Brain Concussion: A nonspecific term used to describe transient alterations or loss of consciousness following closed head injuries. The duration of UNCONSCIOUSNESS generally lasts a few seconds, but may persist for several hours. Concussions may be classified as mild, intermediate, and severe. Prolonged periods of unconsciousness (often defined as greater than 6 hours in duration) may be referred to as post-traumatic coma (COMA, POST-HEAD INJURY). (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p418)Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Hockey: A game in which two parties of players provided with curved or hooked sticks seek to drive a ball or puck through opposite goals. This applies to either ice hockey or field hockey.Football: A competitive team sport played on a rectangular field. This is the American or Canadian version of the game and also includes the form known as rugby. It does not include non-North American football (= SOCCER).Post-Concussion Syndrome: The organic and psychogenic disturbances observed after closed head injuries (HEAD INJURIES, CLOSED). Post-concussion syndrome includes subjective physical complaints (i.e. headache, dizziness), cognitive, emotional, and behavioral changes. These disturbances can be chronic, permanent, or late emerging.Head Protective Devices: Personal devices for protection of heads from impact, penetration from falling and flying objects, and from limited electric shock and burn.Brain Injuries: Acute and chronic (see also BRAIN INJURIES, CHRONIC) injuries to the brain, including the cerebral hemispheres, CEREBELLUM, and BRAIN STEM. Clinical manifestations depend on the nature of injury. Diffuse trauma to the brain is frequently associated with DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY or COMA, POST-TRAUMATIC. Localized injuries may be associated with NEUROBEHAVIORAL MANIFESTATIONS; HEMIPARESIS, or other focal neurologic deficits.Mouth Protectors: Devices or pieces of equipment placed in or around the mouth or attached to instruments to protect the external or internal tissues of the mouth and the teeth.Athletes: Individuals who have developed skills, physical stamina and strength or participants in SPORTS or other physical activities.Sports Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with physical fitness and the diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in exercise and sports activities.Unconsciousness: Loss of the ability to maintain awareness of self and environment combined with markedly reduced responsiveness to environmental stimuli. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp344-5)Sports Equipment: Equipment required for engaging in a sport (such as balls, bats, rackets, skis, skates, ropes, weights) and devices for the protection of athletes during their performance (such as masks, gloves, mouth pieces).Head Injuries, Closed: Traumatic injuries to the cranium where the integrity of the skull is not compromised and no bone fragments or other objects penetrate the skull and dura mater. This frequently results in mechanical injury being transmitted to intracranial structures which may produce traumatic brain injuries, hemorrhage, or cranial nerve injury. (From Rowland, Merritt's Textbook of Neurology, 9th ed, p417)Boxing: A two-person sport in which the fists are skillfully used to attack and defend.Brain Injury, Chronic: Conditions characterized by persistent brain damage or dysfunction as sequelae of cranial trauma. This disorder may result from DIFFUSE AXONAL INJURY; INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES; BRAIN EDEMA; and other conditions. Clinical features may include DEMENTIA; focal neurologic deficits; PERSISTENT VEGETATIVE STATE; AKINETIC MUTISM; or COMA.Brain Chemistry: Changes in the amounts of various chemicals (neurotransmitters, receptors, enzymes, and other metabolites) specific to the area of the central nervous system contained within the head. These are monitored over time, during sensory stimulation, or under different disease states.Trauma Severity Indices: Systems for assessing, classifying, and coding injuries. These systems are used in medical records, surveillance systems, and state and national registries to aid in the collection and reporting of trauma.Brain Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.Craniocerebral Trauma: Traumatic injuries involving the cranium and intracranial structures (i.e., BRAIN; CRANIAL NERVES; MENINGES; and other structures). Injuries may be classified by whether or not the skull is penetrated (i.e., penetrating vs. nonpenetrating) or whether there is an associated hemorrhage.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Soccer: A game in which a round inflated ball is advanced by kicking or propelling with any part of the body except the hands or arms. The object of the game is to place the ball in opposite goals.Acceleration: An increase in the rate of speed.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Martial Arts: Activities in which participants learn self-defense mainly through the use of hand-to-hand combat. Judo involves throwing an opponent to the ground while karate (which includes kung fu and tae kwon do) involves kicking and punching an opponent.Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted: Application of computer programs designed to assist the physician in solving a diagnostic problem.Research Report: Detailed account or statement or formal record of data resulting from empirical inquiry.Dizziness: An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.Wrestling: A sport consisting of hand-to-hand combat between two unarmed contestants seeking to pin or press each other's shoulders to the ground.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Neck Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the neck. It includes injuries to the skin, muscles, and other soft tissues of the neck.VirginiaWest VirginiaPubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.BooksPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Bulimia: Eating an excess amount of food in a short period of time, as seen in the disorder of BULIMIA NERVOSA. It is caused by an abnormal craving for food, or insatiable hunger also known as "ox hunger".Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Ceremonial Behavior: A series of actions, sometimes symbolic actions which may be associated with a behavior pattern, and are often indispensable to its performance.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Carbon Monoxide: Carbon monoxide (CO). A poisonous colorless, odorless, tasteless gas. It combines with hemoglobin to form carboxyhemoglobin, which has no oxygen carrying capacity. The resultant oxygen deprivation causes headache, dizziness, decreased pulse and respiratory rates, unconsciousness, and death. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)IllinoisSports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Lawyers: Persons whose profession is to give legal advice and assistance to clients and represent them in legal matters. (American Heritage Dictionary, 3d ed)Foxes: Any of several carnivores in the family CANIDAE, that possess erect ears and long bushy tails and are smaller than WOLVES. They are classified in several genera and found on all continents except Antarctica.Optic Lobe, Nonmammalian: In invertebrate zoology, a lateral lobe of the FOREBRAIN in certain ARTHROPODS. In vertebrate zoology, either of the corpora bigemina of non-mammalian VERTEBRATES. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1329)Mushroom Bodies: Prominent lobed neuropils found in ANNELIDA and all ARTHROPODS except crustaceans. They are thought to be involved in olfactory learning and memory.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Human Engineering: The science of designing, building or equipping mechanical devices or artificial environments to the anthropometric, physiological, or psychological requirements of the people who will use them.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Operator Regions, Genetic: The regulatory elements of an OPERON to which activators or repressors bind thereby effecting the transcription of GENES in the operon.Waiting Lists: Prospective patient listings for appointments or treatments.Computer Terminals: Input/output devices designed to receive data in an environment associated with the job to be performed, and capable of transmitting entries to, and obtaining output from, the system of which it is a part. (Computer Dictionary, 4th ed.)Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.

MR line scan diffusion imaging of the brain in children. (1/303)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: MR imaging of the self-diffusion of water has become increasingly popular for the early detection of cerebral infarction in adults. The purpose of this study was to evaluate MR line scan diffusion imaging (LSDI) of the brain in children. METHODS: LSDI was performed in four volunteers and 12 patients by using an effective TR/TE of 2736/89.4 and a maximum b value of 450 to 600 s/mm2 applied in the x, y, and z directions. In the volunteers, single-shot echo planar imaging of diffusion (EPID) was also performed. The patients (10 boys and two girls) ranged in age from 2 days to 16 years (average age, 6.6 years). Diagnoses included acute cerebral infarction, seizure disorder, posttraumatic confusion syndrome, complicated migraine, residual astrocytoma, encephalitis, hypoxia without cerebral infarction, cerebral contusion, and conversion disorder. In all patients, routine spin-echo images were also acquired. Trace images and apparent diffusion coefficient maps were produced for each location scanned with LSDI. RESULTS: In the volunteers, LSDI showed less chemical-shift and magnetic-susceptibility artifact and less geometric distortion than did EPID. LSDI was of diagnostic quality in all studies. Diffusion abnormalities were present in five patients. Restricted diffusion was present in the lesions of the three patients with acute cerebral infarction. Mildly increased diffusion was present in the lesions of encephalitis and residual cerebellar astrocytoma. No diffusion abnormalities were seen in the remaining seven children. CONCLUSION: LSDI is feasible in children, provides high-quality diffusion images with less chemical-shift and magnetic-susceptibility artifact and less geometric distortion than does EPID, and complements the routine MR examination.  (+info)

Remediation of attention deficits in head injury. (2/303)

Head injury is associated with psychological sequelae which impair the patient's psychosocial functioning. Information processing, attention and memory deficits are seen in head injuries of all severity. We attempted to improve deficits of focused, sustained and divided attention. The principle of overlapping sources of attention resource pools was utilised in devising the remediation programme. Tasks used simple inexpensive materials. Four head injured young adult males with post concussion syndrome underwent the retraining program for one month. The patients had deficits of focused, sustained and divided attention parallel processing, serial processing, visual scanning, verbal learning and memory and working memory. After the retraining programme the deficits of attention improved in the four patients. Serial processing improved in two patients. Parallel processing and neuropsychological deficits did not improve in any patient. The symptom intensity reduced markedly and behavioural functioning improved in three of the four patients. The results supported an association between improving attention and reduction of symptom intensity. Attention remediation shows promise as a cost effective, time efficient and simple technique to improve the psychological and psychosocial functioning of the head injured patient.  (+info)

Assessment and management of concussion in sports. (3/303)

The most common head injury in sports is concussion. Athletes who sustain a prolonged loss of consciousness should be transported immediately to a hospital for further evaluation. Assessment of less severe injuries should include a thorough neurologic examination. The duration of symptoms and the presence or absence of post-traumatic amnesia and loss of consciousness should be noted. To avoid premature return to play, a good understanding of the possible hazards is important. Potential hazards of premature return to play include the possibility of death from second-impact syndrome, permanent neurologic impairment from cumulative trauma, and the postconcussion syndrome.  (+info)

Traumatic brain injury: diffusion-weighted MR imaging findings. (4/303)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Diffuse axonal injury (DAI) accounts for a significant portion of primary intra-axial lesions in cases of traumatic brain injury. The goal of this study was to use diffusion-weighted MR imaging to characterize DAI in the setting of acute and subacute traumatic brain injury. METHODS: Nine patients ranging in age from 26 to 78 years were examined with conventional MR imaging (including fast spin-echo T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion-recovery, and gradient-echo sequences) as well as echo-planar diffusion-weighted MR imaging 1 to 18 days after traumatic injury. Lesions were characterized as DAI on the basis of their location and their appearance on conventional MR images. Trace apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were computed off-line with the diffusion-weighted and base-line images. Areas of increased signal were identified on the diffusion-weighted images, and regions of interests were used to obtain trace ADC values. RESULTS: In the nine patients studied, isotropic diffusion-weighted images showed areas of increased signal with correspondingly decreased ADC. In one case, decreased ADC was seen 18 days after the initial event. CONCLUSION: Decreased ADC can be demonstrated in patients with DAI in the acute setting and may persist into the subacute period, beyond that described for cytotoxic edema in ischemia.  (+info)

Reversible neuropsychological deficits after mild traumatic brain injury. (5/303)

OBJECTIVES: To determine the influence of motivation on performance in a divided attention test of patients after mild traumatic brain injury (MBI). METHODS: Comparison of the performance of 12 patients with MBI with 10 patients with severe brain injury (SBI) and 11 healthy controls in a computer supported divided attention task before (T1) and after (T2) verbal motivation. RESULTS: At T1, the MBI group performed the same as the SBI group but significantly worse than the controls in all variables. At T2, the MBI group performed worse than the controls at T2 but the results were equal to the results of the controls at T1 and significantly better than the SBI group at T1 or T2. At T2 the MBI group performed at the level of published norms for the rest. CONCLUSION: Before verbal motivation the MBI group's results in the divided attention task were comparable with those from patients with severe brain injury. They failed to exploit their performance potential when it depended on self motivation but were able to perform at the level of the control group when external motivation was applied.  (+info)

Magnetization transfer imaging in the detection of injury associated with mild head trauma. (6/303)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Most traumatic brain injuries are classified as mild, yet in many instances cognitive deficits result. The purpose of this study was to investigate possible relationships between quantitative magnetization transfer imaging (MTI) and neurocognitive findings in a cohort of patients with mild head trauma but negative findings on conventional MR images. METHODS: We examined 13 patients and 10 healthy volunteers with a standard MR protocol including fast spin-echo and gradient-echo imaging, to which was added quantitative MTI. MTI was performed with a modified gradient-echo sequence incorporating pulsed, off-resonance saturation. Both region-of-interest analysis and contour plots were obtained from the MTI data. A subgroup of nine patients was examined with a battery of neuropsychological tests, comprising 25 measures of neurocognitive ability. RESULTS: The magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in the splenium of the corpus callosum was lower in the patient group as compared with the control group, but no significant reduction in MTR was found in the pons. Individual regional MTR values were significantly reduced in two cases, and contour plot analysis revealed focal areas of abnormality in the splenium of four patients. All the patients showed impairment on at least three measures of the neuropsychological test battery, and in two cases a significant correlation was found between regional MTR values and neuropsychological performance. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that MTI and contour plot analysis may add sensitivity to the MR imaging examination of patients with traumatic brain injury.  (+info)

Non-invasive screening for surgical intracranial lesions. (7/303)

The value and reliability of the combined results of skull radiographs, electroencephalography, echoencephalography, isotope angiography, and brain scanning in 147 patients suspected of having an intracranial space occupying lesions are analysed. The overall accuracy of the technique was 79%. No false negatives were found. The advantages of adopting the system proposed by the authors in everyday clinical work is discussed.  (+info)

Effectiveness of headgear in a pilot study of under 15 rugby union football. (8/303)

OBJECTIVE: To determine whether protective headgear reduced the incidence of concussion in a pilot study of under 15 rugby union. METHODS: Sixteen under 15 rugby union teams were recruited from three interschool competitions in metropolitan Sydney and the adjacent country region. A prospective study was undertaken over a single competitive season. The study had two arms: a headgear arm and a control arm. Headgear wearing rates and injury data were reported to the investigators and verified using spot checks. RESULTS: A total of 294 players participated in the study. There were 1179 player exposures with headgear and 357 without headgear. In the study time frame, there were nine incidences of concussion; seven of the players involved wore headgear and two did not. There was no significant difference between concussion rates between the two study arms. CONCLUSIONS: Although there is some controversy about the desirability of wearing protective headgear in football, this pilot study strongly suggests that current headgear does not provide significant protection against concussion in rugby union at a junior level.  (+info)

Aaron M. Yengo-Kahn, BS ,1 Andrew T. Hale, BS ,1 Brian H. Zalneraitis, BS ,1 Scott L. Zuckerman, MD,1,2 Allen K. Sills, MD,1,2 and Gary S. Solomon, PhD1,2 1Vanderbilt Sports Concussion Center, and 2Department of Neurological Surgery, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee. Over the last 2 decades, sport-related concussion (SRC) has garnered significant attention. Even with increased awareness and athlete education, sideline recognition and real-time diagnosis remain crucial. The need for an objective and standardized assessment of concussion led to the eventual development of the Sport Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT) during the Second International Conference on Concussion in Sport in 2004, which is now in its third iteration (SCAT3). In an effort to update our understanding of the most well-known sideline concussion assessment, the authors conducted a systematic review of the SCAT and the evidence supporting its use to date.. ...
In a prospective cohort of 22 male Australian football players, the investigators evaluated the diagnostic accuracy and test-retest repeatability of the King-Devick (K-D) test for identifying sports-related concussion. With a positive likelihood ratio of 11.6 and a positive predictive value of 89%, the K-D test was shown to be an effective screening tool for identifying impaired oculomotor function, a marker for sports-related concussion.. The K-D test may help sports medicine professionals make faster decisions regarding management of sports-related concussion and player fitness on the field.. - Kathleen Freeman, OD, FAAO. Source Link Here. ...
Adolescent athletes will complete the following assessments during a pre-season baseline session: concussion history questionnaire, Sport Concussion Assessment Tool 2 (SCAT2), Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL), Peds QL Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (MFS), Headache Impact Test (HIT-6), and ImPACT. Following a concussion, subjects will be assessed with the SCAT2 within 24 hours of the injury. The SCAT2 will also be given on post-injury day 3. ImPACT will be given on days 1, 3, 10 & 30 post-injury. The PedsQL, MFS, and HIT-6 will be administered on days 3, 10, and 30 post-injury. Athletes who remain out of play on day 10 following concussion will be contacted to participate in a narrative interview to assess the meaning given to their concussion and how it affects their quality of life.. Main Outcome Measures ...
INTRODUCTION: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and previous history of concussion (PHC) are being reported more frequently in college athletes; the presence of these co-morbidities and their effects on concussion assessment has been somewhat limited. PURPOSE: Determine if a relationship exists between ADHD and PHC and the effect of these co-morbidities on neuropsychological test scores. METHODS: This study was a retrospective cross-sectional between groups design. D-1 college athletes (N=1840, males N=1737, females N=103) with a mean age of 19.8+1.6 years completed a computerized neuropsychological test (ImPACT) to establish baseline assessment of concussion history during pre-participation physicals. Participants were divided into groups based upon self-reported diagnosis of ADHD and PHC. Self-report symptoms and ImPACT composite scores served as dependent variables. Comparisons of groups were calculated utilizing regression models and One-Way ANOVAs. All statistical analyses ...
US Youth Soccer has been at the forefront of concussion education and in the creation of policies to address potential concussions that may occur through participation. US Youth Soccer and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have teamed up to help protect participants of all youth sports who may be at risk of concussion. The campaign, is an expansion of the "Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports," and assists in getting concussion information into the hands of coaches, parents, and school and healthcare professionals who are on the front-line to help identify and respond appropriately to concussions among young players. Just last year, new policy provisions were implemented for US Youth Soccer events, which created the highest standards for re-entry into a competition following a possible concussion. Players diagnosed with concussion-like symptoms are required to sit out and must receive a formal release to return-to-play from a licensed medical doctor specializing in concussion ...
US Youth Soccer has been at the forefront of concussion education and in the creation of policies to address potential concussions that may occur through participation. US Youth Soccer and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have teamed up to help protect participants of all youth sports who may be at risk of concussion. The campaign, is an expansion of the "Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports," and assists in getting concussion information into the hands of coaches, parents, and school and healthcare professionals who are on the front-line to help identify and respond appropriately to concussions among young players. Just last year, new policy provisions were implemented for US Youth Soccer events, which created the highest standards for re-entry into a competition following a possible concussion. Players diagnosed with concussion-like symptoms are required to sit out and must receive a formal release to return-to-play from a licensed medical doctor specializing in concussion ...
Background Little is known about the short-term and long-term sequelae of concussion, and about when athletes who have sustained such injuries can safely return to play. Purpose To examine whether sports-related concussion increases the risk of subsequent injury in elite male football players. Study design Prospective cohort study. Methods Injuries were registered for 46 male elite football teams in 10 European countries in the 2001/ 2002-2011/ 2102 seasons. Two survival models were used to analyse whether concussion increased the subsequent risk of an injury in the first year. Results During the follow-up period, 66 players sustained concussions and 1599 players sustained other injuries. Compared with the risk following other injuries, concussion was associated with a progressively increased risk of a subsequent injury in the first year (0 to less than3 months, HR=1.56, 95% CI 1.09 to 2.23; 3 to less than6 months, HR=2.78, 95% CI 1.58 to 4.89; 6-12 months, HR=4.07, 95% CI 2.14 to 7.76). In the ...
Sport concussions are among the most commonly occurring injuries in sport and recreation and pose significant public health implications for Canadians. Many individuals who sustain a concussion recover in the initial 7-10 days but up to 74% of youth and 31% of adults may suffer from persistent symptoms. Little research is currently available evaluating the effects of treatment for individuals who are slower to recover following sport-related concussion. An initial RCT identified a significant treatment effect in individuals with persistent symptoms of dizziness, neck pain and/or headaches following sport-related concussion when treated with a combination of cervical and vestibular physiotherapy compared to a typical protocol of rest followed by graded exertion (Schneider et al, 2014). Low level aerobic exercise in combination with sport specific training may also be of benefit to facilitate recovery in children and youth following concussion (Gagnon et al, 2009, 2016). Further evaluation of ...
Material developed to support many aspects of concussion education and protocol development is available on or through links from the CCC webpage.3 This webpage contains links to the websites of organisations that have contributed to the body of knowledge about concussion prevention and management in Canada and elsewhere. Collectively, these websites have concussion-specific resources for players, parents, coaches, teachers, organisations and others. Questions regarding protocol development can be addressed to the CCC through the Canadian Academy of Sport and Exercise Medicine.3. Recommendation 2: In situations where timely and sufficient availability of medical resources qualified for concussion management is not available, multidisciplinary collaborative approaches should be used to improve concussion management outcomes while facilitating access to medical resources where appropriate.. Current recommendations related to gradual RTP following a concussion state that medical clearance must be ...
People are much more likely to get a concussion if theyve had one before. So prevention is very important after a head injury. Repeated concussions can lead to lasting brain damage, even when the injuries happen months or years apart.. Concussions are serious injuries that can be even more serious if kids dont get the time and rest needed to heal them completely. Anyone with a concussion needs to heal before doing anything that could lead to another concussion.. Safety steps can help prevent concussions. If a concussion does happen, following a doctors advice can lessen its effects.. ...
Some helmets include accelerometers that measure the amount of force affecting a players head. When players experience forces greater than 100 G (100 times the force of gravity), the likelihood of concussion is increased.2Unfortunatelythis measure is not always a good predictor of whether or not a concussion occurred. In other words, there is "cut off" or minimum threshold force for concussion. Therefore, this measurement is only moderately helpful in sideline concussion management.. The medical professional will then perform a focused physical/neurological examination. The provider will look for signs of dizziness or poor coordination, poor attention, confusion, emotionality, or difficulty following instructions. They may also perform cranial nerve testing (there are 12 cranial nerves that control sensory and motor function in the head and neck). The professional may perform strength and sensation testing and perform tests of balance.. Even after this full assessment, it is not always possible ...
Background: Concussion diagnosis and management remains a largely subjective process. This investigation sought to evaluate the utility of a novel neuroelectric measure for concussion diagnosis and return to play decision making.Hypothesis: Brain Network Activation (BNA) scores obtained within 72-hours of injury will be lower than the athletes preseason evaluation and that of a matched control athlete; and the BNA will demonstrate on-going declines at the return to play and post-season time points, while standard measures will have returned to pre-injury and control athlete levels.Design: case-control studyMethods: Football athletes with a diagnosed concussion (n=8) and matched control football athletes (n=8) completed a preseason evaluation of cognitive (i.e., Cogstate Computerized Cognitive Assessment Tool) and neuroelectric function (i.e., BNA), clinical reaction time, SCAT3 self-reported symptoms and quality of life (i.e., Health Behavior Inventory and Satisfaction with Life Scale). Following a
A concussion is where there is a disruption in the normal activity of the brain usually due to an injury. The disturbance in brain function is temporary but there can be complications which may arise up to years after the concussion. Overall concussions are uncommon and most of the time it is not serious. Rest for a few hours is sufficient to overcome the disturbance although some people may need days or weeks to recover.. Although a concussion does not result in permanent brain damage, the effects can be quite severe in the short term. It depends on the extent of the brain injury. Very mild concussions may cause little to nor symptoms and many people do not realize that they have a concussion in these cases. With a more severe concussion that may be disturbances in the senses, impairment of balance and coordination, confusion and even loss of consciousness.. ...
reference - UPMC, YouTube.com). A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury that results from a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or by a hit to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth creating a whiplash effect. This sudden movement can cause the brain to bounce around or twist in the skull, stretching and damaging the brain cells (axons) and creating biochemical changes in the brain not due to bleeding, tearing or bruising of the brain. Concussions result in temporary alteration of mental functioning. Furthermore this can include physical, emotional/social, cognitive symptoms and sleep disturbances. Signs and symptoms can be delayed appearing hours or days later. Concussions cannot be seen on X-ray or CT scan. Concussions do not have to be a result of loss of consciousness. When a student is injured and has a second concussion while he/she still has symptoms from a previous concussion which can lead to permanent disability and even death. The second injury may ...
Concussion Screening and Treatment: One of the specialty services that Legacy Medical Centers provides is free baseline concussion screening for all athletes ten years of age or older. We at Legacy Medical Centers want everyone to be aware of the serious dangers of concussions. It is our belief that baseline screening for athletes is essential for proper treatment should a concussive injury occur. We are proud to offer free baseline ImPACTTM neurocognitive and BIODEXTM balance/vestibular assessments.. There are more than 3.8 million sports related concussions that occur annually in the U.S. The good news is that the vast majority of individuals will heal and return to baseline levels of neurocognitive function with properly directed physical and cognitive rest. Since no two concussions are exactly the same, individualized treatment is necessary for successful recovery.. At Legacy Medical Centers, our concussion specialists follow the Consensus Best Practice, Diagnosis and Management of ...
Virginia Department of Education - Brain Injury and the Schools, A Guide for Teachers. http://www.doe.virginia.gov/special_ed/disabilities/traumatic_brain_injury/brain_injury_schools.pdf. RCPS Traumatic Brain Injury/Concussion Response Process - Flow Chart. https://docs.google.com/a/rockingham.k12.va.us/file/d/0B_9mdEDnu7INQS10eV85LVQzT0U/edit. Concussion Symptoms and Accommodations. https://docs.google.com/a/rockingham.k12.va.us/file/d/0B_9mdEDnu7INSFN1dW9HV0xWS1k/edit?usp=drive_web. CMT-1 CDC Concussion Signs and Symptoms. https://www.cdc.gov/headsup/pdfs/schools/tbi_schools_checklist_508-a.pdf. CMT-2 RCPS Concussion Symptom Monitoring. https://drive.google.com/a/rockingham.k12.va.us/file/d/0B1A8gWms9wWhZ1hybEpoVEFCbjg/view?usp=sharing. CMT-3 RCPS Concussion Notification to Teachers. https://docs.google.com/document/d/1N5U7z8IdI4SI6pM8fboU8cK204nMuzzsEAuKajlquCs/edit. CMT-4 RCPS Concussion Academic ...
Aim: For junior-level Australian Rules Football there is a paucity of head injury and concussion surveillance data; thus, the primary aim was to document head injury and concussion incidence in participants aged 9-17 years with a secondary aim to identify the mechanism-of-injury.. Methods: A prospective cohort study in which a designated representative for each of the 41 teams recorded on a weekly basis the number of head injuries suspected of being a concussion, diagnosed concussions and the mechanism-of-injury during competition games over the course of a 12-game season. For analysis three groups were formed - number of Player-Seasons, Athlete-Exposures, head injury and concussion incidence per 1000 Athlete-Exposures - and were calculated. Narrative data was categorised.. Results: There was 13 reported head injuries resulting in seven concussions in the sample population (n = 976). The incidence rates for head injury and concussion were 1.1 (95% confidence interval: 0.5-1.7) and 0.59 (95% ...
Principle Investigator: Ruben J. Echemendia, Ph.D.. Institution: Pennsylvania State University, Department of Psychology. Title: A comparison of traditional and computerized neuropsychological assessment of athletes prior to and following cerebral concussion. Abstract: Cerebral concussions frequently occur in sports and can have serious, at times catastrophic outcomes to athletes at all levels of competition. Approximately 300,000 sport-related concussions occur annually. High incidence rates have been reported in football, soccer, wrestling, and lacrosse, among others. Concussions account for 30% of all injuries in ice hockey, and in some sports women have significantly higher injury rates than men. The goal of this proposal is to continue data collection and extend the Penn State Cerebral Concussion Project (funded by NOCSAE during the past two years). A computerized neuropsychological (NP) assessment battery (ImPACT; Immediate Post Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) will be added to ...
CHOP is using this study data to create a new model of care for pediatric concussion. PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 12, 2012 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- While general pediatricians and pediatric emergency physicians value their role in concussion management, a study of their self-reported knowledge, practices and attitudes points to the need for improved concussion-specific training and infrastructure to support optimal patient care. The study, released today in the journal Pediatrics, served as a catalyst for The Childrens Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) to create a new "medical home" model for managing pediatric and adolescent concussion.. The study surveyed 145 emergency medicine and primary care providers, among whom 91 percent had cared for at least one concussion patient and 92 percent had referred at least one patient to a concussion specialist in the prior three months. Authors noted variability in how respondents recognized signs, symptoms and physical exam findings for concussion. They recommend ...
ROSEMONT, IL - With the NFLs recent concussion policy changes and the rising rates of sports-related concussions (approximately 300,000/year) baseline testing is becoming a critical piece of the treatment and prevention puzzle. A new study, published in the January issue of the American Journal of Sports Medicine investigates baseline concussion testing two years after the initial test and provides insights into the reliability of pre-season evaluations.. "To date, there is no guideline for how often baseline concussion assessments need to be updated," explains study author, Philip Schatz, PhD, a Professor at Saint Josephs University in Pennsylvania. "Our study evaluated the reliability of baseline test scores two years after the initial test. The results illustrate that the baseline scores were reliable and may contribute towards establishing guidelines on how often testing needs to take place.. The study tested 95 collegiate athletes who underwent baseline testing during either their ...
Post-traumatic migraine (PTM) (i.e., headache, nausea, light and/or noise sensitivity) is an emerging risk factor for prolonged recovery following concussion. Concussions and migraine share similar...
Concussions largely effect the brain on a molecular level as well. They do this by effecting the function of neurons which help control the function of the whole brain. Some things that happen according to the XLNT brain Sport Sports Concussion management "include the release of toxic excitatory neurotransmitters like glutamine, increased metabolic energy demands to assist with the cell recovery, and the inability to regulate electrolytes. All of these things have the ability to accumulate over time and make it harder to fully recover from a concussion.. Recovery from a concussion is even tougher. After having a concussion for a little while cells start to attempt to recuperate and regain form and equilibrium. This process could take anywhere from a several hours to a few months. The body and brain actually try to instill side effects like making bright lights painful in order to make the brain be used to think as little as possible. In order to effectively have your brain heal after a ...
By Carolyn Crist(Reuters Health) - With passage of laws requiring U.S. high schools to report young athletes concussions, more of these head injuries are being reported - but the rate of repeat concussions has gone down, a new study shows.Between 2009 and 2014, all 50 states and the District of Columbia passed concussion laws focused on three core components: mandatory removal from play after a suspected concussion, clearance to return to play from a licensed health professional, and required education of coaches, parents and athletes about concussion symptoms and signs, the study authors note in the American Journal of Public Health online October 19.
From professional sports arenas to peewee playing fields across the nation, the incidence of concussions is on the rise.. An athlete who suffers one concussion is four to six times more likely to sustain a second one.. If left undiagnosed, a concussion can place an athlete at risk of developing second-impact syndrome, a potentially fatal injury that occurs when an athlete sustains a second head injury before a previous head injury has completely healed.. Concussions are a hot-button topic, especially in Hawaii, where hundreds of student-athletes suffer concussions each year.. A concussion is a serious brain injury caused by a sudden bump or blow to the head that can lead to a variety of symptoms:. ...
Young athletes in the U.S. face a "culture of resistance" to reporting when they might have a concussion and to complying with treatment plans, which could endanger their well-being, says a new report from the Institute of Medicine and National Research Council. The report provides a broad examination of concussions in a variety of youth sports with athletes aged 5 to 21. Overall, reported concussions rates are more frequent among high school athletes than college athletes in some sports - including football, mens lacrosse and soccer, and baseball; higher for competition than practice (except for cheerleading); and highest in football, ice hockey, lacrosse, wrestling, soccer, and womens basketball. Concussion rates also appear higher for youths with a history of prior concussions and among female athletes.. Read more:. ...
A range of additional investigations may be utilised to assist in the diagnosis and/or exclusion of injury. Conventional structural neuroimaging is typically normal in concussive injury. Given that caveat, the following suggestions are made: Brain CT (or where available an MR brain scan) contributes little to concussion evaluation but should be employed whenever suspicion of an intracerebral or structural lesion (eg, skull fracture) exists. Examples of such situations may include prolonged disturbance of the conscious state, focal neurological deficit or worsening symptoms.. Other imaging modalities such as fMRI demonstrate activation patterns that correlate with symptom severity and recovery in concussion.10-14 Although not part of routine assessment at the present time, they nevertheless provide additional insight to pathophysiological mechanisms. Alternative imaging technologies (eg, positron emission tomography, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, functional ...
Think Head First brings a comprehensive and cutting edge concussion protocol to the Telluride Medical Center.. This month the Telluride Medical Center announced a partnership with Think Head First to bring a comprehensive concussion management program to the Telluride community. The Think Head First program manages mild head injury and provides education and consultation expertise for sport organizations in the area of concussion management.. The Telluride Medical Centers Think Head First initiative will utilize ImPACT Neuropsychological testing software as an additional tool for assessing and determining when it is appropriate to return to sport safely after a head injury. Laura Cattell, PA-C, who has been with the Telluride Medical Center since 2000 will head up the program and serve as the resident concussion expert. "The ImPACT software is cutting edge. It allows us to get perform testing to measure baseline cognitive function to be used to evaluate a patient if theyre suspected of a ...
A week of cognitive and physical rest-which included taking time off from school or work and avoiding talking on the phone, exercising, watching TV, socializing, or working at a computer-alleviated symptoms of concussion in 49 high school and college athletes, according to a Reuters Health article based on a study in The Journal of Pediatrics.. To measure the effect of "an intensive bout of rest" after a concussion, researchers evaluated the athletes between April 2010 and September 2011 and assigned them to groups based on the time elapsed between sustaining a concussion and the onset of rest. Fourteen of the patients started the rest within a week of their injuries. Another 22 patients began resting within a month of the concussion, and 13 patients began the week of rest between 1 and 7 months after the concussion.. At the beginning of the study, all of the patients had symptoms related to the injury, such as headaches and trouble concentrating. After the week of rest, all groups saw their ...
Researchers examined neuroimaging studies obtained in children and adolescents with sports-related concussions and found that the images appeared normal in 78 percent of cases. Although usually nondiagnostic, occasionally such studies can be useful in guiding decisions about return to play.
Fortunately, most students with a concussion will recover within the first 3 weeks from their injury.10 For students with symptoms lasting longer than 3 weeks, further medical management considerations and accommodations, rather than academic adjustments, may be needed. Schools currently have in place a system for accommodations (504 plan) for students expected to have temporary interference with learning or modifications (IEP) for students with a classifiable chronic condition. However, applying these systems to concussions, in some schools, may be a newer concept. Although healing may be considered "protracted" with some concussions, the expectation is still for a full recovery that no longer would require academic adjustments, accommodations, or modifications. Referral to a concussion specialist (licensed physician, such as a pediatrician, neurologist, primary care sports medicine specialist, or neurosurgeon with expanded knowledge and experience in pediatric concussion management) should ...
By Lisa Rapaport(Reuters Health) - Brain scans may help identify athletes who suffer from brain damage after mild concussions, a small study of current and former professional football players suggests. Researchers examined results from whats known as positron emission tomography (PET) scans for four current and 10 former National Football League (NFL) players who had at least one previous concussion as well as for 16 similar men who werent athletes and had no history of concussions. They measured levels of a substance called translocator protein 18KDa (TSPO), which are thought to rise when the brain responds to traumatic injuries. Compared with men who werent in the NFL, the football players had higher levels of TSPO and greater changes in the brains white matter, the study found.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Recent Preoperative Concussion and Postoperative Complications. T2 - A Retrospective Matched-cohort Study. AU - DSouza, Ryan S.. AU - Sexton, Matthew A.. AU - Schulte, Phillip J.. AU - Pasternak, Jeffrey J.. AU - Abcejo, Arnoley S.. PY - 2019/1/1. Y1 - 2019/1/1. N2 - Background: Physiological alterations during the perianesthetic period may contribute to secondary neurocognitive injury after a concussion. Methods: Patients exposed to concussion and who received an anesthetic within 90 days were matched to unexposed patients without concussion. Intraoperative and postoperative events were compared. Subgroup analyses assessed relationships among patients with a concussion in the prior 30, 31 to 60, and 61 to 90 days and their respective unexposed matches. To facilitate identification of potential targets for further investigation, statistical comparisons are reported before, as well as after, correction for multiple comparisons. Results: Sixty concussion patients were matched to ...
Heres another interesting paper that was presented at the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. Theres a lot of attention being focused on the incidence and management of concussion during sporting events. An international Concussion in Sport Group has been meeting for over 10 years, contemplating classification and management of this injury. They are considering using age to modify management of concussion in young athletes.. The authors looked at their own experience with 200 adolescent and young athletes. They stratified by age (younger = 13-16 year olds, older = 18-22 year olds), with 100 in each group. They matched them by number of previous concussions, and all underwent baseline and post-concussion ImPACT testing. They specifically looked at the number of days needed to return to baseline.. Interestingly, they identified significant differences in recovery time. And strangely enough, the older players did better than the younger ones. Overall, 90% returned to baseline within a month. But ...
(BPT) - Parents of young athletes know that along with the many benefits of participating in sports, there comes a certain amount of injury risk. And while most would agree that the benefits of being active and involved in athletics outweigh those risks, it’s important to make sure your child gets proper treatment if an injury occurs. As more evidence surfaces about long-term health challenges related to concussions, it’s especially crucial that parents bring themselves up to speed on the proper procedures for caring for an athlete who experiences a concussion.The most important thing parents need to know about concussions is that if an athlete exhibits any signs or experiences any symptoms of a concussion, he or she should be immediately removed from play. While this recommendation is nothing new, the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) is again emphasizing its importance with the release of its updated 2013 sports concussion evidence-based guidelines.“Among the most important
In addition to providing interdisciplinary team evaluations and treatment of post concussion symptoms, Good Shepherd is credentialed to utilize ImPACTTM (Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing), the most widely used computerized concussion evaluation tool. ImPACT assesses cognitive functions commonly affected by a concussion, including verbal and visual short-term memory, visual motor speed and reaction time in order to manage recovery.
A recent experiment published on nature.com provided stunning new evidence of how damaging even minor brain impacts can be, finding that concussions can actually kill brain cells far from the original site of head impact.
Concussions are a common injury among athletes in the United States. The annual incidence of sports and recreational related traumatic brain injuries in the United States is 1.6 to 3.8 million, and the likelihood of an athlete in a contact sport experiencing a concussion is as high as 20 percent per season. Even mild traumatic brain injury, including concussion, can cause long-term cognitive problems that affect a persons ability to perform daily activities and to return to school or work. Far more concerning is the mounting body of evidence that concussions are not just transient injuries - but have cumulative effects. It has been well established in animal models that progesterone has neuroprotective benefits. Animal studies using progesterone for acute post-injury treatment have demonstrated reduced cerebral edema, reduced neuro-inflammatory markers, decreased neuronal loss, and improved behavioral outcomes. To date, there have been no studies to assess whether or not progesterone will be ...
WEDNESDAY, Dec. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- The link between concussions and brain injury might be a hot topic in the NFL, but at the high school level? Apparently not so much.. Overall, only about a third of high school athletes, their coaches and parents know that a concussion is a brain injury, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers. The athletes themselves were the most likely to know that fact, the researchers found.. They surveyed 115 athletes, 132 parents and 15 coaches at three high schools in Rochester, Minn. They were involved with a variety of sports -- football, soccer, volleyball, hockey, basketball, wrestling, dance, gymnastics, lacrosse, baseball and softball. All of the participants completed a questionnaire designed to assess what they knew about concussions.. Most people could identify the possible effects of concussion, the study found. Coaches had the most knowledge about how a concussion occurs, when to take an athlete out of a game and the potential effects of ...
Prevention of mild traumatic brain injury involves taking general measures to prevent traumatic brain injury, such as wearing seat belts and using airbags in cars. Older people are encouraged to try to prevent falls, for example by keeping floors free of clutter and wearing thin, flat, shoes with hard soles that do not interfere with balance. Unfortunately, to date, there is no data to support the claim that any particular type of helmet or protective equipment reduces the risk of sports-related concussion. Improvements in the design of protective athletic gear such as helmets may decrease the number and severity of such injuries. New "Head Impact Telemetry System" technology is being placed in helmets to study injury mechanisms and potentially help reduce the risk of concussions among American Football players. Changes to the rules or the practices of enforcing existing rules in sports, such as those against "head-down tackling", or "spearing", which is associated with a high injury rate, may ...
Results of a new study tend to support the prevalent opinion among physicians specialising in sports-related concussion (SRC) that neuroimaging is not that useful in diagnosing SRCs.
Since concussion symptoms for the majority of people with a mild TBI will abate in the following days or weeks, treating symptoms with natural treatments can ease the discomfort.. 1. Engage in light-to-moderate activity. In the first several days following the concussion, follow activity guidelines set by the physician. However, incorporating light-to-moderate exercise within seven days of injury may reduce the risk for developing persistent post-concussive symptoms, a recent study has found. Over 3,000 children and adolescents from 5 to 18 years of age were included in this study. While specific activities and duration were not identified, beginning with light activity and progressing to more moderate activity may be beneficial for long-term health - as long as no new symptoms arise (and old symptoms dont worsen). (21). Early during recovery, safe choices might include walking, yoga, pilates and light aerobic exercise leading to returning to non-contact training and more rigorous aerobic ...
In response to the publicity generated from the Grimsley autopsy, the NFL issued a statement saying that the organization is conducting its own research on the long-term effects of concussion and that findings will be available by 2010. The NFL also held a meeting last June to discuss the research with sports physicians.. Dr. Cantu commends this effort but said that the NFL should have other experts weigh in on their internal investigation on concussion. In 1986, Dr. Cantu issued concussion guidelines for doctors who treat professional athletes. An international committee of experts also published similar guidelines in 2001. The guidelines state that a full recovery is imperative before resuming the sport.. CTE is rare and occurs in those athletes who get injured repeatedly without letting the brain recover. No one knows how tau builds up in the brains of these athletes.. "Athletes who sustain multiple traumas may be okay today but could sustain neurological problems when they are older," said ...
For decades in the N.F.L., the operative term for the situation was that someone "got dinged." It was a cute, almost harmless-sounding description of what was often a concussion or a worrying subconcussive blow to the head.. But with the N.F.L. agreeing to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to settle a lawsuit brought by about 5,000 former players who said the league hid from them the dangers of repeated hits to the head, a backpedaling league has corrected its lingo and hastily amended its methodology. The N.F.L. now has a concussion management protocol, outlined in an inches-thick document that commands teams to institute a specific, detailed game-day and postconcussion course of action.. Read more:. ...
Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center (DVBIC) will host a webinar 1-2:30 p.m., May 11, to highlight two clinical tools to help health care providers treat patients following concussion. Current concussion management guidelines include a stepped, or phased, approach to returning to activities after a period of rest.Webinar presenters will demonstrate how to use clinical recommendations to treat service members and discuss:
newswise.com. http://www.newswise.com/articles/concussions-increase-the-risk-of-lower-extremity-injury A new study shows that college athletes who sustain concussions are more likely to have a lower extremity injury in the same season after they return from the concussion.. Dr. Daniel Herman, a fellow in primary care sports medicine at the University of Florida, presented this research at the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine conference in San Diego, California. Athletes with concussions were 3.79 times more likely to get a muscle or ligament injury than their non-concussed teammates. The severity of the injuries was not statistically different between the two groups. This research takes the popular topic of concussions in a direction that many people have not thought about.. "These results may have clinical implications ranging from pre-season injury risk stratification to post-concussion rehabilitation practices to return to play considerations, said Dr. Herman. My colleagues and I ...
All Sports Concussion Centres work in consultation with The South African Rugby Union, The Chris Burger Petro Jackson Fund and international concussion experts.
Better protection for youth athletes includes new youth sports concussion laws and the need for udpated concussion return--to-play protocols
Remove the athlete from play immediately if a concussion is suspected and do not allow the athlete to return to play that day or at any time until they have written clearance from a medical professional. Concussion symptoms can take time to appear, sometimes hours or days after the injury.. Require written medical authorization (from a qualified medical professional) before allowing the athlete to participate in practice or games. Athlete must also be 100% symptom free at rest and during exertion (see below).. Follow the international graduated return to play guidelines. After the athlete receives medical clearance to return to play and is 100% symptom free at rest, it is important that they return to play using gradual return to play guidelines. If symptoms return during exertion, they need longer time to heal.. ...
Sports concussion has become an increasingly important news topic for young athletes,particularly in light of the detrimental effect that such an injury can have on cognitive, emotional, and academic functioning.
Sports concussion has become an increasingly important news topic for young athletes,particularly in light of the detrimental effect that such an injury can have on cognitive, emotional, and academic functioning.
Researchers have found five molecules, called microRNAs, in saliva that could identify concussive symptoms in children, teens and young adults, according to a new study.. The findings focus on these microRNAs, or fragments of genetic material, that are easily detectable in blood, cerebrospinal fluid and saliva, according to the studys researchers from Penn State College of Medicine.. A test that measures microRNAs in saliva was nearly 90 percent accurate in identifying children and adolescents who had concussion symptoms persisting for at least a month, according to the study published this week in JAMA Pediatrics. That compares to a concussion survey commonly used by doctors that was right less than 70 percent of the time.. As a result of the findings in the latest study, a saliva test may someday be able to diagnose a concussion and predict how long symptoms last, particularly in young people. Concussions most often affect children, teens and young adults who dont usually demonstrate obvious ...
Concussion symptoms can be obvious, like headaches; but they can also be more subtle, such as changes in mood. Here are the symptoms of concussion you
This topic will discuss the management of concussion in children and adolescents. The clinical manifestations and diagnosis of concussion in children, the sideline evaluation of concussion, concussions and traumatic brain injury in adults, and postco
Injuries to the head and neck are common in sports. Sideline physicians must be attentive and prepared with an organized approach to detect and manage these injuries. Because head and neck injuries often occur simultaneously, the sideline physician can combine the head and neck evaluations. When assessing a conscious athlete, the physician initially evaluates the neck for spinal cord injury and determines whether the athlete can be moved safely to the sideline for further evaluation. This decision is made using an on-field assessment of the athletes peripheral sensation and strength, as well as neck tenderness and range of motion. If these evaluations are normal, axial loading and Spurling testing can be performed. Once the neck has been determined to be normal, the athlete can be assisted to the sideline for assessment of concussion symptoms and severity. This assessment should include evaluations of the athletes reported symptoms, recently acquired memory, and postural stability. Injured athletes
This is unfortunate, as these neurocognitive assessments are capable of detecting incomplete recovery. These findings, reported by William Meehan, III, MD, of the Sports Concussion Clinic at Childrens Hospital Boston, along with R. Dawn Comstock, PhD and colleagues at Nationwide Childrens Hospital, stem from a national study of injured athletes at US high schools and a survey of athletic trainers employed by those highs schools soon to be published in Pediatrics.. Awareness of the problem of concussions in young athletes has grown dramatically in recent years, as medical practitioners realize the potential for long term effects of sustaining multiple concussions. Computerized neurocognitive assessments offer an objective means of monitoring recovery. The study by Meehan and his colleagues showed that athletes who are managed with computerized neurocognitive assessments are less likely to be returned to sports within 10 days of their injury, presumably because the computerized assessments ...
Read about concussion symptoms, signs, test, postconcussion syndrome, and treatment. Learn how to tell if you have a concussion and what to do in the case of a mild concussion.
Concussion Information: A concussion is a traumatic brain injury. Symptoms may include headache, loss of memory, confusion, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, slurred speech, fatigue, etc.. What can happen if my child keeps on playing with a concussion or returns too soon? Athletes with the signs and symptoms of concussion should be removed from play immediately. Continuing to play with the signs and symptoms of a concussion leaves the young athlete especially vulnerable to greater injury. There is an increased risk of significant damage from a concussion for a period of time after that concussion occurs, particularly if the athlete suffers another concussion before completely recovering from the first one. This can lead to prolonged recovery, or even to severe brain swelling (second impact syndrome) with devastating and even fatal consequences. It is well known that adolescent or teenage athletes will often fail to report symptoms of injuries. Concussions are no different. As a result, education of ...
In addition to prevention and knowledge transfer, the recommended changes to improve concussion outcomes are dependent on professional practice modifications such as improved coaching styles, referee conduct, and athlete play modifications (Gleadhill, 2014). It is not enough to give a helmet design an improvement or a large class action settlement and not include this in an overall concussion protocol. Education in strength training, particularly in the neck, and use of safety gear such as mouth pieces also are part of the educational and professional evolution in this area. Another element of improvement are rule changes resulting in less contact that may cause concussion in sports. For example, amateur hockey has eliminated checking for youth under 17 years old in Canada as research indicated concussed youth are at much greater risk. Are rule changes enough? Dr. Bennett Omalu of recent movie Concussion (2015) fame recently wrote in the NY Times that he believes no child should participate in ...
Because there is a lot of brand new research coming out about concussions, we felt it necessary to make some things that used to be recommendations, requirements," Unruh said. "Overall there has just been a bigger push for greater concussion awareness and education for everybody, for coaches, for players, and for parents as well.". This school year KSHSAA now requires all athletes to sign a copy of the states Sports Head Injury Prevention Act to make sure that people understand the seriousness of concussions. This state wide act contains the return to play guidelines and also states that "any athlete who exhibits signs, symptoms or behaviors consistent with a concussion shall be immediately removed from the contest and shall not return to play until cleared by an appropriate health care professional.". This act has been in place since 2007, but this season KSHSAA is taking it one step further and forcing parents and athletes to sign it before play begins.. ***. As Stewart ran down the field ...
Concussion is a type of mild traumatic brain injury, is common, and occurs both in sport and as a result of falls or accidents. Concussion has become an increasingly recognized public health concern, largely driven by prominent media coverage of athletes who have sustained concussion. Although much has been written about this condition, its natural history is still not well understood, and practitioners are only now beginning to recognize that concussion often manifests in different clinical domains. These may require targeted treatment in and of themselves; otherwise, persistent post-concussive symptoms may develop. Although most individuals who sustain a concussion recover, and although concussion is a treatable condition, it is important that concussion be managed early and comprehensively to avoid a more prolonged clinical trajectory. A relatively recent term often used in the setting of concussion is repetitive head impact exposure-a biomechanical force applied to the head that does not ...
Looking for pulmonary concussion? Find out information about pulmonary concussion. a jarring of the brain, caused by a blow or a fall, usually resulting in loss of consciousness Shock waves in the air caused by an explosion underground or... Explanation of pulmonary concussion
This year, in recognition of Brain Injury Awareness Month, CDC encourages school professionals, coaches, parents, and athletes to learn the risks for concussions in youth sports. A concussion is a type of traumatic brain injury caused by a bump, blow, or jolt to the head.. An estimated 135,000 sports and recreation-related traumatic brain injuries, including concussions, are treated in U.S. emergency departments each year (1). Most persons with a concussion recover fully. However, returning to sports and other regular activities too quickly can prolong recovery time, sometimes for months. A repeat concussion that occurs before the brain recovers from the first can be very dangerous and might slow recovery or increase the chances for long-term problems. To date, CDC has disseminated approximately 1.3 million educational pieces on concussion in sports for health-care professionals, coaches, parents, and athletes (2). CDCs next steps include an online training course for coaches on concussion ...
A method and apparatus for providing an on-site diagnosis of a subject to determine the presence and/or severity of a concussion is provided. The method includes placing an electrode set coupled to a handheld base unit on the subjects head, acquiring brain electrical signals from the subject through the electrode set, processing the acquired brain electrical signals using a signal processing algorithm stored in a memory of the base unit, determining the presence and/or severity of a concussion from the processed signals, indicating the presence and/or severity of a concussion on the handheld base unit, and determining a course of treatment for the subject based on the indication.
On July 8, 2010, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick signed the Commonwealths youth sports concussion safety law, which applies to all public schools in the state and any school subject to the Massachusetts Interscholastic Athletic Association rules.
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:. Fewer NFL Player Concussions in 2016: League. The number of concussions in the National Football League this season are down from the previous year, the league says.. There were 244 diagnosed concussions in preseason and regular season games in 2016, compared with 275 in 2015. There were 167 concussions in regular season games in 2016, which is 16 fewer than in 2015, the Associated Press reported.. The NFL said it has implemented improved concussion detection and examination protocols.. Players willingness to report injuries is a major factor in the reduced number of concussions, according to Dr. Robert Heyer, president of the NFL Physicians Society and team internist for the Carolina Panthers.. "I have been a team physician 22 years, and in the past three years I think weve seen a cultural change regarding concussions," Heyer told the AP.. "As result of ongoing education, players are more ...
Susan J. White 2016-10-28 04:57:35. Rachel Olatunji is the epitome of a high achiever. The 13-year-old from Evanston works hard and excels in both academics and a host of extracurricular activities, including sports. But last year, Rachel faced a big challenge when she suffered an unexpected concussion in the midst of a soccer match. HEART-STOPPING MOMENT It happened within the first five minutes of a North Shore Country Day School Middle School soccer game. A player collided with Rachel and a group of girls going for the ball. Rachel fell to the ground and was accidentally kicked in the head. "I got hit really hard, right by my eye," she recalled. "At first I couldnt get up; I was feeling dizzy and slow." Understandably concerned, Rachels mom Christine Olatunji immediately called NorthShore Pediatrician Sharon Robinson, MD, after an athletic trainers sideline evaluation noted that Rachel may have suffered a concussion. Dr. Robinson rapidly made an appointment for the Olatunjis at NorthShore ...
In this study, 2,055 high school and college athletes were asked to participate to help researchers better understand how their medical complaints, such as aches and pains, may take longer to dissipate after a concussion. Researchers assessed each participant for balance, thinking and memory skills along with psychological symptoms, such as depression or anxiety, and psychosomatic symptoms, such as feeling faint or dizzy, nausea or upset stomach or pains in the chest or heart. Psychosomatic symptoms are forms of psychological distress that are being expressed as physical illness or pain. "The goal of this study was to determine how physical complaints before and after concussion play a role in recovery," said study author Lindsay D. Nelson, PhD, assistant professor of Neurosurgery and Neurology at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee. "We found the greatest predictor of recovery after a concussion was the severity of early post-concussion symptoms. But somatic complaints before injury ...
Goetzl, E., Elahi, F., Mustapic, M., Kapogiannis, D., Pryhoda, M., Gilmore, A., Gorgens, K., Davidson, B., Granholm, A. and Ledreux, A. (2019, January). Altered levels of plasma neuron-derived exosomes and their cargo proteins characterize acute and chronic mild traumatic brain injury. The FASEB Journal. Gorgens, K. & Oduleye, N. (2018, August). Postconcussion Research and Interventions with NCAA Athletes. Presented at the 2018 American Psychological Association Conference, Washington D.C.. Hamilton, D., Oduleye, N., & Gorgens, K. (2017, May). A Demographic Portrait Between the Association of Blood Biomarkers and Concussion in Athletes. Poster presented at the University of Denver Concussion Conference, Denver, CO. Hamilton, D., Oduleye, N., & Gorgens, K. (2017, May). A Demographic Portrait Between the Association of Blood Biomarkers and Concussion in Athletes. Poster presented at the University of Denver OneDay, Denver, CO. Regan, C., Granholm, A. C., Gorgens, K., Ledreux, A., Shelburne, K., ...
Two sisters who grew up in Beaver Dam have secured an investment from TitletownTech. They have developed a device that could make diagnosing concussions as easy as a four-minute eye test.
In 2001 the first International Symposium on Concussion in Sport was held, organized by hockey, soccer, and olympic organizations not NFL
The National Football League and General Electric Co are teaming up to improve the diagnosis and treatment of brain injuries amid growing concerns about sports-related concussions in youth and professional sports.
Concussions are not fun. I have seizures now because truth be told from November 2014 to August 10, 2015, I suffered an average of two concussions a month with the final major blow ending in traumatic brain injury August 10, 2015. I received these concussions at the hands of my husband, Joseph Michael DeRiso. He gave…
In my first post on concussion I wrote about how I treat patients with post-concussion syndromes and which treatments I have found the most effective. I the more I have read about concussion the more disappointed I was getting that there was minimal effort to prevent incidence of concussion from occurring in the first place. Articles on concussion prevention mostly include buying better equipment and early detection. There are finally programs being developed to prepare the body as well as possible to handle the forces of sport where concussion is a possibility.. One of my patients who was a researcher and inventor once said "We can solve any problem as long as we ask the right questions." I think the right questions are starting being asked by researchers-who is vulnerable to concussions and why? Little can be done beyond equipment to stop a lacrosse ball form hitting a player in the head because it happens so fast. But how can coaches and trainers prepare an athletes body as much as possible ...
Concussed youth athletes should be placed on immediate physical and mental rest DURING THE ACUTE PERIOD. That means AVOIDANCE OF physical exercise, computer games, texting, parties, or going to the mall with friends. During the summer, it will mean absence from camp. Because of these factors and the fact that a youth athletes brain is still developing and growing, some experts suggest that youth remain out of CONTACT RISK sports for three weeks or more after they are symptom free, especially if they have a history of prior concussions. The effectiveness of rest in the acute period, and for those with difficult or prolonged recoveries or history of previous concussions, cannot be underestimated.(7,8) How long a period of cognitive and physical rest a student-athlete will need varies. Slowly introducing mild physical activity after the acute period to help athletes stay conditioned, without increasing their symptoms, and should be guided by a licensed health care professional with expertise in ...
Concussions are the most common form of brain injury in British Columbia, yet they are often under reported due to lack of awareness and education among the general public. The Concussion Awareness Training Tool (CATT) is a free online resource dedicated to providing resources and training to help increase the recognition, treatment and management of concussions.
How should hockey star Sidney Crosby, or my own child, be treated if he suffered a brain concussion? To answer this question I interviewed Dr. Andrew Saul, Editor-in-Chief of the Orthomolecular Medical News Service, and a world authority on nutrition. Dr. Saul confirmed what I suspected, that bruised brains are not receiving the treatment they desperately need.. Newtons Law states, "For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction." Unfortunately, our Maker didnt use screws to anchor the human brain inside its skull. So, without this protection, sudden blows to the head toss the brain against a formidable hard skull, causing various degrees of injury.. But theres a problem. Its easy to diagnose a fractured arm, but impossible to know the amount of brain injury after concussion.. Concussion causes a variety of symptoms such as headache, double vision and the feeling of "having my bell rung." So some hockey players do not remember the score. Or they suffer seizures, weakness on one ...
The PCSS of 2 participants, 4 and 7, did not improve at the follow-up visit but rather worsened by a total of 18 and 19 points, respectively (Table 2). As discussed, most people who sustain a concussion have resolution of their symptoms within a few weeks (,2 weeks for adults, ,4 weeks for children), but 20% have persistent symptoms.20 According to the most recent consensus statement on concussion in sport,2 persistent symptoms are considered to be a failure of normal clinical recovery and a constellation of nonspecific posttraumatic symptoms possibly linked to premorbid and current psychosocial stressors. Increased risk of persistent symptoms developing include having a history of a learning disability, migraines, or psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety or depression; having associated amnesia or loss of consciousness associated with the injury; and being younger than 18 years.21 It is possible that participants 4 and 7 had persistent symptoms. They both reported a history of headaches or ...
Baseline Concussion Testing:. In leu of the fall sport season, I will be completing baseline concussion testing. This will be a requirement for ONLY contact sports, as they are more likely to sustain a concussion (i.e. football and volleyball). Many athletes have already completed their testing. For those athletes who are involved in multiple sports, you will only need to complete baseline testing once. I will be utilizing two types of tests: the Standardized Concussion Assessment Tool (SCAT5) and the ImPACT test. The SCAT5 is a paper test including a symptom checklist, memory tests, and balance tests. It takes about 15 minutes to complete, and will be utilized as a sideline assessment tool. ImPACT is a neuropsychological test completed on the computer (not Brainbook!) including a symptom checklist, verbal and visual memory, processing speed, and reaction time. This test, taking about 45 minutes on average to complete, is a very thorough tool that is utilized to monitor concussion recovery and ...
The Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Pittsburgh was founded more than 75 years ago with a strong commitment to patient care, education and research. Today, our department is the largest neurosurgical academic provider in the United States performing more than 11,000 procedures annually.
According to one concussion expert Ive spoken with, this has already started happening at the NFL level. And of course it makes perfect sense. Ritalin is the medication prescribed most notoriously for "hyperactive" kids and sufferers from ADD (attention deficit disorder), with the goal of improving mental focus. Inevitably, professional athletes and their handlers would seize on Ritalins ability to mask the fact that they hadnt entirely "cleared the cobwebs" from recent blows to the brain. (The phrase in quotes was used last week in an admirably candid interview by Fox TV commentator Terry Bradshaw, 62, discussing how concussions during his own Hall of Fame career have proceeded to impair his quality of life ...
The US secretary of state, Hillary Clinton, has been admitted to hospital after doctors found a blood clot related to a concussion she suffered earlier this month.
GateHouse Media special report: Sports reporter Josh Weir spent four weeks exploring concussions in youth sports in this national reporting project for GateHouse Media Inc. The project focuses on whether new laws succeed in preventing serious head trauma in young athletes.*****In just five years, 49 states have passed laws to raise awareness about concussions and ensure proper treatment of head injuries in young athletes.The rapid spread of return-to-play laws came after the
GateHouse Media special report: Sports reporter Josh Weir spent four weeks exploring concussions in youth sports in this national reporting project for GateHouse Media Inc. The project focuses on whether new laws succeed in preventing serious head trauma in young athletes.*****In just five years, 49 states have passed laws to raise awareness about concussions and ensure proper treatment of head injuries in young athletes.The rapid spread of return-to-play laws came after the
AN DIEGO -- Stan Humphries was driving through his neighborhood two weeks ago when the headache hit. He grabbed his ear and pulled over in pain. He and his wife, Connie, sat in the car for 10 minutes until the throbbing ended. Nearly four months have passed since Humphries had his last concussion, but the headaches still come. The latest concussion was his fourth in 22 months. With no way to assure that his health will be more secure next season, the 32-year-old Humphries today announced his retirement from the National Football League. "All the tests showed that I was O.K. and that there shouldnt be any damage," Humphries said. "But then with every doctor the next question I would ask was, Whats the next one going to be like? They couldnt answer me." Humphriess retirement means that the Chargers will accelerate efforts to move up from No. 3 to No. 2 in the draft to put themselves in position to acquire either Peyton Manning or Ryan Leaf. With Craig Whelihan as the only quarterback on the ...
Background: An estimated 136 000 concussions occur per academic year in high schools alone. The effects of repetitive concussions and the potential for catastrophic injury have made concussion an injury of significant concern for young athletes.. Purpose: The objective of this study was to describe the mechanism of injury, symptoms, and management of sport-related concussions using the High School Reporting Information Online (HS RIO) surveillance system.. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study.. Methods: All concussions recorded by HS RIO during the 2008-2009 academic year were included. Analyses were performed using SPSS software. Chi-square analysis was performed for all categorical variables. Statistical significance was considered for P < .05.. Results: A total of 544 concussions were recorded. The most common mechanism (76.2%) was contact with another player, usually a head-to-head collision (52.7%). Headache was experienced in 93.4%; 4.6% lost consciousness. Most (83.4%) had ...
This study arose from media and sporting organisations concerns in New Zealand about the sideline behaviour of adults at childrens team sporting events. The aim of the study was to measure and elicit the perspectives of coaches and referees of adult behaviour at childrens games. The descriptive cross-sectional study utilised an electronic survey of coaches and referees of organised childrens sport (ages 6-11 years) in a large metropolitan region of New Zealand. The survey contained both closed and open-ended questions drawing upon quantitative and qualitative analytical techniques. The findings indicated significant differences in perception of sideline behaviour between referees and coaches; and between male and female participants. The majority of respondents expressed concern about sideline behaviour. Due to the paucity of research exploring referees perspectives of organised childrens sport, we recommend that future studies of sideline behaviour also consider the value of referees ...
Abstract. The aim of this study was to determine whether the cumulative effects of head impacts from a season of high school football produce magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measureable changes in the brain in the absence of clinically diagnosed concussion. Players from a local high school football team were instrumented with the Head Impact Telemetry System (HITS™) during all practices and games. All players received pre- and postseason MRI, including diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT) was also conducted. Total impacts and risk-weighted cumulative exposure (RWE), including linear (RWELinear), rotational (RWERotational), and combined components (RWECP), were computed from the sensor data. Fractional, linear, planar, and spherical anisotropies (FA, CL, CP, and CS, respectively), as well as mean diffusivity (MD), were used to determine total number of abnormal white matter voxels defined as 2 standard deviations above or below the ...
Knowing how concussions occur, signs and symptoms, along with precautionary steps, your program can take are vital to a successful concussion management program.
CHAPTER 94. An Act concerning the health of student-athletes and supplementing P.L.1984, c.203 (C.45:9-37.35 et seq.) and chapter 40 of Title 18A of the New Jersey Statutes.. Be It Enacted by the Senate and General Assembly of the State of New Jersey:. C.18A:40-41.1 Findings, declarations relative to head injuries of student athletes.. 1. The Legislature finds and declares that:. a. A concussion is caused by a blow or motion to the head or body that disrupts the normal functioning of the brain, and can cause significant and sustained neuropsychological impairments including, but not limited to, problem solving, planning, memory, and behavioral problems;. b. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 300,000 concussions are sustained during sports-related activity in the United States, and more than 62,000 concussions are sustained each year in high-school contact sports;. c. Although concussions are one of the most commonly reported injuries in children and adolescents ...
Think those claims that dietary supplements can help speed concussion recovery sound too good to be true? Youre right. And the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) agrees.. This week, the FDA released a consumer update on companies that market dietary supplements that purport to heal-and in some cases prevent-concussions. The advertising has received more attention with the start of fall school sports, and the agency is stepping up its enforcement actions to warn companies when their claims are false.. "Were very concerned that false assurances of faster recovery will convince athletes of all ages, coaches, and even parents that someone suffering from a concussion is ready to resume activities before they are really ready," said Gary Coody, FDAs national health fraud coordinator. "Also, watch for claims that these products can prevent or lessen the severity of concussions or [traumatic brain injuries].". Because the dietary supplement market is a crowded one that requires no product ...
John Carlson was ruled out against Tampa Bay because of a concussion, the latest setback for the hard-luck tight end.. It is not Carlsons first concussion. He was hospitalized in January 2011 after banging his head on the frozen turf during a playoff game with the Seattle Seahawks at Chicagos Soldier Field. He reportedly also had two concussions playing at Notre Dame. Vikings coach Leslie Frazier said Carlson has not been cleared by doctors to participate in any on-field workouts, leaving him no time to recover in time for the Thursday night, Oct. 25 game against Tampa Bay. Carlson left Sundays game against Arizona after being injured covering a punt. "The doctors have not indicated to me that its something we have to be concerned about long term," Frazier said. "Therell be a lot more discussions." Carlson spent the 2011 season with Seattle on injured reserve because of a preseason shoulder injury. A sprained knee early in training camp limited his participation after the Vikings signed him ...
Its All in Your Head. There is considerable attention in the media these days about concussions. Especially with the snow and ice and kids in school playing a variety of sports, there is a risk of concussions at any time of the year. In fact, recent studies have shown that the overall incidence is actually higher than we thought, the effect of multiple concussions is cumulative, and that a symptom free waiting period before returning to sport or more strenuous daily activities has a beneficial impact on recovery and repeat concussions.. To simplify, a concussion is a blow to the head. There are two distinctions regarding concussions: direct and indirect. A direct concussion is a direct hit to the head, as in boxing or hockey, perhaps when a shoulder pad gets crashes into another players helmet. An indirect concussion is more difficult to identify and understand. This may occur in motor vehicle accident (where there is whiplash and the head does not make contact within the car), a child falling ...
Concussion injuries to our children is the topic of this edition of Radio Curious as we visit with Dr. Robert Cantu, the author of "Concussions and Our Kids". Dr. Cantus medical career centers on neurosurgery and sports medicine and is dedicated to addressing the concussion crisis through research, treatment, education and prevention.. Dr. Cantu writes that the genetic inheritance of a child begins to control his or her athletic skills at about age 14. This is similar to the evolutionary influence that compels young teenagers to set a mark and establish status and belonging within their band or tribe, often through athletic prowess. In the evolutionary history of our species this was necessary for basic survival. Now in the 21st century, many of our children do the same thing, many times with strong family support, yet at the same time, subjecting themselves to radical injury. Dr. Cantu and I spoke by phone from his office near Boston, Massachusetts, on September 24, 2012. I began by asking him ...
Moi wrote in Dont ignore concussions: Kids Health has some great information about concussions at their site: What Is a Concussion and What Causes It? The brain is made of soft tissue and is cushioned by spinal fluid. It is encased in the hard, protective skull. When a person gets a head injury, the brain can…
With the NFL increasingly sensitive to concussions and, more importantly, increasingly willing to pull players out of games who have suffered concussions, it was only a matter of time before teams began to use concussions as a way to gain a strategic advantage.
The pattern of brain abnormalities in symptomatic patients after concussion is highly similar to that seen in Alzheimers disease. The initial traumatic event that caused the concussion may act as a trigger for a sequence of degenerative changes in the brain. Concussion affects more than 1.7 million people in the U.S. annually.
No would be the obvious answer, but im still wondering why. When I was maybe 11 I had a mild concussion after I slipped and hit my head at swim practice. I didnt really feel anything other than a light pain in the back of my head right after, so I continued swimming for the rest of the practice. Looking back at it, it probably wasnt the best idea. But, I was 11 so you cant really blame me. I dont have any permanent damage from it, fortunately. My question is, what could have happened if I had a more severe concussion? Or if I did more vigorous exercise after it? I was reading a book and the topic of concussions came up so I guess Im just curious.
Concussions and CTE What You Need to Know 6 Part Series Part 2 ... Part 1 is here Part one covered concussion, risks leading to it and preventive measures. However, often with all the required precautions taken carefully, concussions still occur. So, you need to know how to identify and deal with a
Texans wide receiver Andre Johnson was ruled out for the remainder of Sundays game with a concussion. The Pro Bowl wide receiver suffered the concussion on a helmet-to-helmet hit against the Jaguars.
You must maintain all CHOA proprietary notices on the Concussion Program Materials. You may not copy, modify, adapt, reverse engineer or create derivative works of the Concussion Program Materials or remove any copyright or other proprietary rights notices therefrom. Notwithstanding the foregoing, where indicated in the Concussion Program Materials, schools and sports organizations are permitted to co-brand certain of the Concussion Program Materials with CHOAs prior written consent. Additionally, schools, sports programs and recreational leagues may put their own logo on the Concussion Policy and modify it to meet their needs. CHOA may update, replace or remove some or all of the Concussion Program Materials from time to time, and you should check back with the website to determine if the Concussion Program Materials you downloaded are current ...
Publisher: University of Delaware. Date Issued: 2014. Abstract: Context: To clinicians, researchers, and athletes alike, the recent evidence suggesting the detrimental effects of subconcussive head impacts (SCHI) in collision sport athletes is alarming. The sport of lacrosse like football, ice hockey, and soccer, has a high-risk for sport-related concussions (SRC). However, there is paucity in research examining male lacrosse players despite the high risk for SRC and the opportunity for repeated SCHI to the helmet during competition. Unlike American football, unique to the sport of lacrosse is the fact that they are often asked to play games with minimal rest periods in between which provides for a chance to study SCHI in this population during a truncated week of competition. Objective: The primary goal of this study was to examine if SCHI had an effect on concussion-related symptoms, clinical reaction time, and oculomotor function in mens lacrosse players (MLAX) in a shortened time frame ...
Child Neurology Center provides evaluation and intervention for acute concussion and post-concussion syndrome. We work closely with regional experts at both the Andrews Institute in Gulf Breeze, Florida and Sacred Heart Hospital.. What is a concussion?. A concussion is an injury to the brain, usually due to a blow to the head. A concussion can cause confusion, memory loss, or loss of consciousness. Repeated concussions can result in permanent brain injury, or even death.. How is a concussion diagnosed?. Diagnosis is accomplished by obtaining a detailed history of the injury, by performing a thorough neurological examination, and by obtaining imaging studies such as CT or MRI of the brain. Examiners may also use IMPACT (Immediate Post-concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing) computerized software to track the childs recovery for a safe return to normal activity.. ...
Its also pleasing to have published studies demonstrating that traditional chiropractic management of post-concussive syndrome patients results in rapid and sustained improvement in post-concussive signs and symptoms, allowing the athlete to return to full competition. All patients afflicted by this post-concussive syndrome ought to be referred to a chiropractor for cervical spine evaluation and therapy.. https://hilpischchiro.com/hilpischchiro/chronic-neck-pain/. If You Suffer with Post Concussion Syndrome You Should See A Blair Upper Cervical Chiropractor. Blair upper cervical chiropractic is a specialty within the chiropractic profession that focuses all of it s attention on the relationship of the top cervical vertebrae. The skull, and the brain-stem and spinal cord. These doctors take precise imaging of the joints of the upper cervical spine and take great care in making precise spinal corrections to restore normal joint motion and neurological function. Our doctors practicing throughout ...
All people carry the APOE gene, which has many variations. A 2010 study found that athletes carrying three of the genes four minor variations were 10 times aslikely as those who did not to have reported a concussion and more than eight times as likely to have suffered brain injury as a result. - - - Scientists have known about the dangers of getting hit on the head since the 1920s, when they diagnosed a form of dementia in boxers. They called it dementia pugilistica or "punch-drunk syndrome." In recent years, the same condition has become known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE. Last year, McAllister and his colleagues completed a study comparing college football players with a group of track and field athletes from the same university. They tested both groups for cognition and memory, and they performed sophisticated imaging that measured changes in their brain cells from the beginning of the season to the end. While the two groups scored equally on the tests, they found that about ...
Blast exposure is associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI), neuropsychiatric symptoms, and long-term cognitive disability. We examined a case series of postmortem brains from U.S. military veterans exposed to blast and/or concussive injury. We found evidence of chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a tau protein-linked neurodegenerative disease, that was similar to the CTE neuropathology observed in young amateur American football players and a professional wrestler with histories of concussive injuries. We developed a blast neurotrauma mouse model that recapitulated CTE-linked neuropathology in wild-type C57BL/6 mice 2 weeks after exposure to a single blast. Blast-exposed mice demonstrated phosphorylated tauopathy, myelinated axonopathy, microvasculopathy, chronic neuroinflammation, and neurodegeneration in the absence of macroscopic tissue damage or hemorrhage. Blast exposure induced persistent hippocampal-dependent learning and memory deficits that persisted for at least 1 month and ...
Purpose: Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) is a signature injury of modern warfare. Unlike impact injuries, which are focal, blast-induced MTBI damage is diffuse, affecting multiple portions of the brain via impaired axonal connectivity, impairing operations involving memory, impulse control and prediction/planning ("executive function."). Current MTBI testing uses highly subjective self-reporting and questionnaires. It is estimated that up to 25% of brain-injured veterans are not properly diagnosed, and may not receive treatment. Previously, we presented a saccade-based test that effectively detected decreased performance in MTBI. Here we present results for these same subjects on smooth pursuit tasks designed to evaluate executive function deficits, and compare their diagnostic value to saccadic testing.. Methods: We compared 11 controls with no history of closed-head injury, and 11 MTBI subjects involved in at least one close-proximity explosion. Subjects were excluded if they were taking ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Markers of postmatch fatigue in professional rugby league players. AU - McLellan, Christopher P.. AU - Lovell, Dale I.. AU - Gass, Gregory C.. PY - 2011/4. Y1 - 2011/4. N2 - McLellan, CP, Lovell, DI, and Gass, GC. Markers of postmatch fatigue in professional rugby league players. J Strength Cond Res 25(4): 1030-1039, 2011-The aim of the present study was to identify neuromuscular, biochemical, and endocrine markers of fatigue after Rugby League match play. Seventeen elite Rugby League players were monitored for a single match. Peak rate of force development (PRFD), peak power (PP), and peak force (PF) were measured during a countermovement jump (CMJ) on a force plate pre and postmatch play. Saliva and blood samples were collected 24 hours prematch, 30 minutes prematch, 30 minutes postmatch, and then at 24-hour intervals for a period of 120 hours to determine plasma creatine kinase concentration ([CK]) and salivary cortisol concentration ([sCort]). There were significant (p , ...
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Traumatic axonal injury is a primary brain abnormality in head trauma and is characterized by reduction of fractional anisotropy (FA) on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Our hypothesis was that patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) have widespread brain white matter regions of reduced FA involving a variety of fiber bundles and show fiber disruption on fiber tracking in a minority of these regions. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Ethics committee approval and informed consent were obtained. Twenty-one patients with mild TBI were investigated (men:women, 12:9; mean age +/- SD, 32 +/- 9 years). In a voxel-based comparison with 11 control subjects (men:women, 8:3; mean age, 37 +/- 9 years) using z score analysis, patient regions with abnormally reduced FA were defined in brain white matter. MR imaging, DTI, and fiber tracking characteristics of these regions were described and analyzed using Pearson correlation, linear regression analysis, or the chi(2) test when appropriate.
Veterans of the Iraqi and Afghanistan conflicts have frequently returned with injuries such as mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). More recently, concern has been raised about the large number of returning soldiers who are diagnosed with both. Literature exists on the neuropsychological factors associated with either alone, however far less research has explored the effects when combined (PTSD+mTBI). With a sample of 206 OEF/OIF veterans, the current study employed neuropsychological and psychological measures to determine whether participants with PTSD+mTBI have poorer cognitive and psychological outcomes than participants with PTSD-o, mTBI-o, or veteran controls (VC), when groups are matched on IQ, education, and age. The PTSD+mTBI and mTBI-o groups exhibited very similar neuropsychology profiles, and both PTSD+mTBI and mTBI-o performed significantly (α=.01) worse than VC on executive functioning and processing speed measures. There were no significant
"Concussion injuries to the brain". Comprehensive Ophthalmology (fourth ed.). New Age International (P): 311. Hutchinson's pupil ... These can be due to concussion injury to the brain and is associated with subdural haemorrhage and unconsciousness. The ...
Concussion[edit]. Main article: Concussion. A concussion is a form of a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI). This injury is a ... "TBI , Traumatic Brain Injury , Traumatic Brain Injury Resources , Brain Injury Support , Brain Injury Information". www. ... Alberts J, Cherian N (2014). Headaches, Traumatic Brain Injury, and Concussion. The Cleveland Clinic Manual of Headache Therapy ... high resolution MR imaging of the brains of Leborgne and Lelong". Brain. 130 (Pt 5): 1432-41. doi:10.1093/brain/awm042. PMID ...
Concussion (mild traumatic brain injury) and the team physician: a consensus statement. Med Sci Sports Exerc. 2006;38(2):395-9. ... The most challenging aspect to managing sport-related concussion (mild traumatic brain injury, TBI) is recognizing the injury.[ ... a b Hosseini AH, Lifshitz J. Brain Injury Forces of Moderate Magnitude Elicit the Fencing Response. Med. Sci. Sports Exerc., ... Summary and agreement statement of the 1st International Symposium on Concussion in Sport, Vienna 2001. Clin J Sport Med. 2002; ...
Schwarz, Alan (2008-09-23). "12 Athletes Leaving Brains to Concussion Study". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-10-25. ...
Tony Care (26 July 2011). "Donated CFL brains show concussion-related disease". CBC News. Retrieved 2 January 2012. Tony ... Following his death, his brain was donated to research in sports-related brain damage. His brain, unlike others, showed no ... Sean Fitz-Gerald (26 July 2011). "Researchers find degenerative disease in brains donated by CFL players". National Post. ...
"Welch to donate brain for concussion study". Edmonton Journal. Retrieved 2008-12-18. "Molinari On The Penguins: Building the ... Welch decided to donate his brain to concussion research at the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy at the Boston ... Penguins ... brains not included". Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. 2008-10-26. Noah Welch career statistics at The Internet Hockey ...
"Athletes agree to donate brains for concussion study". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. September 24, 2008. Rutter, Emily. (May 26, ... School of Medicine and Sports Legacy Institute in order to have research into the effects of concussions on the human brain ... Kacyvenski, like many NFL players, suffered a number of concussions over the course of his playing career. At the end of 2008, ... Also in September, Kacyvenski, the first of five other former NFL players that soon followed, agreed to donate his brain upon ...
Jaffee, MS; Winter, WC (2015). "Sleep disturbances in athletic concussion". Brain Injury. 29 (2): 221-7. doi:10.3109/ ...
Campbell died from a severe concussion of the brain. Doctors later discovered that his brain had been knocked loose from the ... Brain specialist Dr. Tilton E. Tillman "declared death had been caused by a succession of blows on the jaw and not by any ... struck on the rear of the head," and that Campbell's brain had been "knocked completely loose from his skull." The California ...
He suffered a brain concussion and never regained consciousness. Thomas S. Hastings was born in New York City on March 11, 1860 ...
His death was attributed to a concussion on the brain. The archduke was 67 years old. Constantin von Wurzbach: Habsburg, ...
Later tests confirmed brain injuries as a result of concussions. He died in 2001 as a baptized Christian at the VA Hospital in ...
A concussion, which is a mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) may result in decreased LOC. Treatment depends on the degree of ... It can result from traumatic brain injury such as concussion. Stroke and intracranial hemorrhage are other causes. Infections ... such as brain herniation. Mass lesions in the brain stem normally cause coma due to their effects on the reticular formation. ... A pH outside of the range the brain can tolerate will also alter LOC. Exposure to drugs (e.g. alcohol) or toxins may also lower ...
Nowinski alerted police and the coroner of Chris Benoit, asking them to do a brain exam on Benoit's brain to see if concussions ... "Dead athletes' brains show damage from concussions". CNN. January 27, 2009. "Pathologist says Waters' brain tissue had ... Benoit's brain examination report showed extensive damage due to concussions that could have led to dementia. The Concussion ... Postmortem analysis of the brain tissue of former contact sports athletes was revealing that repetitive brain injuries, both ...
She was left with a broken nose, concussion and brain injuries. She said to police that, "He dragged me for a few metres, there ...
... had a brain concussion and had his arm broken. The same evening the general was visited by Vladimir Putin at ...
Some major efforts include Sports Medicine, Concussion and Brain Trauma, Primary Care, Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine and ...
"Concussion Management Policy 123.1-AR SPORTS-RELATED CONCUSSION/MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY". Jim Thorpe Area School Board ( ... September 24, 2012). "Concussion Management Policy 123.1-AR SPORTS-RELATED CONCUSSION/MILD TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY Section 3 ... "Managing Concussions in Student Athletes: The Safety in Youth Sports Act". Jim Thorpe Area School Board (September 24, 2012). " ... "Concussion Management Policy 123.1". Jim Thorpe Area School Board (September 24, 2012). " ...
... its relatively small brain is less prone to concussion than other animals'. Some species have modified joints between bones in ... Several adaptations combine to protect the woodpecker's brain from the substantial pounding that the pecking behaviour causes: ... it has a relatively thick skull with relatively spongy bone to cushion the brain; there is very little cerebrospinal fluid in ... thus transmitting the impact past the brain and allowing its whole body to help absorb the shock; ...
Rick Maese (7 June 2012). "NFL concussions lawsuits aim to improve the damaged brain". Washington Post. Retrieved 19 February ... "Amen Clinics & Brain Spect Imaging". Brain World Magazine. October 25, 2012. Retrieved October 9, 2013. American Psychiatric ... Amen Clinics uses SPECT scans, a type of brain-imaging technology, to measure neural activity through blood flow. It has a ... As of 2014, Amen Clinics had a database of more than 100,000 functional brain scans. The subjects are from 111 countries with ...
Dykan was diagnosed with multiple facial bones fractures, craniocerebral trauma and brain concussion. He went on to miss the ...
He was diagnosed with brain concussion, a broken collarbone and torn knee ligaments. He went through several operations and it ...
Concussion and brain damage, as the head violently contacts other vehicles or objects. Riders wearing an approved helmet reduce ...
Collins MW, Iverson GL, Gaetz M, Lovell MR (2006). "Sport-related concussion". I Zasler ND, Katz DI, Zafonte RD. Brain Injury ... Brain Injury Association of America. "Types of brain injury". Arkiveret fra originalen 2007-10-18. Hentet 2007-12-17.. ... a b c d Concussion på eMedicine *^ Nugent GR (2006). "Reflections on 40 years as a sideline physician". Neurosurgical Focus. 21 ... "Concussion (mild traumatic brain injury) and the team physician: A consensus statement" (PDF). Medicine and Science in Sports ...
Result one man serious hurt that concussion of the brain, ensued ending in death. "A scrimmage man holding ball went down with ...
"Selfridge was badly cut and sustained a concussion of the brain being rendered insensible. He did not regain consciousness ...
... found that reactions to psychological stressors include increased activity in the brain axes which play an important role in ... Concussions in sport. *Decompression sickness. *De Quervain syndrome. *Exposure to human nail dust ...
Contact in football may result in Concussion/Brain Injury which no helmet can prevent. Symptoms include loss of consciousness ... This is a violation of football rules and may cause you to suffer severe brain or neck injury, including paralysis or death and ... Ignoring this warning may lead to another and more serious or fatal brain injury. NO HELMET SYSTEM CAN PROTECT YOU FROM SERIOUS ... Schutt has been active in developing equipment to prevent concussions in American football, including creating a device in 2008 ...
A concussion is any injury to the brain that disrupts normal brain function on a temporary or permanent basis. ... Athletes who have had concussions may report feeling normal before their brain has fully recovered. With most concussions, the ... Once a concussion has occurred, it is important to make sure the helmet is fitted properly. If the concussion occurred due to ... All concussions are serious, and all athletes with suspected concussions should not return to play until they see a doctor. The ...
... by the powerful blow to the head which is the primary shock and by the concussion of the brain against the skull wall when the ... 2. Choke off the blood flow to the brain (example: constrict the carotid artery) ... 1. Deliver a shock to the brain (example: strike the jaw or temple) ... 3. Restrict breathing, limiting oxygen to the brain (example: constrict the windpipe) ...
RCPS Traumatic Brain Injury/Concussion Response Process - Flow Chart. https://docs.google.com/a/rockingham.k12.va.us/file/d/0B_ ... Mobile Aps for Brain Injury. http://www.brainline.org/content/2013/12/life-changing-iphone-and-ipad-apps-for-people-with-brain. ... Returning to School after Brain Injury (MSKTC). http://www.msktc.org/tbi/factsheets/Returning-To-School-After-Traumatic-Brain- ... BrainSTEPS (Strategies Teaching Educators, Parents, and Students) Brain Injury School Re-Entry Consulting Program ...
Brain 101: The Concussion Playbook is a web-based concussion management p... ... Studies have shown effective concussion management requires a school-wide approach. ... Brain 101: The Concussion Playbook is a web-based concussion management program with components tailored for teen athletes, ... Losing Arguments with Your Wife After Her Brain Surgery - Jim Gaffigan - Duration: 8:33. Comedy Central Stand-Up 2,028,816 ...
Brain concussion - Shake it and you break it , Steven Laureys , TEDxLiège - Duration: 16:36. TEDx Talks 131,984 views ... Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury - Duration: 16:57. Dr. Ronald Gefaller 68,498 views ... What happens when you have a concussion? - Clifford Robbins - Duration: 6:16. TED-Ed 874,193 views ... The low-speed coup-contrecoup injury has damage from shifting layers within the brain at the microscopic level. This animation ...
People with a concussion need to be seen by a health care professional. If you think you or someone you know has a concussion, ... Concussion in Sports and Recreation. If a concussion occurs during sports- and recreation-related activities, implement the ... Even if the concussion doesnt show up on these tests, you may still have a concussion. ... Athletes with a concussion should never return to sports or recreation activities the day of the injury and until a health care ...
... athletic directors and general counsel of the seriousness of the risks of concussions to you ... Concussions, also known as traumatic brain injuries, occur when your brain violently impacts the inside of your skull. ... Keywords: Concussions, Brain Injury, Traumatic Brain Injury, Tort Claims, Product Liability, CTE, Football, Dementia ... of all high school football players suffer a concussion each year. Every concussion is a brain injury. The effect of this ...
Traumatic brain injury and concussion in sports.. Kelly JP.. Comment on. *Trends in hospitalization associated with traumatic ... Traumatic brain injury in high school athletes. [JAMA. 1999]. *Relationship between concussion and neuropsychological ... Rehabilitation of persons with traumatic brain injury. NIH Consensus Development Panel on Rehabilitation of Persons With ...
Brain changes persist for months in children who have sustained a mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, U.S. researchers ... 10 (UPI) -- Brain changes persist for months in children who have sustained a mild traumatic brain injury, or concussion, U.S. ... In the brain, DTI specifically images white matter. During a follow-up visit about four months after the injury, the scientists ... as diffusion tensor imaging to examine the brains of 15 children who had within 21 days of injury experienced a concussion and ...
Concussion Question. Wednesday 5/1 I fall test riding a bike - no helmet - and hit left side of head on asphalt. hematoma ... went to ER 24 hours later and had CT and all tests were100% normal and left with concussion diagnosis. never lost conscience. ... went to ER 24 hours later and had CT and all tests were100% normal and left with concussion diagnosis. never lost conscience. ... forearm and hand since I have no issues between the location in the brain and the point of the problem - no upper arm issue, ...
... and Hayley Wickenheiser have all pledged to donate their brains to the Concussion Legacy Foundation. ... By pledging my brain to the Concussion Legacy Foundation and the researchers at the VA-BU-CLF Brain Bank, I hope to support the ... Only 3% of the brains donated to the Brain Bank are female, which makes comparable research difficult. Female brains respond ... Meyers Taylor, Ruggiero, and Wickenheiser have all pledged to donate their brains to the Concussion Legacy Foundation after ...
... are teaming up to improve the diagnosis and treatment of brain injuries amid growing concerns about sports-related concussions ... emergency rooms yearly treat 173,000 temporary brain injuries, including concussions, related to sports or recreation among ... are teaming up to improve the diagnosis and treatment of brain injuries amid growing concerns about sports-related concussions ... Among the lawsuits filed against the NFL over concussions is a class action on behalf of 4,000 former professional football ...
A study of U.S. college athletes who had concussions indicated suppressed brain function more than three years later, ... The study, published in the Journal of Neurotrauma, said with concussions, individuals showed a decrease in their ability to ... Roughly half of the sample had sustained concussions within the past 3.4 years. ... they had suppressed brain functioning,. kinesiology Professor Steven Broglio said in a statement. And that included a decrease ...
1 billion plan to address concussion-linked injuries in former players say the settlement excludes the central brain injury ... 1 billion plan to address concussion-linked injuries in former players say the settlement excludes the central brain injury ... Lawyers who negotiated the settlement with the NFL say the deal is an insurance plan for serious brain injuries and is not ... the brain decay found in dozens of deceased ex-players. ... Lawyers: NFL concussion deal excludes central brain injury. ...
... settlement between the National Football League and 4,500 retired NFL players underscores two key facts about traumatic brain ... traumatic brain injury can be difficult to show unless there is evidence of bleeding in or swelling of the brain. ... the autopsied brains of dozens of former athletes have shown clear evidence of degenerative disease not seen in healthy brains. ... including functional MRI that watches the brain at work, to detect immediate and longer-term changes in the brains performance ...
Football has been accused of failing to take concussion seriously by a brain injury charity after Napoli goalkeeper David ... Brain injury charity appalled by Ospina concussion incident. The Colombia international is on loan at Napoli from Arsenal.. ... Football has been accused of failing to take concussion seriously by a brain injury charity after Napoli goalkeeper David ... Football has been accused of failing to take concussion seriously by a brain injury charity after Napoli goalkeeper David ...
Researchers who identified brain changes in people with post-concussion syndrome say their findings may lead to improved ... Symptoms of post-concussion syndrome, which occurs in 20 percent to 30 percent of people who suffer mild traumatic brain injury ... 21 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers who identified brain changes in people with post-concussion syndrome say their findings may ... This study found that communications and information integration in the brains of the people with post-concussion syndrome were ...
The Science of Concussion and Brain Injury. *16 Things Everyone Should Know about Concussions ... A concussion is an immediate but reversible traumatic paralysis of the nervous function of the brain. It is usually caused by a ... In fact, a concussion is one of eight different types of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) that most commonly result from falls, ... BRAIN INJURY. On impact, the brain bumps into the interior of the skull where it is hit, as well as on the opposite side, ...
Microstructural Changes in the Brain During Recovery After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. *Brain Concussion ... Cerebral Microstructural Changes Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. *Brain Concussion. Observational. *University of Aarhus ... Perceptual-Cognitive Training After a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Towards a Sensitive Marker for Recovery. *Brain Concussion ... An Evaluation of HS-1000 Device Capabilities in the Diagnosis and Assessment of Patients After Concussion. *Brain Concussion ...
The distribution of white matter brain abnormalities in some patients after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) closely ... Concussion patients show Alzheimers-like brain abnormalities. June 21, 2013. June 18, 2013. ScienceBlog.com ... The distribution of white matter brain abnormalities in some patients after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) closely ... Categories Brain & Behavior. Post navigation. Facebook effect: Social media dramatically boosts organ donor registration ...
i have a concussion from a blow to the head.Its going on 3 weeks now and at 1:00 pm today i went to do something on the ... concussion and vision concern. i have a concussion from a blow to the head.Its going on 3 weeks now and at 1:00 pm today i went ... It could be part of concussion. However, it could also be a symptom of subdural hematoma or a brain bleed. Please consult a ... It could be part of concussion. However, it could also be a symptom of subdural hematoma or a brain bleed. Please consult a ...
New technology uses simple radar to detect brain injuries. ... Concussions are a growing worry, particularly in high school ... Effects of Concussion on Brain Can Be Long-Lasting. There is also a difference in the velocity of different parts of the body. ... Concussion Symptoms: New Technology Uses Simple Radar to Detect Brain Injuries. New technology uses simple radar to detect ... Brain Injuries in High School SportsWashington student Mikayla Wilson still suffering effects of her concussion. ...
Through this program, patients and their families benefit from a team of traumatic brain injury specialists, one-on-one ... support and follow-up care for individuals who have had a traumatic brain injury. ... The Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic at The Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center offers comprehensive evaluation, ... More Within Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic Concussion and Traumatic Brain Injury Clinic* About Traumatic Brain ...
Concussions. What is a concussion?. A concussion is a type of brain injury that changes the way the brain normally works. A ... Concussions can have serious long-term health effects, especially on the developing brains of children and teens. Untreated ... What are the signs and symptoms of a concussion?. The signs and symptoms of a concussion may occur minutes, hours or days after ... If treated properly, the majority of people will fully recover from a concussion. However, untreated concussions can lead to ...
... high-profile athletes who suffered repeated blows to the head during their careers have unusual protein clumps in their brains ... Detecting concussion-related brain disease in its earliest stages. American Chemical Society ... An autopsy confirmed that he had clumps of a protein in his brain that are characteristic of CTE. Scientists studying the ... To do this, theyre using different forms of brain imaging, including MRI and PET scans. If they succeed, theyll have new ...
  • These findings may have important implications about when it is truly safe for a child to resume physical activities that may produce a second concussion, potentially further injuring an already vulnerable brain," Mayer said in a statement. (upi.com)
  • If the diagnosis is wrong, and the player returns to the field and is hit in the head again, the second concussion will probably be far more serious, and possibly even fatal. (go.com)
  • If you experience a second concussion before your provider says it is safe to return to your activities, you could get second-impact syndrome, a condition that is often fatal and almost always leads to permanent damage. (novanthealth.org)
  • Why is there increased risk for a second concussion after the first one? (integrisok.com)
  • While evidence of a link between concussion and long-term cognitive and psychiatric consequences is mounting, it may take many more studies to clarify the relationship. (chicagotribune.com)
  • Fortunately, baseline cognitive testing has increasingly become the norm for players as young as grade school, since it can help detect concussion-related changes and guide a physician's decision to clear a concussed young player to return to play. (chicagotribune.com)
  • It is critical for physicians to monitor these secondary tissue damages, as they are frequently the origin of significant long-term effects, including brain damage, cognitive deficits, psychosocial/behavioral/emotional changes, bodily damage and biochemical changes at the cellular level. (scientificamerican.com)
  • All patients underwent neurocognitive evaluation with Immediate Post-Concussion Assessment and Cognitive Testing (ImPACT). (scienceblog.com)
  • When a person with a concussion performs cognitive and motor skill tasks simultaneously, they have a different gait pattern than a healthy individual, and we can identify those anomalies in a person's walk with radar," said research engineer Jennifer Palmer, lead author of a study presented Tuesday at a science conference in Orlando, Florida. (go.com)
  • It turns out that it took both the goggles and the cognitive test for the radar to show that the participant had a concussion. (go.com)
  • Inform your child's teachers, school nurse, coach, counselor and others about your child's concussion and develop a plan to limit physical and cognitive activities until your child has fully recovered. (virginia.gov)
  • Each had a history of one or more concussions and some were experiencing cognitive or mood symptoms. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • CONCUSSION MANAGEMENT PROGRAMS mainly emphasize the use of cognitive testing such as IMPACT. (apta.org)
  • Follow-up care is important to assess for complications of concussion such as memory issues, cognitive issues, and personality issues. (brainandspinalcord.org)
  • Researchers examined data from brain scans of 61 former college and professional football players who didn't have any symptoms of cognitive impairment. (reuters.com)
  • Just as some American football players and boxers have been found to have long-term cognitive deficits after suffering repeated head blows or concussions during play, so soccer and rugby players must be made aware of the same dangers. (lifescript.com)
  • Based on current neuroscience data, the assumption is that the brain does not fully mature until at least the mid-20s, so if a concussion occurs in a still-developing brain, the trajectory of that development will presumably be affected," says Jordan Grafman, Ph.D., chief of cognitive neuroscience at the National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke and a member of the Dana Alliance for Brain Initiatives. (dana.org)
  • Such higher-order cognitive skills are largely processed in the forward regions of the prefrontal cortex and temporal lobes, at the front and sides of the brain. (dana.org)
  • The composite BNA algorithm may be a more sensitive measure of electrophysiological change in the brain that can augment established cognitive assessment tools for detecting impairment in individuals with PTM. (springer.com)
  • The doctors acknowledge that the research on the 111 brains has limitations because, rather than a random sample, most of the families who donated the brains of players did so because those players had symptoms of cognitive problems. (nytimes.com)
  • Clinicians should continue to follow the recommendations for the clinical management of concussion with the assessment of the symptom, cognitive, and motor control domains. (frontiersin.org)
  • The disease can cause brain cell death, cognitive deficits and dementia. (wksu.org)
  • As reported on November 28, 2016 in the online Early Edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , misfolded tau from the brains of either AD or CTE patients propagated in these cell cultures and formed aggregates under identical conditions. (healthcanal.com)
  • MTBI, or concussion, affects more than 1.7 million people in the United States annually. (scienceblog.com)
  • Thus, most professionals who have suffered a MTBI that continues to be symptomatic after a few days, will feel the effects when sufficient demands are made upon the brain. (tbilaw.com)
  • Newswise - MINNEAPOLIS - Hockey players in their early teens who have had a concussion may still have brain changes three months later, long after other symptoms have cleared and they are allowed to return to play, according to a study published in the October 25, 2017, online issue of Neurology ® , the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology . (newswise.com)
  • After completing training, she decided to combine her personal interest in sports and professional interest in the developing brain together as a Neurotrauma/Sports Neurology Fellow with Dr. Christopher Giza. (uclahealth.org)
  • What happens is that when you have a big impact, your skull twists one way but your brain stays in the same place," said John Hardy, chair of Molecular Biology of Neurological Disease at University College London's Institute of Neurology. (lifescript.com)
  • A study published online Thursday in Brain , a journal of neurology, presents the strongest case yet that repetitive hits to the head that don't lead to concussions -meaning no loss of consciousness or other symptoms that can include headaches, dizziness, vision problems or confusion - cause CTE. (wksu.org)
  • Angela Lumba-Brown , clinical assistant professor of pediatrics and of emergency medicine, and co-director of the Stanford Concussion and Brain Performance Center , was interviewed during this NPR segment. (stanford.edu)
  • Clinical findings reported in the Wall Street Journal have also found that the mental exertion of normal, routine class work can actually worsen the effects of a concussion and impede successful recovery. (livescience.com)
  • There is no good clinical evidence that currently available protective equipment will prevent concussion," the paper states. (healthline.com)
  • Dr. Linda Papa, Director of Academic Clinical Research at Orlando Regional Medical Center and Professor at Florida State University and McGill University, will present on her team's latest results in the study and application of blood-based biomarkers in concussion management in both child and adult patients. (prweb.com)
  • The literature on clinical recovery from sport-related concussion has grown dramatically, is mostly mixed, but some factors have emerged as being related to outcome. (braininjuryaustralia.org.au)
  • That might become the new norm," he said, rather than focusing on clinical concussion. (chirotexas.org)
  • With additional attention being placed on rapid and accurate concussion diagnostics and return to play decision-making, the addition of a novel neuroelectric assessment does not appear to provide additional clinical benefit at this time. (frontiersin.org)
  • Concussion, TBI, and CTE represent distinct clinical entities that require clear differentiation: concussion is a neurological syndrome , TBI is a neurological event , and CTE is a neurological disease . (frontiersin.org)
  • Implementing these principles will advance basic science discovery and accelerate clinical translation to benefit people affected by concussion, TBI, and CTE. (frontiersin.org)
  • The settlement reflects a shortage of evidence definitively linking concussion and later depression, dementia and suicide. (chicagotribune.com)
  • The healthy brain of a normal 65-year-old, the brain of a former NFL linebacker, John Grimsley (who suffered eight concussions and died at age 45), and the brain of a 73-year-old boxer who suffered from an extreme form of dementia. (theconversation.com)
  • LONDON (Reuters) - Rugby and soccer players who suffer multiple knocks to the head during their careers are at added risk of brain damage that could lead to dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases, brain scientists are warning. (lifescript.com)
  • The initiative comes nearly two months after the Institute of Medicine launched a sweeping study of sports-related concussions, particularly those in young people from elementary school through early adulthood. (reuters.com)
  • The study, published in the Journal of Neurotrauma, said with concussions, individuals showed a decrease in their ability to allocate attentional resources toward an oddball stimulus, suggesting they had deficits in their ability to update their working memory of the stimulus environment. (redorbit.com)
  • It is believed that the resting state involves connections among a number of brain regions and that the default-mode network plays a major role, study author Dr. Yulin Ge, an associate professor in the radiology department at the NYU School of Medicine in New York City, said in a journal news release. (medicinenet.com)
  • For the study, the UCLA scientists used a brain-imaging tool they had developed previously for assessing neurological changes associated with Alzheimer's disease. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • But the study suggests that in addition to the big hits that cause concussions, these smaller knocks could cause trouble. (sciencenews.org)
  • High school football players have changes in their brain function long before they have recognizable signs of a concussion, according to a new study. (npr.org)
  • Those brain changes may be workarounds, with the brain using other areas to replace those affected by the hits, according to Thomas Talavage , an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Purdue University and a co-author of the study. (npr.org)
  • In a study launched last month, a research team led by concussion experts David Camarillo , PhD, and Gerald Grant , MD, is outfitting Bay Area high school football players with mouthguards that measure the motion of the head during impacts sustained in practices and games. (stanford.edu)
  • Stanford neurosurgeons, Dr. Gerald Grant and Dr. Jamshid Ghajar , are teaming up with several regional high schools for a study that will use virtual reality headsets to track eye movements to better spot concussions. (stanford.edu)
  • We saw every branch, every small wire and how it gets cut," neuroscientist Dr. Sergei Kirov, co-author of the the study in the journal Brain , said in a press release. (healthline.com)
  • The study looked at brain scans of boys who played in Bantam hockey leagues when body checking is first introduced. (newswise.com)
  • These players were back on the ice when our study suggests their brains still needed time to heal. (newswise.com)
  • The authors of 2014 study of Ontario pediatric emergency department and office visits for concussion found playgrounds were the eighth most common cause after hockey or skating, motor vehicle accidents, football/rugby, snow sports, bicycling, baseball and soccer. (cbc.ca)
  • The left image shows a normal brain scan and middle and right images show scans of pro football players from the study. (newswise.com)
  • Reuters Health) - Football players may experience different degrees of brain damage after concussions depending on what position they play and how long they stick with the sport, a small U.S. study suggests. (reuters.com)
  • Non-speed players with a history of recurrent concussions had more damage to white matter and less brain activity during memory exercises, the study found. (reuters.com)
  • The study wasn't a controlled experiment designed to prove whether or how the position played or career duration might influence the risk of brain damage after concussions. (reuters.com)
  • Nowinski said Tuesday that several former NFL players have recently agreed to donate their brains to the center upon their deaths for further study. (latimes.com)
  • A study published last month found "profound abnormalities" in brain activity scans of former NFL players. (lifescript.com)
  • The new study addresses the lack of research upon which to develop science- and data-based treatment for concussion. (eurekalert.org)
  • This provides the best evidence to date that head impact, not concussion, causes CTE, according to the authors of the study. (drugs.com)
  • A small study of professional soccer players found that even those who have never experienced a concussion still have changes in the white matter of their brains, likely from routine and unprotected headers. (time.com)
  • Although our study is small, it is the first to look at soccer players with no symptoms and no diagnoses of concussions," says Koerte. (time.com)
  • Although Bazarian credits the study authors for using DTI, he says that the lack of strict criteria defining concussions means they are difficult to diagnose. (time.com)
  • The study combines data from football players with computer simulations of the brain. (futurity.org)
  • This pilot study reveals the complex relationship between SES and SRC ["sports-related concussion"] recovery, which demands further study with more accurate and validated assessments of SES. (braininjuryaustralia.org.au)
  • Research Study: What is the Difference in Concussion Management in Children as Compared with Adults? (braininjuryaustralia.org.au)
  • Rory Spence and colleagues developed a technique to induce concussion and study recovery in a line of zebrafish that are very genetically similar to humans. (medicalxpress.com)
  • One way we can do that is to study individual structures that would be likely to cause traditional concussion symptoms if they were injured. (stanford.edu)
  • A 2003 federal study called concussions "a serious public health problem" that costs the U.S. an estimated $80 billion a year. (innovations-report.com)
  • In the latest study, areas of abnormally low FA (reflecting abnormal brain regions) were observed in concussion patients but not in controls. (innovations-report.com)
  • Each concussion patient had a unique spatial pattern of low FA that evolved over the study period. (innovations-report.com)
  • Conducted at Georgetown University Medical Center (GUMC), the study states that more than a day's rest is "critical" to allow the brain to recover and rebalance itself by rehabilitating neural networks. (medicaldaily.com)
  • Our imaging study found that increased cumulative impact exposure over the course of a high school football season -- even when there is no evidence of concussion -- is associated with white matter changes in the brain. (chirotexas.org)
  • The study is the first of its kind to show an association between early exposure to repetitive head impacts and structural brain changes later in life. (pbs.org)
  • The study, which was published in the Journal of Neurotrauma , drew on brain imaging for 40 former NFL players between the ages of 40 and 65. (pbs.org)
  • To be sure, they say, the study is too small to justify sweeping changes in rules or policy, and the research doesn't prove a direct link between starting football at too young an age and changes to the brain later in life. (pbs.org)
  • Regardless of the results of this study, it makes sense to me that children, that during those ages of around 10 to 12 whose brains are rapidly developing, shouldn't be hitting their heads over and over again," he said. (pbs.org)
  • This technique can be used not only to assess brain diseases but also to study the blood flow and how it is regulated in the healthy brain. (chemistry2011.org)
  • According to a recent Penn Study, one of the reasons why women are more susceptible to concussions than men is that they have smaller, more breakable nerve fibers. (amenclinics.com)
  • The study provided stunning new evidence of how damaging even minor brain impacts can be, finding that concussions can actually kill brain cells far from the original site of head impact. (michiganautolaw.com)
  • We saw a very quick build-up of reactive oxygen species" in the space between the skull and the brain after the concussion, said Dorian B. McGavern, a senior N.I.H. investigator who oversaw the study. (michiganautolaw.com)
  • In all, the study showed that concussions can actually kill brain cells in lab mice. (michiganautolaw.com)
  • But what this study says is: No, that hit probably wasn't fine, and that poor guy can't feel the damage that's happening in his brain right now. (wksu.org)
  • While the study downplays the role of concussions in the ultimate development of CTE, the familiar symptoms - headaches, fogginess or problems with concentration, memory, balance and coordination, even without a loss of consciousness, are still important signs the brain has been hurt. (wksu.org)
  • In a study published in the journal Radiology , his team reports that although these changes are subtle, they are visible in the brains of young players. (time.com)
  • The MRI scans were done when the participants' brains were in a resting state, such as when the mind wanders or while daydreaming. (medicinenet.com)
  • To do this, they're using different forms of brain imaging, including MRI and PET scans. (eurekalert.org)
  • The players also underwent pre- and post-season brain scans. (sciencenews.org)
  • Then they compared the brain scans with the hits. (npr.org)
  • Compared to the brain scans of healthy players, the scans of the concussed players three months after the concussion showed signs of widespread damage to the white matter of the brain, as well as a 10 percent reduction in molecules associated with metabolism. (newswise.com)
  • The scans also showed other areas of the brain trying to create new connections in a possible attempt to recover function. (newswise.com)
  • If an athlete gets a concussion at any point during the year, he or she returns to the institution for MRI scans to determine whether there are any relevant changes to help players and coaches make decisions during play. (dailylobo.com)
  • Kiehl explained that the brain scans have not yet been used specifically to make playing decisions. (dailylobo.com)
  • If the symptoms are severe i.e. excessive headaches, seizures or repeated vomiting, then the doctor may recommend imaging tests like CT scans and MRI to evaluate if the brain is injured or if there is any internal bleeding. (apollohospitals.com)
  • The changes are only evident when compared to the original brain scans. (time.com)
  • If you experience a concussion in the course of sporting activity for example, make sure you get medical attention immediately. (headway.ie)
  • When women experience a concussion, their symptoms can be more severe, and the recovery process even longer than with similarly affected men. (amenclinics.com)
  • But on the flip side, we find that the brain does not undertake this rebalancing when impacts come too close together. (medicaldaily.com)
  • Most of the time, these routine impacts won't be straight-on collisions that cause a concussion, but research has shown that players as young as nine can still be vulnerable to blows that carry the same amount of force that's more typical for college football. (pbs.org)
  • But even minor impacts can have a tremendous effect on the brain. (michiganautolaw.com)
  • Inside of removing portions of lab animals' skulls to view what happened to their brains during subsequent impacts, like had been done in previous studies, they shaved away microscopic layers of the skull. (michiganautolaw.com)
  • Research is mounting that concussions have devastating impacts on professional football players in the NFL -and the symptoms don't happen overnight . (time.com)
  • Whitlow found that the more impacts a player had to the head, the more changes in a part of the brain called white matter, which is made up of insulated neurons that form the basis of communication between different parts of the brain. (time.com)
  • Eminently qualified, he served as Vice-Chair for the California State Athletic Commission, traveled to Afghanistan in 2011 as a civilian advisor to the Department of Defense and Co-Chaired the American Academy of Neurology's committee, which developed an evidence-based Practice Guideline for Management of Sports Concussions in 2013. (uclahealth.org)
  • But the problem of sports concussions is by no means limited to NFL linebackers or Olympians. (dana.org)
  • Simply put, they hit their head, damaged their brain at the point of trauma and thus have symptoms from that direct damage. (scienceblog.com)
  • i have a concussion from a blow to the head.Its going on 3 weeks now and at 1:00 pm today i went to do something on the computer & I am seeing blurred double vision. (medhelp.org)
  • A concussion is caused by a bump, blow or jolt to the head. (virginia.gov)
  • It can also be caused by a blow to the body that causes the head and brain to move rapidly back and forth. (virginia.gov)
  • CRUNCH Over a season of college football, head knocks that were too small to cause concussions were nonetheless linked to changes in the brain stems of players. (sciencenews.org)
  • A season of head hits left its mark on college football players' brains, even when those hits didn't cause concussions. (sciencenews.org)
  • He said: 'Science has shown over the centuries that whenever the human head is exposed to repeated blows, there is a 100 per cent risk of brain damage. (thesun.co.uk)
  • Concussion occurs when either a direct impact or whiplash effect causes the brain to move inside the head and bump against the skull. (theconversation.com)
  • During the season, 17 players were diagnosed with a concussion, most often from falling and hitting the back of the head. (newswise.com)
  • Concussion is caused by an impact to the head. (brainandspinalcord.org)
  • And in recent months, the long-term neurological consequences of head trauma suffered during sports have been in the public eye due to a series of scientific reports finding unusually high rates of severe brain damage in former professional football players. (dana.org)
  • If players are damaging their brains, it is a large public health issue because everyone, even at a young age, hits their head like this. (time.com)
  • If scientists better understand how the brain moves after an impact and what movement causes the most damage, Kurt says, "we can design better helmets, we can devise technologies that can do onsite diagnostics, for example in football, and potentially make sideline decisions in real time," all of which could improve outcomes for those who take a nasty hit to the head. (futurity.org)
  • The former Miami Dolphins great will donate his brain to scientists studying the long-term effects of repeated head hits. (nytimes.com)
  • As he pledged to donate his brain to scientists studying the long-term effects of repeated head hits, Nick Buoniconti, one of football's most famous and revered players, lashed out at the N.F.L. for failing players and not doing enough to support research. (nytimes.com)
  • These problems, coupled with a growing body of research that connects concussions and head hits to C.T.E., led Buoniconti to donate his brain. (nytimes.com)
  • A Concussion is a blow to the head or body that causes the brain to shake inside the skull. (headway.ie)
  • When most people think of concussions, rough contact sports like football and boxing come to mind, along with severe blows to the head like hitting pavement or taking a punch. (integrisok.com)
  • While it's long been maintained that males are at a higher risk for head trauma (due to violent sports like football), new research is painting a different picture of the concussion landscape. (amenclinics.com)
  • Sharyn Alfonsi: I can understand a football player who keeps, you know, hitting his head, and having impact and concussions. (sdbif.org)
  • Goldstein says the scientists nailed what they wanted to - strong evidence linking head impact to CTE, independent of concussion. (wksu.org)
  • Whitlow wanted to better understand how non-concussive trauma to the head, the kind caused by normal football play , affects the brain. (time.com)
  • A neurologist is a doctor with specialized training in diagnosing, treating and managing disorders of the brain and nervous system such as Alzheimer's disease, stroke, migraine, multiple sclerosis, concussion, Parkinson's disease and epilepsy. (newswise.com)
  • Post-traumatic migraine (PTM) (i.e., headache, nausea, light and/or noise sensitivity) is an emerging risk factor for prolonged recovery following concussion. (springer.com)
  • Concussions and migraine share similar pathophysiology characterized by specific ionic imbalances in the brain. (springer.com)
  • Concussion symptoms that mimic those of a severe migraine headache are to be expected. (integrisok.com)
  • What Should I do If a Concussion Occurs? (cdc.gov)
  • If a concussion occurs during sports- and recreation-related activities, implement the HEADS UP action plan . (cdc.gov)
  • Second Impact Syndrome is a rare condition in which a second, often mild, impact occurs when someone is still suffering from an initial concussion that results in 50% of the cases ending in death and the other half in permanent brain damage. (virginia.gov)
  • Loss of consciousness actually occurs in less than 10 percent of all concussions. (integrisok.com)
  • In the case of concussion, cutting people off from their social circle when we say 'no screen time' -- particularly the young generation with their cell phones and iPads -- they will just get more depressed and anxious. (eurekalert.org)
  • In the case of concussion, the body mounted a brave repair campaign, sending specialized immune cells from the blood and the brain to patch and fill in the frayed membranes. (michiganautolaw.com)
  • We were surprised that the brain pathology was unrelated to signs of concussion, including altered arousal and impaired balance, among others. (drugs.com)
  • These activities can affect the brain function for a brief period of time, resulting in signs of concussion. (apollohospitals.com)
  • In July, doctors at Boston University said that 110 of the 111 brains of former N.F.L. players that they examined showed signs of C.T.E. (nytimes.com)
  • And, they noted, the brain pathology was unrelated to signs of concussion in the mice , such as altered arousal and impaired balance. (wksu.org)
  • But, he says, "we should do simple things now to protect children, like knowing the signs and symptoms of concussion and teaching them to children, so if they are injured on the field, they can get help from health professionals right away. (time.com)
  • Indeed, it is the rotational movements of the brain inside the calvaria (meaning all of the cranium except for the facial bones) and the shearing forces affecting the upper reticular formation that create torque, which leads to the typical loss of consciousness. (scientificamerican.com)
  • One of the biggest misconceptions about concussions is that it involves loss of consciousness. (dana.org)
  • BREAKING: U.S. #Olympic bobsledder @eamslider24 & U.S. ice hockey legend @AngelaRuggiero have pledged to donate their brains to the Concussion Legacy Foundation as we approach the #WinterOlympics . (yahoo.com)
  • Meyers Taylor, Ruggiero, and Wickenheiser have all pledged to donate their brains to the Concussion Legacy Foundation after their deaths. (yahoo.com)
  • In addition to Buoniconti, other former N.F.L. players including Warren Sapp, Matt Hasselbeck and Leonard Marshall have pledged to donate their brains to the C.T.E. Center. (nytimes.com)
  • Concussion is a silent epidemic that is affecting millions of people," says Mehmet Kurt, a former postdoctoral fellow in the lab of David Camarillo, assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford University. (futurity.org)
  • The past decade of research into biomarkers have led to the discovery of two blood-based biomarkers in suspected mild TBI and concussion patients in the emergency department. (prweb.com)
  • The findings support the growing belief that a concussion comes as the result of a succession of insults, not just one bad hit. (npr.org)
  • More research with MRI is needed to further evaluate our findings because it is critical to understand how and when the adolescent human brain reacts and recovers from concussion," Menon said. (newswise.com)
  • The findings suggest that a small measure of brain work could be beneficial, said co-investigator and neuro-rehabilitation specialist Kathleen R. Bell, a physician at UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas. (eurekalert.org)
  • The findings are published today in the online edition of Brain Imaging and Behavior. (innovations-report.com)
  • Last summer, her findings shook the football world when she discovered CTE in the brains of 110 out of 111 deceased NFL players - raising serious concerns for those in the game today. (sdbif.org)
  • The challengers also argue Thursday that the plan would compensate only a few neurological conditions but not the depression and mood disorders that some experts link to earlier concussions. (foxnews.com)
  • Prolonged brain inflammation (chronic microglia activation) is likely a key component to myriad neurological diseases and perhaps even normal brain aging. (reuters.com)
  • Christie's team is using a software program called 'Neurotracker' to observe the brain function of 200 healthy young hockey players, ages 6 to 17, to determine what their neurological activity looks like before suffering a concussion. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • Repeated concussion has long been associated with neurological dysfunction, and was first described in boxers as " punch drunk " syndrome in 1928. (theconversation.com)
  • The objectors complain that it compensates only a few neurological conditions, and not the depression and mood disorders they link to concussions and CTE. (theindianalawyer.com)
  • The purpose of this article is to inform coaches, players, parents, athletic directors and general counsel of the seriousness of the risks of concussions to young people whose brains have not fully developed. (ssrn.com)