A species of anaerobic, spiral bacteria that was formerly classified as Serpulina hyodysenteriae and Treponema hyodysenteriae (and for a short while, Serpula hyodysenteriae). This organism is the agent of swine dysentery.
A genus of spiral bacteria of the family Brachyspiraceae.
Infections with bacteria of the order SPIROCHAETALES.
An order of slender, flexuous, helically coiled bacteria, with one or more complete turns in the helix.
Acute inflammation of the intestine associated with infectious DIARRHEA of various etiologies, generally acquired by eating contaminated food containing TOXINS, BIOLOGICAL derived from BACTERIA or other microorganisms. Dysentery is characterized initially by watery FECES then by bloody mucoid stools. It is often associated with ABDOMINAL PAIN; FEVER; and DEHYDRATION.
Diseases of domestic swine and of the wild boar of the genus Sus.
Infections with bacteria of the family Desulfovibrionaceae.
Infections with bacteria of the genus TREPONEMA.
Infections caused by bacteria that show up as pink (negative) when treated by the gram-staining method.
A genus of gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacteria causing a proliferative enteritis in animals, especially pigs, deer, horses, and rabbits.
A genus of microorganisms of the order SPIROCHAETALES, many of which are pathogenic and parasitic for man and animals.
Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).
A family of spiral bacteria of the order SPIROCHAETALES.
An antibacterial agent that has been used in veterinary practice for treating swine dysentery and enteritis and for promoting growth. However, its use has been prohibited in the UK following reports of carcinogenicity and mutagenicity. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p125)
A genus of flexible, spiral rods found in hydrogen sulfide-containing mud, sewage, and polluted water. None of the species properly referred to in this genus are pathogenic.
Pathological processes in any segment of the INTESTINE from DUODENUM to RECTUM.
The blind sac or outpouching area of the LARGE INTESTINE that is below the entrance of the SMALL INTESTINE. It has a worm-like extension, the vermiform APPENDIX.

Analysis of Serpulina hyodysenteriae strain variation and its molecular epidemiology using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. (1/81)

Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was applied as a molecular typing tool for the spirochaete Serpulina hyodysenteriae, the agent of swine dysentery. Analysis of a collection of 40 mainly Australian isolates, previously characterized by other methods, divided these into 23 PFGE types. This confirmed that there are many strains of the spirochaete in Australia. PFGE was more discriminatory for strain typing than both multilocus enzyme electrophoresis and serotyping. It had similar discriminatory power to restriction endonuclease analysis, but the results of PFGE were easier to interpret. When applied to 29 isolates collected from 4 farms over periods of up to 8 years, 2 PFGE patterns were found on 3 farms, and a single pattern on the other. In each case a new strain had apparently emerged as a variant of an original parent strain. PFGE was found to be a powerful technique for investigating the molecular epidemiology of swine dysentery outbreaks.  (+info)

A comparison of the morphologic effects of Serpulina hyodysenteriae or its beta-hemolysin on the murine cecal mucosa. (2/81)

Studies were carried out to compare the early morphologic changes in the cecal mucosa of mice either infected with Serpulina hyodysenteriae or exposed to the beta-hemolysin of S. hyodysenteriae. Sixty-five 12-24-week-old C3H/HeOuJ mice were infected with S. hyodysenteriae by gastric intubation. Two mice were necropsied every hour for 30 hours following infection. S. hyodysenteriae was isolated from the cecal contents of each mouse at all time points. Macroscopic lesions were first apparent at 14 hours postinfection (PI), and light microscopic lesions were first apparent at 10 hours PI, earlier than has been previously reported. Ultrastructural changes, first evident at 6 hours PI, included disarray and loss of microvilli and terminal web, with dilatation of intercellular spaces. Luminal bacteria were translocated through epithelial cells to the lamina propria, where capillaries exhibited changes indicative of increased permeability. In another experiment, solutions containing between 2,500 and 25,000 hemolytic units of purified S. hyodysenteriae hemolysin were placed within the lumen of surgically closed murine ceca (n = 10); ceca were collected for examination 3 hours following treatment. Ultrastructural changes consisted of loss of microvilli and terminal web and marked vacuolation and exfoliation of epithelial cells. Significant numbers of necrotic and apoptotic epithelial cells were present, and epithelial cells internalized moderate numbers of bacteria. The hemolysin of S. hyodysenteriae induces some of the same early ultrastructural changes in the cecal epithelium of mice as occur following infection with S. hyodysenteriae. Based on the observed bacterial translocation, luminal bacteria also appear to play a unique role in lesion development in this model.  (+info)

Isolation, oxygen sensitivity, and virulence of NADH oxidase mutants of the anaerobic spirochete Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae, etiologic agent of swine dysentery. (3/81)

Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae, the etiologic agent of swine dysentery, uses the enzyme NADH oxidase to consume oxygen. To investigate possible roles for NADH oxidase in the growth and virulence of this anaerobic spirochete, mutant strains deficient in oxidase activity were isolated and characterized. The cloned NADH oxidase gene (nox; GenBank accession no. U19610) on plasmid pER218 was inactivated by replacing 321 bp of coding sequence with either a gene for chloramphenicol resistance (cat) or a gene for kanamycin resistance (kan). The resulting plasmids, respectively, pCmDeltaNOX and pKmDeltaNOX, were used to transform wild-type B. hyodysenteriae B204 cells and generate the antibiotic-resistant strains Nox-Cm and Nox-Km. PCR and Southern hybridization analyses indicated that the chromosomal wild-type nox genes in these strains had been replaced, through allelic exchange, by the inactivated nox gene containing cat or kan. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western immunoblot analysis revealed that both nox mutant cell lysates were missing the 48-kDa Nox protein. Soluble NADH oxidase activity levels in cell lysates of Nox-Cm and Nox-Km were reduced 92 to 96% compared to the activity level in parent strain B204. In an aerotolerance test, cells of both nox mutants were at least 100-fold more sensitive to oxygen exposure than were cells of the wild-type parent strain B204. In swine experimental infections, both nox mutants were less virulent than strain B204 in that fewer animals were colonized by the mutant cells and infected animals displayed mild, transient signs of disease, with no deaths. These results provide evidence that NADH oxidase serves to protect B. hyodysenteriae cells against oxygen toxicity and that the enzyme, in that role, contributes to the pathogenic ability of the spirochete.  (+info)

Characterization of a periplasmic ATP-binding cassette iron import system of Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae. (4/81)

The nucleotide sequence of the pathogenic spirochete Brachyspira hyodysenteriae bit (for "Brachyspira iron transport") genomic region has been determined. The bit region is likely to encode an iron ATP-binding cassette transport system with some homology to those encountered in gram-negative bacteria. Six open reading frames oriented in the same direction and physically linked have been identified. This system possesses a protein containing ATP-binding motifs (BitD), two hydrophobic cytoplasmic membrane permeases (BitE and BitF), and at least three lipoproteins (BitA, BitB, and BitC) with homology to iron periplasmic binding proteins. These periplasmic binding proteins exhibit lipoprotein features. They are labeled by [(3)H]palmitate when tested in recombinant Escherichia coli, and their signal peptides are typical for substrates of the type II secretory peptidase. The FURTA system and Congo red assay indicate that BitB and BitC are involved in iron binding. The Bit system is detected only in B. hyodysenteriae and is absent from B. innocens and B. pilosicoli.  (+info)

Changes in bacterial community structure in the colon of pigs fed different experimental diets and after infection with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. (5/81)

Bacterial communities in the large intestines of pigs were compared using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis targeting the 16S ribosomal DNA. The pigs were fed different experimental diets based on either modified standard feed or cooked rice supplemented with dietary fibers. After feeding of the animals with the experimental diets for 2 weeks, differences in the bacterial community structure in the spiral colon were detected in the form of different profiles of terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs). Some of the T-RFs were universally distributed, i.e., they were found in all samples, while others varied in distribution and were related to specific diets. The reproducibility of the T-RFLP profiles between individual animals within the diet groups was high. In the control group, the profiles remained unchanged throughout the experiment and were similar between two independent but identical experiments. When the animals were experimentally infected with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, causing swine dysentery, many of the T-RFs fluctuated, suggesting a destabilization of the microbial community.  (+info)

The spirochete FlaA periplasmic flagellar sheath protein impacts flagellar helicity. (6/81)

Spirochete periplasmic flagella (PFs), including those from Brachyspira (Serpulina), Spirochaeta, Treponema, and Leptospira spp., have a unique structure. In most spirochete species, the periplasmic flagellar filaments consist of a core of at least three proteins (FlaB1, FlaB2, and FlaB3) and a sheath protein (FlaA). Each of these proteins is encoded by a separate gene. Using Brachyspira hyodysenteriae as a model system for analyzing PF function by allelic exchange mutagenesis, we analyzed purified PFs from previously constructed flaA::cat, flaA::kan, and flaB1::kan mutants and newly constructed flaB2::cat and flaB3::cat mutants. We investigated whether any of these mutants had a loss of motility and altered PF structure. As formerly found with flaA::cat, flaA::kan, and flaB1::kan mutants, flaB2::cat and flaB3::cat mutants were still motile, but all were less motile than the wild-type strain, using a swarm-plate assay. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blot analysis indicated that each mutation resulted in the specific loss of the cognate gene product in the assembled purified PFs. Consistent with these results, Northern blot analysis indicated that each flagellar filament gene was monocistronic. In contrast to previous results that analyzed PFs attached to disrupted cells, purified PFs from a flaA::cat mutant were significantly thinner (19.6 nm) than those of the wild-type strain and flaB1::kan, flaB2::cat, and flaB3::cat mutants (24 to 25 nm). These results provide supportive genetic evidence that FlaA forms a sheath around the FlaB core. Using high-magnification dark-field microscopy, we also found that flaA::cat and flaA::kan mutants produced PFs with a smaller helix pitch and helix diameter compared to the wild-type strain and flaB mutants. These results indicate that the interaction of FlaA with the FlaB core impacts periplasmic flagellar helical morphology.  (+info)

Antigen-specific proliferation of porcine CD8alphaalpha cells to an extracellular bacterial pathogen. (7/81)

A vaccine inducing protective immunity to a spirochaete-induced colitis of pigs predominantly stimulates expansion of CD8+ cells in vivo and in antigen-stimulated lymphocyte cultures. CD8+ cells, however, are rarely considered necessary for protection against extracellular bacterial pathogens. In the present study, pigs recovering from colitis resulting from experimental infection with Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae had increased percentages of peripheral blood CD4- CD8+ (alphaalpha-expressing) cells compared with non-infected pigs. CD8alphaalpha+ cells proliferated in antigen-stimulated cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from B. hyodysenteriae-vaccinated pigs. Proliferating CD8alphaalpha+ cells consisted of CD4-, CD4+ and gammadelta T-cell receptor-positive cells. CD4- CD8alphabeta+ cells from vaccinated or infected pigs did not proliferate upon in vitro antigen stimulation. Of the CD8alphaalpha cells that had proliferated, flow cytometric analysis indicated that the majority of the CD4+ CD8+ cells were large (i.e. lymphoblasts) whereas the CD4- CD8+ cells were predominantly small. Addition of monoclonal antibodies (mAb) specific for either porcine major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I or class II antigens diminished B. hyodysenteriae-specific proliferative responses whereas addition of mAb to porcine MHC II, but not porcine MHC I, reduced the CD8alphaalpha response. In vitro depletion of CD4+ cells by flow cytometric cell sorting diminished, but did not completely abrogate, the proliferative response of cells from vaccinated pigs to B. hyodysenteriae antigen stimulation. These results suggest that CD8alphaalpha cells are involved in recovery and possibly protection from a spirochaete-induced colitis of pigs; yet, this response appears to be partially dependent upon CD4+ cells.  (+info)

Cloning of a beta-hemolysin gene of Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae and its expression in Escherichia coli. (8/81)

Brachyspira (Serpulina) hyodysenteriae induces a mucohemorrhagic diarrheal disease in pigs. The production of a beta-hemolysin has been considered a major virulence attribute of this organism. Previous reports have failed to correlate a specific cloned gene sequence with a purified beta-hemolytic protein sequence. Thus, questions still remain concerning the structural gene sequence of the hemolysin. To answer this question unequivocally, the beta-hemolytic toxin was purified from extracts of log-phase spirochetes, and the N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined (K-D-V-V-A-N-Q-L-N-I-S-D-K) and compared with the translated sequences of previously cloned genes, tlyA to tlyC. The lack of homology between tlyA to tlyC translated sequences and the purified beta-hemolytic toxin sequence resulted in the study that is reported here. A degenerate probe was designed based on the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the purified beta-hemolysin and used to screen a B. hyodysenteriae genomic library. Three overlapping clones were identified, and one was sequenced to reveal an open reading frame coding for a putative 8.93-kDa polypeptide containing the N-terminal sequence of the purified beta-hemolysin. To distinguish this gene from the tlyA to tlyC genes, it has been designated hlyA. A hemolysis-negative Escherichia coli strains containing hlyA was beta-hemolytic on blood agar media. Also, the hemolytic activity of the recombinant protein had identical protease and lipase sensitivities and electrophoretic mobility to those of native B. hyodysenteriae beta-hemolysin. Based on sequence analysis, the translated protein had a pI of 4.3, an alpha-helical structure, and a phosphopantetheine binding motif. Hybridization analysis of genomic DNA indicated that the hlyA gene was present in B. hyodysenteriae and B. intermedia but was not detected in B. innocens, B. pilosicoli, or B. murdochii under high-stringency conditions. The location of hlyA on the chromosomal map was distinct from the locations of tlyA, tlyB, and tlyC.  (+info)

Spirochaetales infections are a group of bacterial infections caused by bacteria belonging to the order Spirochaetales. These bacteria are characterized by their spiral or spirochete shape and are found in a variety of environments, including soil, water, and the human body. Some common examples of Spirochaetales infections include syphilis, Lyme disease, and leptospirosis. These infections can be transmitted through various means, such as sexual contact, bites from infected animals, or exposure to contaminated water or soil. Symptoms of Spirochaetales infections can vary depending on the specific infection, but may include fever, fatigue, headache, muscle aches, and skin rashes. In some cases, more serious symptoms may develop, such as neurological problems, heart problems, or kidney failure. Treatment for Spirochaetales infections typically involves antibiotics, which are used to kill the bacteria causing the infection. The specific antibiotic used and the duration of treatment will depend on the type of infection and the severity of the symptoms. In some cases, additional supportive care may be necessary to manage symptoms and complications.

Dysentery is a type of inflammatory bowel disease that affects the colon and rectum. It is characterized by abdominal pain, diarrhea, and the passage of blood and mucus in the stool. Dysentery can be caused by a variety of factors, including bacterial, viral, or parasitic infections, as well as certain medications or underlying medical conditions. Symptoms of dysentery can range from mild to severe and may include fever, nausea, vomiting, and dehydration. Treatment for dysentery typically involves managing symptoms, such as with pain medication and fluids, and addressing the underlying cause of the condition, if possible. In severe cases, hospitalization may be necessary.

Swine diseases refer to any illness or infection that affects pigs. These diseases can be caused by a variety of factors, including viruses, bacteria, parasites, fungi, and environmental factors. Swine diseases can range from mild to severe and can affect pigs of all ages and sizes. Some common swine diseases include: 1. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) 2. Swine Influenza (Swine Flu) 3. Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) 4. Porcine Parvovirus (PPV) 5. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea (PED) 6. Swine Leukosis Virus (SLV) 7. Porcine Dermatitis and Necrosis Syndrome (PDNS) 8. Porcine Enterotoxemia (PED) 9. Porcine Circovirus Type 1 (PCV1) 10. Porcine Circovirus Type 3 (PCV3) Swine diseases can have significant economic impacts on the pork industry, as well as on animal welfare and public health. Therefore, it is important for veterinarians, farmers, and other stakeholders to be aware of the signs and symptoms of swine diseases and to take appropriate measures to prevent and control their spread.

Desulfovibrionaceae infections refer to infections caused by bacteria belonging to the family Desulfovibrionaceae. This family of bacteria is commonly found in anaerobic environments such as soil, water, and the gastrointestinal tracts of animals. Some species of Desulfovibrionaceae have been associated with various infections in humans, including sepsis, pneumonia, and skin infections. These infections are typically acquired through exposure to contaminated water or soil, or through contact with infected animals. Treatment for Desulfovibrionaceae infections typically involves antibiotics, although the specific antibiotic used may depend on the species of bacteria causing the infection.

Treponemal infections are a group of bacterial infections caused by the bacterium Treponema pallidum. These infections are primarily sexually transmitted and can also be transmitted through direct contact with open sores or through the placenta during pregnancy. The most well-known treponemal infection is syphilis, which can be divided into four stages: primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary. Other treponemal infections include yaws, pinta, and bejel. These infections can cause a range of symptoms, including skin rashes, ulcers, fever, and joint pain. Treatment typically involves antibiotics, although some forms of the infection may be resistant to certain antibiotics.

Gram-negative bacterial infections are a type of bacterial infection caused by bacteria that have a negative gram stain reaction. This means that when they are stained with a special dye called crystal violet, they appear purple or pink under a microscope, rather than the characteristic blue color of gram-positive bacteria. Gram-negative bacteria are a diverse group of bacteria that include many important pathogens, such as Escherichia coli (E. coli), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Salmonella enterica. These bacteria are commonly found in the environment and on the skin and mucous membranes of humans and animals. However, some species of gram-negative bacteria can cause serious infections when they enter the body through cuts, wounds, or other openings. Gram-negative bacterial infections can affect various parts of the body, including the respiratory system, urinary tract, bloodstream, and gastrointestinal tract. The symptoms of these infections can vary depending on the location and severity of the infection, but may include fever, chills, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. In severe cases, gram-negative bacterial infections can lead to sepsis, a life-threatening condition in which the body's immune system overreacts to the infection. Treatment for gram-negative bacterial infections typically involves the use of antibiotics, which are medications that can kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria. The choice of antibiotic will depend on the specific type of bacteria causing the infection and the location and severity of the infection. In some cases, hospitalization may be necessary for intravenous antibiotics or other supportive care.

Carbadox is an antibiotic medication that is used in veterinary medicine to treat bacterial infections in livestock, particularly cattle and swine. It is a synthetic derivative of the antibiotic sulfonamide and works by inhibiting the growth of bacteria by interfering with their ability to synthesize folic acid, which is essential for their growth and reproduction. Carbadox is typically administered to livestock in the form of a feed additive, and it is effective against a wide range of bacterial infections, including Salmonella, Escherichia coli, and Brucella. However, carbadox is not approved for use in humans and should not be used in food-producing animals intended for human consumption. It is important to note that carbadox has been linked to the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, and its use has been restricted in some countries due to concerns about its potential impact on human health and the environment.

Intestinal diseases refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the digestive system, specifically the small and large intestines. These diseases can range from minor, temporary conditions to more serious, chronic illnesses that require long-term management. Some common examples of intestinal diseases include inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), such as Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, celiac disease, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), diverticulitis, and parasitic infections. These conditions can cause a variety of symptoms, such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation, nausea, vomiting, and weight loss. Treatment for intestinal diseases depends on the specific condition and its severity. In some cases, lifestyle changes, such as dietary modifications or stress management, may be sufficient to manage symptoms. In other cases, medications, such as antibiotics or immunosuppressants, may be necessary. In severe cases, surgery may be required to remove damaged tissue or repair abnormalities in the digestive system.

... , formerly Serpulina hyodysenteriae and other binomial names, is a gram-negative anaerobic spirochete ... 615-673, ISBN 978-0-12-263951-7, retrieved 2023-03-22 "MeSH Browser: Brachyspira hyodysenteriae". meshb.nlm.nih.gov. v t e ( ... "Inoculation of pigs with Treponema hyodysenteriae (new species) and reproduction of the disease". Veterinary Medicine, Small ...
... and proposals of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Comb. Nov., Brachyspira innocens Comb. Nov. and Brachyspira pilosicoli Comb. Nov". ... Brachyspira innocens is a species of bacteria. It is thought to be a commensal bacterium. Ochiai S; Adachi Y; Mori K (1997). " ... nov., as Serpula hyodysenteriae comb. nov. and Serpula innocens comb. nov". International Journal of Systematic Bacteriology. ... Bacterio entry Straininfo entry GBIF entry Brachyspira innocens entry EOL entry v t e (Articles with short description, Short ...
... and proposals of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Comb. Nov., Brachyspira innocens Comb. Nov. and Brachyspira pilosicoli Comb. Nov". ... Casas V, Vadillo S, San Juan C, Carrascal M, Abian J (2016-07-21). "The Exposed Proteomes of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and B. ... Mikosza AS, La T, Margawani KR, Brooke CJ, Hampson DJ (April 2001). "PCR detection of Brachyspira aalborgi and Brachyspira ... Hidalgo A, Rubio P, Osorio J, Carvajal A (December 2010). "Prevalence of Brachyspira pilosicoli and "Brachyspira canis" in dogs ...
... hyodysenteriae or Brachyspira pilosicoli by PCR. Brachyspira species previously capable of weak hemolysis only, like B. ... Antimicrobial susceptibility of porcine Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and Brachyspira pilosicoli isolated in Sweden between 1990 ... Brachyspira are capable of hemolysis, the degree of which has been used to characterize them, with B. hyodysenteriae showing ... Zmudzki J, Szczotka A, Nowak A, Strzelecka H, Grzesiak A, Pejsak Z.Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae ...
Porcine and avian intestinal spirochetosis are caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and Brachyspira pilosicoli.[citation needed ... Human intestinal spirochetosis is caused by Brachyspira pilosicoli and Brachyspira aalborgi. ...
The Brachyspira holin (B-Hol) Family (TC# 1.E.55) consists of several proteins from the GTA holin of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae ... a prophage-like gene transfer agent of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae". Journal of Bacteriology 187 (17): 5885-5892. doi:10.1128/JB ... Portal: Biology As of this edit, this article uses content from "1.E.55 The Brachyspira holin (B-Hol) Family", which is ... "1.E.55 The Brachyspira holin (B-Hol) Family". TCDB. Retrieved 2016-03-29. ...
Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and Brachyspira pilosicoli. Infection causes mild gastrointestinal signs in young pigs and can also ...
... genes associated with prophage-like gene transfer agents in the pathogenic intestinal spirochaetes Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, ... Brachyspira pilosicoli and Brachyspira intermedia". Veterinary Microbiology. 134 (3-4): 340-5. doi:10.1016/j.vetmic.2008.09.051 ... Brachyspira is a genus of spirochete; several species have been shown to carry homologous GTA gene clusters. Particles contain ... Brachyspira, and Rhodobacter species". Anaerobe. 13 (2): 43-9. doi:10.1016/j.anaerobe.2007.03.004. PMID 17513139. Grüll MP, ...
PCR detection of Brachyspira aalborgi and Brachyspira pilosicoli in human faeces. FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2001;197:167-70. DOI ... hyodysenteriae at lower abundance.. Culture, purification, and microscopy of B. pilosicoli from glycerol stocks was used to ... Brachyspira aalborgi infection diagnosed by culture and 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing using human colonic biopsy specimens. J ... In this study, spirochetes from the genus Brachyspira were identified at high titers in more than one third of cholera patients ...
Presence and mechanisms of acquired antimicrobial resistance in Belgian Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates belonging to ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Bhlp29.7. Brachyspira pilosicoli ClpX. Brucella. Brucella abortus/Brucella melitensis BP26 ...
Brachyspira hyodysenteriae DNA [Presence] in Unspecified specimen by NAA with probe detection. ... Brachyspira hyodysenteriae DNA [Presence] in Unspecified specimen by NAA with probe detection. ...
Brachyspira hyodysenteriae , Brachyspira , Disentería , Infecciones por Bacterias Gramnegativas , Enfermedades de los Porcinos ... Swine dysentery is causally associated with Brachyspira hampsonii and B. hyodysenteriae infection. Given the importance of ... hyodysenteriae strain D19 (Trial A), compared the relative virulence of B. hyodysenteriae strains D19 and G44 (Trial B), ... Our future research will use intragastric inoculation with 100 mL of a fresh broth culture containing B. hyodysenteriae strain ...
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In vitro susceptibility of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae to a commercial citrus fruit extract Research in Veterinary Science, Vol ...
The most frequent Brachyspira species isolated from chickens are B. intermedia and B. pilosicoli. Clinical signs of Avian ... Intestinal Spirochetosis The most commonly reported clinical signs observed in chickens infected with Brachyspira include: ... is an intestinal disease of chickens caused by infection with the spirochete Brachyspira. The pathogen is commonly found in ... for Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, B. intermedia, and B. pilosicoli), and a Brachyspira genus-specific PCR with sequencing of the ...
Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. *Mareks Disease. *Quercus. *Vet. *Veterinary. *wvsc. Share this post: « WVSC NEWSLETTER OCTOBER ...
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BactoReal® Kit Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is based on the amplification and detection of the nox gene of B. hyodysenteriae ... BactoReal® Kit Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is based on the amplification and detection of the nox gene of B. hyodysenteriae ... BactoReal® Kit Brachyspira hyo/pilo is based on the amplification and detection of the nox gene of B. hyodysenteriae and B. ... BactoReal® Kit Brachyspira hyo/pilo is based on the amplification and detection of the nox gene of B. hyodysenteriae and B. ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Swine: For the treatment and control of swine dysentery associated with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. For the treatment and ... control of swine dysentery associated with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae when followed immediately by tylosin phosphate Type A ...
Brachyspira hyodysenteriae / pathogenicity* Actions. * Search in PubMed * Search in MeSH * Add to Search ... The Spirochete Brachyspira pilosicoli, Enteric Pathogen of Animals and Humans. Hampson DJ. Hampson DJ. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2017 ... Brachyspira pilosicoli-induced avian intestinal spirochaetosis. Le Roy CI, Mappley LJ, La Ragione RM, Woodward MJ, Claus SP. Le ... Development of a real-time PCR for identification of brachyspira species in human colonic biopsies. Westerman LJ, Stel HV, ...
PCR detection of Brachyspira aalborgi and Brachyspira pilosicoli in human faeces. FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2001;197:167-70. DOI ... hyodysenteriae at lower abundance.. Culture, purification, and microscopy of B. pilosicoli from glycerol stocks was used to ... Brachyspira aalborgi infection diagnosed by culture and 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing using human colonic biopsy specimens. J ... In this study, spirochetes from the genus Brachyspira were identified at high titers in more than one third of cholera patients ...
Brachyspira B03.440.425.410.220.100 Brachyspira hyodysenteriae B03.440.425.410.275 Chlorobium B03.440.425.410.290 Chromatium ... Brachyspira B03.440.097.100 Brachyspira hyodysenteriae B03.440.100 Buchnera B03.440.180 Campylobacter B03.440.180.200 ...
"Brachyspira hampsonii" or Brachyspira hyodysenteriae.. Wilberts BL; Arruda PH; Kinyon JM; Madson DM; Frana TS; Burrough ER. Vet ... Imprint cytology detects floating Brachyspira in human intestinal spirochetosis.. Ogata S; Higashiyama M; Adachi Y; Ohara I; ...
Brachyspira hyodysenteriae (organism). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae (organism). Concept ...
Serpula hyodysenteriae). This organism is the agent of swine dysentery.. Terms. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Preferred Term Term ... Serpula hyodysenteriae Serpulina hyodysenteriae Treponema hyodysenteriae Registry Number. txid159. Previous Indexing. Treponema ... Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Preferred Concept UI. M0026415. Registry Number. txid159. Scope Note. A species of anaerobic, spiral ... Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. Tree Number(s). B03.440.097.100. B03.440.425.410.220.100. Unique ID. D017401. RDF Unique Identifier ...
Serpula hyodysenteriae). This organism is the agent of swine dysentery.. Terms. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Preferred Term Term ... Serpula hyodysenteriae Serpulina hyodysenteriae Treponema hyodysenteriae Registry Number. txid159. Previous Indexing. Treponema ... Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Preferred Concept UI. M0026415. Registry Number. txid159. Scope Note. A species of anaerobic, spiral ... Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. Tree Number(s). B03.440.097.100. B03.440.425.410.220.100. Unique ID. D017401. RDF Unique Identifier ...
... hyodysenteriae, is a highly contagious multifactorial diarrhoeal disorder that leads to high economic losses in pig production ... Brachyspira are gram-negative anaerobic bacteria which, however, have a certain tolerance to oxygen. Reproduction takes place ... in the goblet cells of the large intestine where Brachyspira can persist after surviving infection (intermittent shedding!). ...
Brachyspira hyodysenteriae WA1, complete genome. adenine-specific methyltransferase. 1e-13. 77.8. NC_008390:2018201:2028310. ... Brachyspira hyodysenteriae WA1, complete genome. Site-specific DNA-methyltransferase. 3e-06. 53.1. ... Brachyspira intermedia PWS/A chromosome, complete genome. adenine-specific methyltransferase. 1e-09. 64.3. ...
Serpulina hyodysenteriae. Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. B04 - Viruses. Vesicular stomatitis-Indiana virus. Vesicular stomatitis ...
Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira). Serpulina hyodysenteriae B3.440.425.410.711.670.400 B3.440.97.100. B3.851.595.670.400 B3.440 ... Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae). Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane D2.455.426.392.368.284.500. Shiga Toxin D8.811. ...
Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira). Serpulina hyodysenteriae B3.440.425.410.711.670.400 B3.440.97.100. B3.851.595.670.400 B3.440 ... Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae). Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane D2.455.426.392.368.284.500. Shiga Toxin D8.811. ...
Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira). Serpulina hyodysenteriae B3.440.425.410.711.670.400 B3.440.97.100. B3.851.595.670.400 B3.440 ... Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae). Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane D2.455.426.392.368.284.500. Shiga Toxin D8.811. ...
Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira). Serpulina hyodysenteriae B3.440.425.410.711.670.400 B3.440.97.100. B3.851.595.670.400 B3.440 ... Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae). Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane D2.455.426.392.368.284.500. Shiga Toxin D8.811. ...
Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira). Serpulina hyodysenteriae B3.440.425.410.711.670.400 B3.440.97.100. B3.851.595.670.400 B3.440 ... Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae). Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane D2.455.426.392.368.284.500. Shiga Toxin D8.811. ...
Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira). Serpulina hyodysenteriae B3.440.425.410.711.670.400 B3.440.97.100. B3.851.595.670.400 B3.440 ... Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae). Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane D2.455.426.392.368.284.500. Shiga Toxin D8.811. ...
Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira). Serpulina hyodysenteriae B3.440.425.410.711.670.400 B3.440.97.100. B3.851.595.670.400 B3.440 ... Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae). Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane D2.455.426.392.368.284.500. Shiga Toxin D8.811. ...
Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira). Serpulina hyodysenteriae B3.440.425.410.711.670.400 B3.440.97.100. B3.851.595.670.400 B3.440 ... Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae). Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane D2.455.426.392.368.284.500. Shiga Toxin D8.811. ...
Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira). Serpulina hyodysenteriae B3.440.425.410.711.670.400 B3.440.97.100. B3.851.595.670.400 B3.440 ... Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae). Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane D2.455.426.392.368.284.500. Shiga Toxin D8.811. ...
Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira). Serpulina hyodysenteriae B3.440.425.410.711.670.400 B3.440.97.100. B3.851.595.670.400 B3.440 ... Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae). Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane D2.455.426.392.368.284.500. Shiga Toxin D8.811. ...
Swine dysentery is causally associated with Brachyspira hampsonii and B. hyodysenteriae infection. Given the importance of ... hyodysenteriae strain G44. In trial 1, three seeder pigs were placed into two pens containing nine susceptible contact pigs ... hyodysenteriae G44 with greater consistency in the incidence of MMHD among pens compared to a B. hampsonii 30446 transmission ... hyodysenteriae 14 days later, all developed mucohemorrhagic diarrhea within 13 days of re-inoculation. Two seeder pigs were ...
PCR detection of Brachyspira aalborgi and Brachyspira pilosicoli in human faeces. FEMS Microbiol Lett. 2001;197:167-70. DOI ... hyodysenteriae at lower abundance.. Culture, purification, and microscopy of B. pilosicoli from glycerol stocks was used to ... Brachyspira aalborgi infection diagnosed by culture and 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing using human colonic biopsy specimens. J ... In this study, spirochetes from the genus Brachyspira were identified at high titers in more than one third of cholera patients ...
Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira) Serpulina hyodysenteriae B3.440.425.410.711.670.400 B3.440.97.100 B3.851.595.670.400 B3.440. ... Replaced for 2008 by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae) Sesquiterpenes, Guaiane D2.455.426.392.368.284.500 Shiga Toxin D8.811.277.450. ...
Brachyspira Hyodysenteriae Pcr. *Brucella Canis Pcr. *Candida Species Pcr. *Chlamydia Psittaci Pcr ...
Brachyspira hyo/pilo - Ingenetix * Brachyspira hyodysenteriae BactoReal® Kit - Ingenetix * Brachyspira hyodysenteriae BactoReal ...
Brachyspira Brachyspira hyodysenteriae Brachytherapy Brachyura Bradycardia Bradykinin Bradykinin B1 Receptor Antagonists ...
  • The etiologic agents of intestinal spirochetosis are members of the genus Brachyspira (formerly Serpulina and Treponema ). (cdc.gov)
  • Surveillance of intestinal spirochetosis requires molecular tools because culture has limited sensitivity caused by the fastidious nature of Brachyspira spp. (cdc.gov)
  • Avian intestinal spirochetosis (AIS) is an intestinal disease of chickens caused by infection with the spirochete Brachyspira . (poultrydvm.com)
  • The most frequent Brachyspira species isolated from chickens are B. intermedia and B. pilosicoli . (poultrydvm.com)
  • Case 3: Cecal spirochetosis and typhlitis in a Turkey Spirochetes that were identified as Brachyspira pilosicoli were present in the ceca of 7.5- to 18-wk-old turkeys with cecal spirochetosis and typhlitis. (poultrydvm.com)
  • The identity of B. pilosicoli was confirmed on the basis of ultrastructural morphology of the cecal epithelium adherent microbes, immunohistochemical staining with a Brachyspira genus-specific monoclonal antibody, and amplification of a B. pilosicoli species-specific 16S ribosomal RNA (rrs gene) sequence by using the polymerase chain reaction and DNA obtained by laser-capture microdissection of the epithelium-adherent microbial fringe. (poultrydvm.com)
  • In this study, spirochetes from the genus Brachyspira were identified at high titers in more than one third of cholera patients in Bangladesh. (cdc.gov)
  • Brachyspira are spread between flock members through contamination of the soil, water, and/or feed with feces from infected birds. (poultrydvm.com)
  • Our future research will use intragastric inoculation with 100 mL of a fresh broth culture containing B. hyodysenteriae strain G44 as it yields a high incidence of mucohaemorrhagic diarrhea with a reasonable cost. (bvsalud.org)
  • For the treatment and control of swine dysentery associated with Brachyspira hyodysenteriae when followed immediately by tylosin phosphate Type A medicated article in feed. (nih.gov)
  • 14. Comparison of sesion severity, distribution, and colonic mucin expression in pigs with acute swine dysentery following oral inoculation with "Brachyspira hampsonii" or Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. (nih.gov)
  • Pig dysentery , which is caused by B. hyodysenteriae, is a highly contagious multifactorial diarrhoeal disorder that leads to high economic losses in pig production worldwide. (laboklin.com)
  • Brachyspira are gram-negative anaerobic bacteria which, however, have a certain tolerance to oxygen. (laboklin.com)