a protein fragment present on their tumor cells.. "Weve found that this vaccine is tolerated well with limited systemic toxicity, but weve also observed that there are some patients who have immunological responses in the vaccine target in the brain that can cause swelling and transient worsening and, subsequently, some of those children can have very favorable ...
The Adult Brainstem Glioma online support group is a private email list consisting of adults dealing with the diagnosis of a brain stem tumor and their caregivers. Researchers and clinicians are also welcome.. No Cost ...
Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome Malignant melanoma Carcinoma of colon Papillary thyroid carcinoma Astrocytoma, low-grade, somatic Germ cell tumor, nonseminomatous Non-small cell lung cancer not provided Malignant melanoma of skin Colonic Neoplasms Squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck Brainstem glioma Glioblastoma Adenocarcinoma of lung Multiple myeloma Ovarian Neoplasms Lung cancer Neoplasm of brain Gastrointestinal stromal tumor Papillary renal cell carcinoma, sporadic Neoplasm Colorectal Neoplasms ...
Duke University Medical Center A collaborative effort between Duke Medicine researchers and neurosurgeons and scientists in China has produced new genetic insights into a rare and deadly form of childhood and young adult brain cancer called brainstem glioma.. The researchers identified a genetic mutation in the tumor cells that plays a role in both the growth and the death of a cell. Additionally, the mutation to the newly identified gene may also contribute to the tumors resistance to radiation.. The findings, published online in the journal Nature Genetics on June 1, 2014, provide both immediate and long-term benefits. Knowing that this mutation may render radiation ineffective, patients could be spared that therapy. The mutation would also serve as a strong candidate for drug development.. The researchers conducted genetic tests and found that many of the tumor cells had a mutation in a gene called PPM1D, which causes cells to proliferate and avoid natural death. It is the first time this ...
Abnormal growth of cells in the nervous system without evidence of malignant characteristics. Unlike other organ systems, tumors in the central nervous system can have benign histological characteristics but still have life threatening effects due to their location within the neuraxis (e.g., brainstem gliomas ...
Its of course mainly glioblastoma histologically = glioma grade 4 = most aggressive and resistant to treatment - if there was anything except radiation, which gives only temporary relief. On the other hand, surgery and chemo possible in case of glioblastoma multiforme, also doesnt make the positive outcome: ...
Can our products be used on different species? The simple answer is yes. BSG offers distinct and diverse separations tools that work with virtually all species. Read to learn more.
Over 70% of diffuse intrinsic pediatric gliomas, an aggressive brainstem tumor, harbor heterozygous mutations that create a K27M amino acid substitution (methionine replaces lysine 27) in the tail of histone H3.3. The role of the H3.3K27M mutation in tumorigenesis is not fully understood. Here, we use a human embryonic stem cell system to model this tumor. We show that H3.3K27M expression synergizes with p53 loss and PDGFRA activation in neural progenitor cells derived from human embryonic stem cells, resulting in neoplastic transformation. Genome-wide analyses indicate a resetting of the transformed precursors to a developmentally more primitive stem cell state, with evidence of major modifications of histone marks at several master regulator genes. Drug screening assays identified a compound targeting the protein menin as an inhibitor of tumor cell growth in vitro and in mice.
Bio Geo Nerd Brain Anatomy and Functions. MBBS Medicine Humanity First Anatomy of the Brain Stem. CNS Intro to Brain and Ventricles Medulla Oblongata. Introduction to Neuroanatomy Physiopedia. Midbrain powerful meditation Lyra Nara Natural Remedies. McCabism Ron Denniss brain transplant. Activity 7 Nervous System Histology Brain amp Cranial. Brain Stem. Neonatal Brain Damage and LongTerm Outcomes. MBBS Medicine Humanity First Anatomy of the Brain Stem. Brain stem anatomy. Aicardi syndrome Genetics Home Reference NIH. Activity 7 Nervous System Histology Brain amp Cranial. Cranial Nerves amp Brain dissection ppt video online download. Childhood Brain Stem Glioma Treatment PDQ174Health. Summary of the Cranial Nerves TeachMeAnatomy. CNS Intro to Brain and Ventricles Medulla Oblongata. Cerebellum and brainstem Anatomy Study Guide Kenhub. Brainstem Brain Stem Lateral View Posterior Stock. Central Nervous System at Harvard University StudyBlue. MBBS Medicine Humanity First Anatomy of the Brain Stem. ...
Neuro-oncology is the study of brain and spinal cord neoplasms, many of which are (at least eventually) very dangerous and life-threatening (astrocytoma, glioma, glioblastoma multiforme, ependymoma, pontine glioma, and brain stem tumors are among the many examples of these). Among the malignant brain cancers, gliomas of the brainstem and pons, glioblastoma multiforme, and high-grade (highly anaplastic) astrocytoma are among the worst. In these cases, untreated survival usually amounts to only a few months, and survival with current radiation and chemotherapy treatments may extend that time from around a year to a year and a half, possibly two or more, depending on the patients condition, immune function, treatments used, and the specific type of malignant brain neoplasm. Surgery may in some cases be curative, but, as a general rule, malignant brain cancers tend to regenerate and emerge from remission easily, especially highly malignant cases. In such cases, the goal is to excise as much of the ...
0339] In still other embodiments, polypeptide analytes are selected from antigens including endogenous antigens produced by a host or exogenous antigens that are foreign to that host. The antigens may be in the form of soluble peptides or polypeptides or polynucleotides from which an expression product (e.g., protein or RNA) is producible. Suitable endogenous antigens include, but are not restricted to, cancer or tumor antigens. Non-limiting examples of cancer or tumor antigens include antigens from a cancer or tumor selected from ABL1 proto-oncogene, AIDS related cancers, acoustic neuroma, acute lymphocytic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, adenocystic carcinoma, adrenocortical cancer, agnogenic myeloid metaplasia, alopecia, alveolar soft-part sarcoma, anal cancer, angiosarcoma, aplastic anemia, astrocytoma, ataxia-telangiectasia, basal cell carcinoma (skin), bladder cancer, bone cancers, bowel cancer, brain stem glioma, brain and CNS tumors, breast cancer, CNS tumors, carcinoid tumors, ...
Pediatric brain cancer is one of the most common forms of disease diagnosed in children. Market Research Future, a firm which specializes in market reports related to the healthcare sector among others, published in its recent report on Pediatric Brain Tumor Market Research Report - Global Forecast till 2023, that the global pediatric brain tumor market is growing at the CAGR of 4.1% during the forecast period and expected to reach US$ 1659.4 million by 2023. Increasing incidences of pediatric brain tumor are being identified around the world which has contributed gradually to the growth of the market.. The main causative factor for pediatric brain tumor market is genetics. Most of the tumors are diagnosed after child birth till 12 years of age, which is usually detected after appearance of certain symptoms. Due to the appearance of additional types of mutations in terms of pediatric brain tumor, the scope of the market has widened significantly. Most of the tumors currently known in this ...
Objectives Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) may enhance the radiographic diagnosis of pediatric brain tumors. This study reviews the DWI properties of pediatric brain tumors at our institution and...
An auditory stimulus can be used to study the peripheral and central hearing apparatus. In addition to neurologic evaluation, it can also be used to evaluate peripheral (conductive and sensorimotor) hearing disorders. Clicks are used to sequentially activate the eighth nerve, followed by brainstem structures during the first ten milliseconds. The waves of the response (defined as positive upward peaks) correlate with brainstem regions. Wave I reflects acoustic nerve function. Waves II and III relate to structures in the pontomedullary region. Waves IV and V reflect function in the upper pons and low midbrain. Abnormalities occur if these structures are damaged, especially if myelin disease occurs. As such, the studies are especially useful in patients with acoustic neuromas, multiple sclerosis, brainstem gliomas, and trauma. ...
Looking for cavernous angioma? Find out information about cavernous angioma. A tumor composed of lymphatic vessels or blood. a benign tumor consisting of blood or lymph vessels. There are two forms of angioma-simple angioma, which is... Explanation of cavernous angioma
These patients tumors presented identically and were treated identically, but the children had very different outcomes," said Dr. Jeffrey Greenfield, an associate professor of neurological surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College and the studys senior author. "Its early, but I think that this opens up really exciting possibilities for exploring the differences in gene expression between boys and girls with brain tumors.". The retrospective study, which physicians believe to be the largest of its kind, looked at 97 patients treated at Weill Cornell and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center - 43 females and 54 males - who were 21 or younger at the time they were diagnosed with the rare and malignant high-grade glioma. Investigators gathered information including tumor location, type and grade. They also reviewed surgeons notes and radiology reports measuring how much tumor had been removed during surgery, the date of recurrence or progression, and the date of death or last doctors visit. The ...
Convection-enhanced delivery permits the direct homogeneous delivery of small- and large-molecular-weight putative therapeutics to the nervous system in a manner that bypasses the blood-nervous system barrier. The development of co-infused surrogate imaging tracers (for computed tomography and MRI) allows for the real-time, noninvasive monitoring of infusate distribution during convective delivery. Real-time image monitoring of convective distribution of therapeutic agents insures that targeted structures/nervous system regions are adequately perfused, enhances safety, informs efficacy (or lack thereof) of putative agents, and provides critical information regarding the properties of convection-enhanced delivery in normal and various pathologic tissue states ...

Integrated Molecular Meta-Analysis of 1,000 Pediatric High-Grade and Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.Integrated Molecular Meta-Analysis of 1,000 Pediatric High-Grade and Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

Brain Stem Neoplasms. Cell Cycle Proteins. Child. Child, Preschool. DNA Topoisomerases, Type I ... Pediatric glioblastoma is one of the most common and most deadly brain tumors in childhood. Using an integrative genetic ...
more infohttps://repository.icr.ac.uk/handle/internal/802

Brain Stem Glioma Treatment,Brain Stem Glioma Treatment Cost IndiaBrain Stem Glioma Treatment,Brain Stem Glioma Treatment Cost India

Brain Stem Glioma Treatment India, Brain Stem Glioma Treatment Cost In India Info On Cost Brain Stem Glioma Treatment Mumbai ... Brain Stem Glioma Treatment Hospitals Center India, Brain Stem Glioma Treatment Doctors Surgeon India ... Children with a brain stem glioma may experience the following symptoms. Sometimes, children with brain stem glioma do not show ... Tumors that arise along these structures are called brain stem gliomas. Most brain stem gliomas occur in the pons ("pontine ...
more infohttp://www.indiahealthtour.com/treatments/cancer-treatment/brain-stem-glioma-treatment-india.html

18  F-FDG PET standard uptake values of the normal pons in children: establishing a reference value for diffuse intrinsic...18 F-FDG PET standard uptake values of the normal pons in children: establishing a reference value for diffuse intrinsic...

... is a useful diagnostic and prediction tool in brain tumors, but its value in childhood diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) ... Kwon JW, Kim IO, Cheon JE, Kim WS, Moon SG, Kim TJ, Chi JG, Wang KC, Chung JK, Yeon KM: Paediatric brain-stem gliomas: MRI, FDG ... Evaluation of 18 F-FDG PET and MRI associations in pediatric diffuse intrinsic brain stem glioma: a report from the pediatric ... Metabolic imaging of the brain stem and spinal cord: studies with positron emission tomography using 18 F-2-deoxyglucose in ...
more infohttps://ejnmmires.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/2191-219X-4-8

Brain stem neoplasms - Medical Dictionary / Glossary | MedindiaBrain stem neoplasms - Medical Dictionary / Glossary | Medindia

Brain stem neoplasms - Tumor of the brain stem, is clearly explained in Medindia s glossary of medical terms ... Brain stem neoplasms - Glossary. Written & Compiled by Medindia Content Team. Medically Reviewed by The Medindia Medical Review ...
more infohttps://www.medindia.net/glossary/brain_stem_neoplasms.htm

ICD-10-CM Code C71.7 - Malignant neoplasm of brain stemICD-10-CM Code C71.7 - Malignant neoplasm of brain stem

ICD-10-CM Neoplasms Index References for C71.7 - Malignant neoplasm of brain stem The ICD-10-CM Neoplasms Index links the ... Malignant neoplasm of brain stem BILLABLE Billable Code Billable codes are sufficient justification for admission to an acute ... C71.7 is a billable ICD code used to specify a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of brain stem. A billable code is detailed ... DRG Group #054-055 - Nervous system neoplasms without MCC. Related Concepts SNOMET-CT * Primary malignant neoplasm of brain ...
more infohttps://icd.codes/icd10cm/C717

brainstem neoplasms primary drug 2000:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search enginebrainstem neoplasms primary drug 2000:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engine

Brain Stem Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Stem Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Carboplatin / therapeutic use. Glioma / drug therapy ... Brain Stem Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Stem Neoplasms / radiotherapy. Glioma / drug therapy. Glioma / radiotherapy ... Brain Neoplasms / drug therapy. Brain Stem Neoplasms / drug therapy. Glioma / drug therapy. Medulloblastoma / drug therapy. ... MeSH-major] Brain Stem Hemorrhage, Traumatic / diagnosis. Brain Stem Neoplasms / diagnosis. Magnetic Resonance Imaging / ...
more infohttp://www.bmlsearch.com/?kwr=brainstem+neoplasms+primary+drug+2000:2010%5Bpubdate%5D&cxts=100&stmp=b1

Phase I Rindopepimut After Conventional Radiation in Children w/ Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas - Full Text View -...Phase I Rindopepimut After Conventional Radiation in Children w/ Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas - Full Text View -...

Brain Neoplasms. Brain Stem Neoplasms. Central Nervous System Neoplasms. Nervous System Neoplasms. Neoplasms by Site. Neoplasms ... Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Infratentorial Neoplasms. Vaccines. Immunologic ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT01058850?view=record

Search of: neoplasms [CONDITION] AND child [AGE-GROUP] | Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies - List Results -...Search of: neoplasms [CONDITION] AND child [AGE-GROUP] | Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies - List Results -...

Nimotuzumab in Combination With Radio-chemotherapy for the Treatment of Brainstem Tumor in Children. *Childhood Brain Stem ... Effectiveness of Musical Training in Hong Kong Chinese Childhood Brain Tumor Survivors. *Brain Neoplasms ... Ferumoxytol in Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Pediatric Patients With Brain Tumors. *Childhood Brain Neoplasm ... Application of Palliative Treatment in Children With Brain Stem Glioma and Recurrent High-grade Tumors in the Central Nervous ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/results?term=neoplasms+%5BCONDITION%5D+AND+child+%5BAGE-GROUP%5D&recr=Open&show_down=Y

Gait ataxia and Increased pressure inside skull - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosisGait ataxia and Increased pressure inside skull - Symptom Checker - check medical symptoms at RightDiagnosis

8. Brain Stem Neoplasms. 9. Cerebellar abscess. 10. Cerebellar ataxia, X-linked. More causes » , Show All 66 Causes , Show ... Brain symptoms (2787 causes) *Clumsiness (408 causes) *Nerve symptoms (9132 causes) *Balance symptoms (1691 causes) *Head ...
more infohttps://wrongdiagnosis.com/cosymptoms/gait-ataxia/increased-pressure-inside-skull.htm

Dr. Caetano Coimbra, MD - Reviews - Dallas, TXDr. Caetano Coimbra, MD - Reviews - Dallas, TX

Caetano Coimbra, MD, a highly rated Neurosurgery Specialist in Dallas, TX specializing in Meningiomas, Brain Surgery, Subdural ... Coimbra performed a 12 hour surgery to remove my tumor that was pushing my brain stem to the left. It was a very risky surgery ... Brain Cancer. *Brain Disorders. *Brain Surgery. *Brain Tumor. *Brain Tumor Surgery. *Brainstem Neoplasm ... He is incredibly arrogant (he called my surgery baby brain surgery, because it was so easy.) However, I had brain surgery ...
more infohttps://www.healthgrades.com/physician/dr-caetano-coimbra-xr4ys

Translating Mesothelioma Molecular Genomics and Dependencies into Precision Oncology-Based TherapiesTranslating Mesothelioma Molecular Genomics and Dependencies into Precision Oncology-Based Therapies

Brain Stem Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; &n.... Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - July 22, 2019. ... Conditions: Adenocarcinoma; Adenocystic Carcinoma; Anal Cancer; Appendix Cancer; Brain Tumor; Glioblastoma; Astrocytoma; Bile ...
more infohttps://medworm.com/728961920/translating-mesothelioma-molecular-genomics-and-dependencies-into-precision-oncology-based-therapies/

Epigenetic EGFR gene repression confers sensitivity to therapeutic BRAFV600E blockade in colon neuroendocrine carcinomas.Epigenetic EGFR gene repression confers sensitivity to therapeutic BRAFV600E blockade in colon neuroendocrine carcinomas.

Brain Stem Neoplasms; Breast Cancer; Cervical Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; &n.... Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - July 22, 2019. ... NAMPT as a Dedifferentiation-Inducer Gene: NAD+ as Core Axis for Glioma Cancer Stem-Like Cells Maintenance ... More News: Brain , Cancer , Cancer & Oncology , Carcinoma , Clinical Trials , Colon Cancer , Colorectal Cancer , Genetics , ... Conditions: Adenocarcinoma; Adenocystic Carcinoma; Anal Cancer; Appendix Cancer; Brain Tumor; Glioblastoma; Astrocytoma; Bile ...
more infohttps://medworm.com/739999268/epigenetic-egfr-gene-repression-confers-sensitivity-to-therapeutic-brafv600e-blockade-in-colon-neuro/

ACVR1 | Cancer Genetics WebACVR1 | Cancer Genetics Web

ACVR1 and Brain Stem Glioma, Childhood. View Publications. 8. Brain Tumours, Childhood. ACVR1 and Brain Tumours. View ... ACVR1 and Brain, Astrocytoma, Childhood. View Publications. 3. Colorectal Cancer. ACVR1 and Colonic Neoplasms. View ... Brain Stem Glioma - Childhood Signal Transduction Wu G, Diaz AK, Paugh BS, et al.. The genomic landscape of diffuse intrinsic ... Brain Stem Glioma - Childhood NTRK1 gene NTRK2 NTRK3 gene Signal Transduction Fontebasso AM, Papillon-Cavanagh S, ...
more infohttp://www.cancerindex.org/geneweb/ACVR1.htm

Clinical and molecular features of patients with prefibrotic primary myelofibrosis previously diagnosed as having essential...Clinical and molecular features of patients with prefibrotic primary myelofibrosis previously diagnosed as having essential...

Brain Stem Neoplasms. Benign and malignant intra-axial tumors of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; or MEDULLA OBLONGATA of the BRAIN ... Primary brain stem neoplasms are more frequent in children. Histologic subtypes include GLIOMA; HEMANGIOBLASTOMA; GANGLIOGLIOMA ... STEM. Primary and metastatic neoplasms may occur in this location. Clinical features include ATAXIA, cranial neuropathies (see ... A de novo myeloproliferation arising from an abnormal stem cell. It is characterized by the replacement of bone marrow by ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/pmarticle/2343588/Clinical-and-molecular-features-of-patients-with-prefibrotic-primary-myelofibrosis-previously-diagnosed.html

Table of Contents - January 06, 1968, 98 (1) | CMAJTable of Contents - January 06, 1968, 98 (1) | CMAJ

Metastatic neoplasms of the brain stem K. M. Hunter and N. B. Rewcastle ...
more infohttps://www.cmaj.ca/content/98/1

Cellular schwannoma of the abducens nerve: case report and review of the literature.Cellular schwannoma of the abducens nerve: case report and review of the literature.

Brain Stem Neoplasms / pathology. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / pathology*, surgery*. Female. Humans. Immunohistochemistry. ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Cellular-schwannoma-abducens-nerve-case/19200646.html

A Phase I Study of IMC-A12 in Combination With Temsirolimus in Pediatric Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid TumorsA Phase I Study of IMC-A12 in Combination With Temsirolimus in Pediatric Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors

Brain Stem Neoplasms. .map{width:100%;height:300px;margin-bottom:15px;} Name. Location. ... histologic verification (except patients with intrinsic brain stem tumors, optic. pathway gliomas or pineal tumors and ... histologic verification (except patients with intrinsic brain stem tumors, optic. pathway gliomas or pineal tumors and ...
more infohttp://www.knowcancer.com/cancer-trials/NCT01182883/

Gamma Knife surgery for metastatic brainstem tumors in: Journal of Neurosurgery Volume 105 Issue 2 (2006)Gamma Knife surgery for metastatic brainstem tumors in: Journal of Neurosurgery Volume 105 Issue 2 (2006)

Hunter KMFRewcastle NB: Metastatic neoplasms of the brain stem. Can Med Assoc J 98:1-71968 ... Julow JViola AMajor TValalik ISagi SMangel L: Iodine-125 brachytherapy of brain stem tumors. Strahlenther Onkol 180:449-4542004 ... Metastatic neoplasms of the brain stem. . Can Med Assoc J. 98. :. 1. -. 7. , 1968. ), false ... Shuto TFujino HAsada HInomori SNagano H: Gamma knife radiosurgery for metastatic tumours in the brain stem. Acta Neurochir ( ...
more infohttps://thejns.org/abstract/journals/j-neurosurg/105/2/article-p213.xml?rskey=Ci2bwr&result=8

Bone symptoms - RightDiagnosis.comBone symptoms - RightDiagnosis.com

Brain -- bone -- fat ... bone cysts, bone lumps, bone lumps*Brain Stem Neoplasms ... increased pressure inside skull*Branchial ... Cartilaginous neoplasms ... bone lump*Casanthranol -- Teratogenic Agent ... extra digits*Cat Eye Syndrome ... hip dislocation, ... Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms ... osteoporosis*Adrenal gland hyperfunction ... osteoporosis*Adrenal incidentaloma ... osteoporosis* ... Anencephaly ... absence of skull bone normally surrounding the brain*Aneurysmal bone cysts ... bone swelling, bone lump, bone ...
more infohttps://www.rightdiagnosis.com/sym/bone_symptoms.htm

BRAF V600E mutation is a significant prognosticator of the tumour regrowth rate in brainstem gangliogliomas.  - PubMed - NCBIBRAF V600E mutation is a significant prognosticator of the tumour regrowth rate in brainstem gangliogliomas. - PubMed - NCBI

BRAF V600E; Brain stem neoplasms; Ganglioglioma; Growth; Prognosis. PMID:. 28986151. DOI:. 10.1016/j.jocn.2017.09.014. ... especially a brainstem counterpart, is unclear. To identify potential molecular features predictive of brainstem ... BRAF V600E mutation is a significant prognosticator of the tumour regrowth rate in brainstem gangliogliomas.. Chen X1, Pan C1, ... Furthermore, a high percentage of paediatric brainstem gangliogliomas have BRAF V600E mutations. However, their clinical ...
more infohttps://phgkb.cdc.gov/PHGKB/phgHome.action?action=forward&dbsource=huge&id=181581

Carotid cavernous fistula imitating brainstem glioma<...Carotid cavernous fistula imitating brainstem glioma<...

Brain Stem Neoplasms Endovascular Procedures Traffic Accidents Magnetic Resonance Angiography Brain Edema ... Clark, SW, Dang, T, Toth, G, Pride, GL, Greenberg, B & Warnack, W 2011, Carotid cavernous fistula imitating brainstem glioma ... Carotid cavernous fistula imitating brainstem glioma. Stephen W. Clark, Toan Dang, Gabor Toth, Glenn L. Pride, Benjamin ... Carotid cavernous fistula imitating brainstem glioma. / Clark, Stephen W.; Dang, Toan; Toth, Gabor; Pride, Glenn L.; Greenberg ...
more infohttps://utsouthwestern.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/carotid-cavernous-fistula-imitating-brainstem-glioma

Role of surgery in brainstem gliomas<...Role of surgery in brainstem gliomas<...

Brain Stem Neoplasms Neurosurgery Glioma Brain Stem ASJC Scopus subject areas. *Clinical Neurology ... Role of surgery in brainstem gliomas. / Mohanty, Aaron.. In: Neurology India, Vol. 57, No. 3, 01.07.2009, p. 231-232.. Research ... Role of surgery in brainstem gliomas. In: Neurology India. 2009 ; Vol. 57, No. 3. pp. 231-232. ... Mohanty, A 2009, Role of surgery in brainstem gliomas, Neurology India, vol. 57, no. 3, pp. 231-232. https://doi.org/10.4103/ ...
more infohttps://researchexperts.utmb.edu/en/publications/role-of-surgery-in-brainstem-gliomas

Content of stem tumor CD133+ cells in brain neoplasms of different histological type | Experimental oncologyContent of stem tumor CD133+ cells in brain neoplasms of different histological type | Experimental oncology

... there are conflicting data on the content of cancer stem cells responsible for recurrence and resistance to chemotherapy in ... Content of stem tumor CD133+ cells in brain neoplasms of different histological type. Lisyaniy N.I.*, Stanetskaya D.N., ... Brain tumour stem cells. Nat Rev Cancer 2006; 6: 425-6.. *7. Dalerba P, Cho R, Clarke M. Cancer stem cells: Models and concepts ... Singh S, Clarke I, Terasaki M, et al. Identification of a cancer stem cell in human brain tumors. Cancer Res 2003; 63: 5821-8. ...
more infohttp://exp-oncology.com.ua/article/10421/content-of-stem-tumor-cd133-sup-sup-cells-in-brain-neoplasms-of-different-histological-type

Schneiderian Carcinoma disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical TrialsSchneiderian Carcinoma disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials

brain stem astrocytic neoplasm 10.3. CDKN2A TP53 19. epidural neoplasm 10.3. KRT5 TP53 ... neoplasm. MP:0002006 9.65. CDKN2A EP300 RBL2 NOTCH1 TP53 14. renal/urinary system. MP:0005367 9.63. EP300 GAS6 RBL2 NOTCH1 SOX4 ... somatic stem cell division. GO:0048103 9.49. CDKN2A NOTCH1 19. positive regulation of Notch signaling pathway. GO:0045747 9.26 ... Low-grade Papillary Schneiderian Carcinoma, a Unique and Deceptively Bland Malignant Neoplasm: Report of a Case. ( 25634744 ) ...
more infohttps://www.malacards.org/card/schneiderian_carcinoma

Squamous Cell Papilloma disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical TrialsSquamous Cell Papilloma disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials

brain stem astrocytic neoplasm 10.6. CDKN2A TP53 7. keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma 10.5. CDKN2A TP53 ... neoplasm. MP:0002006 9.87. AURKA CDKN2A CYP2E1 F3 HPGDS TP53 13. no phenotypic analysis. MP:0003012 9.7. AURKA CD274 CDKN2A ...
more infohttps://www.malacards.org/card/squamous_cell_papilloma
  • BRAF V600E mutation is a significant prognosticator of the tumour regrowth rate in brainstem gangliogliomas. (cdc.gov)
  • To identify potential molecular features predictive of brainstem ganglioglioma's clinical outcomes, a retrospective cohort of 28 World Health Organization (WHO) grade I brainstem gangliogliomas was analysed for BRAF V600E, IDH1 R132H, and IDH2 R172K mutations, TERT C228T/C250T promoter mutation, H3F3A K27M mutation and MGMT methylation. (cdc.gov)
  • These data suggest that BRAF V600E can predict the regrowth rate of brainstem gangliogliomas after microsurgery, and a BRAF V600E-targeted therapeutic may be a promising early intervention measure for patients who harbour BRAF V600E mutation after microsurgery. (cdc.gov)
  • The two-year survival for paediatric HGG ranges from 30%, for tumours arising in the cerebral cortex, to less than 10% for diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs), which arise in the brainstem. (cancerindex.org)
  • 12 months and less than or equal to 21 years of age with a diagnosis and histologic verification (except patients with intrinsic brain stem tumors, optic pathway gliomas or pineal tumors and elevations of serum or CSF alpha-fetoprotein or beta-HCG) of measureable or evaluable relapsed or refractory solid tumors. (knowcancer.com)
  • However, their clinical significance, including possible connections between the biomarkers and ganglioglioma's clinical features, especially a brainstem counterpart, is unclear. (cdc.gov)
  • All but one of 18 patients with asymptomatic brainstem deposits remained free of symptoms. (thejns.org)
  • In 35 patients with symptomatic brainstem deposits, neurological symptoms improved in 21, remained stable in 11, and worsened in three. (thejns.org)
  • The ICD-10-CM Neoplasms Index links the below-listed medical terms to the ICD code C71.7. (icd.codes)