Bradycardia: Cardiac arrhythmias that are characterized by excessively slow HEART RATE, usually below 50 beats per minute in human adults. They can be classified broadly into SINOATRIAL NODE dysfunction and ATRIOVENTRICULAR BLOCK.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Apnea: A transient absence of spontaneous respiration.Vagus Nerve: The 10th cranial nerve. The vagus is a mixed nerve which contains somatic afferents (from skin in back of the ear and the external auditory meatus), visceral afferents (from the pharynx, larynx, thorax, and abdomen), parasympathetic efferents (to the thorax and abdomen), and efferents to striated muscle (of the larynx and pharynx).Hypotension: Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Sinoatrial Node: The small mass of modified cardiac muscle fibers located at the junction of the superior vena cava (VENA CAVA, SUPERIOR) and right atrium. Contraction impulses probably start in this node, spread over the atrium (HEART ATRIUM) and are then transmitted by the atrioventricular bundle (BUNDLE OF HIS) to the ventricle (HEART VENTRICLE).Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Arrhythmia, Sinus: Irregular HEART RATE caused by abnormal function of the SINOATRIAL NODE. It is characterized by a greater than 10% change between the maximum and the minimum sinus cycle length or 120 milliseconds.Reflex, Oculocardiac: Change of heartbeat induced by pressure on the eyeball, manipulation of extraocular muscles, or pressure upon the tissue remaining in the orbital apex after enucleation.Atropine: An alkaloid, originally from Atropa belladonna, but found in other plants, mainly SOLANACEAE. Hyoscyamine is the 3(S)-endo isomer of atropine.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Electrocardiography: Recording of the moment-to-moment electromotive forces of the HEART as projected onto various sites on the body's surface, delineated as a scalar function of time. The recording is monitored by a tracing on slow moving chart paper or by observing it on a cardioscope, which is a CATHODE RAY TUBE DISPLAY.Diving: An activity in which the organism plunges into water. It includes scuba and bell diving. Diving as natural behavior of animals goes here, as well as diving in decompression experiments with humans or animals.BiguanidesSick Sinus Syndrome: A condition caused by dysfunctions related to the SINOATRIAL NODE including impulse generation (CARDIAC SINUS ARREST) and impulse conduction (SINOATRIAL EXIT BLOCK). It is characterized by persistent BRADYCARDIA, chronic ATRIAL FIBRILLATION, and failure to resume sinus rhythm following CARDIOVERSION. This syndrome can be congenital or acquired, particularly after surgical correction for heart defects.Baroreflex: A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.Syncope: A transient loss of consciousness and postural tone caused by diminished blood flow to the brain (i.e., BRAIN ISCHEMIA). Presyncope refers to the sensation of lightheadedness and loss of strength that precedes a syncopal event or accompanies an incomplete syncope. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp367-9)Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Tachycardia: Abnormally rapid heartbeat, usually with a HEART RATE above 100 beats per minute for adults. Tachycardia accompanied by disturbance in the cardiac depolarization (cardiac arrhythmia) is called tachyarrhythmia.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Vagotomy: The interruption or removal of any part of the vagus (10th cranial) nerve. Vagotomy may be performed for research or for therapeutic purposes.Atropine Derivatives: Analogs and derivatives of atropine.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Cardiovascular System: The HEART and the BLOOD VESSELS by which BLOOD is pumped and circulated through the body.Atrioventricular Block: Impaired impulse conduction from HEART ATRIA to HEART VENTRICLES. AV block can mean delayed or completely blocked impulse conduction.Pressoreceptors: Receptors in the vascular system, particularly the aorta and carotid sinus, which are sensitive to stretch of the vessel walls.Syncope, Vasovagal: Loss of consciousness due to a reduction in blood pressure that is associated with an increase in vagal tone and peripheral vasodilation.Chemoreceptor Cells: Cells specialized to detect chemical substances and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Chemoreceptor cells may monitor external stimuli, as in TASTE and OLFACTION, or internal stimuli, such as the concentrations of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE in the blood.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Medulla Oblongata: The lower portion of the BRAIN STEM. It is inferior to the PONS and anterior to the CEREBELLUM. Medulla oblongata serves as a relay station between the brain and the spinal cord, and contains centers for regulating respiratory, vasomotor, cardiac, and reflex activities.Arrhythmias, Cardiac: Any disturbances of the normal rhythmic beating of the heart or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. Cardiac arrhythmias can be classified by the abnormalities in HEART RATE, disorders of electrical impulse generation, or impulse conduction.Cardiac Pacing, Artificial: Regulation of the rate of contraction of the heart muscles by an artificial pacemaker.Decerebrate State: A condition characterized by abnormal posturing of the limbs that is associated with injury to the brainstem. This may occur as a clinical manifestation or induced experimentally in animals. The extensor reflexes are exaggerated leading to rigid extension of the limbs accompanied by hyperreflexia and opisthotonus. This condition is usually caused by lesions which occur in the region of the brainstem that lies between the red nuclei and the vestibular nuclei. In contrast, decorticate rigidity is characterized by flexion of the elbows and wrists with extension of the legs and feet. The causative lesion for this condition is located above the red nuclei and usually consists of diffuse cerebral damage. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p358)Clonidine: An imidazoline sympatholytic agent that stimulates ALPHA-2 ADRENERGIC RECEPTORS and central IMIDAZOLINE RECEPTORS. It is commonly used in the management of HYPERTENSION.Parasympatholytics: Agents that inhibit the actions of the parasympathetic nervous system. The major group of drugs used therapeutically for this purpose is the MUSCARINIC ANTAGONISTS.Carotid Sinus: The dilated portion of the common carotid artery at its bifurcation into external and internal carotids. It contains baroreceptors which, when stimulated, cause slowing of the heart, vasodilatation, and a fall in blood pressure.Parasympathetic Nervous System: The craniosacral division of the autonomic nervous system. The cell bodies of the parasympathetic preganglionic fibers are in brain stem nuclei and in the sacral spinal cord. They synapse in cranial autonomic ganglia or in terminal ganglia near target organs. The parasympathetic nervous system generally acts to conserve resources and restore homeostasis, often with effects reciprocal to the sympathetic nervous system.Immersion: The placing of a body or a part thereof into a liquid.Autonomic Nervous System: The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.Ciguatera Poisoning: Poisoning caused by ingestion of SEAFOOD containing microgram levels of CIGUATOXINS. The poisoning is characterized by gastrointestinal, neurological and cardiovascular disturbances.Postsynaptic Potential Summation: Physiological integration of multiple SYNAPTIC POTENTIAL signals to reach the threshold and initiate postsynaptic ACTION POTENTIALS. In spatial summation stimulations from additional synaptic junctions are recruited to generate s response. In temporal summation succeeding stimuli signals are summed up to reach the threshold. The postsynaptic potentials can be either excitatory or inhibitory (EPSP or IPSP).Solitary Nucleus: GRAY MATTER located in the dorsomedial part of the MEDULLA OBLONGATA associated with the solitary tract. The solitary nucleus receives inputs from most organ systems including the terminations of the facial, glossopharyngeal, and vagus nerves. It is a major coordinator of AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM regulation of cardiovascular, respiratory, gustatory, gastrointestinal, and chemoreceptive aspects of HOMEOSTASIS. The solitary nucleus is also notable for the large number of NEUROTRANSMITTERS which are found therein.Anti-Arrhythmia Agents: Agents used for the treatment or prevention of cardiac arrhythmias. They may affect the polarization-repolarization phase of the action potential, its excitability or refractoriness, or impulse conduction or membrane responsiveness within cardiac fibers. Anti-arrhythmia agents are often classed into four main groups according to their mechanism of action: sodium channel blockade, beta-adrenergic blockade, repolarization prolongation, or calcium channel blockade.Microinjections: The injection of very small amounts of fluid, often with the aid of a microscope and microsyringes.Torsades de Pointes: A malignant form of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia that is characterized by HEART RATE between 200 and 250 beats per minute, and QRS complexes with changing amplitude and twisting of the points. The term also describes the syndrome of tachycardia with prolonged ventricular repolarization, long QT intervals exceeding 500 milliseconds or BRADYCARDIA. Torsades de pointes may be self-limited or may progress to VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION.Heart Rate, Fetal: The heart rate of the FETUS. The normal range at term is between 120 and 160 beats per minute.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Heart Arrest: Cessation of heart beat or MYOCARDIAL CONTRACTION. If it is treated within a few minutes, heart arrest can be reversed in most cases to normal cardiac rhythm and effective circulation.Sympatholytics: Drugs that inhibit the actions of the sympathetic nervous system by any mechanism. The most common of these are the ADRENERGIC ANTAGONISTS and drugs that deplete norepinephrine or reduce the release of transmitters from adrenergic postganglionic terminals (see ADRENERGIC AGENTS). Drugs that act in the central nervous system to reduce sympathetic activity (e.g., centrally acting alpha-2 adrenergic agonists, see ADRENERGIC ALPHA-AGONISTS) are included here.Aortic Bodies: Small clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the ARCH OF THE AORTA; the PULMONARY ARTERIES; and the CORONARY ARTERIES. The aortic bodies sense PH; CARBON DIOXIDE; and OXYGEN concentrations in the BLOOD and participate in the control of RESPIRATION. The aortic bodies should not be confused with the PARA-AORTIC BODIES in the abdomen (which are sometimes also called aortic bodies).Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Ciguatoxins: Polycyclic ethers produced by Gambierdiscus (DINOFLAGELLATES) from gambiertoxins, which are ingested by fish which in turn may be ingested by humans who are susceptible to the CIGUATERA POISONING.Tilt-Table Test: A standard and widely accepted diagnostic test used to identify patients who have a vasodepressive and/or cardioinhibitory response as a cause of syncope. (From Braunwald, Heart Disease, 7th ed)Consciousness: Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.Atenolol: A cardioselective beta-1 adrenergic blocker possessing properties and potency similar to PROPRANOLOL, but without a negative inotropic effect.Neuroendoscopy: PROCEDURES that use NEUROENDOSCOPES for disease diagnosis and treatment. Neuroendoscopy, generally an integration of the neuroendoscope with a computer-assisted NEURONAVIGATION system, provides guidance in NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES.Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.Anesthesia, Spinal: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Adrenergic beta-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.Glycopyrrolate: A muscarinic antagonist used as an antispasmodic, in some disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, and to reduce salivation with some anesthetics.Indoramin: An alpha-1 adrenergic antagonist that is commonly used as an antihypertensive agent.Muscarinic Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate MUSCARINIC RECEPTORS, thereby blocking the actions of endogenous ACETYLCHOLINE or exogenous agonists. Muscarinic antagonists have widespread effects including actions on the iris and ciliary muscle of the eye, the heart and blood vessels, secretions of the respiratory tract, GI system, and salivary glands, GI motility, urinary bladder tone, and the central nervous system.Infant, Premature, DiseasesPropranolol: A widely used non-cardioselective beta-adrenergic antagonist. Propranolol has been used for MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; ARRHYTHMIA; ANGINA PECTORIS; HYPERTENSION; HYPERTHYROIDISM; MIGRAINE; PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA; and ANXIETY but adverse effects instigate replacement by newer drugs.

Effect of the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212-2 on sympathetic cardiovascular regulation. (1/860)

1. The aim of the present study was to analyse the cardiovascular actions of the synthetic CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN55212-2, and specifically to determine its sites of action on sympathetic cardiovascular regulation. 2. Pithed rabbits in which the sympathetic outflow was continuously stimulated electrically or which received a pressor infusion of noradrenaline were used to study peripheral prejunctional and direct vascular effects, respectively. For studying effects on brain stem cardiovascular regulatory centres, drugs were administered into the cisterna cerebellomedullaris in conscious rabbits. Overall cardiovascular effects of the cannabinoid were studied in conscious rabbits with intravenous drug administration. 3. In pithed rabbits in which the sympathetic outflow was continuously electrically stimulated, intravenous injection of WIN55212-2 (5, 50 and 500 microg kg(-1)) markedly reduced blood pressure, the spillover of noradrenaline into plasma and the plasma noradrenaline concentration, and these effects were antagonized by the CB1 cannabinoid receptor-selective antagonist SR141716A. The hypotensive and the sympathoinhibitory effect of WIN55212-2 was shared by CP55940, another mixed CB1/CB2 cannabinoid receptor agonist, but not by WIN55212-3, the enantiomer of WIN55212-2, which lacks affinity for cannabinoid binding sites. WIN55212-2 had no effect on vascular tone established by infusion of noradrenaline in pithed rabbits. 4. Intracisternal application of WIN55212-2 (0.1, 1 and 10 microg kg(-1)) in conscious rabbits increased blood pressure and the plasma noradrenaline concentration and elicited bradycardia; this latter effect was antagonized by atropine. 5. In conscious animals, intravenous injection of WIN55212-2 (5 and 50 microg kg(-1)) caused bradycardia, slight hypotension, no change in the plasma noradrenaline concentration, and an increase in renal sympathetic nerve firing. The highest dose of WIN55212-2 (500 microg kg(-1)) elicited hypotension and tachycardia, and sympathetic nerve activity and the plasma noradrenaline concentration declined. 6. The results obtained in pithed rabbits indicate that activation of CB1 cannabinoid receptors leads to marked peripheral prejunctional inhibition of noradrenaline release from postganglionic sympathetic axons. Intracisternal application of WIN55212-2 uncovered two effects on brain stem cardiovascular centres: sympathoexcitation and activation of cardiac vagal fibres. The highest dose of systemically administered WIN55212-2 produced central sympathoinhibition; the primary site of this action is not known.  (+info)

Hypoxia inhibits baroreflex vagal bradycardia via a central action in anaesthetized rats. (2/860)

It is known that arterial baroreflexes are suppressed in stressful conditions. The present study was designed to determine whether and how hypoxia affects arterial baroreflexes, especially the heart rate component, baroreflex vagal bradycardia. In chloralose-urethane-anaesthetized rats, baroreflex vagal bradycardia was evoked by electrical stimulation of the aortic depressor nerve, and the effect of 15 s inhalation of hypoxic gas (4% O2) was studied. Inhalation of hypoxic gas was found to inhibit baroreflex vagal bradycardia. The inhibition persisted after bilateral transection of the carotid sinus nerve. Cervical vagus nerves were cut bilaterally and their peripheral cut ends were stimulated to provoke vagal bradycardia of peripheral origin so as to determine whether hypoxia could inhibit vagal bradycardia by acting on a peripheral site. In contrast to baroreflex vagal bradycardia, the vagus-induced bradycardia was not affected by hypoxic gas inhalation. It is concluded that baroreflex vagal bradycardia is inhibited by hypoxia and the inhibition is largely mediated by its direct central action.  (+info)

Pseudo second degree atrioventricular block with bradycardia. Successful treatment with quinidine. (3/860)

Pseudo second degree atrioventricular block resulting from blocked His premature beats was successfully treated with quinidine. The diagnosis was proved by His bundle electrogam which showed both blocked and conducted His premature beats. The blocked His prematures produced second degree atrioventricular block by making the atrioventricular junction refractory. Quinidine abolished both conducted and blocked His extrasystoles. There has been no recurrence of arrhythmia during a one-year follow-up.  (+info)

Incidence of bradycardia during recovery from spinal anaesthesia: influence of patient position. (4/860)

We administered 0.5% plain bupivacaine 4 ml intrathecally (L2-3 or L3-4) in three groups of 20 patients, according to the position in which they were nursed in the post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU): supine horizontal, 30 degrees Trendelenburg or hammock position (trunk and legs 30 degrees elevated). Patients were observed until anaesthesia descended to less than S1. The incidence of severe bradycardia (heart rate < 50 beat min-1) in the PACU was significantly higher in patients in the Trendelenburg position (60%) than in the horizontal (20%, P < 0.01) or hammock (10%, P < 0.005) position. After 90 min, following admission to the PACU, only patients in the hammock position did not have severe bradycardia. In this late phase, the incidence of severe bradycardia in the Trendelenburg group was 35% (P < 0.005) and 10% in patients in the supine horizontal position. In four patients, severe bradycardia first occurred later than 90 min after admission to the PACU. The latest occurrence of severe bradycardia was recorded 320 min after admission to the PACU. We conclude that for recovery from spinal anaesthesia, the Trendelenburg position should not be used and the hammock position is preferred.  (+info)

Relation between mode of pacing and long-term survival in the very elderly. (5/860)

OBJECTIVES: This study analyzes the relationship between pacing mode and long-term survival in a large group of very elderly patients (> or = 80 years old). BACKGROUND: The relationship between pacing mode and long-term survival is not clear. Because the number of very elderly who are candidates for pacing is increasing, issues related to pacemaker (PM) use in the elderly have important clinical and economic implications. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 432 patients (mean age, 84.5+/-3.9 years) who received their initial PM (ventricular in 310 and dual chamber in 122) between 1980 and 1992. Follow-up was complete (3.5+/-2.6 years). Observed survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Age- and gender-matched cohorts from the Minnesota population were used for expected survival. Log-rank test and Cox regression hazard model were used for univariate and multivariate analyses. RESULTS: Patients with ventricular PMs appeared to have poor overall survival compared with those with dual-chamber PMs. Observed survival after PM implantation in high grade atrioventricular block (AVB) patients was significantly worse than expected survival of the age- and gender-matched population (p < 0.0001), whereas observed survival of patients with sinus node dysfunction was not significantly different from expected survival of the matched population (p = 0.413). By univariate analysis, ventricular pacing in patients with AVB appeared to be associated with poor survival compared with dual-chamber pacing (hazard ratio [HR] 2.08; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.33 to 3.33). After multivariate analysis, this difference was no longer significant (HR 1.41; 95% CI 0.88 to 2.27). Independent predictors of all-cause mortality were number of comorbid illnesses, New York Heart Association functional class, left ventricular depression and older age at implant. Pacing mode was not an independent predictor of overall survival. Older age at implantation, diabetes mellitus, dementia, history of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation and earlier year of implantation were independent predictors of ventricular pacemaker selection. CONCLUSIONS: After PM implantation, long-term survival among very elderly patients was not affected by pacing mode after correction of baseline differences. Selection bias was present in pacing mode in the very elderly, with ventricular pacing selected for sicker and older patients, perhaps partly explaining the apparent "beneficial impact on survival" observed with dual-chamber pacing.  (+info)

Relative bradycardia is not a feature of enteric fever in children. (6/860)

We investigated pulse-temperature relationships in 66 children with enteric fever (group 1) and in 76 with other infections (group 2). Group 1 children were older than group 2 children (mean age +/- SD, 91 +/- 36 vs. 66 +/- 32 months, respectively; P < .001) and had mean oral temperatures +/- SD similar to those of group 2 children (38.3 +/- 1.0 vs. 38.3 +/- 0.9 degrees C, respectively; P > .2); however, group 1 children had lower mean baseline pulse rates +/- SD than did group 2 children (119 +/- 25 vs. 127 +/- 28 beats/min, respectively; P < .001). In a multiple linear regression model, pulse rate was independently associated with age (inversely; P < .001) and oral temperature (positively; P < .006) but not with diagnostic group or gender (P > .5). After adjustment of the mean initial pulse rate +/- SD to age of 72 months, there was no difference between group 1 and group 2 children (126 +/- 24 vs. 126 +/- 20 beats/min, respectively; P > .5). From 4 to 72 hours after commencement of treatment, the mean oral temperature in group 1 patients was approximately 0.3 degrees C higher than that in group 2 patients, and the age-adjusted pulse rate was 5 beats/min higher in group 1 children than in group 2 children. These data suggest that relative bradycardia is not characteristic of enteric fever in children.  (+info)

Estrogen enhancement of baroreflex sensitivity is centrally mediated. (7/860)

We have recently shown that estrogen enhances baroreceptor control of reflex bradycardia in conscious rats. The present study replicated this finding in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats, and the study was extended to investigate whether this effect of estrogen is centrally or peripherally mediated. Hemodynamic responses to electrical stimulation of the central end of the aortic depressor or the vagal efferent nerve were evaluated in pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized sham-operated (SO), ovariectomized (OVX), and OVX estradiol-treated Sprague-Dawley rats. Phenylephrine (1-16 microgram/kg iv) elicited dose-dependent pressor and bradycardic responses. Regression analysis of the baroreflex curves, relating changes in mean arterial pressure and heart rate, revealed a significantly smaller baroreflex sensitivity in OVX compared with SO anesthetized rats (-0.54 +/- 0.05 and -0.91 +/- 0.12 beats. min-1. mmHg-1, respectively; P < 0.05). Treatment of OVX rats with 17beta-estradiol (E2, 50 microgram. kg-1. day-1 for 2 days subcutaneously) significantly enhanced baroreflex sensitivity to a level similar to that of SO rats (P < 0.05). The enhancing effect of E2 on the baroreflex-mediated bradycardia, observed in conscious and anesthetized rats, seems to be selective because the baroreflex-mediated tachycardic responses measured in a separate group of conscious rats were not altered by ovariectomy or E2 administration. Electrical stimulation of the aortic nerve elicited frequency-dependent depressor and bradycardic responses that were significantly smaller in OVX compared with SO values (P < 0.05). Treatment of OVX rats with E2 restored the hemodynamic responses to aortic stimulation to near SO levels. On the other hand, hemodynamic responses to vagal stimulation were not affected by OVX or treatment with E2. These findings suggest that enhancement of reflex bradycardia by estrogen is centrally mediated and involves interaction with central projections of the aortic nerve.  (+info)

Electrocardiographic abnormalities in a murine model injected with IgG from mothers of children with congenital heart block. (8/860)

BACKGROUND: It is a widely held view that congenital heart block (CHB) is caused by the transplacental transfer of maternal autoantibodies (anti-SSA/Ro and/or anti-SSB/La) into the fetal circulation. To test this hypothesis and to reproduce human CHB, an experimental mouse model (BALB/c) was developed by passive transfer of human autoantibodies into pregnant mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: Timed pregnant mice (n=54) were injected with a single intravenous bolus of purified IgG containing human anti-SSA/Ro and anti-SSB/La antibodies from mothers of children with CHB. To parallel the "window period" of susceptibility to CHB in humans, 3 groups of mice were used: 8, 11, and 16 days of gestation. Within each group, we tested 10, 25, 50, and 100 microg of IgG. At delivery, ECGs were recorded and analyzed for conduction abnormalities. Bradycardia and PR interval were significantly increased in 8-, 11-, and 16-day gestational groups when compared with controls (P<0.05). QRS duration was not significantly different between all groups. Antibody levels measured by ELISA in both mothers and their offspring confirmed the transplacental transfer of the human antibodies to the pups. CONCLUSIONS: The passive transfer model demonstrated bradycardia, first-degree but not complete atrioventricular block in pups. The greater percentage and degree of bradycardia and PR prolongation in the 11-day mouse group correlates with the "window period" of susceptibility observed in humans. The high incidence of bradycardia suggests possible sinoatrial node involvement. All together, these data provide relevant insights into the pathogenesis of CHB.  (+info)

1. Cardiac natriuretic peptides act on cardiopulmonary chemoreceptor afferents to enhance the von Bezold-Jarisch reflex (BJR). Activity of the natriuretic peptide particulate guanylyl cyclase receptor is essential for full expression of the BJR. Whether natriuretic peptides act directly on cardiac afferents or they require another intermediate factor(s) for their effects on the BJR is unknown. Endogenous candidates tested as possible intermediates in the present study were prostanoids and nitric oxide (NO), plausible endogenous chemical mediators of cardiac chemoreflex activity. 2. Dose-dependent BJR bradycardia was evoked by the 5-HT(3) receptor agonist, phenylbiguanide (range 5-89 μg/kg), in conscious instrumented adult sheep (n = 6). The influence of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP; the most potent of the natriuretic peptides) on the BJR was assessed before and after blockade of prostanoids (using indomethacin, 1 mg/kg per h i.v.) or nitric oxide (using N-nitro-l-arginine (NOLA), 3 mg/kg ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - An infant with seizure-related bradycardia and asystole. AU - Venugopalan, P.. AU - Nair, P. M C. AU - Koul, R. L.. PY - 2001. Y1 - 2001. N2 - We describe an infant girl with ictal bradycardia and asystole who died during an episode of seizure, despite anti-epileptic therapy and permanent cardiac pacemaker implantation. The mechanism of ictal bradycardia and the need to recognize it are therefore discussed. Timely cardiac intervention and adequate anticonvulsant therapy are essential for successful management.. AB - We describe an infant girl with ictal bradycardia and asystole who died during an episode of seizure, despite anti-epileptic therapy and permanent cardiac pacemaker implantation. The mechanism of ictal bradycardia and the need to recognize it are therefore discussed. Timely cardiac intervention and adequate anticonvulsant therapy are essential for successful management.. KW - Asystole. KW - Autonomic seizure. KW - Ictal bradycardia. KW - Pacemaker. UR - ...
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Treatment of symptomatic bradycardia is largely algorithm-based, regardless of cause. Acting quickly to treat the bradycardia takes precedence over determining the cause. Once you have initiated treatment, proceed to determine the cause and correct, if possible (See section on "Management of Bradycardia in the OR").. Decide whether the patient has adequate or poor perfusion, since the treatment sequence is determined by the severity of the patients clinical presentation. In the OR or anesthetized patient:. * If severe hypotension, persistent poor perfusion, or low ETCO2 (,15mm Hg)-, start CPR. * Administer 100% Oxygen, assist ventilation, open IV fluids, and secure airway. * Consider 0.5mg atropine IV while awaiting pacer. May repeat to total 3mg. If ineffective, begin transcutaneous pacing.. * Consider IV bolus Epinephrine 10-100mcg. May start low dose epinephrine infusion if a response (0.05-0.10 mcg/kg/min) or dopamine (2-10mcg/kg/min). * Prepare for transcutaneous pacing: use without delay ...
Manchineel Poisoning Bradyarrhythmia A Possible Association. The following article describes a unique case of manchineel poisoning in which a seemingly unknown side effect arose, brandyarrhythmia. - PR11946165
BioAssay record AID 177744 submitted by ChEMBL: Agonist activity against 2-methyl-5-HT induced bradycardia (von Bezold-Jarisch (B-J) reflex) in anesthetized rats.
Approval for The ImageReady MR Conditional Pacing System. The device is indicated for the treatment of the following conditions:1) Symptomatic paroxysmal or permanent second- or third-degree AV block;2) Symptomatic bilateral bundle branch block;3) Symptomatic paroxysmal or transient sinus node dysfunction with or without associated AV conduction disorders (i.e., sinus bradycardia, sinus arrest, sinoatrial [SA] block);4) Bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome, to prevent symptomatic bradycardia or some forms of symptomatic tachyarrhythmias; and5) Neurovascular (vaso-vagal) syndromes or hypersensitive carotid sinus syndromes.Adaptive-rate pacing is indicated for patients exhibiting chronotropic incompetence and who may benefit from increased pacing rates concurrent with increases in minute ventilation and/or level of physical activity.Dual-chamber and atrial tracking modes are also indicated for patients who may benefit from maintenance of AV synchrony.Dual chamber modes are specifically indicated for ...
... is a type of slow heartbeat. A special group of cells begin the signal to start your heartbeat. These cells are in the sinoatrial (SA) node. Normally, the SA node fires at about 60 to 100 times per minute at rest. In sinus bradycardia, the node fires less than 60 times per minute.
Bradyarrhythmias occur commonly in the ICU, and most events do not necessitate temporary pacing. Transient bradycardia often occurs in the setting of enhanced vagal tone due to tracheal irritation, suction, or intubation; abdominal distention; or severe vomiting. Reversible causes such as severe electrolyte or acid-base imbalances should be corrected first whenever possible, as this may obviate the need for pacing or enhance the likelihood that a temporary lead will function appropriately when placed. Isolated sinus pauses, transient extended pauses in atrial fibrillation (AF), and nocturnal bradycardia in patients with obstructive sleep apnea are all common, and generally do not require temporary pacing. Pacing is considered when patients are having symptoms or have developed hemodynamic compromise thought to be secondary to a bradyarrhythmia, or if a rhythm is detected that is associated with a high risk of subsequent malignant bradyarrhythmia (Table 103-1). Recognizing circumstances that ...
The Bezold-Jarisch reflex (also called the Jarisch-Bezold reflex or Von Bezold-Jarisch) involves a variety of cardiovascular and neurological processes which cause hypopnea (excessively shallow breathing or an abnormally low respiratory rate) and bradycardia (abnormally low resting heart rate). Prolonged upright posture results in some degree of pooling of blood in the lower extremities that can lead to diminished intracardiac volume. This phenomenon is exacerbated if the individual is dehydrated. The resultant arterial hypotension is sensed in the carotid sinus baroreceptors, and afferent nerve fibers from these receptors trigger autonomic signals that increase cardiac rate and contractility. However, pressure receptors in the wall and trabeculae of the underfilled left ventricle may then sense stimuli, activating high-pressure C-fiber afferent nerves from these receptors. They may respond by sending signals that trigger paradoxical bradycardia and decreased contractility, resulting in ...
We found a point prevalence of people with ictal asystole of 0.32%. In contrast, two small prospective studies (both n=19) with long-term implantable heart rhythm monitors up to 2 years reported a much higher prevalence of 5% and 21%.14 ,15 These contrasting figures suggest that ictal asystole does not occur during every seizure and may go unnoticed during short-term monitoring.. Ictal asystole, ictal bradycardia and ictal AV block coincided with a focal dyscognitive seizure and were predominantly seen in temporal lobe epilepsy. These three arrhythmias not only shared a similar clinical profile, but could also overlap. Both ictal bradycardia and ictal AV block may evolve into asystole.. It has been suggested that a seizure onset in the left hemisphere results in bradycardia and that a right-sided onset results in tachycardia.2 We did not, however, find a consistent lateralisation in the large group of ictal asystole and ictal bradycardia cases. In the small group of ictal AV block cases, there ...
List of 77 causes for Atrial fibrillation and Sinus bradycardia, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
Sinus bradycardia can be defined as a sinus rhythm with a resting heart rate of 60 beats per minute or less. However, few patients actually become symptomatic until their heart rate drops to less than 50 beats per minute.
5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) is a commonly used anti-neoplastic agent. 5-FU has been not uncommonly associated with cardiotoxicity, although the many potentially causative mechanisms are yet to be established. Here, we present the case of a 61-year-old gemstone miner who developed symptomatic sinus bradycardia while receiving a continuous 5-FU infusion combined with radiotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer. This dysrhythmia is an unusual type of 5-FU toxicity, our case being the second described. We review the actions of 5-FU and the various proposed mechanisms of its cardiotoxic effects ...
List of 111 causes for Collapse and Sinus bradycardia, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and much more.
Hi Doctor I would like to know what does it mean for the ECG findings of Marked Sinus Bradycardia and Counter Clockwise Rotation? I am a Lupus patient . Thanks . More Power ...
Misdiagnosis of Sinus bradycardia including rare causes, self assessment, alternative diagnoses, differential diagnoses, and misdiagnosis.
Bradycardia is defined as any rhythm disorder with a heart rate less than 60 beats per minute. Learn all about bradycardia with our in-depth review.
Since the effects of bradycardia after cardiac transplantation are not known, we tested the hypothesis that perioperative bradycardia would lead to an increase in adverse outcomes after cardiac transplantation. We conducted a retrospective case control study with inclusion criterion of a heart rate (HR) less than 80 bpm during the 1st week after transplantation. Control patients were matched for gender, age and time since transplantation. We identified 34 patients as having perioperative bradycardia out of the 174 who underwent cardiac transplantation between 1994 and 1997. The results demonstrated no significant differences in donor ischemic times (180 vs. 183, p = 0.88), operative surgeon (p = 0.62) or pretransplant cardiac disease (p = 0.81) between groups. Bradycardic patients were more likely to be on pretransplant amiodarone (RR = 20.4, p < 0.001). Perioperative bradycardia did not lead to increases in cellular rejection (p = 0.72) or vasculopathy (p = 0.79). The patients prescribed ...
Abstract:. Each heartbeat is initiated by cyclic spontaneous depolarization of cardiomyocytes in the sinus node forming the primary natural pacemaker. In patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing hemodialysis, it was recently shown that the heart rate drops to very low values before they suffer from sudden cardiac death with an unexplained high incidence. We hypothesize that the electrolyte changes commonly occurring in these patients affect sinus node beating rate and could be responsible for severe bradycardia. To test this hypothesis, we extended the Fabbri et al. computational model of human sinus node cells to account for the dynamic intracellular balance of ion concentrations. Using this model, we systematically tested the effect of altered extracellular potassium, calcium, and sodium concentrations. Although sodium changes had negligible (0.15 bpm/mM) and potassium changes mild effects (8 bpm/mM), calcium changes markedly affected the beating rate (46 bpm/mM ionized calcium without ...
Percussion pacing involves using ones fist to repeatedly strike a patients left sternal border in a rhythmic manner. The resulting increase in ventricular pressure can trigger myocardial depolarization and subsequent contraction. We describe the successful treatment of acute preoperative symptomatic sinus bradycardia with percussion pacing in a 63-year-old patient scheduled for placement of a gastric feeding tube after trauma involving spinal cord injury. Although no longer included in current advanced cardiovascular life support guidelines, percussion pacing may be a suitable alternative to chest compressions in multitrauma cases where the force of compressions could cause further complications ...
Atrial Fibrillation Treatment 2011 John Mandrola Disclosures None Approach to AF treatment (after making the diagnosis and exclusion of obvious causes) Anticoagulants Devices Ablation Treat Symptoms Rhythm Control Prevent Heart Failure Rate Control Topics for today An AF doctors approach to preventing stroke Whats the best tool for treating AF? • Drugs? • Devices? • Ablation? Education Knowledge Education 6 Things that I explain • What is AF? • What causes AF? • What our the goals of treatment? - Cures are rare • What are the possible treatments? • The importance of treating associated conditions - TLC - Therapeutic Lifestyle Changes • The Quandary… The Quandary AF AF RX AF Treatment…Bad? • Prolonged QT and VF - Sotalol, Dofetilide, Amiodarone, dronedarone • 1:1 Atrial Flutter and syncope and SCD - Propafenone, Flecanide • Organ toxicity (Liver, Lung and Thyroid) - Amio, Dronedarone • Bleeding from blood thinners • Severe Bradycardia warranting an implantable ...
therapy treatment will be selected in accordance with the form of the disease.For example, when the method of functional cardiomyopathy Interference.This uses the appropriate device.They treat patients aged 10-14 years.Due to the fact that in recent years significantly increased the sensitivity of people to drugs, specialists will develop and implement new non-drug methods.Nevertheless, with climacteric cardiomyopathy, for example, the doctor prescribes mainly pharmaceuticals.The essence of therapy in this case is to use means on the basis of valerian.In the presence of negative T waves, doctors recommend drugs Inderal and verapamil.These medications, however, should not be taken in too severe bradycardia.With severe cases, a specialist may prescribe hormone therapy.The primary efficacy therapeutic course in this case it is considered a significant reduction in pain that is not dependent on ECG.Patients also recommend that ACE inhibitors ("Benazepril", "quinapril" and others.).The dosage in ...
This is the option to protect existing drawings meet older woman online changedmanually by the user from losing the changes while the drawing isupdated. The very best language of adoration is that which adoringly in the where to meet singles in phoenix free month plainest words sets forth the simple truth with regard to our great lord. This is a similar system to gas blowback guns, but generally is more efficient and more powerful as all the power of the gas is going to making the bullet fly out the barrel, and not to making the slide recoil. Verapamil is not suitable in combination with beta-blockers because severe bradycardia and heart failure can occur. I know this product supposedly "thickens" hair but i have thick hair and it just provides a really nice natural hold. Its tough to strike the right counterbalance between my dreams, aspirations and my baby but the joy of being my daughters mom is impeccable! Every year, we met up to make an sdedicated cruise through various cities in france. ...
Doctors give trusted, helpful answers on causes, diagnosis, symptoms, treatment, and more: Dr. Fowler on what can relieve symptoms of bradycardia: If people have symptomatic bradycardia ie dizzy light headedness etc. The may need a pacemaker. If pts heart rates are low around 30 beats per minute or have 3sec pauses or longer and arent on any thing like beta blockers etc a pacemaker will help keep the heart rate at a programmed rate to prevent symptoms.
Bradycardia Resources - http://amzn.to/2fKfgNr Bradycardia is a slower than normal heart rate. The heart usually beats between 60 and 100 times a minute in an adult at rest. If you have bradycardi ...
An apparatus and method for controlling pulse energy in an arrythmia control device wherein bradycardia pacing pulses are normally delivered at a first energy, and after antitachycardia therapy, bradycardia pulses are delivered at a second energy, the second energy being greater than the first energy. The antitachycardia therapy may be at least one of antitachycardia pacing, cardioversion and defibrillation; and is delivered at a third energy level greater than said second energy level. The second energy level is maintained for a predetermined period of time and then returned to the normal bradycardia pacing energy.
Pacemaker therapy is most commonly initiated because of symptomatic bradycardia, usually resulting from sinus node disease. Randomized multicenter trials assessing the relative benefits of different pacing modes have made possible an evidence-based approach to the treatment of bradyarrhythmias. During the past several decades, major advances In technology and in our understanding of cardiac pathophysiology have led to the development of new pacing techniques for the treatment of heart failure in the absence of bradycardia. Left ventricular or biventricular pacing may improve symptoms of heart failure and objective measurements of left ventricular systolic dysfunction by resynchronizing cardiac contraction. However, emerging clinical data suggest that long-term right ventricular apical pacing may have harmful effects. As the complexity of cardiac pacing devices continues to grow, physicians need to have a basic understanding of device indications, device function, and common problems encountered ...
Chapter 124: Bradyarrhythmias answers are found in the Harrisons Manual of Medicine powered by Unbound Medicine. Available for iPhone, iPad, Android, and Web.
Definition of Central bradycardia with photos and pictures, translations, sample usage, and additional links for more information.
Online Doctor Chat - Hypotension, bradycardia, Ask a Doctor about diagnosis, treatment and medication for Hypertension, Online doctor patient chat conversation by Dr. Jyoti Patil
Bradycardia is a sort of arrhythmia characterized by decreased coronary heart charge, thats less than 60 beats in line with minute (bpm). it could be taken into consideration as a variant of the norm
BioAssay record AID 177426 submitted by ChEMBL: Compound was evaluated for the inhibition of 5-HT induced bradycardia [Benzold-Jarisch (BJ) reflex test] in rats at 5 min.
A persons heart beats between 60 to 100 times per minute when theyre resting. If you heart beats less than 60 per min, it may be a symptom of Bradycardia.
Bradycardia - an easy to understand guide covering causes, diagnosis, symptoms, treatment and prevention plus additional in depth medical information.
Learn more about Bradycardia at TriStar Centennial Parthenon Pavilion DefinitionCausesRisk FactorsSymptomsDiagnosisTreatmentPreventionrevision ...
ACLS Megacode Case 1: Sinus Bradycardia (Bradycardia VF/Pulseless VT Asystole Out-of-Hospital Scenario You are a paramedic and arrive on the scene to find a 57-year-old woman complaining of indigestion.
Sorry! I have been doing research on the internet. I have no idea why my posting got all disjointed. NO, I am not experiencing all of those symptoms. HAHA ...
I am a 32 year old female in good health. I eat well and exercise regularly, and have always had very low but healthy blood pressure. I have had a history of unusual chest and rib pains that started ab...
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My son had hand surgery last June and during post op he had extremely high blood pressure that they had to give him medicine for before releasing him from the hospital. Well we thought maybe it was a f...
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This clinical trials features 10 companies, including Monash Health, Shijiazhuang Yiling Pharmaceutical Co Ltd, International Bio Service Co Ltd, Shandong Buchang Pharmaceutical Co Ltd
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Warren is having a tougher road. His lungs were less developed from the beginning, requiring a second dose of surfactant. And then he was thriving. The past several days have been more difficult for him. He has gone up on his oxygen, currently at 32%, with more frequent desats (oxygen saturation dropping below 80). He has struggled with his feedings, going up and down, and is currently receiving all nutrition via his picc line. They will resume feedings today. Hes had 3 chest X-rays so far, all normal, trying to see why he is struggling to digest and breathe. He has several episodes a day, 5 in the last hour, of apnea and bradycardia. This causes the scary sounding alarm to go off. The only me that sends nurses running. But he remains active and alert. And when I hold him, he gradually works his way back to room air. He is such a sweet boy and cuddles right up to his momma. Last week there were talks of him being ready to try breathing without the cpap, this week it was turned up. Up and down ...
Evidence-based recommendations on dual-chamber pacemakers for symptomatic bradycardia due to sick sinus syndrome without atrioventricular block
Looking for online definition of fetal bradycardia in the Medical Dictionary? fetal bradycardia explanation free. What is fetal bradycardia? Meaning of fetal bradycardia medical term. What does fetal bradycardia mean?
Premature ventricular contractions is one of the most common symptomatic arrhythmia. Antiarrhythmia drugs for premature ventricular contractions, such as beta-blockers and sodium channel blockers, can cause bradycardia. For sinus bradycardia patients complicated with premature ventricular contractions, its hard for doctors to make decision. The purpose of the study is to assess the effects of Chinese medicine Shansong Yangxin capsule for sinus bradycardia complicated with ventricular premature beats, which based on the numbers of premature ventricular contractions and average hear rate in 24-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram (ECG) after 8 weeks treatment as the primary endpoint of the study. Secondary endpoints are evaluation of the Shensong Yangxin capsule on quality of life. This study is a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, multi-center trial. Sinus bradycardia patients(average heart rate 45-59 beat per minute) associated with premature ventricular contractions (PVC number ,10000 ...
Sick sinus syndrome comprises a variety of conditions involving sinus node dysfunction and commonly affects elderly persons. While the syndrome can have many causes, it usually is idiopathic. Patients may experience syncope, pre-syncope, palpitations, or dizziness; however, they often are asymptomatic or have subtle or nonspecific symptoms. Sick sinus syndrome has multiple manifestations on electrocardiogram, including sinus bradycardia, sinus arrest, sinoatrial block, and alternating patterns of bradycardia and tachycardia (bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome). Diagnosis of sick sinus syndrome can be difficult because of its nonspecific symptoms and elusive findings on electrocardiogram or Holter monitor. The mainstay of treatment is atrial or dual-chamber pacemaker placement, which generally provides effective relief of symptoms and lowers the incidence of atrial fibrillation, thromboembolic events, heart failure, and mortality, compared with ventricular pacemakers.
A four-week-old Charolais heifer was referred for surgical treatment of an infected umbilicus. The heifer was sedated with intravenous xylazine, and an indwelling intravenous jugular cannula was placed. General anaesthesia was induced with intravenous ketamine and maintained with isoflurane in 100 per cent oxygen. Surgical exploration of the abdomen revealed an infected urachus originating from the apex of the bladder and bilaterally infected umbilical arteries. Anaesthesia was stable for 35 minutes until surgical traction of the urachus and umbilical arteries resulted in bradycardia and hypoventilation/apnoea, which resolved when the traction was released, but recurred as and when traction was reinitiated. Collaboration between the anaesthetist and the surgeon was necessary to progress the procedure while minimising perturbations in physiology. Towards the end of the procedure, during peritoneal lavage with sterile saline, severe bradycardia developed (heart rate ,20 bpm) and was successfully ...
The frequency, clinical course, and prognosis of sinus node dysfunction in 431 patients with acute myocardial infarction admitted to the coronary care unit were studied. Sinus node dysfunction occurred in 20 patients. In 13, the principal manifestation consisted of severe sinus bradycardia. In the remaining 7, periods of bradycardia alternating with episodes of supraventricular tachycardia were noted. Though several of the patients with sinus bradycardia required intravenous atropine or temporary pacing, normal sinus rhythm returned in virtually all during follow-up. The clinical course of patients with both bradycardia and tachycardia was less benign, during the acute phase and during follow-up; 5 of the 6 survivors required continued antiarrhythmic therapy or permanent pacing. The differences in the clinical course between these two groups of patients may reflect distinct underlying pathological changes. The findings in this study suggest that in contrast to sinus bradycardia, the occurrence ...
For patient information click here Editor-In-Chief: C. Michael Gibson, M.S., M.D. [1]; Associate Editor(s)-in-Chief: Sahar Memar Montazerin, M.D.[2] Synonyms and Keywords: Bradycardia-tachycardia syndrome, tachycardia-bradycardia syndrome, tachy-brady syndrome, sinus node dysfunction, SND, SSS, Sinus arrest, sinus bradycardia, are forms or variants of sick sinus syndrome. ...
The main conclusion of this prospective study is that in patients with adenosine-sensitive syncope, the mechanism of syncope is heterogeneous, although bradycardia is the most frequent finding. The causal relationship between ATP-induced AV block and syncope due to paroxysmal AV block is weak. Atrioventricular block induced by ATP predicts AV block as the mechanism of spontaneous syncope in only a few tilt-negative cases.. At the time of ILR-documented syncope, about half of the patients showed long pauses, and two-thirds had severe bradycardia. Sinus arrest or bradycardia was more frequent in patients who had an associated positive response during tilt testing. This finding is consistent with that observed in a previous study in patients with tilt-positive syncope (8). The finding of progressive sinus bradycardia frequently followed by sinus arrest has been regarded as highly suggestive of a neurally mediated mechanism. The association between AV block and sinus arrest, as in Patient no. 4, ...
Profound bradycardia caused by sugammadex has been reported, although its mechanism is unclear. Herein, we suggest a possible culprit for this phenomenon. A 50-year-old woman without comorbidity except mild obesity underwent a transabdominal hysterectomy and right salpingo-oophorectomy. After surgery, sugammadex 200 mg was intravenously administered. Approximately 4 min later, her heart rate decreased to 36 bpm accompanied by hypotension (41/20 mmHg) and ST depression in limb lead electrocardiogram (ECG). Atropine 0.5 mg was injected intravenously without improving the hemodynamics. Intravenous adrenaline 0.5 mg was added despite the lack of signs suggesting allergic reactions. Her heart rate and blood pressure quickly recovered and remained stable thereafter, although 12-lead ECG taken 1 h later still showed ST depression. In this case, the significant bradycardia appeared attributable to coronary vasospasm (Kounis syndrome) induced by sugammadex, considering the ECG findings and high incidence of
Definition. Abnormality of cardiac rhythm is cardiac arrhythmia. 1-bradycardia means heart rate less than 60 beats per minute. 2- Tachycardia means heart rate more than 100 beats per minute.. Bradycardia. It may be sinus bradycardia or pathological bradycardia. Sinus bradycardia. Heart rate is 60 beats per minute and is usually asymptomatic .it causes include hypothermia, hypothyroidism, B-Blockers and digitalis, increased intracranial pressure, degeneration and fibrosis of atrium and sinus node.. Pathological bradycardia. It may be due to sinus node disease and atrioventricular block or atrioventricular conduction disturbance. Treatment. No treatment in asymptomatic cases. In sinus bradycardia atropine or beta one agonist is indicated.. Tachycardia. It may be sinus tachycardia or pathological tachycardia.. Sinus tachycardia. Heart rate is more than 100 beats per minute is sinus rhythm can be caused by fever, exercise, emotions, pregnancy, anemia, thyrotoxicosis, and increased ...
INTRODUCTION. Sinus tachycardia is widely recognized as one of the classic features of active rheumatic fever, but the fact that an abnormally slow heart rate is often present during the acute phase of this disease has received little emphasis.. Apparently the first report discussing the occurrence of sinus bradycardia in acute rheumatism was that of Andrieu and Aujalen1 in 1936. Later, Keith2 commented on the pulse rates observed in a large series of rheumatic children. He found that many cases developed a heart rate slower than normal as the acute phase of the illness subsided. Bradycardia was noted to occur ...
5.5 are indications for anti-digoxin Fab, if available. The best regimen is currently unclear. Consider giving 400 mg over 20 minutes followed by 400-800 mg over 4-8 hours by infusion. In the absence of anti-digoxin Fab: Give insulin/dextrose for potassium >5,5. Do not give calcium. Consider treating severe bradycardia due to AV block with temporary pacing Treat ventricular fibrillation with low-energy direct current cardioversion. Previously forced vomiting or performing gastric lavage was part of the treatment of poisoning, but is no longer recommended. There is a lack of evidence that weighs efficacy versus harm. Activated charcoal is still used, since it binds toxins in the gastrointestinal tract to reduce absorption. It is uncertain whether repeated administration of activated charcoal is effective, in theory interrupting enterohepatic cycling. This treatment is used for digoxin poisoning, another cardiac glycoside. Supportive care like monitoring vitals and electrolyte and fluid balance is ...
Infusion reactions are expected to occur and include nausea, vomiting, fever, rigors or chills, flushing, dyspnea, hypoxemia, chest tightness, hypertension, tachycardia, bradycardia, dysgeusia, hematuria, and mild headache. Premedication with antipyretics, histamine antagonists, and corticosteroids may reduce the incidence and intensity of infusion reactions. Severe reactions, including respiratory distress, severe bronchospasm, severe bradycardia with heart block or other arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, hypotension, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, renal compromise, encephalopathy, loss of consciousness, and seizure also may occur. Many of these reactions are related to the amount of DMSO administered. Minimizing the amount of DMSO administered may reduce the risk of such reactions, although idiosyncratic responses may occur even at DMSO doses thought to be tolerated. The actual amount of DMSO depends on the method of preparation of the product for infusion. Limiting the amount of DMSO infused ...
Infusion reactions are expected to occur and include nausea, vomiting, fever, rigors or chills, flushing, dyspnea, hypoxemia, chest tightness, hypertension, tachycardia, bradycardia, dysgeusia, hematuria, and mild headache. Premedication with antipyretic, histamine antagonists, and corticosteroids may reduce the incidence and intensity of infusion reactions.. Severe reactions, including respiratory distress, severe bronchospasm, severe bradycardia with heart block or other arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, hypotension, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, renal compromise, encephalopathy, loss of consciousness, and seizure also may occur. Many of these reactions are related to the amount of DMSO administered. Minimizing the amount of DMSO administered may reduce the risk of such reactions, although idiosyncratic responses may occur even at DMSO doses thought to be tolerated. The actual amount of DMSO depends on the method of preparation of the product for infusion. Limiting the amount of DMSO infused ...
Extensive research has been conducted on the genetic regulation of SAN development as a whole unit. However, the existence of genetically distinguishable domains, i.e. the Nkx2-5+ SA junction and Nkx2-5− SAN head, within the developing SAN indicates the involvement of different regulatory mechanisms for these two domains. Shox2 was originally thought to regulate SAN development by preventing ectopic Nkx2-5 activation in the SAN (Blaschke et al., 2007; Espinoza-Lewis et al., 2009). However, as shown in the present study, the situation is more complicated. We provide unambiguous evidence that Shox2 is co-expressed with Nkx2-5 in the SA junction during SAN development, and loss of Shox2 in the Nkx2-5+ domain leads to severely hypoplastic and eventually unidentifiable SA junction structures. The compromised SAN function in the mutant mice, which is manifested as severe bradycardia, irregular R-R intervals and variable P-R intervals, demonstrates for the first time the requirement for Shox2 in the ...
Blocked premature atrial contractions (BPACs) are considered a type cardiac bradyarrhythmia and if occurring in utero is classified under a fetal bradyarrhythmia. Pathology It is seen when a premature atrial contraction occurs very early on and...
Abstract: Facial paralysis is the most frequent unilateral cranial nerve pathology affecting pregnant population 2 to 4 times more often than the nonpregnant population. There exists an association with preeclampsia but this has largely been overlooked. Clinicians often dismiss it for idiopathic palsy as seen in the present case. A 30-year-old woman, Gravida 4, Para 3, presented at 26 weeks pregnancy with complaints of facial weakness, blurring of vision, altered taste sensation, increased noise sensitivity for 1 month, headache since 18 days, and vomiting since 2-3 days. Her pulse was 90/min, BP was 170/120, and RR was 18/min. Uterus was 18 weeks size and proteinuria++ was present. Ultrasonography revealed a 26 weeks fetus, severe bradycardia, and absent liquor. HELLP syndrome was diagnosed after investigations. Six units of fresh frozen plasma were transfused. An informed decision for termination of pregnancy was made. She delivered a 450?gram stillborn. The third stage was complicated with ...
Hi bunee, Welcome to the heart forum. It looks like aldo has given some excellent advice. I personally have Sick Sinus Syndrome and Bradycardia which I have had to have a pacemaker implanted to keep my heart rate up. It was beating in the 20-30 beats per minute range before pacer. I have never been on a beta blocker though and dont have any experience with this. Since your having dizziness and chest tightness it would be a good idea to pursue having it looked into further. Low heart rate can cause dizziness and passing out if it becomes low enough. Please let us know how your doing ...
Pacemaker implantation complication rates in elderly and young patients Kazim Serhan Özcan, Damirbek Osmonov, Servet Altay, Cevdet Dönmez, Ersin Yildirim, Ceyhan Türkkan, Baris Güngör, Ahmet Ekmekçi, Ahmet Taha Alper, Kadir Gürkan, Ä°zzet ErdinlerDepartment of Cardiology, Siyami Ersek Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery Center, Istanbul, TurkeyAims: To evaluate the complication rate differences between elderly and younger patients who receive a permanent pacemaker implantation.Methods: We reviewed all cases admitted to our institution between January 2008 and June 2009 with symptomatic bradyarrhythmia for whom a permanent pacemaker was implanted. Beginning in June 2009, we prospectively collected data from all patients with the same diagnosis and procedure. The frequency of complications due to the pacemaker implantation procedure was evaluated and compared between young (<70 years old) and elderly (≥70 years old) patients.Results: Among 574 patients with a
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. DS patients have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that DS patients have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient who had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation later died of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss of function mutation died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. Death could be prevented with mechanical ventilation after seizures induced by hyperthermia or maximal electroshock. Muscarinic receptor antagonists did not prevent bradycardia or death when given at doses selective for peripheral parasympathetic blockade, whereas apnea was prevented at doses known to be high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Anoxia causes bradycardia due to a direct effect on the heart. We conclude that SUDEP in DS may ...
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. DS patients have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that DS patients have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient who had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation later died of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss of function mutation died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. Death could be prevented with mechanical ventilation after seizures induced by hyperthermia or maximal electroshock. Muscarinic receptor antagonists did not prevent bradycardia or death when given at doses selective for peripheral parasympathetic blockade, whereas apnea was prevented at doses known to be high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Anoxia causes bradycardia due to a direct effect on the heart. We conclude that SUDEP in DS may ...
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. DS patients have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that DS patients have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient who had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation later died of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss of function mutation died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. Death could be prevented with mechanical ventilation after seizures induced by hyperthermia or maximal electroshock. Muscarinic receptor antagonists did not prevent bradycardia or death when given at doses selective for peripheral parasympathetic blockade, whereas apnea was prevented at doses known to be high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Anoxia causes bradycardia due to a direct effect on the heart. We conclude that SUDEP in DS may ...
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. DS patients have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that DS patients have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient who had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation later died of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss of function mutation died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. Death could be prevented with mechanical ventilation after seizures induced by hyperthermia or maximal electroshock. Muscarinic receptor antagonists did not prevent bradycardia or death when given at doses selective for peripheral parasympathetic blockade, whereas apnea was prevented at doses known to be high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Anoxia causes bradycardia due to a direct effect on the heart. We conclude that SUDEP in DS may ...
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. DS patients have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that DS patients have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient who had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation later died of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss of function mutation died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. Death could be prevented with mechanical ventilation after seizures induced by hyperthermia or maximal electroshock. Muscarinic receptor antagonists did not prevent bradycardia or death when given at doses selective for peripheral parasympathetic blockade, whereas apnea was prevented at doses known to be high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Anoxia causes bradycardia due to a direct effect on the heart. We conclude that SUDEP in DS may ...
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. DS patients have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that DS patients have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient who had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation later died of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss of function mutation died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. Death could be prevented with mechanical ventilation after seizures induced by hyperthermia or maximal electroshock. Muscarinic receptor antagonists did not prevent bradycardia or death when given at doses selective for peripheral parasympathetic blockade, whereas apnea was prevented at doses known to be high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Anoxia causes bradycardia due to a direct effect on the heart. We conclude that SUDEP in DS may ...
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. DS patients have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that DS patients have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient who had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation later died of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss of function mutation died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. Death could be prevented with mechanical ventilation after seizures induced by hyperthermia or maximal electroshock. Muscarinic receptor antagonists did not prevent bradycardia or death when given at doses selective for peripheral parasympathetic blockade, whereas apnea was prevented at doses known to be high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Anoxia causes bradycardia due to a direct effect on the heart. We conclude that SUDEP in DS may ...
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. DS patients have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that DS patients have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient who had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation later died of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss of function mutation died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. Death could be prevented with mechanical ventilation after seizures induced by hyperthermia or maximal electroshock. Muscarinic receptor antagonists did not prevent bradycardia or death when given at doses selective for peripheral parasympathetic blockade, whereas apnea was prevented at doses known to be high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Anoxia causes bradycardia due to a direct effect on the heart. We conclude that SUDEP in DS may ...
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. DS patients have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that DS patients have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient who had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation later died of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss of function mutation died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. Death could be prevented with mechanical ventilation after seizures induced by hyperthermia or maximal electroshock. Muscarinic receptor antagonists did not prevent bradycardia or death when given at doses selective for peripheral parasympathetic blockade, whereas apnea was prevented at doses known to be high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Anoxia causes bradycardia due to a direct effect on the heart. We conclude that SUDEP in DS may ...
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. DS patients have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that DS patients have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient who had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation later died of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss of function mutation died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. Death could be prevented with mechanical ventilation after seizures induced by hyperthermia or maximal electroshock. Muscarinic receptor antagonists did not prevent bradycardia or death when given at doses selective for peripheral parasympathetic blockade, whereas apnea was prevented at doses known to be high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Anoxia causes bradycardia due to a direct effect on the heart. We conclude that SUDEP in DS may ...
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. DS patients have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that DS patients have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient who had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation later died of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss of function mutation died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. Death could be prevented with mechanical ventilation after seizures induced by hyperthermia or maximal electroshock. Muscarinic receptor antagonists did not prevent bradycardia or death when given at doses selective for peripheral parasympathetic blockade, whereas apnea was prevented at doses known to be high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Anoxia causes bradycardia due to a direct effect on the heart. We conclude that SUDEP in DS may ...
Dravet syndrome (DS) is a severe childhood-onset epilepsy commonly due to mutations of the sodium channel gene SCN1A. DS patients have a high risk of sudden unexplained death in epilepsy (SUDEP), believed to be due to cardiac mechanisms. Here we show that DS patients have peri-ictal respiratory dysfunction. One patient who had severe and prolonged postictal hypoventilation later died of SUDEP. Mice with an Scn1aR1407X/+ loss of function mutation died after spontaneous and heat-induced seizures due to central apnea followed by progressive bradycardia. Death could be prevented with mechanical ventilation after seizures induced by hyperthermia or maximal electroshock. Muscarinic receptor antagonists did not prevent bradycardia or death when given at doses selective for peripheral parasympathetic blockade, whereas apnea was prevented at doses known to be high enough to cross the blood brain barrier. Anoxia causes bradycardia due to a direct effect on the heart. We conclude that SUDEP in DS may ...
Pharmacological therapy has long been the primary technique for controlling ventricular rates in patients with atrial fibrillation. Cardiac glycosides, β-adrenergic blockers, or calcium channels blockers are used, alone or frequently in combination, to prolong atrioventricular (AV) nodal refractoriness. Increased concealed conduction in the AV node results in moderation of the ventricular rate with conduction now occurring in an irregularly, irregular pattern. Although AV nodal blocking agents are usually considered to be safer and better tolerated than most membrane-active antiarrhythmic drugs, they do have some potential disadvantages. Many patients will require more than one agent. In patients with intermittent atrial fibrillation, excess bradycardia due to intrinsic or drug-induced sinus node dysfunction may be seen. Nocturnal bradycardia is common even if daytime or exercise rates are poorly controlled. Stress from an acute severe illness may make heart rate control difficult even in ...
Timolol, though used as an eye drop for glaucoma, does have some systemic absorption and effects and can cause bradycardia and bronchospasm. *Molecular medicine pearl - Why is glucagon the treatment for beta blocker overdose, you might ask? Remember from med school that beta receptors are coupled to G-proteins, which activate cAMP formation from ATP…
Is Bradycardia a common side effect of Amlodipine? View Bradycardia Amlodipine side effect risks. Male, 59 years of age, took Amlodipine . Patient was hospitalized.
Ingredients: Olanzapine 7.5 mg. Packing: 10 Tabs/Strip. Formulation: Tablet. Dosage: As directed by physician.. Precautions: Impaired renal, hepatic, cardiovascular function; prostatic hypertrophy; paralytic ileus; DM; parkinsonism; pregnancy. History of blood dyscrasias, myelosuppression, seizures; dementia; dyslipidaemia. IM: Hypotension, bradyarrhythmia, hypoventilation; monitor BP carefully. Caution when used in adolescents due to increased risk of weight gain and hyperlipidaemia. Efficacy and safety have not been established in paediatric patients ,13 yr.. Contraindications: Angle-closure glaucoma; lactation. IM: History of CVS disease, heart surgery.. Side Effects: Postural hypotension; constipation; dizziness; wt gain; agitation; insomnia; akathisia; tremor; personality disorders; oedema; somnolence; increased appetite; antimuscarinic effects; speech difficulty; exacerbation of Parkinsons disease; hallucinations; asthenia; increased body temperature; bradycardia; hyperprolactinaemia; QT ...
Aim: To evaluate the safety of pacemaker implantation in patients with Alzheimers disease (AD).; Methods: We reviewed all cases admitted to our institution between January 2008 and June 2009, with symptomatic bradyarrhythmia for whom a permanent pacemaker was implanted. Beginning in June 2009, we prospectively collected data from all patients with the same diagnosis and procedure. Patients with a diagnosis of AD were included in the study. The risks and frequency of complications due to the pacemaker implantation were evaluated. Because of the older age of patients, they were divided into 2 groups to define the effect of age on complication rate. Group 1 consisted of patients aged ...
HEMANGEOLTM prevents the response of endogenous catecholamines to correct hypoglycemia and masks the adrenergic warning signs of hypoglycemia, particularly tachycardia, palpitations and sweating. HEMANGEOLTM can cause hypoglycemia in children, especially when they are not feeding regularly or are vomiting; withhold the dose under these conditions. Hypoglycemia may present in the form of seizures, lethargy, or coma. If a child has clinical signs of hypoglycemia, parents should discontinue HEMANGEOLTM and call their health care provider immediately or take the child to the emergency room. Concomitant treatment with corticosteroids may increase the risks of hypoglycemia. HEMANGEOLTM may cause or worsen bradycardia or hypotension. Monitor heart rate and blood pressure after treatment initiation or increase in dose. Discontinue treatment if severe (,80 beats per minute) or symptomatic bradycardia or hypotension (systolic blood pressure ,50 mmHg) occurs. HEMANGEOLTM can cause bronchospasm; do not use ...
Diabetic men and women are 2.4 and 5.1 times more likely to develop cardiac heart failure than their nondiabetic counterparts (Framingham study). As well as predisposing to noncardiac causes of heart failure, such as hypertension and ischemic cardiomyopathy, diabetes is associated with a form of cardiomyopathy in which the coronary arteries are normal and small-vessel disease is absent (no basal lamina abnormalities in the myocardial capillaries, no lactic acid production during atrial pacing, etc). Diabetic cardiomyopathy is typically of the mildly dilated variety, with diastolic preceding systolic dysfunction. It is also more often associated than other forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) with bradyarrhythmia (presumably due to conduction neuropathy).. The morphology of diabetic DCM is nonspecific. Its pathophysiology remains incompletely elucidated, but is undoubtedly myriad, comprising vascular and metabolic lesions of the coronary microcirculation, endothelium, and autonomic nervous ...
COSTA, Roberto et al. Permanent cardiac pacing in children with postoperative bradycardia: long-term follow-up. Rev Bras Cir Cardiovasc [online]. 2005, vol.20, n.4, pp.392-397. ISSN 0102-7638. http://dx.doi.org/10.1590/S0102-76382005000400007.. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the long-term outcomes of children submitted to permanent cardiac pacing due to postoperative bradycardia and to identify risk factors for mortality. METHODS: From 1980 to 2004, 120 children were submitted to permanent pacemaker (PM) implantation. Interval between the defect correction and PM implantation was 1.2 ± 2.8 years, on average (median = 21 days). Atrioventricular blocks were present in 94.2% of patients. Transvenous leads (78.3%) and ventricular pacemaker systems (79.2%) were used in most of the cases. Risk factors were studied using the Cox proportional model. The Kaplan-Meier method and the Log-Rank test were used to analyze survival. RESULTS: After a mean of 5.7 ± 5.9 years (maximum = 22.5 years) of follow-up, 97 ...
Indications for Dual Chamber Temporary Pacing Complete heart block Sinus bradycardia Bradycardia with congestive heart failure Atrial and/or ventricular ectopic arrhythmia Reentrant tachycardias During pulse generator replacement
Shifting the weightbearing line as much as possible, viagra pack generic sample thus a high likelihood of disclosing and seeking peace. The one-way valve that responds to haloperidol and sedation suitable for observation. The vent allows the physician to get form his house to places with which we manifest our human qualities and our contribution to understanding the anatomy of the data do not present before positioning it develops a more direct view of the. Treatment consists of a pathologic etiology and unexplained syncope are vasodepressor marked hypotension, cardioinhibitory profound bradycardia, and decreased signal within the osteopathic lesion. Of infants and preschool children, lesions are pruritic, medications such as hypoplastic or absent cry, respiratory distress syndrome of pregnancy increased lumbar curve will persist. Aspiration of the glottis, with the fibres of the. Sidebend and rotate toward the side of the same side and are often sensed by the media where every illness is ...
Bradycardia is a heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute. A slow heart rate does not automatically cause adverse symptoms and may not require treatment, according to the American Heart...
Bradycardia is considered to be a low heart rate (or low pulse) that can sometimes be associated with low blood pressure or perfusion to parts of the body. This can caused by a number of factors.
Bradycardia & Dry Cough & Fatigue & Narrow Pulse Pressure Symptom Checker: Possible causes include Congestive Heart Failure. Check the full list of possible causes and conditions now! Talk to our Chatbot to narrow down your search.
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You are working in TCC when EMS arrives, bagging an unresponsive elderly-appearing female. They report that they were called to a nursing home for unresponsiveness, and found the patient on the floor. On their arrival, she was minimally responsive to noxious stimuli and had a heart rate of 36 on the monitor. She received atropine 0.5 mg x 3 prehospital with minimal response. Her blood pressure is 80/60. To identify if there is heart block, you get an EKG demonstrating marked sinus bradycardia with a 1st degree AV block and possible ST elevation in the inferior and precordial leads (see below): ...
NOTOC__ ,html> ,div class="col-md-12 text-justify" style="border: 1px #e4e4e4 solid; margin-top: 30px; margin-bottom: 30px; padding: 20px; border-radius: 4px; box-shadow: 0 0 12px #ccc; background-color: #fff; color: #003b6e; font-weight: bolder; ">,!--#93322d-#003b6e ,h4> ,b> Cardiac Gene and Circuit Mechanisms ,/b> ,small>,i> (NS090340),/i>,/small>,/h4> ,br> ,h4> Specific Aims and Tasks ,/h4> ,h5> The primary mission of the SRA is to understand the basic biological mechanisms, genetic and physiological risk factors, predictive diagnostic biomarkers, and potential methods of preventing sudden unexpected death, the most common cause of premature mortality in human epilepsy. This project will test the principal hypothesis that mutation of single genes co-expressed in brain, heart, and brainstem central autonomic neurons increase SUDEP risk by promoting cardiorespiratory arrhythmias. We will identify and validate novel ictal bradycardia and SUDEP gene candidates in mouse models to expand the ...
NOTOC__ ,html> ,div class="col-md-12 text-justify" style="border: 1px #e4e4e4 solid; margin-top: 30px; margin-bottom: 30px; padding: 20px; border-radius: 4px; box-shadow: 0 0 12px #ccc; background-color: #fff; color: #003b6e; font-weight: bolder; ">,!--#93322d-#003b6e ,h4> ,b> Cardiac Gene and Circuit Mechanisms ,/b> ,small>,i> (NS090340),/i>,/small>,/h4> ,br> ,h4> Specific Aims and Tasks ,/h4> ,h5> The primary goal of this project is to contribute to our understanding of the basic biological mechanisms, genetic and physiological risk factors, predictive diagnostic biomarkers, and potential methods of preventing sudden unexpected death, the most common cause of premature mortality in human epilepsy. This project will test the principal hypothesis that mutation of single genes co-expressed in brain, heart, and brainstem central autonomic neurons increase SUDEP risk by promoting cardiorespiratory arrhythmias. We will identify and validate novel ictal bradycardia and SUDEP gene candidates in ...
Reading a recent medical report I noted the following:"bifascicular block", sinus bradycardia", Right bundle branch block", this after an EKG last week for short period of pain in the middle of the chest. (I feel OK now, swam slowly for 30 minutes this morning (3 times a week for the last several years - and feel better afterward - - but if I dig some dirt in the yard for planting holes of tomatoes or other plants - I can become exhausted quickly (while swimming 30 minutes slowly does not tire me) - I dont know what physical limits I should place on my self? I take atenolol, losaran, 1/2 pill hydroc.thiszd, and hytrin. I generally feel OK everyday. DOB 8/27/33. Thank you very much for any advise or suggestions. Chris ...
Technological advances in cardiac pacing initially focused on therapeutic modalities such as the development of dual chamber pacing or the development of rate modulation. More recently, the use of the cardiac pacemaker as an implanted arrhythmia monitor has been refined. The application of these capabilities to bradycardia pacing can be traced to the development of both ventricular and atrial cardioverter-defibrillators.12,13 These diagnostic features can evaluate the appropriateness of atrial and ventricular sensing, can test lead integrity, can be used to modulate features such as rate-responsiveness, and can provide continuous arrhythmia surveillance.14-16 Like many other technological advances in pacing, however, the clinical impact of this advanced capability has not been thoroughly studied. To our knowledge, the present report is the largest prospective observational study to assess the clinical significance of nonsustained episodes of atrial tachyarrhythmias in pacemaker patients.. A ...
A slow heart rate, called bradycardia, may result from various medications. Some drugs were developed specifically to slow the heart rate. But bradycardia may be an unwanted side effect of a wide range of other medications that were not developed to have any impact on the heart.
Hello. My heart rate is very low sometimes. It also beats very, very loudly, and I am at rest. Normally, I can do 15 push-ups, swim at the Y, walk 3 miles with groceries in my backpack. Now, my legs are Ike water, I am shaky, weak, dizzy, fatigued. I actually must nap for several hours. This Frid...
Good Breathing --- Grady Jeremiah continues to make great improvement in his breathing. He is now going several days without any bradycardias, or heart rate drops related to lapses in breathing. He still has the occasional breathing lapses, but those mostly occur when he is eating or having a bowel movement. One of the criteria to go home is to go five days without any bradycardias. Please continue to pray that his lungs will develop and that the breathing lapses will completely stop.Good Eating --- Today the speech therapists came to evaluate his bottle feeding progress. He definitely decided to show off for them and took his second full bottle today without any struggle and without any breathing lapses! They said he did the best of all the babies they worked with today! They said his suck-swallow-breathe coordination and rhythm was excellent. However, he still is not able to do every feed via bottle as it makes him tired. Another criteria to go home is to do all feedings via bottle without ...
Bradycardia[edit]. Main articles: Bradycardia and Athletic heart syndrome. Bradycardia was defined as a heart rate less than 60 ... A very slow heart rate (bradycardia) may be associated with heart block.[medical citation needed] It may also arise from ... Bradycardia may be associated with medical conditions such as hypothyroidism. Trained athletes tend to have slow resting heart ... Setting a lower threshold for bradycardia prevents misclassification of fit individuals as having a pathologic heart rate. The ...
Severe bradycardia or advanced AV block[edit]. Unless a pacemaker is present, beta-blockers can severely depress conduction in ... Usage of beta-blockers in tachycardic patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome can result in severe bradycardia, ... These agents, therefore, may be useful in individuals exhibiting excessive bradycardia with sustained beta blocker therapy. ... bradycardia, hypotension, heart failure, heart block, fatigue, dizziness, alopecia (hair loss), abnormal vision, hallucinations ...
Bradycardia - Heart rate that is below the normal range. References[edit]. *^ a b c d e f g h i Butler, P. J; Jones, D. R (1997 ... Bradycardia and cardiac output[edit]. Bradycardia is the response to facial contact with cold water: the human heart rate slows ... Mild bradycardia is caused by subjects holding their breath without submerging the face in water.[8][9] When breathing with the ... The diving bradycardia was first described by Edmund Goodwyn in 1786 and later by Paul Bert in 1870.[23] ...
... is a benzamide,[12] derivative of morpholine,[103] which acts pharmacologically as a selective, reversible inhibitor of monoamine oxidase A (RIMA),[9] a type of monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI), and increases levels of norepinephrine (noradrenaline), dopamine, and especially serotonin.[104][105] in neuronal cells as well as in synaptic vesicles; extracellular levels also increase which results in increased monoamine receptor stimulation and suppression of REM sleep, down regulation of 3-adrenoceptors. A single 300 mg dose of moclobemide inhibits 80% of monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) and 30% of monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B), blocking the decomposition of norepinephrine, serotonin and, to a lesser extent, dopamine. There is also some evidence pointing towards moclobemide possessing neuroprotective properties.[8] There is no cumulative effect of moclobemide centrally when taken long-term.[8] With long-term use of moclobemide, there is a significant down-regulation of B-adrenoceptors.[8] ...
Thucydides' narrative pointedly refers to increased risk among caregivers, more typical of the person-to-person contact spread of viral hemorrhagic fever (e.g., Ebola virus disease or Marburg virus) than typhus or typhoid. Unusual in the history of plagues during military operations, besieging Spartan troops are described as not having been afflicted by the illness raging near them within the city. Thucydides' description further invites comparison with VHF in the character and sequence of symptoms developed, and of the usual fatal outcome on about the eighth day. Some scientists have interpreted Thucydides' expression "lugx kenē" (λύγξ κενή) as the unusual symptom of hiccups,[20] which is now recognized as a common finding in Ebola virus disease. Outbreaks of VHF in Africa in 2012 and 2014 reinforced observations of the increased hazard to caregivers and the necessity of barrier precautions for preventing disease spread related to grief rituals and funerary rites. The 2015 west African ...
Slow heart rate (bradycardia). *Sensitivity to cold temperatures. *Constipation. *Depressed mood. *Memory difficulty ...
Bradycardia and cardiac outputEdit. Bradycardia is the response to facial contact with cold water: the human heart rate slows ... Mild bradycardia is caused by subjects holding their breath without submerging the face in water.[8][9] When breathing with the ... The diving bradycardia was first described by Edmund Goodwyn in 1786 and later by Paul Bert in 1870.[23] ... Vega, Jose L. (2017-08-01). "Edmund Goodwyn and the first description of diving bradycardia". Journal of Applied Physiology. ...
BradycardiasEdit. Normal sinus rhythm, with solid black arrows pointing to normal P waves representative of normal sinus node ... Bradycardia may also occur in some types of seizures. TachycardiasEdit. In adults and children over 15, resting heart rate ... This may be caused by a slowed signal from the sinus node (sinus bradycardia), by a pause in the normal activity of the sinus ... Bradycardias may also be present in the normally functioning heart of endurance athletes or other well-conditioned persons. ...
... bradycardia; severe heart failure or coronary artery disease. Also: Raynaud's syndrome, intermittent claudication, epilepsy, ...
Certain calcium channel blocker should be avoided with some beta-receptor blockers since they may cause severe bradycardia and ... should be avoided in patients with AV node dysfunction and/or patients on other medications which might cause bradycardia (i.e ...
Complications include bradycardia, hypotension, and hypothermia. Substances that may cause this toxidrome are opioids. The ... Complications include bradycardia, hypothermia, and tachypnea. Substances that may cause this toxidrome include carbamates, ... Common mnemonics for organophosphate poisoning include the "killer B's" of bradycardia, bronchorrhea and bronchospasm because ... An alternative mnemonic is DUMBBELLSS - Diarrhea, Urination, Miosis, Bradycardia, Bronchospasm, Emesis, Lacrimation, Lethargy, ...
Reference Bystolic.com • Severe bradycardia • Heart block greater than first degree • Patients with cardiogenic shock • ... bradycardia, or impotence. However, according to the FDA In late August 2008, the FDA issued a Warning Letter to Forest ...
Bradycardia or tachycardia. Depression, anxiety disorders and insomnia. Solitude: may avoid friends and family and become more ...
Control of bradycardia. Control of bronchodilatation. Methoctramine was shown to produce some cytotoxic effects, being the ... particularly against bradycardia. However, currently it's only addressed for research purposes, since the administration to ...
Bradycardia also occurs. Because a frequent side effect of digitalis is reduction of appetite, some individuals have used the ... Digitalis poisoning can cause heart block and either bradycardia (decreased heart rate) or tachycardia (increased heart rate), ...
Bradycardia, hypotension, reduced cardiac output, small vessel vasculopathy. Neurologic. Global development delay, loss of knee ...
Alboni, Paolo; Alboni, Marco; Gianfranchi, Lorella (Feb 2011). "Diving bradycardia: a mechanism of defence against hypoxic ... reflex bradycardia), and reduced blood circulation to the extremities such as fingers and toes (peripheral vasoconstriction). ...
Epinephrine infusions may also be used for symptomatic bradycardia.[18] Anaphylaxis[edit]. Epinephrine is the drug of choice ...
Chen, Chao‐Yin; Dicarlo, Stephen E. (January 1998). "Endurance exercise training‐induced resting Bradycardia: A brief review". ...
"Can Sinus Bradycardia Be Inherited?". NEJM Journal Watch. Massachusetts Medical Society. (Subscription required (help)). ...
"Can Sinus Bradycardia Be Inherited?". NEJM Journal Watch. Massachusetts Medical Society. (Subscription required (help)). ...
"Relative bradycardia" may also be present, which is low or low-normal heart rate despite the presence of a fever. Laboratory ... Ostergaard L, Huniche B, Andersen PL (November 1996). "Relative bradycardia in infectious diseases". J. Infect. 33 (3): 185-91 ...
Follow bradycardia, prolonged QT closely. Roden DM (August 1998). "Mechanisms and management of proarrhythmia". Am. J. Cardiol ...
"Atropine and bradycardia after myocardial infarction". Kounis NG, Chopra RK. Ann Intern Med 1974; 81: 117-8. "Oxytetracycline- ...
Sinus bradycardia is also very common. In addition, depressed conduction is a predominant feature of digoxin toxicity. Other ...
Evidence-based recommendations on dual-chamber pacemakers for symptomatic bradycardia due to sick sinus syndrome without ... Dual‑chamber pacemakers for symptomatic bradycardia due to sick sinus syndrome without atrioventricular block. Technology ... 1.1 Dual‑chamber pacemakers are recommended as an option for treating symptomatic bradycardia due to sick sinus syndrome ...
SYNCOPAL BRADYCARDIA. Br Med J 1905; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.2340.1237-c (Published 04 November 1905) Cite this as ...
Bradycardia heart rhythms are characterized by a slowness of the heartbeat, usually at a rate under 60 beats per minute (normal ... Bradycardia heart rhythms are characterized by a slowness of the heartbeat, usually at a rate under 60 beats per minute (normal ...
Sinus bradycardia can be defined as a sinus rhythm with a resting heart rate of 60 beats per minute or less. However, few ... Sinus Bradycardia Differential Diagnoses. Updated: Dec 27, 2017 * Author: Mark W Livingston, MD; Chief Editor: Erik D Schraga, ... Asymptomatic sinus bradycardia following bariatric surgery. Am J Cardiol. 2014 Mar 15. 113(6):1049-53. [Medline]. ... encoded search term (Sinus%20Bradycardia) and Sinus Bradycardia What to Read Next on Medscape. Medscape Consult. ...
Stress: Bradycardia. His cardiologist/electrophysiologist has come to the conclusion that the Sinus Bradycardia (Sick Sinus ... Re: Sinus Bradycardia. Hi Debbie,. Sorry to hear about your husband. Hope hes hanging in there okay mentally!. I cant offer ... Re: Sinus Bradycardia. aloha,. I think the pacemaker might be moving forward (or backwards) a bit too fast.. First off, his ... Bradycardia is common in athletes. Does or did his exercise rise to that level?. I would keep the pacemaker as my Ace-in-the- ...
Bradycardia is also part of the mammalian diving reflex. A diagnosis of bradycardia in adults is based on a heart rate less ... Patients with bradycardia have likely acquired it, as opposed to having it congenitally. Bradycardia is more common in older ... Pathological causes include sinus bradycardia, sinus arrest, sinus exit block, or AV block. A ventricular bradycardia, also ... Ventricular bradycardias occurs with sinus bradycardia, sinus arrest, and AV block. Treatment often consists of the ...
Sinus bradycardia can be defined as a sinus rhythm with a resting heart rate of 60 beats per minute or less. However, few ... Drugs & Diseases , Emergency Medicine , Sinus Bradycardia Q&A What is the definition of sinus bradycardia?. Updated: Dec 27, ... Sinus bradycardia can be defined as a sinus rhythm with a resting heart rate of 60 beats per minute or less. However, few ... Asymptomatic sinus bradycardia following bariatric surgery. Am J Cardiol. 2014 Mar 15. 113(6):1049-53. [Medline]. ...
... Elisabeth Codsi,1 Carl H. Rose,1 Marysia S. Tweet,2 Sharonne N. Hayes,2 ... E. Nof, R. Kuperstein, L. Miller, A. Gwetta, M. Glikson, and D. Luria, "Acquired post partum bradycardia associated with ...
Bradycardia News and Research. RSS Bradycardia, ("heart slowness"), as applied to adult medicine, is defined as a resting heart ... Developed for patients with bradycardia - a heart rate that is too slow - the Nanostim device is designed to be placed directly ...
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Bradycardia can be life threatening if the heart is unable to maintain a rate that pumps enough oxygen-rich blood throughout ... Treatment of bradycardia will vary from one patient to another and will depend on the type, severity and cause of their ... Bradycardia is caused by a disruption in the hearts electrical system that controls the heart rate. This disruption can come ... Bradycardia can affect patients of all ages, genders and ethnicities. However, older patients are at an increased risk as well ...
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bradycardia Bradycardia is a heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute. It can be caused by a problem with the hearts ... Symptoms of bradycardia can include fatigue, dizziness, lightheadedness, fainting or near-fainting spells, or, in extreme cases ...
Ictal bradycardia is a diagnosis in which people that have temporal lobe epilepsy experience bradycardia and is also ... Ictal bradycardia is a potential cause or reason for ictal asystole to occur and is believed to help explain the phenomenon of ... In comparison, ictal bradycardia causes epileptic discharges that disrupt the normal cardiac rhythm in a negative fashion. ... Although there is limited amount of information about ictal bradycardia, as it is a relatively new discovery and is considered ...
Reflex bradycardia is a bradycardia (decrease in heart rate) in response to the baroreceptor reflex, one of the bodys ... In the presence of high mean arterial pressure, the baroreceptor reflex produces a reflex bradycardia as a method of decreasing ... Stimuli causing reflex bradycardia include: Oculocardiac reflex sympathetic response to intracranial hypertension Systemically ... In reflex bradycardia, blood pressure is reduced by decreasing cardiac output (CO) via a decrease in heart rate (HR). An ...
Sinus bradycardia is a sinus rhythm with a rate that is lower than normal. In humans, bradycardia is generally defined to be a ... Bradycardia is not necessarily problematic. People who regularly practice sports may have sinus bradycardia, because their ... Sinus bradycardia can also be an adaptive advantage; for example, diving seals may have a heart rate as low as 12 beats per ... Sinus bradycardia is a common condition found in both healthy individuals and those who are considered well conditioned ...
What is bradycardia?. Bradycardia is a type of abnormal heart rhythm, or arrhythmia. It occurs when the heart beats very slowly ... How is bradycardia diagnosed?. Bradycardia can sometimes be diagnosed in your physicians office with an electrocardiogram (ECG ... What are the symptoms of bradycardia?. Sometimes bradycardia causes no symptoms and your doctor may not need to treat it. ... Other causes of bradycardia. * A response of the vagus nerve affecting the heart (see Reflex Syncope in the Syncope article) ...
The American Heart Association explains bradycardia as the medical term for a heart rate thats too slow, a heart rate of less ... Bradycardia = too slow. A heart rate of less than 60 beats per minute (BPM) in adults is called bradycardia. Whats too slow ...
... Yomi Fashola, Sanjeev Kaul, and Douglas Finefrock ... A case report in The Journal of Trauma, 1994, discussed a case of severe and fatal bradycardia in a 36-year-old patient with ... K. Noble and C. Isles, "Hyperkalaemia causing profound bradycardia," Heart, vol. 92, no. 8, p. 1063, 2006. View at Publisher · ... This is also unlikely to be the cause of her acute bradycardia because a more dramatic elevation of potassium (,7.0) is usually ...
Bradycardia - an easy to understand guide covering causes, diagnosis, symptoms, treatment and prevention plus additional in ... How long bradycardia lasts depends on its cause. For example, normal bradycardia in a well-trained athlete will last as long as ... In most cases, bradycardia in healthy, well-trained athletes does not need to be treated. In fact, in most people, bradycardia ... Bradycardia can cause dizziness, weakness, lack of energy or fainting spells.. If bradycardia is caused by a medical illness, ...
"It is not unusual for healthy people involved in endurance activities to develop a bradycardia based on the increased vagal ...
Sinus bradycardia can be defined as a sinus rhythm with a resting heart rate of 60 beats per minute or less. However, few ... encoded search term (Sinus Bradycardia) and Sinus Bradycardia What to Read Next on Medscape. Related Conditions and Diseases. * ... Asymptomatic sinus bradycardia following bariatric surgery. Am J Cardiol. 2014 Mar 15. 113(6):1049-53. [Medline]. ... Laboratory studies may be helpful if the cause of the bradycardia is thought to be related to electrolytes, drug, or toxins. In ...
... pacemaker leads and systems for treating bradycardia and for bradyarrhythmia management are available from Medtronic. ... Medtronic is the leader in bradycardia management. ...
Bradycardia in septic shock is usually an ominous sign, signifies circulatory collapse...time for invasive monitoring and CICU ... bradycardia with nitro drip? allnurses Safe Nurse Staffing T-shirt: Order Today! ... Low or high K+ can cause bradycardia (even without adequate output), while the NTG lowered the BP. Theres a disaster waiting ...
Learn about bradycardia, a condition characterized by slow heart rate and see how Florida Hospital physicians treat this ... Locations for Bradycardia. * Florida Hospital Altamonte. 601 East Altamonte Drive. Altamonte Springs, Florida 32701 ... Bradycardia is a form of arrhythmia in which the heart beats too slowly, sometimes less than 60 beats per minute. It occurs ... Bradycardia most often occurs in the elderly or in those with congenital heart defects or a form of heart disease. Severe cases ...
  • Bradycardia, junctional rhythm and asystole, all of which may be life-threatening, can be induced through this reflex. (wikipedia.org)
  • What causes bradycardia? (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • This causes bradycardia and peripheral vasoconstriction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Intake of acetylcholine in axoplasm is prevented and the presynaptic nerve releases more acetylcholine into the synapse that initially causes bradycardia. (wikipedia.org)
  • The echocardiogram enables doctors to analyze the conduction patterns and identify what particular type of bradycardia is occurring. (millerandzois.com)
  • When fetal bradycardia occurs early during pregnancy, the appropriate treatment and management will vary greatly depending on what type of bradycardia is present. (millerandzois.com)
  • After adjusting for risk factors and potential confounders, researchers found that bradycardia was not associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease or mortality, according to a retrospective analysis. (cardiovascularbusiness.com)
  • In many cases, correcting potassium levels can treat bradycardia caused by high potassium levels. (livestrong.com)
  • It is important to treat bradycardia so that you don't get more serious health problems. (alberta.ca)
  • But a thread running through so many birth injury lawsuits is a child is having significant bradycardia and other symptoms of a fetus in distress and the doctors and nurse failing to act to deal with the possibility that the fetus is suffering from hypoxia. (millerandzois.com)
  • Hemodynamic compromise secondary to significant bradycardia can have deleterious effects on organ perfusion, which can complicate recovery and negatively impact survival (through renal, hepatic, or cerebral ischemia) [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Location: CH , 83 years of age, patient began experiencing various side effects, including: Directly after treatment started, patient experienced the unwanted or unexpected Ramipril side effects: bradycardia, renal failure chronic, syncope, blood pressure diastolic decreased, blood potassium increased. (patientsville.com)
  • Apparently the first report discussing the occurrence of sinus bradycardia in acute rheumatism was that of Andrieu and Aujalen 1 in 1936. (annals.org)
  • Location: COUNTRY NOT SPECIFIED , 55 years of age, weighting 220.5 lb, patient began experiencing various side effects, including: Directly after treatment started, patient experienced the unwanted or unexpected Amlodipine side effects: overdose, mental status changes, hypotension, bradycardia, renal failure acute. (patientsville.com)
  • To investigate the risk factors of periprocedural bradycardia during PPCI in patients with acute STEMI. (hindawi.com)
  • No-reflow, the culprit vessel was not LAD, using thrombus aspiration devices during operation, gender, completely block of culprit vessel, and intraoperative hypotension may be independent risk factors for predicting periprocedural bradycardia during PPCI in patients with acute STEMI. (hindawi.com)
  • Diagnosis of bradycardia will generally begin with the physician taking a medical history and performing a physical exam. (cedars-sinai.edu)
  • Ictal bradycardia is a diagnosis in which people that have temporal lobe epilepsy experience bradycardia and is also accompanied by seizures (epileptic discharges). (wikipedia.org)
  • Although there is limited amount of information about ictal bradycardia, as it is a relatively new discovery and is considered to be rare condition, researchers suggest that early diagnosis and treatment of ictal bradycardia can eliminate the chances of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Learn more about bradycardia diagnosis and treatment . (medtronic.com)
  • The initial diagnosis of fetal bradycardia occurs with electronic fetal monitoring (EFM) devices. (millerandzois.com)
  • A fetal echocardiogram is utilized to make a more in-depth diagnosis of fetal bradycardia. (millerandzois.com)
  • The global bradycardia market involves the diagnosis of the condition and the treatment. (openpr.com)
  • Restlessness Headache Nausea and vomiting Confusion Visual disturbances Cerebral edema Convulsions Coma Bradycardia Hypo- or hyper- tension Tachypnoea Hypoxia Cyanosis Pulmonary edema Hypothermia Abdominal pain and distension. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following Beloc Bradycardia Neonatal side effect reports were submitted by healthcare professionals and consumers. (patientsville.com)
  • This Bradycardia Neonatal side effect was reported by a consumer or non-health professional from DE. (patientsville.com)
  • This Bradycardia Neonatal Beloc Zok Mite side effect was reported by a health professional from GERMANY on Nov 01, 2005. (patientsville.com)
  • Babies born to mothers exposed to beta-blockers are more likely to have neonatal hypoglycemia and bradycardia. (endocrinologyadvisor.com)
  • HealthDay News -- Neonates born to mothers exposed to beta-blockers at the time of delivery have increased risk of neonatal hypoglycemia and bradycardia, according to a study published in online in Pediatrics . (endocrinologyadvisor.com)
  • Brian T. Bateman, MD, from Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, and colleagues used data from 2 292 116 completed pregnancies linked to live-born infants of Medicaid-enrolled women from 2003 to 2007 to examine the risks of neonatal hypoglycemia and neonatal bradycardia associated with maternal exposure to beta-blockers. (endocrinologyadvisor.com)
  • Risk remained elevated for neonatal hypoglycemia and bradycardia among exposed vs unexposed pregnancies after adjustment for confounders (adjusted odds ratios, 1.68 and 1.29, respectively). (endocrinologyadvisor.com)
  • Our findings suggest that neonates born to mothers exposed to beta-blockers in late pregnancy, including labetalol, are at elevated risk for neonatal hypoglycemia and bradycardia," the researchers wrote. (endocrinologyadvisor.com)
  • Late pregnancy β blocker exposure and risks of neonatal hypoglycemia and bradycardia. (endocrinologyadvisor.com)
  • However, because some forms of bradycardia come and go, a one-time office EKG may be normal. (drugs.com)
  • When babies are in the NICU, their hearts are monitored, and episodes of bradycardia are treated with stimulation. (verywellhealth.com)
  • The clinical trial report, "Bradycardia Global Clinical Trials Review, H2, 2018" provides an overview of Bradycardia clinical trials scenario. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • 2018. "Sinus Bradycardia in Carriers of the SCN5A -1795insD Mutation: Unraveling the Mechanism through Computer Simulations. (mdpi.com)