Tissue NECROSIS in any area of the brain, including the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Brain infarction is the result of a cascade of events initiated by inadequate blood flow through the brain that is followed by HYPOXIA and HYPOGLYCEMIA in brain tissue. Damage may be temporary, permanent, selective or pan-necrosis.
The formation of an area of NECROSIS in the CEREBRUM caused by an insufficiency of arterial or venous blood flow. Infarcts of the cerebrum are generally classified by hemisphere (i.e., left vs. right), lobe (e.g., frontal lobe infarction), arterial distribution (e.g., INFARCTION, ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY), and etiology (e.g., embolic infarction).
Formation of an infarct, which is NECROSIS in tissue due to local ISCHEMIA resulting from obstruction of BLOOD CIRCULATION, most commonly by a THROMBUS or EMBOLUS.
NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).
Localized reduction of blood flow to brain tissue due to arterial obstruction or systemic hypoperfusion. This frequently occurs in conjunction with brain hypoxia (HYPOXIA, BRAIN). Prolonged ischemia is associated with BRAIN INFARCTION.
Embolism or thrombosis involving blood vessels which supply intracranial structures. Emboli may originate from extracranial or intracranial sources. Thrombosis may occur in arterial or venous structures.
Stroke caused by lacunar infarction or other small vessel diseases of the brain. It features hemiparesis (see PARESIS), hemisensory, or hemisensory motor loss.
A spectrum of pathological conditions of impaired blood flow in the brain. They can involve vessels (ARTERIES or VEINS) in the CEREBRUM, the CEREBELLUM, and the BRAIN STEM. Major categories include INTRACRANIAL ARTERIOVENOUS MALFORMATIONS; BRAIN ISCHEMIA; CEREBRAL HEMORRHAGE; and others.
Brief reversible episodes of focal, nonconvulsive ischemic dysfunction of the brain having a duration of less than 24 hours, and usually less than one hour, caused by transient thrombotic or embolic blood vessel occlusion or stenosis. Events may be classified by arterial distribution, temporal pattern, or etiology (e.g., embolic vs. thrombotic). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp814-6)
Non-specific white matter changes in the BRAIN, often seen after age 65. Changes include loss of AXONS; MYELIN pallor, GLIOSIS, loss of ependymal cells, and enlarged perivascular spaces. Leukoaraiosis is a risk factor for DEMENTIA and CEREBROVASCULAR DISORDERS.
Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.
NECROSIS occurring in the MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY distribution system which brings blood to the entire lateral aspects of each CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE. Clinical signs include impaired cognition; APHASIA; AGRAPHIA; weak and numbness in the face and arms, contralaterally or bilaterally depending on the infarction.
The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.
A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Blocking of a blood vessel in the SKULL by an EMBOLUS which can be a blood clot (THROMBUS) or other undissolved material in the blood stream. Most emboli are of cardiac origin and are associated with HEART DISEASES. Other non-cardiac sources of emboli are usually associated with VASCULAR DISEASES.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Changes in the amounts of various chemicals (neurotransmitters, receptors, enzymes, and other metabolites) specific to the area of the central nervous system contained within the head. These are monitored over time, during sensory stimulation, or under different disease states.
Increased intracellular or extracellular fluid in brain tissue. Cytotoxic brain edema (swelling due to increased intracellular fluid) is indicative of a disturbance in cell metabolism, and is commonly associated with hypoxic or ischemic injuries (see HYPOXIA, BRAIN). An increase in extracellular fluid may be caused by increased brain capillary permeability (vasogenic edema), an osmotic gradient, local blockages in interstitial fluid pathways, or by obstruction of CSF flow (e.g., obstructive HYDROCEPHALUS). (From Childs Nerv Syst 1992 Sep; 8(6):301-6)
Vascular diseases characterized by thickening and hardening of the walls of ARTERIES inside the SKULL. There are three subtypes: (1) atherosclerosis with fatty deposits in the ARTERIAL INTIMA; (2) Monckeberg's sclerosis with calcium deposits in the media and (3) arteriolosclerosis involving the small caliber arteries. Clinical signs include HEADACHE; CONFUSION; transient blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX); speech impairment; and HEMIPARESIS.
The circulation of blood through the BLOOD VESSELS of the BRAIN.
Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.
Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.
Disease having a short and relatively severe course.
The arterial blood vessels supplying the CEREBRUM.
Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Drugs intended to prevent damage to the brain or spinal cord from ischemia, stroke, convulsions, or trauma. Some must be administered before the event, but others may be effective for some time after. They act by a variety of mechanisms, but often directly or indirectly minimize the damage produced by endogenous excitatory amino acids.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Radiography of the vascular system of the brain after injection of a contrast medium.
Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.
Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.
Persistently high systemic arterial BLOOD PRESSURE. Based on multiple readings (BLOOD PRESSURE DETERMINATION), hypertension is currently defined as when SYSTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently greater than 140 mm Hg or when DIASTOLIC PRESSURE is consistently 90 mm Hg or more.
The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Non-invasive method of vascular imaging and determination of internal anatomy without injection of contrast media or radiation exposure. The technique is used especially in CEREBRAL ANGIOGRAPHY as well as for studies of other vascular structures.
A strain of albino rat used widely for experimental purposes because of its calmness and ease of handling. It was developed by the Sprague-Dawley Animal Company.
A diagnostic technique that incorporates the measurement of molecular diffusion (such as water or metabolites) for tissue assessment by MRI. The degree of molecular movement can be measured by changes of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) with time, as reflected by tissue microstructure. Diffusion MRI has been used to study BRAIN ISCHEMIA and tumor response to treatment.
In screening and diagnostic tests, the probability that a person with a positive test is a true positive (i.e., has the disease), is referred to as the predictive value of a positive test; whereas, the predictive value of a negative test is the probability that the person with a negative test does not have the disease. Predictive value is related to the sensitivity and specificity of the test.
Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.
Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.
Narrowing or stricture of any part of the CAROTID ARTERIES, most often due to atherosclerotic plaque formation. Ulcerations may form in atherosclerotic plaques and induce THROMBUS formation. Platelet or cholesterol emboli may arise from stenotic carotid lesions and induce a TRANSIENT ISCHEMIC ATTACK; CEREBROVASCULAR ACCIDENT; or temporary blindness (AMAUROSIS FUGAX). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp 822-3)
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Insufficiency of arterial or venous blood supply to the spleen due to emboli, thrombi, vascular torsion, or pressure that produces a macroscopic area of necrosis. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.
MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION in which the anterior wall of the heart is involved. Anterior wall myocardial infarction is often caused by occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. It can be categorized as anteroseptal or anterolateral wall myocardial infarction.
Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.
Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.
The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
The geometric and structural changes that the HEART VENTRICLES undergo, usually following MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION. It comprises expansion of the infarct and dilatation of the healthy ventricle segments. While most prevalent in the left ventricle, it can also occur in the right ventricle.
Generally, restoration of blood supply to heart tissue which is ischemic due to decrease in normal blood supply. The decrease may result from any source including atherosclerotic obstruction, narrowing of the artery, or surgical clamping. Reperfusion can be induced to treat ischemia. Methods include chemical dissolution of an occluding thrombus, administration of vasodilator drugs, angioplasty, catheterization, and artery bypass graft surgery. However, it is thought that reperfusion can itself further damage the ischemic tissue, causing MYOCARDIAL REPERFUSION INJURY.
Infarctions that occur in the BRAIN STEM which is comprised of the MIDBRAIN; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA. There are several named syndromes characterized by their distinctive clinical manifestations and specific sites of ischemic injury.
The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
The muscle tissue of the HEART. It is composed of striated, involuntary muscle cells (MYOCYTES, CARDIAC) connected to form the contractile pump to generate blood flow.
A transferase that catalyzes formation of PHOSPHOCREATINE from ATP + CREATINE. The reaction stores ATP energy as phosphocreatine. Three cytoplasmic ISOENZYMES have been identified in human tissues: the MM type from SKELETAL MUSCLE, the MB type from myocardial tissue and the BB type from nervous tissue as well as a mitochondrial isoenzyme. Macro-creatine kinase refers to creatine kinase complexed with other serum proteins.
Streptococcal fibrinolysin . An enzyme produced by hemolytic streptococci. It hydrolyzes amide linkages and serves as an activator of plasminogen. It is used in thrombolytic therapy and is used also in mixtures with streptodornase (STREPTODORNASE AND STREPTOKINASE). EC 3.4.-.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.
A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.
A circumscribed collection of purulent exudate in the brain, due to bacterial and other infections. The majority are caused by spread of infected material from a focus of suppuration elsewhere in the body, notably the PARANASAL SINUSES, middle ear (see EAR, MIDDLE); HEART (see also ENDOCARDITIS, BACTERIAL), and LUNG. Penetrating CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA and NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES may also be associated with this condition. Clinical manifestations include HEADACHE; SEIZURES; focal neurologic deficits; and alterations of consciousness. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp712-6)
The hemodynamic and electrophysiological action of the left HEART VENTRICLE. Its measurement is an important aspect of the clinical evaluation of patients with heart disease to determine the effects of the disease on cardiac performance.
Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.
The hospital unit in which patients with acute cardiac disorders receive intensive care.
An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.
The symptom of paroxysmal pain consequent to MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA usually of distinctive character, location and radiation. It is thought to be provoked by a transient stressful situation during which the oxygen requirements of the MYOCARDIUM exceed that supplied by the CORONARY CIRCULATION.
Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.
Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.
The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.
A disorder of cardiac function caused by insufficient blood flow to the muscle tissue of the heart. The decreased blood flow may be due to narrowing of the coronary arteries (CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE), to obstruction by a thrombus (CORONARY THROMBOSIS), or less commonly, to diffuse narrowing of arterioles and other small vessels within the heart. Severe interruption of the blood supply to the myocardial tissue may result in necrosis of cardiac muscle (MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION).
Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.
Precordial pain at rest, which may precede a MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.
The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.
A reduction in brain oxygen supply due to ANOXEMIA (a reduced amount of oxygen being carried in the blood by HEMOGLOBIN), or to a restriction of the blood supply to the brain, or both. Severe hypoxia is referred to as anoxia, and is a relatively common cause of injury to the central nervous system. Prolonged brain anoxia may lead to BRAIN DEATH or a PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE. Histologically, this condition is characterized by neuronal loss which is most prominent in the HIPPOCAMPUS; GLOBUS PALLIDUS; CEREBELLUM; and inferior olives.
Specialized non-fenestrated tightly-joined ENDOTHELIAL CELLS with TIGHT JUNCTIONS that form a transport barrier for certain substances between the cerebral capillaries and the BRAIN tissue.
The veins and arteries of the HEART.
Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.
The restoration of blood supply to the myocardium. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION in which the inferior wall of the heart is involved. It is often caused by occlusion of the right coronary artery.
A condition in which the LEFT VENTRICLE of the heart was functionally impaired. This condition usually leads to HEART FAILURE; MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; and other cardiovascular complications. Diagnosis is made by measuring the diminished ejection fraction and a depressed level of motility of the left ventricular wall.
The circulation of blood through the CORONARY VESSELS of the HEART.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
The amount of BLOOD pumped out of the HEART per beat, not to be confused with cardiac output (volume/time). It is calculated as the difference between the end-diastolic volume and the end-systolic volume.
Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
A family of percutaneous techniques that are used to manage CORONARY OCCLUSION, including standard balloon angioplasty (PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY), the placement of intracoronary STENTS, and atheroablative technologies (e.g., ATHERECTOMY; ENDARTERECTOMY; THROMBECTOMY; PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL LASER ANGIOPLASTY). PTCA was the dominant form of PCI, before the widespread use of stenting.
A strain of albino rat developed at the Wistar Institute that has spread widely at other institutions. This has markedly diluted the original strain.
A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.
Shock resulting from diminution of cardiac output in heart disease.
Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.
A condition characterized by long-standing brain dysfunction or damage, usually of three months duration or longer. Potential etiologies include BRAIN INFARCTION; certain NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ANOXIA, BRAIN; ENCEPHALITIS; certain NEUROTOXICITY SYNDROMES; metabolic disorders (see BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC); and other conditions.
A heterogeneous condition in which the heart is unable to pump out sufficient blood to meet the metabolic need of the body. Heart failure can be caused by structural defects, functional abnormalities (VENTRICULAR DYSFUNCTION), or a sudden overload beyond its capacity. Chronic heart failure is more common than acute heart failure which results from sudden insult to cardiac function, such as MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
A method of computed tomography that uses radionuclides which emit a single photon of a given energy. The camera is rotated 180 or 360 degrees around the patient to capture images at multiple positions along the arc. The computer is then used to reconstruct the transaxial, sagittal, and coronal images from the 3-dimensional distribution of radionuclides in the organ. The advantages of SPECT are that it can be used to observe biochemical and physiological processes as well as size and volume of the organ. The disadvantage is that, unlike positron-emission tomography where the positron-electron annihilation results in the emission of 2 photons at 180 degrees from each other, SPECT requires physical collimation to line up the photons, which results in the loss of many available photons and hence degrades the image.
Pressure, burning, or numbness in the chest.
The lower right and left chambers of the heart. The right ventricle pumps venous BLOOD into the LUNGS and the left ventricle pumps oxygenated blood into the systemic arterial circulation.
A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.
A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.
The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.
Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.
Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.
A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.
The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)
A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.
The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.
Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)
Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.
A PEPTIDE that is secreted by the BRAIN and the HEART ATRIA, stored mainly in cardiac ventricular MYOCARDIUM. It can cause NATRIURESIS; DIURESIS; VASODILATION; and inhibits secretion of RENIN and ALDOSTERONE. It improves heart function. It contains 32 AMINO ACIDS.
An episode of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA that generally lasts longer than a transient anginal episode that ultimately may lead to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
Analyses for a specific enzyme activity, or of the level of a specific enzyme that is used to assess health and disease risk, for early detection of disease or disease prediction, diagnosis, and change in disease status.
Laceration or tearing of cardiac tissues appearing after MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
Procedures in which placement of CARDIAC CATHETERS is performed for therapeutic or diagnostic procedures.
The confinement of a patient in a hospital.

Diffusion-weighted MRI in acute lacunar syndromes. A clinical-radiological correlation study. (1/678)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Clinical-radiological correlation studies in lacunar syndromes have been handicapped by the low sensitivity of CT and standard MRI for acute small-vessel infarction and their difficulty in differentiating between acute and chronic lesions. METHODS: We prospectively studied 43 patients presenting with a classic lacunar syndrome using diffusion-weighted MRI, a technique with a high sensitivity and specificity for acute small-vessel infarction. RESULTS: All patients were scanned within 6 days of stroke onset. An acute infarction was identified in all patients. Pure motor stroke was associated with lesions in the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC), pons, corona radiata, and medial medulla; ataxic hemipareses with lesions in the PLIC, corona radiata, pons, and insular cortex; sensorimotor stroke with lesions in the PLIC and lateral medulla; dysarthria-clumsy hand syndrome with lesions in the PLIC and caudate nucleus; and pure sensory stroke with a lesion in the thalamus. Supratentorial lesions extended into neighboring anatomic structures in 48% of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Lacunar syndromes can be caused by lesions in a variety of locations, and specific locations can cause a variety of lacunar syndromes. Extension of lesions into neighboring structures in patients with lacunar syndromes appears to be more frequent than previously described in studies using CT and standard MRI.  (+info)

Neonatal focal temporal lobe or atrial wall haemorrhagic infarction. (2/678)

AIMS: To describe two variants of infarction within the temporal lobe, associated with local matrix bleeding and mild to moderate intraventricular haemorrhage. METHODS: The files of 10 neonates, extracted from a sonographic study of 560 very low birthweight infants conducted between 1993 and 1997, were retrospectively examined. RESULTS: Seven lesions were located in the middle to posterior area of the temporal lobe, three others faced the atrium. All except two of those with a temporal site were VLBW infants with hyaline membrane disease. Except for one fatal case, intraventricular bleeding was mild to moderate. Computed tomograms or magnetic resonance imaging were used to illustrate the haemorrhagic nature of three lesions. Survivors of this so far undescribed entity who were followed up for more than 18 months did not have a uniform type of cerebral palsy but some scored in the low normal range on the Bayley Mental Development Index. One girl developed temporal lobe epilepsy. CONCLUSIONS: This pattern of injury seems to be one of venous infarction associated with temporal or para-atrial matrix haemorrhage. The temporal site fits the picture of venous infarction within the area drained by the inferior ventricular vein. A less constant lateral atrial vein, either draining into the basal or internal cerebral vein, is probably involved in the para-atrial lesion. Sonography may be the only practical tool currently available for detection in life.  (+info)

Primary somatosensory cortex activation is not altered in patients with ventroposterior thalamic lesions: a PET study. (3/678)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We know remarkably little about the mechanisms underlying cortical activation. Such mechanisms might be better understood by studying the effect of well-localized lesions on the cortical activations in simple paradigms. METHODS: We used H(2)(15)O and positron emission tomography to measure regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) at rest and during hand vibration in 7 patients with unilateral thalamic lesion involving the ventroposterior (VP) somatosensory thalamic relay nuclei. We compared the results with those obtained in 6 patients with thalamic lesions sparing the VP nuclei and 6 healthy controls. RESULTS: The patients with VP lesions had a selective hypoperfusion at rest in the ipsilesional primary sensorimotor cortex (SM1). This hypoperfusion was significantly correlated with the degree of contralateral somatosensory deficit. This abnormality may reflect the deafferentation of SM1 from its somatosensory thalamic input. Despite this deafferentation, the ipsilesional SM1 was normally activated by the vibration of the hypoesthetic hand. CONCLUSIONS: The fact that a lesion of the somatosensory thalamic relay nuclei alters the rCBF at rest in SM1 but not its activation by hand vibration indicates that the mechanism of cortical activation is complex, even in the case of simple sensory stimulation. In addition, a dissociation may occur between obvious neurological deficits and apparently normal activation patterns, which suggests that activation studies should be interpreted cautiously in patients with focal brain lesions.  (+info)

High-resolution EEG in poststroke hemiparesis can identify ipsilateral generators during motor tasks. (4/678)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Multimodal neuroimaging with positron emission tomography (PET) scanning or functional MRI can detect and display functional reorganization of the brain's motor control in poststroke hemiplegia. We undertook a study to determine whether the new modality of 128-electrode high-resolution EEG, coregistered with MRI, could detect changes in cortical motor control in patients after hemiplegic stroke. METHODS: We recorded movement-related cortical potentials with left and right finger movements in 10 patients with varying degrees of recovery after hemiplegic stroke. All patients were male, and time since stroke varied from 6 to 144 months. All patients were right-handed. There was also a comparison group of 20 normal control subjects. RESULTS: Five of 8 patients with left hemiparesis had evidence of ipsilateral motor control of finger movements. There were only 2 cases of right hemiparesis; in addition, 1 patient had a posteriorly displaced motor potential originating behind a large left frontal infarct (rim). CONCLUSIONS: Reorganization of motor control takes place after stroke and may involve the ipsilateral or contralateral cortex, depending on the site and size of the brain lesion and theoretically, the somatotopic organization of the residual pyramidal tracts. Our results are in good agreement with PET and functional MRI studies in the current literature. High-resolution EEG coregistered with MRI is a noninvasive imaging technique capable of displaying cortical motor reorganization.  (+info)

Experimental model of small deep infarcts involving the hypothalamus in rats: changes in body temperature and postural reflex. (5/678)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Intraluminal middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion in rats has been reported to cause hyperthermia assumed to be caused by hypothalamic damage. To clarify the effects of hypothalamic ischemia on body temperature and to obtain a model simulating lacunar infarction, we attempted to produce small infarcts in deep structures (including the hypothalamus). METHODS: A surgical suture was advanced to occlude the origin of the hypothalamic (HTA) and/or anterior choroidal arteries (AChA) without compromise of the anterior or middle cerebral artery origins. After treatment, rectal temperature and postural reflex were examined repeatedly for 3 days under nonanesthetic conditions. The AChA and HTA and their link with small deep infarction were then confirmed by TTC, hematoxylin and eosin, and TUNEL stains and by microsurgical dissection after colored silicone perfusion into the cerebral arteries. RESULTS: Advancement of the suture near to but not occluding the MCA origin (0.5 to 1.9 mm proximal) produced small, deep, nonneocortical strokes in 25 of 36 animals without producing MCA ischemic changes. These infarctions mainly affected the hypothalamus in 13 animals (HTA area: infarct volume 6+/-1 mm(3)) and involved both the internal capsule and hypothalamus in 12 animals (HTA+AChA area infarct volume 48+/-10 mm(3)). Rats with HTA infarction alone exhibited persistent hyperthermia for 72 hours; some also had transient mild postural abnormality. The AChA+HTA infarct group showed a transient elevation of body temperature for 24 hours and definitive postural abnormality. In the remaining 11 animals, the suture was inadvertently advanced across the MCA origin, producing a large infarct that affected both the neocortex (MCA territory) and nonneocortical structures (volume 381+/-30 mm(3), n=11). The MCA infarct group displayed a transient hyperthermia and severe postural abnormality. CONCLUSIONS: When properly positioned, the intraluminal suture method permits selective AChA and/or HTA obstruction without inducing MCA territory ischemia. This model confirms that selective hypothalamic infarction produces significant and sustained temperature regulation abnormalities. The model also may be useful in investigating the pathophysiology of small, deep, end-vessel infarction.  (+info)

The association between the Val34Leu polymorphism in the factor XIII gene and brain infarction. (6/678)

Factor XIII catalyzes the formation of covalent bounds between fibrin monomers, thus stabilizing the fibrin clot and increasing its resistance to fibrinolysis. The frequency of a frequent Val34Leu polymorphism in the FXIII A-subunit gene has been shown to be lower in patients with myocardial infarction or venous thrombosis than in controls, whereas it was higher in patients with hemorrhagic stroke than in controls. Our aim was to study the relation between brain infarction (BI) and the FXIII Val34Leu polymorphism in 456 patients consecutively recruited with a BI confirmed by MRI, and 456 matched controls. The distribution of genotypes was different in cases (63. 2% Val/Val; 30.9% Val/Leu; 5.9% Leu/Leu) compared with controls (49. 8% Val/Val; 42.8% Val/Leu; 7.4% Leu/Leu; P <.001). Carrying the Leu allele was associated with an OR of 0.58 (95% CI = 0.44-0.75). A similar association was observed in cases and controls free of previous cardiovascular or cerebrovascular history (OR = 0.51; 95% CI = 0.36-0.73). No heterogeneity of this association was observed after stratification on the main BI subtypes. Adjustment for traditional vascular risk factors did not modify these findings. In addition, the effect of smoking was modified by the polymorphism (P =.05); the effect of smoking was weaker among Leu carriers than among noncarriers. In conclusion, there was a negative association of the FXIII Val34Leu polymorphism with BI, thus suggesting a protective effect of the Leu allele against thrombotic cerebral artery occlusion. In addition, our results suggest that among Leu carriers, the protective effect of the polymorphism outweighed the effect of smoking. (Blood. 2000;95:586-591)  (+info)

Stroke incidence and case fatality in Shiga, Japan 1989-1993. (7/678)

BACKGROUND: This paper describes incidence rates and case-fatality for sub-types of stroke using data collected in Takashima, Shiga, Japan, from 1989 to 1993 and compares these with similar registers in other parts of Japan. METHODS: Registered patients included all residents of the county who experienced a first-ever stroke. Stroke was defined as sudden onset of neurological symptoms which continued for a minimum of 24 hours or led to death. Almost all such patients are hospitalized in this country. Early case fatality was defined as patients who died within 28 days of stroke onset. Diagnosis of stroke type was based on clinical symptoms as well as computed tomography (CT) scans. RESULTS: Age-adjusted incidence rates for stroke per 100,000 population aged 35 years and older were 268.7 for men and 167.5 for women. The age-specific incidence rate of both cerebral infarction and cerebral haemorrhage increased with advancing age. The occurrence of cerebral infarction in men was twice as high as in women. The 28-day case fatality for all sub-types of stroke was 16.1% in men and 15.8% in women. Case fatality for cerebral infarction, cerebral haemorrhage, and subarachnoid haemorrhage was 10.7%, 22.4% and 28.6% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Takashima County has a moderately high stroke incidence rate and case fatality compared with other similar studies in Japan. The incidence rate of cerebral infarction in men is twice that in women, while other sub-types of stroke showed smaller differences. In order to decrease the incidence of stroke in Japan, greater efforts at primary prevention will be necessary, in particular, it is important to prevent cerebral infarction in men.  (+info)

Knowing no fear. (8/678)

People with brain injuries involving the amygdala are often poor at recognizing facial expressions of fear, but the extent to which this impairment compromises other signals of the emotion of fear has not been clearly established. We investigated N.M., a person with bilateral amygdala damage and a left thalamic lesion, who was impaired at recognizing fear from facial expressions. N.M. showed an equivalent deficit affecting fear recognition from body postures and emotional sounds. His deficit of fear recognition was not linked to evidence of any problem in recognizing anger (a common feature in other reports), but for his everyday experience of emotion N.M. reported reduced anger and fear compared with neurologically normal controls. These findings show a specific deficit compromising the recognition of the emotion of fear from a wide range of social signals, and suggest a possible relationship of this type of impairment with alterations of emotional experience.  (+info)

Hypertension plays a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Treating hypertension has been associated with reduction in the risk of stroke and myocardial infarction. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), ramipril, showed a 32 % in relative risk of reduction in the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) trial. Angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), losartan, also showed a 25 % in relative risk of reduction in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension study (LIFE).. Elderly people, especially hypertensive patients, with silent brain infarction have an increased risk of stroke and cognitive decline. However, no reports are seen on comparison of the effects of ARBs and ACEIs on progression of silent brain infarction and cognitive decline in patients with essential hypertension in the elderly.. The researchers therefore longitudinally evaluate silent brain infarction using magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive decline by Mini-Mental State ...
Hypertension plays a major role in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Treating hypertension has been associated with reduction in the risk of stroke and myocardial infarction. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor (ACEI), ramipril, showed a 32 % in relative risk of reduction in the Heart Outcomes Prevention Evaluation (HOPE) trial. Angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB), losartan, also showed a 25 % in relative risk of reduction in the Losartan Intervention For Endpoint reduction in hypertension study (LIFE).. Elderly people, especially hypertensive patients, with silent brain infarction have an increased risk of stroke and cognitive decline. However, no reports are seen on comparison of the effects of ARBs and ACEIs on progression of silent brain infarction and cognitive decline in patients with essential hypertension in the elderly.. The researchers therefore longitudinally evaluate silent brain infarction using magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive decline by Mini-Mental State ...
Objective: To explore genetic and lifestyle risk factors of MRI-defined brain infarcts (BI) in large population-based cohorts. Methods: We performed meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and examined associations of vascular risk factors and their genetic risk scores (GRS) with MRI-defined BI and a subset of BI, namely, small subcortical BI (SSBI), in 18 population-based cohorts (n = 20,949) from 5 ethnicities (3,726 with BI, 2,021 with SSBI). Top loci were followed up in 7 population-based cohorts (n = 6,862; 1,483 with BI, 630 with SBBI), and we tested associations with related phenotypes including ischemic stroke and pathologically defined BI. Results: The mean prevalence was 17.7% for BI and 10.5% for SSBI, steeply rising after age 65. Two loci showed genome-wide significant association with BI: FBN2, p = 1.77 × 10-8; and LINC00539/ZDHHC20, p = 5.82 × 10-9. Both have been associated with blood pressure (BP)-related phenotypes, but did not replicate in the smaller follow-up
To better understand why this finding is important, you need to know the players. Subclinical cerebrovascular disease is defined as the presence of silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities. Research has shown that individuals with greater white matter hyperintensity volume and evidence of subclinical infarcts are at greater risk of experiencing an ischemic stroke (especially cryptogenic stroke) or dying. (2). An ischemic stroke, also known as a cerebral infarction, is caused by a blockage in a blood vessel in the brain. Ischemic stroke is the most common type of stroke. Of the more than 795,000 people in the United States who have a stroke every year, about 87 percent of them are ischemic stroke.(3) Silent brain infarcts are strokes that are void of clinically overt stroke-like symptoms. However, they are associated with subtle cognitive and physical deficits that often are not noticed. According to a study reported in Stroke, about 20 percent of stroke-free older adults have ...
Baseline covariates, stratified by gender, were compared among participants with and without one or more SBI using the χ2 test or the t test. Spearman rank correlations were computed between CysC and other continuous covariates. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association between each marker of renal function and odds of one or more SBI. We adjusted a priori for factors that might plausibly confound the association between renal function and SBI: Age, race, gender, weight, height, diabetes, systolic and diastolic BP, use of antihypertensive medications, smoking, and aspirin use. Because the relationship between SCr and renal function differs between men and women, it was hypothesized a priori that the relationship between SCr and the odds of SBI may also differ by gender. Hence, a separate analysis was performed for each gender. The multivariate association between CysC and SBI was also estimated among subgroups defined by level of SCr to determine whether this ...
Silent brain infarction is a frequent complication of cardiac surgery and is associated with mood changes and cognitive disruption. Microsphere embolism (ME) rodent models recapitulate both the diffuse ischemic infarcts and the delayed subtle behavioral disturbances characteristic to silent infarction (SI). Previously, we have shown that ME leads to increased hippocampal inflammation, weakening of the blood brain barrier, and the infiltration of peripherally circulating inflammatory cells in rats. Given long-term increases in inflammatory activity following SI, the current study tests the efficacy of anti-inflammatory versus anti-depressant treatment strategies to reduce the inflammatory and behavioral sequelae of injury. Adult rats were administered either chronic meloxicam (preferential COX-2 inhibitor) or fluoxetine (SSRI) beginning five days prior to ME surgeries. After a two week recovery, animals were tested for anxiety-like behaviors in the open field paradigm and the hippocampus was ...
Justin M. Dean, Evelyn McClendon, Kelly Hansen, Aryan Azimi-Zonooz, Kevin Chen, Art Riddle, Xi Gong, Elica Sharifnia, Matthew Hagen, Tahir Ahmad, Lindsey A. Leigland, A. Roger Hohimer, Christopher D. Kroenke, Stephen A. Back ...
Nelson, David J. and Cazin, Catherine S. J. and Nolan, Steven P.; Cossy, Janine, ed. (2016) Grignard reagents and palladium. In: Grignard Reagents and Transition Metal Catalysts. De Gruyter, Berlin, pp. 1-60. ISBN 9783110352726 Full text not available in this repository.Request a copy from the Strathclyde author ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Migraine, white matter hyperintensities, and subclinical brain infarction in a diverse community. T2 - The northern manhattan study. AU - Monteith, Teshamae. AU - Gardener, Hannah. AU - Rundek, Tatjana. AU - Dong, Chuanhui. AU - Yoshita, Mitsuhiro. AU - Elkind, Mitchell S V. AU - DeCarli, Charles. AU - Sacco, Ralph L.. AU - Wright, Clinton B.. PY - 2014. Y1 - 2014. N2 - Background and Purpose: Migraine with aura is a risk factor for ischemic stroke. The goals of this study are to examine the association between migraine and subclinical cerebrovascular damage in a race/ethnically diverse older population-based cohort study. METHODS-: In the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS), we quantified subclinical brain infarctions and white matter hyperintensity volumes among participants with self-reported migraine, confirmed by the International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 criteria. RESULTS-: Of 546 study participants with imaging and migraine data (41% men; mean age at MRI, 71±8 ...
1. Moran C, Phan TG, Srikanth VK. Cerebral small vessel disease: A review of clinical, radiological, and histopathological phenotypes. International Journal of Stroke. 2012;7:36-46 2. Pantoni L. Cerebral small vessel disease: From pathogenesis and clinical characteristics to therapeutic challenges. Lancet Neurol. 2010;9:689-701 3. Xiong YY, Mok V. Age-related white matter changes. Journal of Aging Research. 2011;2011:1-13 4. Xiong Y, Mok V, Wong A, Chen X, Chu WC, Fan Y, Soo Y, Wong KS. The age-related white matter changes scale correlates with cognitive impairment. Eur J Neurol. 2010;17:1451-1456 5. Debette S, Markus HS. The clinical importance of white matter hyperintensities on brain magnetic resonance imaging: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Bmj. 2010;341:c3666 6. de Groot JC, de Leeuw FE, Oudkerk M, Hofman A, Jolles J, Breteler MM. Cerebral white matter lesions and subjective cognitive dysfunction: The rotterdam scan study. Neurology. 2001;56:1539-1545 7. Chowdhury MH, Nagai A, Bokura ...
This study took advantage of the prospective accumulation of data in 493 patients who had clinical and radiologic evidence suggesting that their hemispheric ischemic events were of lacunar type. Caution must be exercised in making comparisons between the current observations and other reports in the literature. First, patients in the nonlacunar control group in this study had overt evidence of large-artery disease and did not consist of the usual normal subjects with whom lacunar syndromes have been compared previously. Second, no patients were accepted into the current study who failed to fulfill the clinical criteria for lacunar syndromes. Unlike other reports appearing in the literature, patients with radiologic findings alone were not considered to have lacunar strokes. Lastly, the definition of a lacunar stroke is an evolving process. There is uncertainty with regard to considering lacunar strokes that involve clinically one body area alone. In the current study these patients were ...
Study Highlights: Older migraine sufferers may be more likely to have silent brain injury. Ischemic silent brain infarctions are symptomless brain injuries and are a risk factor for future strokes. Researchers suggest people who have both migraines and vascular risk factors pay close attention to lifestyle factors that can reduce their chance of stroke.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Prenatal cerebral ischemia disrupts MRI-defined cortical microstructure through disturbances in neuronal arborization. AU - Dean, Justin M.. AU - McClendon, Evelyn. AU - Hansen, Kelly. AU - Azimi-Zonooz, Aryan. AU - Chen, Kevin. AU - Riddle, Art. AU - Gong, Xi. AU - Sharifnia, Elica. AU - Hagen, Matthew. AU - Ahmad, Tahir. AU - Leigland, Lindsey A.. AU - Hohimer, A. Roger. AU - Kroenke, Christopher D.. AU - Back, Stephen A.. PY - 2013/1/16. Y1 - 2013/1/16. N2 - Children who survive preterm birth exhibit persistent unexplained disturbances in cerebral cortical growth with associated cognitive and learning disabilities. The mechanisms underlying these deficits remain elusive. We used ex vivo diffusion magnetic resonance imaging to demonstrate in a preterm large-animal model that cerebral ischemia impairs cortical growth and the normal maturational decline in cortical fractional anisotropy (FA). Analysis of pyramidal neurons revealed that cortical deficits were associated with ...
Retinal, Brain, Brain Imaging, Confidence Interval, Fractal, Gender, Lacunar Infarct, Lacunar Stroke, Odds Ratio, Patients, Risk, Risk Factors, Stroke
Splenic infarcts are an uncommon but well established cause of abdominal pain. In younger patients, haematological causes tend to be more common and in older patients thrombo-embolism is the predominant cause.
Obkective: Fibrinogen levels and fibrinogen clot structure have been implicated in pathogenesis of vascular disease. We examined fibrinogen levels and variation in fibrinogen genes (fibrinogen γ (FGG), α (FGA) and β (FGB)), associated with fibrin clot structure and fibrinogen levels, in relation to cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). Methods and Results This study was performed in the Rotterdam Scan Study, a population-based study among 1077 elderly with cerebral magnetic resonance imaging. Plasma fibrinogen levels and haplotypes were determined. We examined the association of fibrinogen levels and haplotypes with silent brain infarcts and white matter lesions by means of logistic regression models. We constructed seven haplotypes (frequency ,0.01) that describe the total common variation in the FGG and FGA genes. Haplotype 2 (G-A-T-A-G-T-G) was associated with presence of silent brain infarcts when compared to the most frequent haplotype (G-G-T-G-G-T-A) (odds ratio (OR) 1.41, 95% CI ...
Lacunar stroke or lacunar infarct (LACI) is the most common type of stroke, and results from the occlusion of small penetrating arteries that provide blood to the brains deep structures. Patients who present with symptoms of a lacunar stroke, but who have not yet had diagnostic imaging performed, may be described as suffering from lacunar stroke syndrome (LACS). Much of the current knowledge of lacunar strokes comes from C. Miller Fishers cadaver dissections of post-mortem stroke patients. He observed lacunae (empty spaces) in the deep brain structures after occlusion of 200-800 μm penetrating arteries and connected them with five classic syndromes. These syndromes are still noted today, though lacunar infarcts are diagnosed based on clinical judgment and radiologic imaging. Each of the 5 classical lacunar syndromes has a relatively distinct symptom complex. Symptoms may occur suddenly, progressively, or in a fluctuating (e.g., the capsular warning syndrome) manner. Occasionally, cortical ...
Background: Cerebral small vessel disease is related to widespread endothelial dysfunction, and suspected hypoperfusion at the level of the microcirculation. Lacunar infarcts are a major manifestation of small vessel disease, and result in significant long-term neurological morbidity and mortality. Congenital hypoplastic variants of the vessels of the Circle of Willis may result in impairment of collateral channels at the time of ischemia.. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that lateralization of first-ever lacunar infarcts is related to relative hypoperfusion of the ipsilateral hemisphere due to asymmetric hypoplasia of the vessels of the Circle of Willis and inadequate side-to-side collateral circulation.. Methods: We analyzed 40 consecutive patients that presented to a stroke center with a first-ever supratentorial lacunar infarct. All patients were able to undergo intracranial vascular imaging. Patients with significant large-vessel disease (even if asymptomatic) were excluded. A neuroradiologist, ...
We found in a population-based sample of nondemented elderly people that higher CRP levels were associated with presence and progression of periventricular and subcortical white matter lesions. These associations were independent of cardiovascular risk factors or carotid atherosclerosis. People with higher CRP levels tended to have more prevalent and incident lacunar infarcts than those with lower CRP levels; however, these associations were nonsignificant.. Some methodological issues need to be discussed. First, nonparticipation both at baseline and at follow-up was associated with older age.10 Participants with repeated MRI scans had lower CRP levels, fewer white matter lesions, and fewer silent brain infarcts at baseline than those without follow-up scans. This selective attrition has most likely reduced the power to find an association with risk of incident lacunar infarcts.. The cross-sectional association between CRP levels and white matter lesions, however, was not different for all ...
Braun H, Schreiber S. Microbleeds in cerebral small vessel disease. Lancet Neurol. 2013 Aug;12(8):735-6.. Mencl S, Garz C, Niklass S, Braun H, Göb E, Homola G, Heinze HJ, Reymann KG, Kleinschnitz C, Schreiber S. Early microvascular dysfunction in cerebral small vessel disease is not detectable on 3.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging: a longitudinal study in spontaneously hypertensive stroke-prone rats. Exp Transl Stroke Med. 2013 Jun 25;5:8.. Bueche CZ, Garz C, Kropf S, Bittner D, Li W, Goertler M, Heinze HJ, Reymann K, Braun H, Schreiber S. NAC changes the course of cerebral small vessel disease in SHRSP and reveals new insights for the meaning of stases - a randomized controlled study. Exp Transl Stroke Med. 2013 Apr 15;5:5. Schreiber S, Bueche CZ, Garz C, Braun H. Blood brain barrier breakdown as the starting point of cerebral small vessel disease? - New insights from a rat model. Exp Transl Stroke Med. 2013 Mar 14;5(1):4. Braun H, Bueche CZ, Garz C, Oldag A, Heinze HJ, Goertler M, Reymann ...
Lacunar strokes and diabetes are risk factors for cognitive dysfunction. Elucidating modifiable risk factors for cognitive dysfunction has large public health implications. One factor may be glycemic status, as measured by glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C). The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between A1C and cognitive function in lacunar stroke patients with diabetes.The effect of baseline and follow-up A1C on the baseline and the change in Cognitive Assessment Screening Instrument (CASI) score over time among participants with a median of 2 cognitive assessments (range 1-5) was examined in of 942 individuals with diabetes and a lacunar stroke who participated in the Secondary Prevention of Small Subcortical Strokes (SPS3) trial (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00059306).Every 1 % higher baseline A1C was associated with a 0.06 lower standardized CASI z-score (95% CI -0.101, -0.018). Higher baseline A1C values were associated with lower CASI z-score over time (p for interaction=0.037). ...
I am a Stroke Association Post-Doctoral Fellow and part time research radiographer at Edinburgh Imaging. My research interests include chronic systemic inflammatory arthropathies and their effects on the brain, and cerebral small vessel disease. My post doc focuses on the morphological changes in retinal vessels and retinal nerve fibre layers and relationships to cerebral small vessel disease.. My PhD investigated the role of inflammation in cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), work conducted under supervision of Professors Joanna Wardlaw (stroke; neuroimaging) and Stuart Ralston (rheumatology). My PhD was cross-disciplinary as we were interested in inflammatory arthropathies and effects on the brain. I found, for the first time, an increased burden of enlarged perivascular spaces (PVS) as a marker of inflammation in a group of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, a chronic inflammatory disease, versus healthy controls and stroke patients with overt SVD, suggesting that inflammation is ...
We also identified a tendency for patients with lacunar strokes not to get screened for AF even though the detection rate of AF is similar between lacunar and non-lacunar strokes. The relationship of lacunar strokes with AF is the subject of an ongoing debate in literature. However, the main focus of stroke management should be the identification of modifiable risk factors even when the mechanism of a particular stroke uncertain. As the most recent guidelines (ESC 2016) do not differentiate between ischaemic stroke subtypes when considering anticoagulation in patients with AF, then perhaps an equal effort should be made to identify AF in patients with lacunar and non-lacunar strokes ...
In this study, we considered that patients with multiple recent subcortical (lacunar) infarcts seen on DWI would be likely to have a proximal embolic source, but were able to find a definite embolic source in only one patient. Thus, embolic mechanisms would not be a likely explanation for the occurrence of multiple acute lacunar infarcts in most of our patients. This is consistent with previous clinical and epidemiological studies (summarised by Mead et al7) which found that, while some lacunar strokes might be attributed to cardiac or artery-to-artery emboli, the majority (,80%) occurred in the absence of a definite embolic source.5,7,12 Few of our patients gave any history of previous stroke or TIA, and it was generally a long time before the current presentation, indicating that most of the acute as well as the old small subcortical lesions were asymptomatic.. Four of the 10 patients were not classified clinically as having a lacunar syndrome (two posterior circulation and two partial ...
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Stroke and dementia are common and debilitating health issues worldwide. Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) underlies a large proportion of these cases. However, the cause of SVD is unknown. Research into the causes and pathophysiological mechanisms of SVD is hampered by the fact that small vessels themselves are difficult to visualise in people. The wide range of clinical
Here, we demonstrated that endothelial dysfunction is an early precipitant of disease development in a rat model of SVD and a sample of humans with sporadic SVD. We identified a deletion in Atp11b and loss of ATP11B protein that cause endothelial dysfunction, with abnormalities of the BBB TJs, increased EC proliferation, and reduction in eNOS and NO. This dysfunction led to secretion of factors, including HSP90α, which blocked the maturation of OPCs into myelinating oligodendrocytes, consistent with the impairment of myelination and inherent vulnerability of white matter to damage seen in adult humans with SVD (42). We also demonstrated therapeutic reversal of endothelial dysfunction and associated reduction in white matter vulnerability. The early reduction of the BBB TJ markers but lack of tracer leakage (along with the brain slice culture experiments) showed that leakage of substances through the BBB is not important for initial SVD pathology in our model. However, it is highly likely that ...
About small vessel disease: Small vessel disease (acronym: SVD), a group of vascular disorders resulting from the pathological impairment of the small blood vessels of the brain, is strongly linked to causing some forms of dementia and stroke. These diseases have a huge social and economic impact. SVD is a global problem, but a treatment is yet to be discovered.
Question - Have CVA infarct, left MCA distribution. CT scan shows polysinusitis, lacunar infarct. What does it mean?. Ask a Doctor about Posterior cerebral artery, Ask a Cardiologist
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BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The ABCD system was developed to predict early stroke risk after transient ischemic attack. Incorporation of brain imaging findings has been suggested, but reports have used inconsistent methods and been underpowered. We therefore performed an international, multicenter
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: NINDS (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke)-SiGN (Stroke Genetics Network) is an international consortium of ischemic stroke studies that aims to generate high-quality phenotype data to identify the genetic basis of pathogenic stroke subtypes. This analysis characterizes the etiopathogenetic basis of ischemic stroke and reliability of stroke classification in the consortium. METHODS: Fifty-two trained and certified adjudicators determined both phenotypic (abnormal test findings categorized in major pathogenic groups without weighting toward the most likely cause) and causative ischemic stroke subtypes in 16 954 subjects with imaging-confirmed ischemic stroke from 12 US studies and 11 studies from 8 European countries using the web-based Causative Classification of Stroke System. Classification reliability was assessed with blinded readjudication of 1509 randomly selected cases. RESULTS: The distribution of pathogenic categories varied by study, age, ...
Hi have any of you been told you have Small Vessel Disease or MS after an MRI my latest MRI shows I may have SVD or MS I dont think it is MS to be honest, but lately my dizziness and memory and...
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I have been experiencing various progressive symptoms suggesting a brainstem lesion over the last six months. MRI study of the head was done a few days ago and were reported by the radiologist to show...
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It highlights the key findings that can be seen on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) scans, including those related to normal brain aging and common diseases such as brain infarcts, fractures of the skull as well as fractures and tumors of the vertebral column. It offers insights into brain MRI and CT scans, enabling readers to interpret the key findings ...
缺乏維生素B12 和 小間隙腦中風後之疲倦和憂鬱的關聯 (以上標題清楚。以下請自檢查,各專有名次翻譯、順序)小間隙腦中風 (Lacunar stroke) 之定義:急性的中風。症狀 ... ...
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Title:Basal Ganglia Enlarged Perivascular Spaces are Linked to Cognitive Function in Patients with Cerebral Small Vessel Disease. VOLUME: 11 ISSUE: 2. Author(s):Marjolein Huijts, Annelien Duits, Julie Staals, Abraham A Kroon, Peter W de Leeuw and Robert J van Oostenbrugge. Affiliation:Department of Neurology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, PO Box 5800, 6202 AZ Maastricht , The Netherlands.. Keywords:Cerebral small vessel disease, cognition, enlarged perivascular spaces, hypertension, lacunar stroke, white matter lesions.. Abstract:Enlarged perivascular spaces (EPVS) are a feature of cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD) and have been related to cSVD severity. A higher number of EPVS were related to decreased cognition in healthy elderly, but this has never been investigated in patients at high risk of cSVD. We included 189 patients with a high risk of cSVD (hypertensive patients and lacunar stroke patients). Patients underwent brain MRI and extensive neuropsychological assessment. EPVS ...
© Cambridge University Press 2014. Introduction: Cerebral ischemia is thought to be an important disease mechanism in cerebral small vessel disease (SVD). It has been hypothesized that acute ischemia in the territory of the perforating artery results in lacunar stroke, while chronic ischemia occurring in the distal territories of the perforating arteries results in changes to cerebral white-matter, known as leukoaraiosis. The spatial pattern of leukoaraiosis, with changes first occurring in the brain regions furthest from the origin of the perforating arteries, would be consistent with disease occurring due to hypoperfusion. This has led to the suggestion that cerebral blood flow (CBF) is reduced in SVD, and many studies have been performed to investigate this issue. In addition, cerebral arteriopathy underlying SVD may also impair the ability of small cerebral vessels to vasodilate, leading to problems maintaining perfusion in response to drops in blood pressure and perfusion pressure. Impairments of
TY - JOUR. T1 - Juvenile-onset multiple brain infarcts localized in the posterior circulation. T2 - A case report. AU - Maruyama, Kenji. AU - Oya, Yasushi. AU - Shigeto, Hiroshi. AU - Ogawa, Masafumi. AU - Kawai, Mitsuru. PY - 2002/3/14. Y1 - 2002/3/14. N2 - We report a 37-year-old male patient with multiple brain infarcts due to arterial lesions localized in the posterior circulation, who developed a paramedian pontine infarct on the left side. He had been treated as schizophrenia for 20 years. A cranial CT performed one year before showed old small infarcts in the territories of the bilateral thalamo-perforating and left thalamo-geniculate arteries and the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery. The vertebral and basilar arteries were small in diameter on MRI and MR angiography (MRA). Cerebral angiography revealed a narrow smooth basilar artery. In addition, the P 2 segments of the bilateral posterior cerebral arteries were markedly narrow with irregular walls. Carotid arteriograms were ...
Cerebral small vessel disease (CSVD) is a common group of neurological conditions that confer a significant burden of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In most cases, CSVD is only recognized in its advanced stages once its symptomatic sequelae develop. However, its significance in asymptomatic healthy populations remains poorly defined. In population-based studies of presumed healthy elderly individuals, CSVD neuroimaging markers including white matter hyperintensities, lacunes, cerebral microbleeds, enlarged perivascular spaces, cortical superficial siderosis, and cerebral microinfarcts are frequently detected. While the presence of these imaging markers may reflect unique mechanisms at play, there are likely shared pathways underlying CSVD. Herein, we aim to assess the etiology and significance of these individual biomarkers by focusing in asymptomatic populations at an epidemiological level. By primarily examining population-based studies, we explore the risk factors that are involved in the ...
Scans of sufficient quality for data analysis were available in 29 cases and 35 controls. NAA was significantly reduced in patients compared with controls (lower by 7.27%, P = 0.004). However, when lesion load within each individual voxel (mean 22% in SVD vs 5% in controls, P , 0.001) was added as a covariate, these differences were no longer significant, suggesting that the metabolite differences arose primarily from differences in lesioned tissue. In patients with SVD, there was no correlation between cognitive scores and any brain metabolite. No lactate, an indicator of anaerobic metabolism, was detected. ...
Neuroscience research articles are provided.. What is neuroscience? Neuroscience is the scientific study of nervous systems. Neuroscience can involve research from many branches of science including those involving neurology, brain science, neurobiology, psychology, computer science, artificial intelligence, statistics, prosthetics, neuroimaging, engineering, medicine, physics, mathematics, pharmacology, electrophysiology, biology, robotics and technology. ...
Goyal, M., Almekhlafi, M. A., Cognard, C., McTaggart, R., Blackham, K., Biondi, A., van der Lugt, A., Majoie, C. B. L. M., van Zwam, W. H., van der Worp, H. B. & Hill, M. D., Jan 2019, In: Neuroradiology. 61, 1, p. 3-8 6 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Editorial › Academic › peer-review ...
Results A total of 23 ACMIs were found in 16 of the 783 patients (2.0%). Patients with ACMIs did not differ in vascular risk or cognitive profile, but were more often diagnosed with vascular dementia (odds ratio [OR] 5.1; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4-18.9, p = 0.014). ACMI presence was associated with lower levels of β-amyloid (p , 0.004) and with vascular imaging markers (lacunar infarcts: OR 3.5, CI 1.3-9.6, p = 0.015; nonlacunar infarcts: OR 4.1, CI 1.4-12.5, p = 0.012; severe white matter hyperintensities: OR 4.8, CI 1.7-13.8, p = 0.004; microbleeds: OR 18.9, CI 2.5-144.0, p = 0.0001). After a median follow-up of 2.1 years, the risk of poor clinical outcome (composite of marked cognitive decline, major vascular event, death, and institutionalization) was increased among patients with ACMIs (hazard ratio 3.0; 1.4-6.0, p = 0.005). ...
Age 65-74; Age >=75 years; Hypertension; Diabetes mellitus; Smoker; Atrial fibrillation; Cardiac diseases; Chronic kidney disease; Non-lacunar stroke; Previous ischemic ...
Common cerebral small vessel disease (cSVD) abnormalities are a common neuroradiological finding, especially in the elderly. They are associated with a wide cli
4403] Dey, A. K., Stamenova V., Bacopulos A., Jeyakumar N., Turner G. R., Black S. E., et al. (2019). Cognitive heterogeneity among community-dwelling older adults with cerebral small vessel disease. Neurobiology of Aging. 77, 183 - 193. ...
To the Editor: Descriptions of the natural history of brain infarction and evaluation of therapeutic interventions rely on definitions of the degree of handicap and neurologic deficit of the patients. The Barthel index is the best known of the functional evaluation systems since it is the easiest to perform. The index describes basically the degree of independence from nursing care or other medical help. The maximum score of 100 reflects a high degree of independence, but not freedom from symptoms, since handicaps related to speech impediments are not included in the evaluation. At the lower end of the scale, improvement in the patients condition is not reflected in a higher score. Therefore, the Barthel index is not suitable for an evaluation of subtle therapeutic effects despite a close correlation with the neurologic score up to the level of relative autonomy at a score of approximately 60 points.
Hey all, please keep in your thoughts my father. Last evening my dad has some sort of a brain infarction or anniorism (not sure how to spell it). We thought it was a stroke. I had to call 911 and he had to be taken to the hospital..he was totally incoherent and confused.. He is doing much better today and is acting like himself but they found some sort of oddity in his brain and are still trying to figure out what it is..understandably. He has to have a biopsy among a lot of other things...it is really scary but Im SOO grateful that he was at home when it happened and not somewhere on the road. Since he had a temporary form of amnesia, I hate to think of what couldve happened......... I will keep in touch on how he is doing but in the meantime.......please keep him in your thoughts and prayers. HUGS. ...
Neonatal Hypoxic and Ischemic Brain Injury (HIE): Read more about Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Complications, Causes and Prognosis.
Cerebral infarction causes irreversible damage to the brain. In one study of patients with carotid artery dissection, 60% had ... which can travel through the arteries to the brain and block the blood supply to the brain, resulting in an ischaemic stroke, ... Blood clots, or emboli, originating from the dissection are thought to be the cause of infarction in the majority of cases of ... Carotid artery dissection is a separation of the layers of the artery wall supplying oxygen-bearing blood to the head and brain ...
"Ancrod for the treatment of acute ischemic brain infarction. The Ancrod Stroke Study Investigators". Stroke. 25 (9): 1755-9. ...
When injecting spheres into the cerebral circulation, their size determines the pattern of brain infarction: Macrospheres (300- ... resulting in a cessation of blood flow and subsequent brain infarction in its area of supply. If the suture is removed after a ... "Induction of reproducible brain infarction by photochemically initiated thrombosis". Ann Neurol. 17 (5): 497-504. doi:10.1002/ ... "Induction of reproducible brain infarction by photochemically initiated thrombosis". Annals of Neurology. 17 (5): 497-504. doi: ...
Watson BD, Dietrich WD, Busto R, Wachtel MS, Ginsberg MD (1985). "Induction of reproducible brain infarction by photochemically ... A thrombus is formed in the illuminated blood vessels, causing a stroke in the dependent brain tissue. Rose bengal has been ...
Burke CJ, Tannenberg AE (June 1995). "Prenatal brain damage and placental infarction--an autopsy study". Developmental Medicine ... Chipkevitch E (1994). "Brain tumors and anorexia nervosa syndrome". Brain & Development. 16 (3): 175-9, discussion 180-2. doi: ... Tumors: tumors in various regions of the brain have been implicated in the development of abnormal eating patterns. Brain ... "Individual differences in personality traits reflect structural variance in specific brain regions". Brain Research Bulletin. ...
The cause of death was listed as brain stem infarction. Many of the MotoGP riders wore black armbands or placed small #74's on ...
1997) Brain infarction and the clinical expression of Alzheimer disease. The Nun Study. JAMA 277: 813-7 Snowdon DA, Kemper SJ, ... especially predictive factors in early life and the role of brain infarction. He is the director of the Nun Study, a ... Their focus was to understand how changes in the brain could be linked to Alzheimer's disease and other neurological disorders ... and post-mortem examination of their brains. The study moved with Snowdon to the University of Kentucky. Many of the procedures ...
Any further elevations will lead to brain infarction and brain death.[citation needed] In infants and small children, the ... shift brain structures, contribute to hydrocephalus, cause brain herniation, and restrict blood supply to the brain. It is a ... This results in widespread reduction in cerebral flow and perfusion, eventually leading to ischemia and brain infarction. ... This type of drain is known as an external ventricular drain (EVD). This is rarely required outside brain injury and brain ...
Hypertension is an important risk factor for brain infarction and hemorrhage. Approximately 85% of strokes are due to ... traumatic or chemical injury to the brain, and uremic encephalopathy. Hypertensive retinopathy is a condition characterized by ... infarction and the remainder are due to hemorrhage, either intracerebral hemorrhage or subarachnoid hemorrhage. The incidence ...
... reduce brain infarction and stroke in a rodent model. 10-Epi-PD1 (ent-AT-NPD1: i.e. 10S,17S-Dihydroxy-4Z,7Z,11E,13E,15Z,19Z- ... DHA, the main PD1 precursor, is mostly found in tissues such as the retinal synapses, photoreceptors, the lungs and the brain, ...
In 2011, Kanno died due to cerebral infarction and brain hemorrhage. According to Anime News Network, YU-NO is "considered one ...
Mistri died on 27 January 2011 as a result a brain infarction. Her funeral was held on 29 January in Karachi, with over 2,000 ...
Major depression is a risk factor and also a consequence of silent brain infarction (SBI). Persons who present with symptoms of ... June 1997). "Silent brain infarction on magnetic resonance imaging and neurological abnormalities in community-dwelling older ... 2001). "Elevated plasma homocysteine levels and risk of silent brain infarction in elderly people". Stroke: A Journal of ... 2009). "Acrolein, IL-6 and CRP as markers of silent brain infarction". Atherosclerosis. 203 (2): 557-62. doi:10.1016/j. ...
... is sometimes seen in individuals with brain infarctions. The damaged side of the brain conveys size information that ... by changes in the brain (such as from traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, migraines, prescription drugs, and illicit drugs), and ... ISBN 978-0-7817-4811-7. Headache and the Eye Archived 2008-12-07 at the Wayback Machine Austin JH (2006). Zen-brain reflections ... Epileptiform abnormalities including spikes and sharp waves in the medial temporal lobe of the brain can diagnose this ...
He died of a brain stem infarction after spending two weeks in a coma. Dome Karasu driver Tojiro Ukiya died in a test run on ...
The causes of Parinaud syndrome include brain tumors (pinealomas), multiple sclerosis and brainstem infarction. Due to the lack ...
Duvernoy, Henri M. (2013). Human Brain Stem Vessels: Including the Pineal Gland and Information on Brain Stem Infarction. ... Tatu, Laurent; Moulin, Thierry; Bogousslavsky, Julien; Duvernoy, Henri (1996-11-01). "Arterial territories of human brain ...
Neuroimaging evidence for cortical or subcortical infarction, subdural hematoma, or other focal brain pathology. Elevated ... Diagnosing alcohol-related dementia can be difficult due to the wide range of symptoms and a lack of specific brain pathology. ... Alcohol can damage the brain directly as a neurotoxin, or it can damage it indirectly by causing malnutrition, primarily a loss ... Other types of alcohol-related dementia such as Korsakoff's Syndrome cause the destruction of certain areas of the brain, where ...
Hemorrhagic stroke - Infarction of the brain due to internal bleeding from Charcot-Bouchard aneurysms. Hypertensive ... Myocardial infarction (a.k.a. heart attack) - A myocardial infarction is the death of a part of the heart which is typically ... The top three causes of ACS are ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI, 30%), non ST elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI ... CAD can lead to ischemia (angina pectoris) or infarction (myocardial infarction). Treatment of CAD includes angioplasty, ...
"Heart and vessel pathology underlying brain infarction in 142 stroke patients". Department of Pathology, National ... "Calgary Stroke Program (E.E.S.), Hotchkiss Brain Institute, University of Calgary, Canada; Duke Clinical Research Institute (L. ... Cryptogenic cerebral infarction (CCI)[sunting , sunting sumber]. CCI paling banyak ditemukan dalam penderita patent foramen ... "Cryptogenic cerebral infarction: from classification to concept". SourceCHU de la Cavale Blanche, Service de neurologie; Timsit ...
April 2001). "Effects of nitric oxide on reactive oxygen species production and infarction size after brain reperfusion injury ...
... development of brain infarction resulting from complications due to hypertensive crisis in patients suffering from hypertension ... and chronic leukemia is comparable to the prognosis for the patient ailing from myocardial infarction and cerebral infarction. ... transmural myocardial infarction and massive thromboembolism of pulmonary artery, caused by phlebemphraxis of lower limbs). For ... ranging from a negligible change for acute myocardial infarction with major complication or comorbidity to nearly nine times ...
One exception to coagulative necrosis is the brain, which undergoes liquefactive necrosis in response to infarction. ... Hemorrhagic infarct Infarction Robbins Basic Pathology v t e. ... and results in a progressively more pale area of infarction ...
... reveals Dibny was killed by an infarction in her brain. A microscopic scan of Dibny's brain reveals tiny footprints as a clue ... to the infarction's cause. Doctor Mid-Nite and Mister Terrific realize, as does Batman in the course of his own investigation, ...
March 2007). "Functional SNP in an Sp1-binding site of AGTRL1 gene is associated with susceptibility to brain infarction". ... Kubo M (November 2008). "[Genetic risk factors of ischemic stroke identified by a genome-wide association study]". Brain and ...
In the brain, infarction results in stroke, and in the spinal cord it may result in paralysis. a person's age - there are some ... including arteries to the brain, spinal cord and heart). In the arterial system, bubbles (arterial gas embolism) are far more ... although the symptoms from arterial gas embolism are generally more severe because they often arise from an infarction ( ... are indicative of probable brain involvement and require urgent medical attention. Paraesthesias or weakness involving a ...
The patient was marked with the behavior, and brain imaging noticed the infarctions in the thalamus. In conjunction with the ... Brain 106: 237-255. Shallice, T., Burgess, P. W., Schon, F., and Baxter, D. M. (1989). The origins of utilization behaviour. ... Brain 112: 1587-1598. Eslinger, P. J., Warner, G. C., Grattan, L. M., and Easton, J. D. (1991). "Frontal lobe" utilization ... A coronal section of the brain confirmed an infarct, tissue death due to lack of oxygen, in the left superior frontal gyrus ...
An injectable form of Tβ4 has been developed for internal indications such as myocardial infarction, stroke and brain trauma. ... RegeneRx Biopharmaceuticals is developing an injectable form of Tβ4 for internal indications such as myocardial infarction, ... stroke, multiple sclerosis, brain trauma, and peripheral neuropathy. Dr. Goldstein's research has helped define the role of ... the neuroendocrine system and the brain. Dr. Goldstein is the author of more than 450 scientific articles in professional ...
... myocardial infarction, and brain stroke (see 20-Hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid). Among the CYP450 superfamily, members of the ... and brain-specific cytochrome P450, catalyzes omega- and (omega-1)-hydroxylation of fatty acids". Journal of Biological ...
... s have been suggested to play a role in the treatment of cytotoxic edema and brain infarctions. It was found ... P1 and P2Y receptors are known to be widely distributed in the brain, heart, kidneys, and adipose tissue. Xanthines (e.g. ... By enhancing the source of ATP provided by mitochondria, there could be a similar 'protective' effect for brain injuries in ... 2010). "Purinergic Receptor Stimulation Reduces Cytotoxic Edema and Brain Infarcts in Mouse Induced by Photothrombosis by ...
Cushing Dead; Brain Surgeon, 70. A Pioneer Who Won Fame as Founder of New School of Neuro-Surgery. Discovered Malady Affecting ... was that the basophil adenoma Minnie might have harbored underwent partial infarction, leading to symptom regression.[3] The ...
... and myocardial infarction. Haematological malignancy induction was comparable to that observed in the general population, with ...
mainly in liver, kidneys, brain and muscles. Elimination half-life. ca. 7 days (in hyperthyroidism 3-4 days, in hypothyroidism ... people with acute myocardial infarction, and people with thyrotoxicosis of any etiology.[15] Levothyroxine is also ...
The impact of late career job loss on myocardial infarction and stroke: A 10 year follow up using the health and retirement ... found that reactions to psychological stressors include increased activity in the brain axes which play an important role in ... Is the effect of job strain on myocardial infarction risk due to interaction between high psychological demands and low ...
increased risk of myocardial infarction (heart attack)[7]:10[26]. *psychosis in extreme cases in the genetically predisposed[2] ... in collaboration with the International Brain Research Organization (IBRO) and its local affiliates. ...
Infarction means death of a tissue or organ. So a myocardial infarction or heart attack is when blood flow to part of the heart ... If the blocked artery brought blood to the brain, people can have a stroke. If the blocked artery is to the kidneys, it can ... If the organ or tissue dies, doctors call this an infarction. If it is hurt from low blood flow, but not enough to die, it is ... For all of these types of ischemia or infarction, doctors can try to reopen the blocked artery. This may be done by surgery or ...
An accumulation of these polyglutamine-TBP cells will occur, as shown by protein aggregates in brain sections of patients, ... "Polymorphisms in the 5' regulatory region of the tissue factor gene and the risk of myocardial infarction and venous ...
... spinal cord and brain. It plays a central role in many biochemical processes, such as the building of cell membranes and the ... This disease process leads to myocardial infarction (heart attack), stroke and peripheral vascular disease. Since higher blood ...
... experimentally after a stroke to allow blood flow back to the affected part of the brain; and in the event of a massive ... DIC and efficacy of treatment in acute myocardial infarction. Alternatively, a more rapid detection of fibrinolytic activity, ...
The brain requires approximately 3.3 ml of oxygen per 100 g of brain tissue per minute. Initially the body responds to lowered ... Cerebral infarction - A "stroke", caused by complete oxygen deprivation due to an interference in cerebral blood flow which ... Cerebral edema, brain hemorrhages and hydrocephalus exert pressure on brain tissue and impede their absorption of oxygen. ... Cerebral hypoxia is a form of hypoxia (reduced supply of oxygen), specifically involving the brain; when the brain is ...
A CT scan is the best test to look for bleeding in or around your brain. In some hospitals, a perfusion CT scan may be done to ... Other causes of intraparenchymal hemorrhage include hemorrhagic transformation of infarction which is usually in a classic ... In some hospitals, a perfusion MRI scan may be done to see where the blood is flowing and not flowing in your brain. Angiogram ... Substantial displacement of brain parenchyma may cause elevation of intracranial pressure (ICP) and potentially fatal ...
Brain function[edit]. A 2017 systematic review found lower vitamin C concentrations in people with cognitive impairment, ... A 2013 meta-analysis found no evidence that vitamin C supplementation reduces the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, ...
CPR can prolong the survival of the brain in the lack of a normal pulse, but defibrillation is the intervention which is most ... Temporay pacing may be done for very slow heartbeats, or bradycardia, from drug overdose or myocardial infarction. A pacemaker ... or depression of electrical impulses themselves from the brain. ...
Brain ischemia. *Ischaemic heart disease. *large intestine: Ischemic colitis. *small intestine: Mesenteric ischemia ...
The brain shows manifestations of increased pressure within the cranium, such as headache, nausea, vomiting, and/or ... The most common clinical presentations of hypertensive emergencies are cerebral infarction (24.5%), pulmonary edema (22.5%), ... In the brain, hypertensive encephalopathy - characterized by hypertension, altered mental status, and swelling of the optic ... The risks of developing a life-threatening disease affecting the heart or brain increase as the blood flow increases. Commonly ...
Infective: encephalitis, meningitis, brain abscess, spinal epidural abscess. *Neoplastic: glioma, meningioma, brain tumors, ... "Deterioration of pre-existing hemiparesis brought about by subsequent ipsilateral lacunar infarction" (PDF). Journal of ... Radiological studies like a CT scan or magnetic resonance imaging of the brain should be used to confirm injury in the brain ... or disease affecting the brain. As a lesion that results in hemiplegia occurs in the brain or spinal cord, hemiplegic muscles ...
Wright JW, Harding JW (2015). "The Brain Hepatocyte Growth Factor/c-Met Receptor System: A New Target for the Treatment of ... treatment for coronary artery disease as well as treatment for the damage that occurs to the heart after myocardial infarction. ...
Outside the brain, phentermine releases norepinephrine and epinephrine - also known as noradrenaline and adrenaline ... myocardial infarction, cardiac failure and cardiac arrest have been reported. ...
... traveling to the brain resulting in small ischemic strokes without symptoms, altered blood flow to the brain, inflammation, ... such as acute myocardial infarction, cardiac surgery, pericarditis, myocarditis, hyperthyroidism, pulmonary embolism, pneumonia ... Emboli in the brain may result in an ischemic stroke or a transient ischemic attack (TIA). ... including bleeding in the brain) is similar to that of warfarin and DOACs despite its inferior efficacy.[81][88] ...
Brain Research. 1309: 136-145. doi:10.1016/j.brainres.2009.10.067. PMID 19891959. S2CID 25369069.. ... myocardial infarction (heart attack), and stroke.[8][9][12][13][14] ... "Anti-inflammatory effects of crocin and crocetin in rat brain microglial cells". European Journal of Pharmacology. 648 (1-3): ... in patients with a form of brain cancer known as glioblastoma.[14] The drug is currently under investigation for its possible ...
As per aspirin, except without Reye syndrome and with the following additions: myocardial infarctions, strokes and hypertension ... Rapidly hydrolysed to 6-acetylmorphine and then to morphine after crossing the blood-brain barrier which in turn activates the ... Higher potential for abuse compared to other opioids due to its rapid penetration of the blood-brain barrier. ... As per diclofenac, except with lower risk of myocardial infarction, stroke and hypertension. ...
damage to the pituitary from radiation therapy to the head (e.g. for leukemia or brain tumors), from surgery, from trauma, or ... ischemic or hemorrhagic infarction from low blood pressure (Sheehan syndrome) or hemorrhage pituitary apoplexy ...
Brain: encephalopathy symptoms including agitation, confusion, coma; causes may include ischemia, bleeding, formation of blood ... or an intestinal infarction.[10] A pierced internal organ (free air on an abdominal x-ray or CT scan), an abnormal chest x-ray ... In the central nervous system, direct damage of the brain cells and disturbances of neurotransmissions causes altered mental ... brain, urinary tract, skin, and abdominal organs.[3] Risk factors include being very young, older age, a weakened immune system ...
"Brain. 124 (8): 1646-1656. doi:10.1093/brain/124.8.1646. PMID 11459755. Archived from the original on 2010-02-17.. ... A number of conditions that involve the central nervous system may lead to vertigo including: lesions caused by infarctions or ... Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Ménière's disease, labyrinthitis, stroke, brain tumors, brain injury, multiple ... brain tumors, brain injury, multiple sclerosis, migraines, trauma, and uneven pressures between the middle ears.[2][4][5] ...
Myocardial infarction → 심근 경색 (B). *Respiratory failure → 호흡 부전 (E). *Shock (circulatory) → 쇼크 (E) ... Brain → 뇌 (B+). *nerve → 신경 (E). *Sensory system → 감각 기관 (E). *Auditory system → 청각 기관 (E) *Ear → 귀 (C) ...
As such, it can be caused by a wide number of conditions, including myocardial infarction (in which the heart muscle is starved ... and blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown resulting in vascular leakiness.[18] ... of Parkinson's disease is death of dopaminergic neurons as a result of changes in biological activity in the brain with respect ...
Brain ischemia/. cerebral infarction. (ischemic stroke/TIA). TACI, PACI. *precerebral: Carotid artery stenosis ... Intracranial aneurysm, also known as brain aneurysm, is a cerebrovascular disorder in which weakness in the wall of a cerebral ... If an aneurysm ruptures, blood leaks into the space around the brain. This is called a subarachnoid hemorrhage. Onset is ... This leads to hemorrhage in the subarachnoid space and sometimes in brain parenchyma. Minor leakage from aneurysm may precede ...
Solomon DH, Glynn RJ, Levin R, Avorn J (May 2002). "Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug use and acute myocardial infarction". ... Rofecoxib crossed the placenta and blood-brain barrier,[5][6][8] and took 1-3 hours to reach peak plasma concentration with an ... The plaintiff experienced a mild myocardial infarction and claimed that rofecoxib was responsible, after having taken it for ... previous myocardial infarction, angina, cerebrovascular accident, transient ischemic attack, or coronary artery bypass). ...
"Regular aspirin intake and acute myocardial infarction". British Medical Journal. 1 (5905): 440-3. March 1974. doi:10.1136/bmj. ... including the transmission of pain information to the brain, modulation of the hypothalamic thermostat, and inflammation. ... Aspirin is an important part of the treatment of those who have had a myocardial infarction (heart attack).[38] ... "Myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation: the acute management of myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation [ ...
Fatal Infarction of Brain in Migraine Br Med J 1964; 1 :225 ... Fatal Infarction of.... *Fatal Infarction of Brain in Migraine ... Fatal Infarction of Brain in Migraine. Br Med J 1964; 1 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.1.5377.225 (Published 25 January 1964) ...
Risk factors for ischaemic brain infarction. British Medical Journal 1988; 297 :69 doi:10.1136/bmj.297.6640.69-c ... Risk factors for ischaemic brain infarction.. British Medical Journal 1988; 297 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.297.6640.69-c ...
CT signs of early cerebral infarction are subtle within the first 6 hours after symptom onset, but important to recognize. The ... CT signs of early cerebral infarction are subtle within the first 6 hours after symptom onset, but important to recognize. The ... Detectability, Prevalence, and Significance of Early CT Signs of Hemispheric Infarction Rüdiger von Kummer, Luigi Bozzao, ... by publishing this series of early CT scans from study patients in order to improve early recognition of ischemic infarction by ...
A new study shows people who suffer from migraine headaches may be at risk for brain lesions and infarctions, which are areas ... Parkinsons Disease Migraine Parkinsons Disease Surgical Treatment Brain Brain Facts Ataxia Language Areas in The Brain Ways to ... Brain Infarctions Found In Patients Suffering From Migraine. by Medindia Content Team on May 28, 2004 at 5:08 PM General Health ... A new study shows people who suffer from migraine headaches may be at risk for brain lesions and infarctions, which are areas ...
... aged from 15-55 with acute ischemic brain infarction verified by computed tomography and/or angiography and/or brain scanning ... Ethanol intoxication preceding brain infarction was 4-7 times as common in men and 6-15 times as common in women as ethanol ... Ethanol intoxication: a risk factor for ischemic brain infarction.. M Hillbom, M Kaste ... Both occasional ethanol intoxication and regular heavy drinking seem to carry an increased risk of ischemic brain infarction. ...
Cerebral Infarction Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2017BriefGlobalDatas clinical trial report, Cerebral Infarction Global ... The number of cerebral infarction (brain infarction) clinical trials conducted globally, has increased by ##% for the period ... Clinical Research in Cerebral Infarction (Brain Infarction) in H1, 2017 *May 2017 ... Cerebral Infarction Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2017. Brief. GlobalDatas clinical trial report, "Cerebral Infarction ...
... and the BRAIN STEM. Brain infarction is the result of a cascade of events initiated by inadequate blood flow through the brain ... Tissue NECROSIS in any area of the brain, including the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES, the CEREBELLUM, ... that is followed by HYPOXIA and HYPOGLYCEMIA in brain tissue. Damage may be temporary, permanent, selective or pan-necrosis. ... Brain; Brain Infarctions; Brain Infarctions, Venous; Brain Venous Infarction; Brain Venous Infarctions; Infarction, Brain; ...
Brain strokes were more sensitive to inclement weather than myocardial infarctions. This paper provides quantitative estimates ... We studied 2,833 myocardial infarctions and 1,096 brain strokes registered in two Moscow hospitals between 1992 and 2005. Daily ... The influence of meteorological and geomagnetic factors on acute myocardial infarction and brain stroke in Moscow, Russia. ... barometric pressure and geomagnetic activity on hospitalizations with myocardial infarctions and brain strokes. ...
Cerebral Infarction (Brain Infarction) Therapeutics, G7 Countries, Clinical Trials by Phase, 2017*. Cerebral Infarction (Brain ... Cerebral Infarction (Brain Infarction) Therapeutics, E7 Countries, Clinical Trials by Phase, 2017*. Cerebral Infarction (Brain ... Cerebral Infarction (Brain Infarction) Therapeutics, G7 Countries, Clinical Trials by Phase, 2017*. Cerebral Infarction (Brain ... Cerebral Infarction (Brain Infarction) Therapeutics, E7 Countries, Clinical Trials by Phase, 2017*. Cerebral Infarction (Brain ...
2009). Hemostatic Factors and Subclinical Brain Infarction in a Community-Based Sample: The ARIC Study. Cerebrovascular ... Hemostatic Factors and Subclinical Brain Infarction in a Community-Based Sample: The ARIC Study. ...
... revealing an area of cerebral infarction - the result of a stroke. The infarct - brain tissue starved of blood - appears as the ... scan of the brain of woman aged 48 years, ... CT brain scan showing cerebral infarction - stroke. M136/0022 ... Caption: Computed X-ray tomography (CT) scan of the brain of woman aged 48 years, revealing an area of cerebral infarction - ... The infarct - brain tissue starved of blood - appears as the dark rectangular area in centre. In CT, a narrow X-ray beam is ...
We encountered a patient presenting with simultaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and brainstem infarction caused by a dissecting ... Brain Stem Infarctions / diagnosis, etiology*. Cerebral Angiography. Humans. Intracranial Aneurysm / complications*, diagnosis ... This is a rare case of a vertebrobasilar dissecting aneurysm that simultaneously caused both SAH and brain stem infarction. MRI ... MRI demonstrated a small infarction in the left dorsal pons, and an intramural hematoma of the left vertebral artery and lower ...
Contrast-Enhanced Transcranial Color-Coded Sonography in Acute Hemispheric Brain Infarction. Thomas Postert, B. Braun, S. Meves ... Contrast-Enhanced Transcranial Color-Coded Sonography in Acute Hemispheric Brain Infarction. Thomas Postert, B. Braun, S. Meves ... Contrast-Enhanced Transcranial Color-Coded Sonography in Acute Hemispheric Brain Infarction. Thomas Postert, B. Braun, S. Meves ... Twenty-three of 24 patients with symmetrical MCA exhibited lacunar infarctions (n=9), small infarctions of ,1/3 of the MCA ...
Cystatin C and Subclinical Brain Infarction. Stephen L. Seliger, W.T. Longstreth, Ronit Katz, Teri Manolio, Linda F. Fried, ... Cystatin C and Subclinical Brain Infarction. Stephen L. Seliger, W.T. Longstreth, Ronit Katz, Teri Manolio, Linda F. Fried, ... Cystatin C and Subclinical Brain Infarction. Stephen L. Seliger, W.T. Longstreth, Ronit Katz, Teri Manolio, Linda F. Fried, ... Cystatin C and Subclinical Brain Infarction Message Subject (Your Name) has sent you a message from American Society of ...
Clinical trial for Brain stem infarction , Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis , Quadriplegia , Spinal Cord Injury , Muscular ...
Infarction. Cognitive Dysfunction. Brain Infarction. Vascular Diseases. Cardiovascular Diseases. Ischemia. Pathologic Processes ... Brain Infarction Hypertension Drug: Angiotensin II Receptor Antagonists Drug: Angiotensin-converting Enzyme Inhibitors Phase 4 ... Progression of silent brain infarction or white matter lesion on magnetic resonance imaging [ Time Frame: two years ]. ... Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers (ARB) and ACE Inhibitors (ACEI) on Silent Brain Infarction and Cognitive Decline. This study ...
Progression of silent brain infarction or white matter lesion on magnetic resonance imaging [ Time Frame: two years ] ... Angiotensin II Receptor Blockers (ARB) and ACE Inhibitors (ACEI) on Silent Brain Infarction and Cognitive Decline. This study ... However, no reports are seen on comparison of the effects of ARBs and ACEIs on progression of silent brain infarction and ... Elderly people, especially hypertensive patients, with silent brain infarction have an increased risk of stroke and cognitive ...
... possibly reflecting residual left ventricular function after myocardial infarction. ... Increased plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentrations in the early or subacute phase of myocardial infarction are a ... Plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentrations predict survival after acute myocardial infarction J Am Coll Cardiol. 1996 Jun; ... Conclusions: Increased plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentrations in the early or subacute phase of myocardial infarction ...
MCA infarctions and 9% (2/23) anterior cerebral artery infarctions. By the time the NCCT showed the infarction, 38% (8/21) of ... Evaluating Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Delayed Cerebral Infarction after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. J. ... Evaluating Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability in Delayed Cerebral Infarction after Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage ... Spatiotemporal evolution of blood brain barrier damage and tissue infarction within the first 3h after ischemia onset. ...
Plasma brain natriuretic peptide as an indicator for angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition after myocardial infarction. ... Augmented secretion of brain natriuretic peptide in acute myocardial infarction. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 1991;180:431-436. ... Increased plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Circulation. 1993;88:82-91. ... Prognostic value of plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentration in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Circulation. ...
Strokes Due to Vertebro-Basilar Disease: Infarction, Vascular Insufficiency and Hemorrhage of the Brain Stem and Cerebellum. ... Strokes Due to Vertebro-Basilar Disease: Infarction, Vascular Insufficiency and Hemorrhage of the Brain Stem and Cerebellum.. ... This provides a firm foundation for subsequent chapters on clinical syndromes resulting from brainstem infarction, hemorrhage, ...
Inhibition of the brain renin-angiotensin system by oral APA inhibitor is at least as effective as oral AT1R blocker to inhibit ... Inhibition of Brain Angiotensin III Formation as a New Strategy for Prevention of Heart Failure After Myocardial Infarction J ... Conclusion: Inhibition of the brain renin-angiotensin system by oral APA inhibitor is at least as effective as oral AT1R ... 1 Brain and Heart Research Group, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. ...
26 patients with either brain stem infarction (19 cases), or cerebellum infarction (7 cases) were treated. Ages ranged from 42- ... p,Electro-Acupuncture for Treatment of Dysequilibrium Due to Cerebellum or Brain Stem Infarction by Zhao Hong,/p,,p, ... 26 patients with either brain stem infarction (19 cases), or cerebellum infarction (7 cases) were treated. Ages ranged from 42- ... Electro-Acupuncture for Treatment of Dysequilibrium Due to Cerebellum or Brain Stem Infarction by Zhao Hong ...
... In: Neuroradiology, Vol. ... Infarctions detected using WB-CTP were significantly larger than those not detected (15.0 vs. 2.2 ml;P = 0.0007);infarct ... The detection of infratentorial infarctions can be improved by assessing WB-CTP as part of the multimodal stroke workup. ... However, it remains a diagnostic challenge, especially small volume infarctions in the brainstem are likely to be missed. ...
Pahwa R, , Lyons KE, , Wilkinson SB, , Simpson RK Jr, , Ondo WG, & Tarsy D, : Long-term evaluation of deep brain stimulation of ... Kitagawa M, , Murata J, , Kikuchi S, , Sawamura Y, , Saito H, & Sasaki H, : Deep brain stimulation of subthalamic area for ... Rehncrona S, , Johnels B, , Widner H, , Tornqvist AL, , Hariz M, & Sydow O: Long-term efficacy of thalamic deep brain ... Skidmore FM, , Rodriguez RL, , Fernandez HH, , Goodman WK, , Foote KD, & Okun MS: Lessons learned in deep brain stimulation for ...
Effects of silent brain infarctions in different locations on cognitive function. The effect of silent brain infarctions in ... Advanced periventricular leukoaraiosis, silent brain infarction and microbleeds. Leukoaraiosis and silent brain infarction are ... 41 patients with microbleeds and without silent brain infarctions), SBI (46 patients with silent brain infarctions and without ... The numbers of silent brain infarctions in basal ganglia, thalamus, corona radiata and brain stem were added into the four ...
... and brain infarction.1 Brain infarcts are due to either thromboembolism from endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) or to vascular ... Brain CT scan and MRI showed multiple bilateral cerebellar and cerebral infarctions in distal vascular fields (fig 1A). ... We suggest that, in persons with distal field brain infarctions in the context of hypereosinophilia, and in view of the high ... Multiple microembolic borderzone brain infarctions and endomyocardial fibrosis in idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and in ...
Multiple microembolic borderzone brain infarctions and endomyocardial fibrosis in idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and in ... Multiple microembolic borderzone brain infarctions and endomyocardial fibrosis in idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and in ... Multiple microembolic borderzone brain infarctions and endomyocardial fibrosis in idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome and in ...
Incorporation of brain imaging findings has been suggested, but reports have used inconsistent methods and been underpowered. ... score and brain infarction on imaging to determine the optimal weighting of infarction in the score (ABCD(2)I). METHODS: Twelve ... Addition of brain infarction to the ABCD2 Score (ABCD2I): a collaborative analysis of unpublished data on 4574 patients.. ... "Addition of Brain Infarction to the ABCD2 Score (ABCD2I): a Collaborative Analysis of Unpublished Data on 4574 Patients." ...
Brain natriuretic peptide as a predictor of sudden cardiac death in patients with myocardial infarction ... Brain natriuretic peptide as a predictor of sudden cardiac death in patients with myocardial infarction ... Brain natriuretic peptide as a predictor of sudden cardiac death in patients with myocardial infarction ... Brain natriuretic peptide as a predictor of sudden cardiac death in patients with myocardial infarction ...
  • Bhaskaran K, Hajat S, Haines A, Herrett E, Wilkinson P, Smeeth L (2009) Effects of ambient temperature on the incidence of myocardial infarction. (springer.com)
  • Chang CL, Shipley M, Marmot M, Poulter N (2004) Lower ambient temperature was associated with an increased risk of hospitalization for stroke and acute myocardial infarction in young women. (springer.com)
  • Cornelissen G, Halberg F, Breus TK, Syutkina EV, Baevsky R, Weydahl A et al (2002) Non-photic solar associations of heart rate variability and myocardial infarction. (springer.com)
  • Treating hypertension has been associated with reduction in the risk of stroke and myocardial infarction. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This study sought to examine whether plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels can predict prognosis after myocardial infarction. (nih.gov)
  • Although the prognosis after myocardial infarction depends on residual left ventricular function, it is not known whether plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide after the onset of myocardial infarction can be used to predict long-term outcome. (nih.gov)
  • By Cox proportional hazards model analysis of the noninvasive variables, it was found that plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentration was more closely related to survival after myocardial infarction (p = 0.0001). (nih.gov)
  • Increased plasma brain natriuretic peptide concentrations in the early or subacute phase of myocardial infarction are a powerful noninvasive indicator of poor prognosis, possibly reflecting residual left ventricular function after myocardial infarction. (nih.gov)
  • Background Elevated plasma levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the N-terminal fragment of the ANP prohormone (N-ANP) are associated with decreased left ventricular function and decreased long-term survival after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). (ahajournals.org)
  • Inhibition of brain angiotensin III by central infusion of aminopeptidase A (APA) inhibitor firibastat (RB150) inhibits sympathetic hyperactivity and heart failure in rats after myocardial infarction (MI). (nih.gov)
  • 1 ). The researchers introduced the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) as a good predictor of sudden cardiac death (SCD) after acute myocardial infarction (AMI). (onlinejacc.org)
  • If we know the value of this predictive role in post-myocardial infarction patients with EF between 30% and 40%, we may be able to use it as a guide to defibrillator implantation decision. (onlinejacc.org)
  • Risk stratification after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) includes the evaluation of left ventricular (LV) function. (qxmd.com)
  • AIMS: Cardiac and renal functions are major independent predictors of outcomes in both ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). (elsevier.com)
  • In humans, the per-CID has shown a cardioprotective effect in a randomized control trial involving 250 patients within 6 first hours of myocardial infarction and candidate for primary angioplasty. (strokecenter.org)
  • Complication Of Hypertension(Heart Attack : Myocardial Infarction , Cardiomyopathy )(Brain : Stroke , Dementia )( Visual Loss )(Headache)(Renal Failure)( Artherosclerosis , Aneurysm ) End Organ Damage 免版稅剪貼畫,向量插圖和股票. (123rf.com)
  • Life saving measures for acute myocardial infarction include reperfusion therapy. (uwi.edu)
  • In this study, the acute myocardial infarction (AMI) model was established after injecting A20 plasmid into the rats, the protective effect of the myocardial cells was observed after myocardial injury, and the mechanism of its action was investigated. (uwi.edu)
  • The most common co-morbidities associated with acute myocardial infarction in Tobago are dyslipidaemia, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. (uwi.edu)
  • The goal of this study is to identify co-morbidities associated with acute myocardial infarction in Tobago. (uwi.edu)
  • Between 1990 and 2001, 250 patients were admitted to rule out myocardial infarction in Antigua, 55% were confirmed. (uwi.edu)
  • The term 'acute' is also included in the definition of several diseases, such as severe acute respiratory syndrome, acute leukemia, acute myocardial infarction, acute hepatitis, etc. (hpathy.com)
  • Professor Nicholas Mills, principal investigator, University of Edinburgh, UK, said: 'These results are controversial because they suggest that the Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction needs to move away from binary thresholds to diagnose and treat patients with myocardial infarction. (news-medical.net)
  • Myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. (news-medical.net)
  • The Universal Definition of Myocardial Infarction recommends that any increase in troponin above the 99th centile of a healthy reference population should be used as one of the diagnostic criteria. (news-medical.net)
  • The High-STEACS trial is the first randomized trial to evaluate whether the introduction of a high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I assay with a 99th centile diagnostic threshold would reduce subsequent myocardial infarction or cardiovascular death at one year in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome. (news-medical.net)
  • Registries were used to record the primary outcome of myocardial infarction or cardiovascular death at one year. (news-medical.net)
  • Of those, less than one third had a final diagnosis of myocardial infarction. (news-medical.net)
  • However, use of this method to help diagnose and treat patients was not associated with lower rates of recurrent myocardial infarction or cardiovascular death at one year. (news-medical.net)
  • One hundred consecutive patients (67 men, 33 women) aged from 15-55 with acute ischemic brain infarction verified by computed tomography and/or angiography and/or brain scanning were studied. (ahajournals.org)
  • Medical records of 40 dogs presented for evaluation of acute-onset, nonprogressive, intracranial dysfunction by means of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) diagnosis of brain infarction were reviewed. (avmi.net)
  • MRI shows acute infarctions in the temporo-occipital regions on the left most likely of small embolic nature. (blogspot.com)
  • A silent brain infarct (SBI) is defined as imaging or neuropathological evidence of brain infarction without a history of acute neurological dysfunction attributable to the lesion. (pfmjournal.org)
  • Patients may have silent but acute brain infarcts that can be embolic in origin. (pfmjournal.org)
  • To investigate the characteristics and risk factors of dysphagia using the videofluoroscopic dysphagia scale (VDS) with a videofluoroscopic swallowing study (VFSS) in patients with acute cerebral infarctions. (e-arm.org)
  • Brain CT 12 hours after the onset showed no evidence of intracranial bleeding and brain MRI revealed acute infarcts in the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) territories ( Fig. 1A ). (pfmjournal.org)
  • Computed X-ray tomography (CT) scan of the brain of woman aged 48 years, revealing an area of cerebral infarction - the result of a stroke. (sciencephoto.com)
  • CE-TCCS findings on admission and during follow-up were correlated with infarction size as demonstrated on follow-up CT, and clinical findings were assessed by use of the European Stroke Scale. (ahajournals.org)
  • A total of 483 consecutive stroke patients, who were admitted to our department within 12 hours after the onset of clinical symptoms suggestive for an infarction in the territory of the MCA, were examined with TCCS within a period of 24 months. (ahajournals.org)
  • Subclinical brain infarcts (SBI) are radiographically defined lesions consistent with infarcts in individuals without a clinical history of stroke. (asnjournals.org)
  • Elderly people, especially hypertensive patients, with silent brain infarction have an increased risk of stroke and cognitive decline. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The detection of infratentorial infarctions can be improved by assessing WB-CTP as part of the multimodal stroke workup. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • How can therapy help with stroke (infarction) blocking a brain artery symptoms? (chidsg.com)
  • stroke (infarction) blocking a mortal brain artery, vascular dementia are forever killing americans. (chidsg.com)
  • Citing the potential utility of silent brain infarcts (SBI) as both a possible stroke risk factor and a surrogate outcome in stroke trials, Dr. Gupta and colleagues performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the precise association between SBI and subsequent stroke. (heart.org)
  • Dysphagia is particularly common when associated with brain lesions, and is found in approximately 50% of stroke patients [ 1 ]. (e-arm.org)
  • In many cases, however, it is difficult to clearly distinguish boundaries in brain lesions following a stroke. (e-arm.org)
  • Resulting from an occlusion of a major cerebral artery [most often middle cerebral artery (MCA)] or its branches, ischemic stroke is characterized by permanent or transient obstruction of blood flow, impeding the delivery of oxygen and essential nutrients to the brain. (frontiersin.org)
  • Cerebral infarction is the most common form of stroke (80% of strokes). (strokecenter.org)
  • A retrospective study of 104 patients with the diagnosis of stroke who had undergone contrast-enhanced MR scanning within2 weeks of the inciting neurological event revealed 66 patients who demonstrated different patterns of contrast-enhancement in the region of infarction. (ac.ir)
  • METHODS: Initial CT scans with intraparenchymal hematoma from the first 1000 patients with stroke in the Oxford Vascular Study were independently categorized as intracerebral hemorrhage or hemorrhagic transformation of infarction by 5 neuroradiologists, both blinded and unblinded to clinical history. (ox.ac.uk)
  • CONCLUSIONS: Reliability of diagnosis of intraparenchymal hematoma on CT brain scan in minor stroke is poor, particularly if scanning is delayed. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Immediate brain imaging is justified in patients with minor stroke. (ox.ac.uk)
  • In ischemic stroke, either permanent or briefly transient hindrance of blood flow occurs which leads to decreased oxygen and nutrient supply to the brain. (frontiersin.org)
  • Predictors of mortality and recurrence after hospitalized cerebral infarction in an urban community: the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study. (medscape.com)
  • Old microbleeds are a potential risk factor for cerebral bleeding after ischemic stroke: a gradient-echo T2*-weighted brain MRI study. (medscape.com)
  • Besides a brain tumur, bleed and stroke what else can show up on a MRI that causes severe headaches? (healthtap.com)
  • Carotid artery dissection is a separation of the layers of the artery wall supplying oxygen-bearing blood to the head and brain and is the most common cause of stroke in young adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, when blood clots form and break off from the site of the tear, they form emboli, which can travel through the arteries to the brain and block the blood supply to the brain, resulting in an ischaemic stroke, otherwise known as a cerebral infarction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood clots, or emboli, originating from the dissection are thought to be the cause of infarction in the majority of cases of stroke in the presence of carotid artery dissection. (wikipedia.org)
  • The restricted oxygen due to the restricted blood supply causes an ischemic stroke, which can result in an infarction if the blood flow is not restored within a relatively short period of time. (wikipedia.org)
  • These four entities predict the extent of the stroke, the area of the brain affected, the underlying cause, and the prognosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • This leads to poor oxygen supply or cerebral hypoxia and thus leads to the death of brain tissue or cerebral infarction / ischemic stroke. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other effects that may result from brain ischemia are stroke, cardiorespiratory arrest, and irreversible brain damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Other pathological events that may result in brain ischemia include cardiorespiratory arrest, stroke, and severe irreversible brain damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vertebrobasilar artery dissection presenting with simultaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and brain stem infarction: case report. (biomedsearch.com)
  • We encountered a patient presenting with simultaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and brainstem infarction caused by a dissecting aneurysm of the vertebrobasilar artery, which was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) but did not show abnormal findings on cerebral angiography. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Strokes Due to Vertebro-Basilar Disease: Infarction, Vascular Insufficiency and Hemorrhage of the Brain Stem and Cerebellum. (annals.org)
  • This provides a firm foundation for subsequent chapters on clinical syndromes resulting from brainstem infarction, hemorrhage, or transient vascular insufficiency. (annals.org)
  • [ 1 ] Other influences are the site of the hemorrhage, the local partial pressure of oxygen in the tissues, the local pH, the patient's hematocrit, the local glucose concentration, the hemoglobin concentration, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, and the patient's temperature. (medscape.com)
  • The brain magnetic resonance imaging showed extensive cerebral infarction , and retinal hemorrhage was observed in the fundus examination. (bvsalud.org)
  • To identify causative factors, we reviewed 11 cases of upper airway obstruction, 8 cases of brain infarction, 5 cases of gastrointestinal hemorrhage, and 2 cases of pulmonary thromboembolism. (elsevier.com)
  • Interobserver reliability in distinguishing hemorrhagic transformation of infarction from intracerebral hemorrhage may depend on delays to CT but has not been reported previously despite the clinical importance of this distinction. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) is one of the brain diseases such as cerebral infarction, cerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage. (jp-cellculture.com)
  • These diseases have a common feature that they are caused by inflammation/exclusion due to hemorrhage or by brain tissue disorder due to ischemia. (jp-cellculture.com)
  • Dissecting aneurysm of the vertebral artery causing subarachnoid hemorrhage after non-hemorrhagic infarction--case report. (biomedsearch.com)
  • CONCLUSIONS-: Migraine may be a risk factor for subclinical brain infarction. (elsevier.com)
  • Subclinical brain infarction (SBI) and white matter hyperintensity volumes (WMHV) were quantified from the MRI sub-study. (heart.org)
  • The purpose of this study is to elucidate whether or not angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB) are more beneficial or equal to angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) on development or progression of silent brain infarction and cognitive decline in Japanese patients with essential hypertension in the elderly. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • However, no reports are seen on comparison of the effects of ARBs and ACEIs on progression of silent brain infarction and cognitive decline in patients with essential hypertension in the elderly. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The researchers therefore longitudinally evaluate silent brain infarction using magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive decline by Mini-Mental State Examination twice at an interval of 2 years in patients with essential hypertension in the elderly who are received antihypertensive therapy by ARB or ACEI. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The second woman (case B), who had hypertension, showed leukoaraiosis in the periventricular white matter and deep brain areas, which are often seen in the normal elderly but are also seen in association with vascular risk factors or in the context of cognitive impairment ( Fig. 1B ) [ 1 ]. (pfmjournal.org)
  • A 72-year-old man (case E) with a history of hypertension and current smoking underwent brain MRI for progressive visual disturbance. (pfmjournal.org)
  • Most patients with brain infarction had a history of hypertension poorly controlled despite treatment with multiple agents. (elsevier.com)
  • MRI demonstrated a small infarction in the left dorsal pons, and an intramural hematoma of the left vertebral artery and lower basilar artery. (biomedsearch.com)
  • All patients were treated in accordance with the 2007 guidelines for the management of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). (eurotranslog.eu)
  • 1 Brain infarcts are due to either thromboembolism from endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) or to vascular endothelial toxicity of eosinophilic cells. (bmj.com)
  • Brain CT scan and MRI showed multiple bilateral cerebellar and cerebral infarctions in distal vascular fields (fig 1A). (bmj.com)
  • To the best of our knowledge, bleeding caused by a focal infarction and underlying vascular disease as a complication of DBS surgery has never been described. (cprm-a.com)
  • A clinical trial in patients with cardiogenic cerebral infarction caused by moving blood clots from heart to brain has been conducted in order to evaluate the treatment for after-effects by regenerating brain vascular tissues after injection of autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells. (jp-cellculture.com)
  • Leukoaraiosis, microbleeds, and silent brain infarctions are phenotypes of small vessel disease. (medsci.org)
  • Microbleeds and silent brain infarctions sometimes coexist with leukoaraiosis. (medsci.org)
  • This study aims to analyze the effects of microbleeds and silent brain infarctions on cognitive function of patients with advanced periventricular leukoaraiosis. (medsci.org)
  • The presence and locations of microbleeds and silent brain infarctions were evaluated. (medsci.org)
  • Age and the presence of microbleeds were independent risk factors for the lower scores in all four tests, whereas the presence of silent brain infarctions was the only independent risk factor for the lower scores in Clock Drawing Test and Verbal Fluency Test. (medsci.org)
  • Microbleeds and silent brain infarctions were associated differently with cognitive impairment of patients with advanced periventricular leukoaraiosis. (medsci.org)
  • Leukoaraiosis, microbleeds, and silent brain infarctions are different phenotypes of small vessel disease caused by different kinds of arteriole degeneration [ 1 , 2 ] . (medsci.org)
  • Other phenotypes of small vessel disease such as microbleeds and silent brain infarctions are usually found coexisting with advanced leukoaraiosis [ 7 - 11 ] and they might also be associated with cognitive dysfunction [ 10 , 12 - 14 ] . (medsci.org)
  • However, it remains unclear whether the coexisting microbleeds and silent brain infarctions will deteriorate the cognitive function for patients with advanced periventricular leukoaraiosis, and whether microbleeds and silent brain infarctions have different impact on cognitive function considering they might be different in specific pathogenesis. (medsci.org)
  • The third woman (case C) showed silent brain infarctions (SBIs) in deep brain areas on FLAIR ( Fig. 1C ). (pfmjournal.org)
  • A fifty-four-year-old woman died from multiple brain infarction and hemor rhage in the bilateral cerebrum, cerebellum, and brainstem, with renal infarc tion. (elsevier.com)
  • 6-8 We performed a prospective study to correlate echocardiographic LV hypertrophy with development of new cardiac events and atherothrombotic brain infarction (ABI) in unselected patients older than 62 years. (elsevier.com)
  • Aronow, WS , Koenigsberg, M & Schwartz, KS 1988, ' Usefulness of echocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy in predicting new coronary events and atherothrombotic brain infarction in patients over 62 years of age ', The American Journal of Cardiology , vol. 61, no. 13, pp. 1130-1132. (elsevier.com)
  • Aronow, WS & Ahn, C 1994, ' Prevalence of coexistence of coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, and atherothrombotic brain infarction in men and women ≥62 years of age ', The American journal of cardiology , vol. 74, no. 1, pp. 64-65. (elsevier.com)
  • Subclinical brain infarcts (SBI) are common in the elderly and are associated with covert neurologic and cognitive impairment. (asnjournals.org)
  • Brain CT scan showed recurrent infarcts in the right centrum semiovale. (bmj.com)
  • A concurrent medical condition was detected in 18/33 dogs with brain infarcts, with chronic kidney disease (8/33) and hyperadrenocorticism (6/33) being most commonly encountered. (avmi.net)
  • All of them were concerned about abnormal findings on their MRIs, and asked whether they had brain infarcts. (pfmjournal.org)
  • Neuroinflammation is believed to be involved in the pathophysiological mechanisms of silent brain infarcts (SBI). (univaq.it)
  • A) Fluid attenuated inversion recovery brain magnetic resonance imaging shows cerebral infarcts in the right posterior inferior cerebellar artery territory. (pfmjournal.org)
  • Silent brain infarcts and the risk of dementia and cognitive decline. (nature.com)
  • It has been suggested that concentrations of plasma brain natriuretic peptide reflect left ventricular function. (nih.gov)
  • Plasma brain natriuretic peptide levels measured on admission and day 2 correlated significantly with hemodynamic variables, which are influenced by left ventricular function. (nih.gov)
  • Previous data suggest that plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) may increase proportionally more than plasma ANP after AMI and in chronic heart failure. (ahajournals.org)
  • Natriuretic peptides, and particularly brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), emerged as a potential marker of ventricular function and prognosis after AMI. (qxmd.com)
  • Brain natriuretic peptide levels are related to ventricular function, either systolic or isolated diastolic, and can give prognostic information in patients surviving AMI. (qxmd.com)
  • Brain natriuretic peptide had a very good accuracy in the prediction of death (AUC = 0.95) and the development of heart failure (AUC = 0.90). (qxmd.com)
  • Brain natriuretic peptide had a very good performance in detecting the occurrence of an adverse event. (qxmd.com)
  • Inhibition of the brain renin-angiotensin system by oral APA inhibitor is at least as effective as oral AT1R blocker to inhibit cardiac dysfunction after MI but without hypotension or renal dysfunction. (nih.gov)
  • There are hypothesis that virus is causing increase risk for both cerebral and cardiac infarctions. (blogspot.com)
  • We report a case of 59-year-old woman with multiple myeloma who developed cerebral infarction probably related to cardiac involvement of amyloidosis, and discuss the pathophysiological mechanisms based on kidney biopsy and characteristic echocardiographic and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging features. (pfmjournal.org)
  • Herein, we report a patient with multiple myeloma who suffered from embolic infarction associated with cardiac amyloidosis diagnosed based on the kidney biopsy, echocardiographic and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results. (pfmjournal.org)
  • Professor Mills said: 'The trial found that implementation of a high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I assay using the 99th centile as the diagnostic threshold increased the frequency of diagnosing myocardial injury or infarction. (news-medical.net)
  • Cerebral artery gas embolism (e.g. during ascent from a SCUBA dive) is also a possible cause of infarction (Levvett & Millar, 2008) Computed tomography (CT) and MRI scanning will show damaged area in the brain, showing that the symptoms were not caused by a tumor, subdural hematoma or other brain disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • BACKGROUND: Carotid atherosclerosis is responsible for ~20% of ischemic strokes, but it is unclear whether carotid disease is associated with the presence of downstream silent brain infarction (SBI). (cornell.edu)
  • Major risk factors for cerebral infarction are generally the same as for atherosclerosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • This method makes a selective cortical infarction inducement with high reproducibility in SCID and C.B-17 by direct electrocoagulation and ligation at a middle cerebral artery (MCA) distance part. (clea-japan.com)
  • Thrombolysis was considered but rejected because of the "fusiform aneurysmal" appearance of the left internal carotid artery and middle cerebral artery on the initial brain CT scan. (southsudanmedicaljournal.com)
  • In the present study, we examined the neuroprotective effects of polydatin against ischemic brain injury using a rat model of permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). (frontiersin.org)
  • We describe a patient with infarction of the left middle cerebral artery where a spot sign was observed. (jkna.org)
  • Gotoh O, Asano T, Koide T, Takakura K. Ischemic brain edema following occlusion of the middle cerebral artery in the rat. (medscape.com)
  • The number of cerebral infarction (brain infarction) clinical trials conducted globally, has increased by ## % for the period 2012- 2016. (reportlinker.com)
  • GlobalData's clinical trial report, "Cerebral Infarction Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2017" offers an overview of Cerebral Infarction clinical trials scenario. (reportlinker.com)
  • This industry report offers best line data relating to the clinical trials on Cerebral Infarction. (reportlinker.com)
  • Brain infarction and the clinical expression of Alzheimer disease. (nature.com)
  • A clinical trial aimed at recovering damaged neural function by regenerating cerebrovascular network after injecting autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells has been conducted in seriously ill patients with immediately following the onset of cardiogenic cerebral infarction. (jp-cellculture.com)
  • The CT reading panel of ECASS wants to share its experience by publishing this series of early CT scans from study patients in order to improve early recognition of ischemic infarction by CT and thus to improve patient care, and to provide material for practice. (springer.com)
  • 26 patients with either brain stem infarction (19 cases), or cerebellum infarction (7 cases) were treated. (jcm.co.uk)
  • We examined its diagnostic accuracy in the detection of infratentorial infarctions and compared it to nonenhanced computed tomography (NECT), aiming to identify factors influencing its detection rate. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • The spot sign refers to tiny enhanced foci within the hematoma on a brain computed tomography angiography image. (jkna.org)
  • 반점징후(spot sign)는 뇌컴퓨터단층혈관조영술(brain computed tomography angiography) 원천영상(source image)에서 혈종 안에 작고 조영 증강되는 병터로 정의된다[ 1 ]. (jkna.org)
  • 또한 함께 시행한 뇌컴퓨터단층촬영관류영상(brain computed tomography perfusion imaging)에서 뇌혈류(cerebral blood flow)와 뇌혈액량(cerebral blood volume)의 불일치(mismatch)가 관찰되지 않아 동맥내혈전용해술의 적응증은 아니었고, 이에 보존적으로 항혈전제 투약을 하였다. (jkna.org)
  • CT signs of early cerebral infarction are subtle within the first 6 hours after symptom onset, but important to recognize. (springer.com)
  • Functional brain abnormalities in young adults at genetic risk for late-onset Alzheimer's dementia. (nature.com)
  • The patient was considered to be a rare case of nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis who developed multiple small infarctions mainly in the brainstem and cerebel lum. (elsevier.com)
  • Whether a cerebral infarction is thrombotic or embolic based, its pathophysiology, or the observed conditions and underlying mechanisms of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1 Patients who survive are at high risk for developing sequelae of cerebral vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI), leading to delayed infarction, which occurs in 40%-70% of patients with SAH, representing the leading cause of post-SAH morbidity and mortality. (ajnr.org)
  • The per-conditioning remote ischemic (Per-CID) showed a neuroprotective effect in cerebral ischemia by reducing the final size of cerebral infarction animal models. (strokecenter.org)
  • A new study shows people who suffer from migraine headaches may be at risk for brain lesions and infarctions, which are areas of the brain where the tissue has died. (medindia.net)
  • Thus researchers conclude that based on the current evidence, further study into the possible etiologic mechanisms of brain lesions in migraine patients is required as they feel this will not only provide important clues about the pathophysiology of migraine but also contribute to management guidelines for migraine. (medindia.net)
  • A 62-year-old apparently healthy woman (case D) with a history of migraine headache underwent brain MRI for her chronic headaches. (pfmjournal.org)
  • METHODS-: In the Northern Manhattan Study (NOMAS), we quantified subclinical brain infarctions and white matter hyperintensity volumes among participants with self-reported migraine, confirmed by the International Classification of Headache Disorders-2 criteria. (elsevier.com)
  • Both s.c. and oral firibastat inhibited brain APA and attenuated left ventricle dysfunction. (nih.gov)
  • A large cohort of patients with cerebral infarction was evaluated to determine the association between brain lesions and swallowing dysfunction. (e-arm.org)
  • We performed a retrospective study of patients with SAH with delayed infarction on follow-up NCCT. (ajnr.org)
  • These may then partially or fully occlude one of the arteries in the Circle of Willis (the brain's circulation system), however the blockage is proximal to the blood brain barrier. (stackexchange.com)
  • Often, even a complete occlusion is totally asymptomatic because bilateral circulation keeps the brain well perfused. (wikipedia.org)
  • Deep brain stimulation (DBS) in the subthalamic nucleus is considered to be a well-established treatment for patients with Parkinson's disease who have severe motor dysfunctions. (cprm-a.com)
  • abstract = "Brain infarction is one of the common causes of death and also a major cause of severe disability. (fujita-hu.ac.jp)
  • Participants had a brain magnetic resonance imaging, blood samples drawn, and a physical and neurological examination. (medindia.net)
  • Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging before the operation did not show any abnormalities in the patient and only showed a small infarction zone. (cprm-a.com)
  • We divided patients into 8 groups according to lesion areas commonly observed on brain magnetic resonance imaging. (e-arm.org)
  • We assessed blood-brain barrier permeability, measured as permeability surface area product, by using CTP in patients with SAH with delayed infarction. (ajnr.org)
  • This question seems to stem from a misunderstanding of the nature of the Blood-Brain-Barrier, the circulatory system of the brain and of thrombi. (stackexchange.com)
  • No, a thrombus would be much too large to pass through the highly selective blood brain barrier. (stackexchange.com)
  • No, thrombi are far too bulky to cross the blood brain barrier. (stackexchange.com)
  • ApoE deficiency compromises the blood-brain barrier especially after injury. (nature.com)
  • I: The time courses of the brain water, sodium and potassium contents and blood-brain barrier permeability to 125I-albumin. (medscape.com)
  • If the infarction occurs on the left side brain, speech will be slurred. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the brain becomes damaged irreversibly and infarction occurs, the symptoms may be permanent. (wikipedia.org)
  • MRI shows extensive cortical and subcortical as well as periventricular infarctions in temporo-occipital regions on the left. (blogspot.com)
  • This model shows high long-term survival rate with high cortical infarction reproducibility to its chronic phase. (clea-japan.com)
  • Most studies have categorized brain lesions according to cortical, subcortical, and brainstem locations, and their associated characteristic dysphagia patterns have been investigated for each lesion location [ 3 , 6 , 7 , 9 ]. (e-arm.org)
  • Risk factors for ischaemic brain infarction. (bmj.com)
  • Ethanol intoxication: a risk factor for ischemic brain infarction. (ahajournals.org)
  • Both occasional ethanol intoxication and regular heavy drinking seem to carry an increased risk of ischemic brain infarction. (ahajournals.org)
  • Although renal impairment is associated with accelerated cerebrovascular disease and an increased risk for clinically apparent brain infarct, few studies have examined the relationship between renal function and SBI, and these may have been limited by the inaccuracy of creatinine as a renal function marker. (asnjournals.org)
  • Patients with SAH are at increased risk of delayed infarction. (ajnr.org)
  • Furthermore, a 14 year follow-up cohort study in a Japanese community in Hisayama town, Japan revealed that the homozygote of the susceptible G allele of this particular SNP had significantly higher risk of brain infarction (hazard ratio = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.22-3.29, P = 0.006). (fujita-hu.ac.jp)
  • In addition to their ability to differentiate into multiple different cell types that would be contributory to the recovery and repair of the brain by replacing destroyed cells, mesenchymal stem cells also secrete angiogenins, cytokines and trophic factors that can support and stimulate multiple other cell types. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The objective of this study was to assess impacts of air temperature, barometric pressure and geomagnetic activity on hospitalizations with myocardial infarctions and brain strokes. (springer.com)
  • Our study reveals a statistically significant increase in permeability surface area product preceding delayed infarction in patients with SAH. (ajnr.org)
  • We tried to make diffuse small size infarction in the rat brain by microsphere injection and investigated early-stage effects of exercise in the present study. (nii.ac.jp)
  • To identify a gene(s) susceptible to brain infarction, we performed a large-scale association study of Japanese patients with brain infarction, using 52608 gene-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. (fujita-hu.ac.jp)
  • The purpose of this study was to describe the pattern of diffuse enhancement seen on contrast-enhanced MR images in patients with subacute infarction. (ac.ir)
  • Permeability surface area product, CBF, and MTT values were then obtained in the location of the subsequent infarction. (ajnr.org)
  • Subsequent follow-up NCCT demonstrated new delayed infarction in all 21 patients, at which time 38% of patients had new focal neurologic deficits. (ajnr.org)
  • This medical exhibit features the interruption of the cervical vasculature with the blockage of the carotid arteries and subsequent infarction of the left frontal lobe of the brain. (photoshelter.com)
  • There is consensus that brain infarct contributes to this deficit, but the subtle lowering of IQ in children with normal MRI scans might be accounted for by chronic systemic complications leading to insufficient oxygen delivery to the brain. (uni.lu)
  • Cerebral infarction causes irreversible damage to the brain. (wikipedia.org)