Brachiocephalic Veins: Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They drain blood from the head, neck, and upper extremities, and unite to form the superior vena cava.Brachiocephalic Trunk: The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.Superior Vena Cava Syndrome: A condition that occurs when the obstruction of the thin-walled SUPERIOR VENA CAVA interrupts blood flow from the head, upper extremities, and thorax to the RIGHT ATRIUM. Obstruction can be caused by NEOPLASMS; THROMBOSIS; ANEURYSM; or external compression. The syndrome is characterized by swelling and/or CYANOSIS of the face, neck, and upper arms.Vena Cava, Superior: The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.Azygos Vein: A vein which arises from the right ascending lumbar vein or the vena cava, enters the thorax through the aortic orifice in the diaphragm, and terminates in the superior vena cava.Jugular Veins: Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.Phlebography: Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.Catheterization, Central Venous: Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Veins: The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Arteriovenous Shunt, Surgical: Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Subclavian Artery: Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.Subclavian Vein: The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.Sports Medicine: The field of medicine concerned with physical fitness and the diagnosis and treatment of injuries sustained in exercise and sports activities.Deep Sedation: Drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients cannot be easily aroused but respond purposely following repeated painful stimulation. The ability to independently maintain ventilatory function may be impaired. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)Medical Illustration: The field which deals with illustrative clarification of biomedical concepts, as in the use of diagrams and drawings. The illustration may be produced by hand, photography, computer, or other electronic or mechanical methods.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Central Venous Catheters: Catheters that are inserted into a large central vein such as a SUBCLAVIAN VEIN or FEMORAL VEIN.Catheters, Indwelling: Catheters designed to be left within an organ or passage for an extended period of time.Ligamentum Flavum: The paired bands of yellow elastic tissue that connect adjoining laminae of the vertebrae. With the laminae, it forms the posterior wall of the spinal canal and helps hold the body erect.Pulmonary Veins: The veins that return the oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium of the heart.TexasAorta: The main trunk of the systemic arteries.Apolipoproteins E: A class of protein components which can be found in several lipoproteins including HIGH-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; VERY-LOW-DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS; and CHYLOMICRONS. Synthesized in most organs, Apo E is important in the global transport of lipids and cholesterol throughout the body. Apo E is also a ligand for LDL receptors (RECEPTORS, LDL) that mediates the binding, internalization, and catabolism of lipoprotein particles in cells. There are several allelic isoforms (such as E2, E3, and E4). Deficiency or defects in Apo E are causes of HYPERLIPOPROTEINEMIA TYPE III.Catheterization, Peripheral: Insertion of a catheter into a peripheral artery, vein, or airway for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes.Sternotomy: Making an incision in the STERNUM.Hemothorax: Hemorrhage within the pleural cavity.Visual Acuity: Clarity or sharpness of OCULAR VISION or the ability of the eye to see fine details. Visual acuity depends on the functions of RETINA, neuronal transmission, and the interpretative ability of the brain. Normal visual acuity is expressed as 20/20 indicating that one can see at 20 feet what should normally be seen at that distance. Visual acuity can also be influenced by brightness, color, and contrast.Professional Corporations: Legally authorized corporations owned and managed by one or more professionals (medical, dental, legal) in which the income is ascribed primarily to the professional activities of the owners or stockholders.Needlestick Injuries: Penetrating stab wounds caused by needles. They are of special concern to health care workers since such injuries put them at risk for developing infectious disease.Sternoclavicular Joint: A double gliding joint formed by the CLAVICLE, superior and lateral parts of the manubrium sterni at the clavicular notch, and the cartilage of the first rib.Carotid Artery, Common: The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.Carotid Arteries: Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Pacemaker, Artificial: A device designed to stimulate, by electric impulses, contraction of the heart muscles. It may be temporary (external) or permanent (internal or internal-external).Arteriovenous Fistula: An abnormal direct communication between an artery and a vein without passing through the CAPILLARIES. An A-V fistula usually leads to the formation of a dilated sac-like connection, arteriovenous aneurysm. The locations and size of the shunts determine the degree of effects on the cardiovascular functions such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEART RATE.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Electrodes, Implanted: Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.Lung Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LUNG.Lung Diseases, Interstitial: A diverse group of lung diseases that affect the lung parenchyma. They are characterized by an initial inflammation of PULMONARY ALVEOLI that extends to the interstitium and beyond leading to diffuse PULMONARY FIBROSIS. Interstitial lung diseases are classified by their etiology (known or unknown causes), and radiological-pathological features.Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.Audiovisual Aids: Auditory and visual instructional materials.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Muscle Spasticity: A form of muscle hypertonia associated with upper MOTOR NEURON DISEASE. Resistance to passive stretch of a spastic muscle results in minimal initial resistance (a "free interval") followed by an incremental increase in muscle tone. Tone increases in proportion to the velocity of stretch. Spasticity is usually accompanied by HYPERREFLEXIA and variable degrees of MUSCLE WEAKNESS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p54)Muscle Relaxants, Central: A heterogeneous group of drugs used to produce muscle relaxation, excepting the neuromuscular blocking agents. They have their primary clinical and therapeutic uses in the treatment of muscle spasm and immobility associated with strains, sprains, and injuries of the back and, to a lesser degree, injuries to the neck. They have been used also for the treatment of a variety of clinical conditions that have in common only the presence of skeletal muscle hyperactivity, for example, the muscle spasms that can occur in MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1991, p358)Infusion Pumps, Implantable: Implanted fluid propulsion systems with self-contained power source for providing long-term controlled-rate delivery of drugs such as chemotherapeutic agents or analgesics. Delivery rate may be externally controlled or osmotically or peristatically controlled with the aid of transcutaneous monitoring.Baclofen: A GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID derivative that is a specific agonist of GABA-B RECEPTORS. It is used in the treatment of MUSCLE SPASTICITY, especially that due to SPINAL CORD INJURIES. Its therapeutic effects result from actions at spinal and supraspinal sites, generally the reduction of excitatory transmission.Obturator Nerve: A nerve originating in the lumbar spinal cord (L2 to L4) and traveling through the lumbar plexus to the lower extremity. The obturator nerve provides motor innervation to the adductor muscles of the thigh and cutaneous sensory innervation of the inner thigh.Injections, Spinal: Introduction of therapeutic agents into the spinal region using a needle and syringe.Hepatic Veins: Veins which drain the liver.

Right atrial bypass grafting for central venous obstruction associated with dialysis access: another treatment option. (1/149)

PURPOSE: Central venous obstruction is a common problem in patients with chronic renal failure who undergo maintenance hemodialysis. We studied the use of right atrial bypass grafting in nine cases of central venous obstruction associated with upper extremity venous hypertension. To better understand the options for managing this condition, we discuss the roles of surgery and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement. METHODS: All patients had previously undergone placement of bilateral temporary subclavian vein dialysis catheters. Severe arm swelling, graft thrombosis, or graft malfunction developed because of central venous stenosis or obstruction in the absence of alternative access sites. A large-diameter (10 to 16 mm) externally reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (GoreTex) graft was used to bypass the obstructed vein and was anastomosed to the right atrial appendage. This technique was used to bypass six lesions in the subclavian vein, two lesions at the innominate vein/superior vena caval junction, and one lesion in the distal axillary vein. RESULTS: All patients except one had significant resolution of symptoms without operative mortality. Bypass grafts remained patent, allowing the arteriovenous grafts to provide functional access for 1.5 to 52 months (mean, 15.4 months) after surgery. CONCLUSION: Because no mortality directly resulted from the procedure and the morbidity rate was acceptable, this bypass grafting technique was adequate in maintaining the dialysis access needed by these patients. Because of the magnitude of the procedure, we recommend it only for the occasional patient in whom all other access sites are exhausted and in whom percutaneous dilation and/or stenting has failed.  (+info)

Volume flow measurement in hemodialysis shunts using time-domain correlation. (2/149)

Volume flow was measured in 58 hemodialysis shunts (32 grafts and 26 radial fistulas) using the color velocity imaging-quantification method. This method is based on time-domain correlation for velocity calculation and integration of time-varying velocity profiles generated by M-mode sampling. Measurements were made in the brachial artery to estimate radial fistula flow or directly in the grafts. Intraoperator reproducibility was 14.9% for fistulas and 11.6% for grafts. Flow rate was significantly lower in abnormal shunts associated with a functional disorder or a morphologic complication (808 ml/min +/- 484) than in shunts associated with no abnormalities (1401 ml/min +/- 562). Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that a flow rate of 900 ml/min for fistulas and 1300 ml/min for grafts provided 81% and 79% sensitivity and 79% and 67% specificity, respectively. A functional disorder or a morphologic complication was associated with all fistulas and grafts in which flow rates were lower than 500 ml/min and 800 ml/min, respectively.  (+info)

The snuffbox arteriovenous fistula for vascular access. (3/149)

OBJECTIVES: to determine the applicability, patency rates and factors influencing patency of snuffbox arteriovenous fistulae for haemodialysis access. DESIGN: retrospective non-randomised study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: patency was determined by reference to an ongoing database and dialysis records of 645 vascular access procedures between 1985 and 1997, including 210 snuffbox fistulae in 201 patients. RESULTS: snuffbox fistulae comprised 189/376 (50%) primary procedures. Records of 208 snuffbox fistulae were available for patency analysis by the life-table method. Twenty-two (11%) thrombosed within 24 hours of operation. After six weeks 80% were used for dialysis. Cumulative patency was 65% at 1 year and 45% at 5 years. After thrombosis of snuffbox fistulae, ipsilateral wrist fistulae could be constructed in 45%. Fistula patency was significantly better in men than women (p<0.001) and for left- than right-sided fistulae (p<0.001). Diabetes, age >70 years, and the prior commencement of haemodialysis did not significantly affect fistula survival. CONCLUSIONS: the snuffbox AV fistula gives a long segment of arterialised vein for needling and preserves proximal vessels. It is feasible in 50% of patients requiring primary access and has good long-term patency, especially in men. A more proximal fistula may be preferable in women with smaller vessels.  (+info)

Minimally invasive thymoma with extensive intravascular growth. (4/149)

A 70-year-old male with grossly non-invasive thymic tumor associated with myasthenia gravis was subjected to thymothymectomy. Microscopic examination showed extensive intravascular tumor extensions into veins of thymic tissue and surrounding muscles and a minute direct invasion of the thymic tissue. Histologically, the tumor showed mixed-type thymoma with polygonal epithelial cells. These pathological findings indicated that the tumor cells extended mainly into vessels beyond the tumor capsule via tumor drainage veins rather than invading neighboring structures. After chemotherapy and mediastinal irradiation, the patient is now in complete remission of myasthenia gravis and is recurrence-free 15 months after surgery.  (+info)

Occlusion of azygos vein via direct percutaneous puncture of innominate vein following cavopulmonary anastomosis. (5/149)

A 2-year-10-month-old boy was diagnosed with a complex congenital heart disease: right atrial isomerism, left superior vena cava (LSVC), complete atrioventricular septal defect, secundum type atrial septal defect, transposition of the great arteries with pulmonary atresia, patent ductus arteriosus, absence of a right superior vena cava (RSVC), and dextrocardia. He had received a left Blalock-Taussig (BT) shunt at the age of 3 months and a left bidirectional Glenn shunt one year after BT shunt. Progressive cyanosis was noted after the second operation and cardiac catheterization showed a functional Glenn shunt with an engorged azygos vein, which was inadvertently skipped for ligation. Because of the absence of RSVC, transcatheter occlusion of the azygos vein was performed successfully via direct puncture of the innominate vein.  (+info)

Crushed stents in benign left brachiocephalic vein stenoses. (6/149)

Two hemodialysis patients presenting with left venous arm congestion due to benign catheter-induced stenosis of the left brachiocephalic vein were treated by angioplasty and stent placement. External compression of the stents was responsible for rapid recurrence of the symptoms. No osseous or vascular malformation could be identified. Mechanical constraints induced by respiratory chest wall motion and aortic arch flow-related pulsation are proposed to explain this observation. This potential hazard should be considered when stent placement into the left brachiocephalic vein is advocated.  (+info)

Stent placement for treatment of central and peripheral venous obstruction: a long-term multi-institutional experience. (7/149)

PURPOSE: The clinical success and patency of central and peripheral venous stents in patients with symptomatic venous obstruction (SVO) were assessed. METHODS: The records of patients with SVO treated with venous stents from 1992 to 1999 were reviewed. Demographic and procedural variables were analyzed to determine their effect on clinical success, primary patency, and secondary patency. Patency was determined by means of a follow-up duplex scan or venogram. RESULTS: Forty central venous (CV) and 14 peripheral venous (PV) obstructions were treated in 49 patients. Sixty-five stents were placed (50 CV and 15 PV), 54 in previously unstented lesions and 11 in previously stented lesions. Causes of CV lesions included catheter placement (82%), tumor compression (6%), arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and no prior catheter (2%), and other (10%). All PV lesions resulted from complications of dialysis. Indications for CV stents included limb edema (46%), AVF malfunction (30%), both limb edema and AVF malfunction (14%), and other (10%). PV stent indications were AVF malfunction (86%) and limb edema (14%). Thirteen CV stents indicated to treat tumor compression (three cases), May-Thurner syndrome (one case), deep venous thrombosis (three cases), superior vena cava syndrome (one case), and lower-extremity catheter-related lesions (five cases) were excluded from the analysis of clinical outcome. Fifty-two stents (37 CV and 15 PV) were included in the analysis of clinical outcome. All CV lesions included in the analysis were complications of prolonged catheterization. Eighty-nine percent of patients had end-stage renal disease and an AVF. Complications developed in 26% of patients with PV stents and in no patients with CV stents (P <.002). The mean follow-up period was 16 months. Sixty-two percent of patients required a reintervention for recurrent SVO. Only 32% of the interventions resulted in sustained symptomatic improvement. For CV stents, the primary patency rate was 85%, 27%, and 9% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively; the secondary patency rate was 91%, 71%, and 39% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively; and the clinical success rate was 94%, 94%, and 79%, at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively. For PV stents, the primary patency rate was 73%, 17% and 17% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively; the secondary patency rate was 80%, 56%, and 35% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively; and the clinical success rate was 92%, 75%, and 42% at 3, 12 and 24 months, respectively. CONCLUSION: Stents provide a temporary benefit in most patients with central or peripheral upper-extremity SVO. Regular follow-up and reinterventions are required to maintain patency and achieve long-term clinical success. Stents used for CV lesions have higher clinical success rates than stents used for PV lesions. Patients with a reasonable life expectancy or who are unable to return for subsequent procedures should be considered for undergoing alternative therapy.  (+info)

Arteriovenous fistulae complicating cardiac pacemaker lead extraction: recognition, evaluation, and management. (8/149)

Transvenous pacemaker lead extraction has become a commonly performed procedure that is associated with a small but significant risk. We report two cases where lead extraction was complicated by arteriovenous fistulae between branches of the aortic arch and the left brachiocephalic vein. Presenting signs and symptoms included severe chest or back pain, persistent or copious bleeding from the venous puncture site, unexplained hypotension or anemia, superior vena cava syndrome, and signs of central venous hypertension or acute heart failure. One patient whose injury was not recognized immediately and who did not undergo repair died rapidly, whereas the other patient who was diagnosed quickly underwent successful repair. Immediate diagnosis with arteriography and rapid intervention with surgery or percutaneous techniques are indicated and may prevent mortality.  (+info)

*Venous translucence

Axillary, subclavian and brachiocephalic vein obstruction. Surgery 1977; 82:816. Comerota, AJ; Katz, ML et al. Venous duplex ... Deep vein thrombosis: US assessment using vein compression. Radiology 1987;162:191. Cohan, RH; Leder, RA et al. Extravascular ... To strip or not to strip the long saphenous vein: a varicose veins trial. Br J Surg 1981;68:426-8. Nicolaides, AN; Zukowski, A ... Surgery for primary troncular varicose veins without stripping the saphenous vein: pre- and post-operative evaluationby duplex ...

*Stellate ganglion

... right stellate ganglion is in relation with right brachiocephalic vein anteriorly • right stellate ganglion is in relation with ...

*Superior vena cava

The brachiocephalic veins, superior vena cava, inferior vena cava, azygos vein, and their tributaries. Persistent left superior ... It is formed by the left and right brachiocephalic veins (also referred to as the innominate veins), which also receive blood ... It is a large-diameter (24 mm), yet short, vein that receives venous return from the upper half of the body, above the ... Obstruction can lead to enlarged veins in the head and neck, and may also cause breathlessness, cough, chest pain, and ...

*Thymus

The veins end in the left brachiocephalic vein, internal thoracic vein, and in the inferior thyroid veins. Lymphatic vessels ... The left brachiocephalic vein may even be embedded within the thymus. In the neck, it lies on the front and sides of the ... travel only away from the thymus, accompanying the arteries and veins. These drain into the brachiocephalic, tracheobronchial ...

*Suboccipital venous plexus

The external vertebral venous plexuses travel inferiorly from this suboccipital region to drain into the brachiocephalic vein. ... The occipital vein joins in the formation of the plexus deep to the musculature of the back and from here drains into the ... external jugular vein. The plexus surrounds segments of the vertebral artery.. ...

*Thyroid

The inferior thyroid veins originate in a network of veins and drain into the left and right brachiocephalic veins. Both ... The venous blood is drained via superior and middle thyroid veins, which drain to the internal jugular vein, and via the ... arteries and veins form a plexus between the two layers of the capsule of the thyroid gland. Lymphatic drainage frequently ...

*Anomalous pulmonary venous connection

There are four variants: Supracardiac (50%): blood drains to one of the innominate veins (brachiocephalic veins) or the ... Normally, pulmonary veins return oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium where it can then be pumped to the rest of ... The four pulmonary veins are reconnected to the left atrium, and any associated heart defects such as atrial septal defect, ... TAPVC can occur with obstruction, which occurs when the anomalous vein enters a vessel at an acute angle and can cause ...

*Thoracic diaphragm

The diaphragm drains blood into the brachiocephalic veins, azygos veins, and veins that drain into the inferior vena cava and ... Arteries and veins above and below the diaphragm supply and drain blood. From above, the diaphragm receives blood from branches ... left suprarenal vein. The sternal portion of the muscle is sometimes wanting and more rarely defects occur in the lateral part ...

*Lung

A shallower groove in front of the artery and near the edge of the lung, lodges the left brachiocephalic vein. The esophagus ... and above this is a wide groove for the superior vena cava and right brachiocephalic vein; behind this, and close to the top of ... The lungs filter out small blood clots from veins and prevent them from entering arteries and causing strokes. The lungs also ... The lungs include the bronchial airways that terminate in alveoli, the lung tissue in between, and veins, arteries, nerves and ...

*Parathyroid gland

... and the inferior thyroid vein drains into the brachiocephalic vein. Lymphatic vessels from the parathyroid glands drain into ... Each parathyroid vein drains into the superior, middle and inferior thyroid veins. The superior and middle thyroid veins drain ... "a small compact yellow glandular body attached to the thyroid at the point where the veins emerged". The glands were first ...

*Lymph duct

The thoracic duct drains lymph into the circulatory system at the left brachiocephalic vein between the left subclavian and ... A lymph duct is a great lymphatic vessel that empties lymph into one of the subclavian veins. There are two lymph ducts in the ... left internal jugular veins. Lymphatic system Right lymphatic duct Thoracic duct. ...

*Persistent left superior vena cava

In PLSVC, the left brachiocephalic vein does not develop fully and the left upper limb and head & neck drain into the right ...

*Superior deep cervical lymph nodes

... which joins the thoracic duct on the left side and the brachiocephalic vein on the right side. This article incorporates text ... lymph nodes lie under the Sternocleidomastoideus in close relation with the accessory nerve and the internal jugular vein. Some ...

*Metastasis

... thoracic duct and right lymphatic duct into the systemic venous system at the venous angle and into the brachiocephalic veins, ... Because of their thinner walls, veins are more frequently invaded than are arteries, and metastasis tends to follow the pattern ... For example, colorectal cancer spreads primarily through the portal vein to the liver. Some tumors, especially carcinomas may ...

*Outline of human anatomy

Brachiocephalic vein Inferior thyroid vein Inferior laryngeal vein Pericardial veins Pericardiophrenic veins Bronchial veins ... veins Lumbar veins Ascending lumbar vein Hepatic veins Renal veins Left suprarenal vein Left ovarian vein Left testicular vein ... Diploic veins Emissary veins Cerebral veins Superficial cerebral veins Deep cerebral veins Basal vein Great cerebral vein Veins ... vein Ethmoidal veins Lacrimal vein Vorticose veins Ciliary veins Central retinal vein Episcleral vein Inferior ophthalmic vein ...

*Paget-Schroetter disease

... creating enough repetitive pressure against the brachiocephalic and external jugular veins to cause thrombosis. Symptoms may ... Paget-Schroetter disease, also known as Paget-von Schrötter disease, is a form of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a ... These DVTs typically occur in the axillary or subclavian veins. The condition is relatively rare. It usually presents in young ... Drapanas, T; Curran, WL (1966). "Thrombectomy in the treatment of "effort" thrombosis of the axillary and subclavian veins". ...

*Venae cavae

... and forms from a convergence of the left and right brachiocephalic veins, which contain blood from the head and the arms. ... The venae cavae (from the Latin for "hollow veins", singular "vena cava") are two large veins (venous trunks) that return ... Origin: 1590-1600; New Latin vena cava (sg), venae cavae (pl), 'hollow vein/veins'. Although the classical Latin pronunciation ... It is the largest vein in the human body. The superior vena cava (or cranial vena cava in animals) is above the heart, ...

*List of MeSH codes (A07)

... axillary vein MeSH A07.231.908.106 --- azygos vein MeSH A07.231.908.130 --- brachiocephalic veins MeSH A07.231.908.155 --- ... femoral vein MeSH A07.231.908.380 --- hepatic veins MeSH A07.231.908.427 --- iliac vein MeSH A07.231.908.498 --- jugular veins ... mesenteric veins MeSH A07.231.908.670.567 --- portal vein MeSH A07.231.908.670.730 --- splenic vein MeSH A07.231.908.670.874 ... umbilical veins MeSH A07.231.908.713 --- pulmonary veins MeSH A07.231.908.752 --- renal veins MeSH A07.231.908.783 --- retinal ...

*Thoracic inlet

... and right common carotid arteries left subclavian arteries veins internal jugular veins brachiocephalic veins subclavian veins ...

*Innominate

... (from Latin: innominatus "nameless") can refer to: The brachiocephalic artery The brachiocephalic veins The three ...

*Thoracic duct

... at the commencement of the brachiocephalic vein. It also collects most of the lymph in the body other than from the right ... at the commencement of the brachiocephalic vein, below the clavicle, near the shoulders. The lymph transport, in the thoracic ... in the vicinity where the thoracic duct empties into the left brachiocephalic vein, right between where the left subclavian ... There are also two valves at the junction of the duct with the left subclavian vein, to prevent the flow of venous blood into ...

*Index of anatomy articles

... blood brain barrier body bone bone marrow bony labyrinth Bowman's capsule brachial artery brachial plexus brachiocephalic vein ... internal carotid artery internal cerebral vein internal ear internal iliac artery internal iliac vein internal jugular vein ... trigone colliculus collum colon columns of the fornix commissure common carotid artery common facial vein communicating veins ... pons pontine nuclei pontocerebellum popliteal artery popliteal bursa popliteal fossa popliteal vein popliteus portal vein ...

*Pancoast tumor

The growing tumor can cause compression of a brachiocephalic vein, subclavian artery, phrenic nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve ... causes facial swelling cyanosis and dilatation of the veins of the head and neck. A Pancoast tumor is an apical tumour that is ... vein, branches of the brachial plexus, ribs and vertebral bodies), as well as mediastinal lymphadenectomy. Surgical access may ...

*Common carotid artery

To its right side below is the brachiocephalic trunk, and above, the trachea, the inferior thyroid veins, and the remains of ... The superior thyroid vein crosses the artery near its termination, and the middle thyroid vein a little below the level of the ... the left brachiocephalic vein, and the remains of the thymus; behind, it lies on the trachea, esophagus, left recurrent ... the vein lying lateral to the artery, and the nerve between the artery and vein, on a plane posterior to both. On opening the ...

*Brachiocephalic

The brachiocephalic artery supplies blood to the right arm, head and neck. The left and right brachiocephalic veins merge to ... Brachiocephalic, an alternate spelling of brachycephalic, is a grouping within the cephalic index describing "short headed" ...

*Brachiocephalic artery

However, there are two brachiocephalic veins. It arises, on a level with the upper border of the second right costal cartilage ... The brachiocephalic artery (or brachiocephalic trunk or innominate artery) is an artery of the mediastinum that supplies blood ... Brachiocephalic artery Brachiocephalic trunk This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of ... There is no brachiocephalic artery for the left side of the body. The left common carotid, and the left subclavian artery, come ...

*Category:Mid-importance Anatomy articles

Talk:Brachial veins. *Talk:Brachialis muscle. *Talk:Brachiocephalic artery. *Talk:Brachioradialis. *Talk:Brain asymmetry ...

*Thymic veins

... are veins which drain the thymus. They are tributaries of the left brachiocephalic vein. Keynes, G (1967). "The ... Thymic Vein". British Medical Journal. 1 (5540): 634. doi:10.1136/bmj.1.5540.634-b. PMC 1841430 . "Thymic vein". Medcyclopaedia ... http://www.instantanatomy.net/thorax/vessels/vinsuperiormediastinum.html https://radiopaedia.org/cases/thymic-vein-on-ct. ...
The left and right brachiocephalic veins (or innominate veins) in the upper chest are formed by the union of each corresponding internal jugular vein and subclavian vein. This is at the level of the sternoclavicular joint. The left brachiocephalic vein is usually longer than the right. These veins merge to form the superior vena cava, a great vessel, posterior to the junction of the first costal cartilage with the manubrium sternum. The brachiocephalic veins are the major veins returning blood to the superior vena cava. The brachiocephalic vein is formed by the confluence of the subclavian and internal jugular veins. In addition it receives drainage from: Left and right internal thoracic vein (Also called internal mammary veins): drain into the inferior border of their corresponding vein Left and right inferior thyroid veins: drain into the superior aspect of their corresponding veins near the confluence Left superior intercostal vein: drains into the left brachiocephalic vein The left ...
Central vein stenosis/occlusion is a common well-described sequel to the placement of hemodialysis catheters in the central venous system. The precise mechanisms by which central vein stenosis occurs are not well known. Current concepts in central vein stenosis pathophysiology focus on the response to vessel injury model, emphasizing the process of trauma. A case of left brachiocephalic vein stenosis due to the insertion and function of a temporary right subclavian hemodialysis catheter is presented. The purpose of the manuscript is to emphasize that, with the introduction of a temporary subclavian hemodialysis catheter via the right subclavian vein apart from causing concurrent stenosis/infarction of the right subclavian and right brachiocephalic vein, it is also possible to cause stenosis of the left brachiocephalic vein (close to its contribution to the superior vena cava) although the catheter tip is placed in the correct anatomical position in the superior vena cava ...
Central vein stenosis/occlusion is a common well-described sequel to the placement of hemodialysis catheters in the central venous system. The precise mechanisms by which central vein stenosis occurs are not well known. Current concepts in central vein stenosis pathophysiology focus on the response to vessel injury model, emphasizing the process of trauma. A case of left brachiocephalic vein stenosis due to the insertion and function of a temporary right subclavian hemodialysis catheter is presented. The purpose of the manuscript is to emphasize that, with the introduction of a temporary subclavian hemodialysis catheter via the right subclavian vein apart from causing concurrent stenosis/infarction of the right subclavian and right brachiocephalic vein, it is also possible to cause stenosis of the left brachiocephalic vein (close to its contribution to the superior vena cava) although the catheter tip is placed in the correct anatomical position in the superior vena cava ...
In 24 (0.98%) of 2457 patients with congenital heart disease the brachiocephalic vein was in an anomalous position below the aortic arch. This is a much higher proportion of such cases than reported so far. This high frequency may arise from differences in the study population and the method of diagnosis. This venous anomaly was more common in patients with tetralogy of Fallot or ventricular septal defect with pulmonary atresia. Patients with the venous anomaly were more likely to have a right aortic arch. The anomalous course of the brachiocephalic vein from the neck to the junction of the superior vena cava was shown by cross sectional echocardiography. In doubtful cases, Doppler study usually clarified the anatomical arrangement. ...
Brachiocephalic vein definition is - either of two large veins that occur one on each side of the neck, receive blood from the head and neck, and unite to form the superior vena cava -called also innominate vein.
Incidental note of common origin of left common carotid and brachiocephalic trunk (bovine arch) and thyroidea ima artery arising from the lateral aspect of the aortic arch, coursing between the left common carotid artery and left brachiocephalic vein to supply the inferior lobes of the thyroid. ...
Definition: Brachiocephalic vein definition: The left and right brachiocephalic veins (or innominate veins) in the upper chest are formed by the union of each corresponding internal jugular vein and subclavian vein. These great vessels merge to form the superior vena cava. The brachiocephalic veins are the major veins returning blood to the superior vena cava. ...
Definition: In PLSVC, the left brachiocephalic vein does not develop fully and the left upper limb and head & neck drain into the right atrium via the coronary sinus. However, from a morphological point of view, the "anatomical" drainage of a persistent left superior vena cava is always into the coronary sinus. ...
The Orthopedics PERL Channel contains hundreds of items, including full-color medical illustrations, medical animations and patient education articles. The Orthopedics Channel covers topics relevant to skeletal and muscular anatomy, orthopedic injury and repair, and general sports medicine. Health Animation channels are produced by Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.
One of the two terminal lymphatic vessels, formed by the union of the right jugular lymphatic vessel and vessels from the lymph nodes of the right upper extremity, thoracic wall, and both lungs; lying on the right side of the root of the neck and emptying into the right brachiocephalic vein. Also called right thoracic duct. ...
Venous access in the critically ill can be a major problem despite the wide variety of methods now available. A new technique is described involving percutaneous catheterisation of the innominate vein via a right second intercostal space approach.
Tiny tubes, called lymphatic vessels, pick up and carry the intercellular liquid (lymph) from the tissues of the body into the lymphatic trunks (bigger-caliber lymphatic vessels), which convey this fluid into the either of the two lymphatic ducts (right and left). Finally, these ducts drain the intercellular lymph into the subclavian veins, which are located in the shoulder. The subclavian veins (right and left) carry the lymph and deoxygenated blood from the arm, draining it into the brachiocephalic vein. ...
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A 35-year-old woman was diagnosed with cancer of the right breast, which required a mastectomy. An implanted port was placed on the left chest wall. X-ray verified catheter tip placement in the brachiocephalic vein. The nurse accessed the port and documented that no blood return was obtained. However, believing the port was patent, even though she did not obtain blood return, the nurse infused ondansetron (Zofran), followed by an injection of 60 cc of doxorubicin (Adriamycin). After the nurse injected the doxorubicin, she once again documented the absence of blood return. As the drug was being injected, the patient complained of pain in the lower chest area below the ribs. Realizing this is not a normal reaction, the nurse discontinued the injection of the chemotherapeutic agent. The patient again complained of severe chest pain with a burning sensation in her lower chest area. The nurse notified the physician of the change in the patients condition. A chest X-ray and cathetergram were ordered. ...
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Click picture to show/hide bloodflows). Pathophysiology. In the absence of a fully functional left ventricle and/or aortic valve, preservation of systemic circulation and survival is dependent on a patent ductus arteriosus. In this case, the right ventricle takes over for the left to supply the pulmonary and systemic circuits as well as the coronary arteries and brachiocephalic veins (in a retrograde direction). The amount of blood flow to the pulmonary and systemic circulation is a function of the vascular resistance which, in turn, is influenced by the size of the interatrial orifice. Arterial defects that restrict movement cause pressure in the left atrium and pulmonary circuit to increase, and thus restrict pulmonary blood flow. Increased pulmonary blood flow brings a larger volume of oxygenated blood back to the left atrium, which then mixes with the systemic venous return in the right via the foramen ovale.. During the prenatal period all blood, aside from a small volume of pulmonary ...
SCVS 2018 Abstracts: Statins Improve Long Term Functional Radiocephalic Fistulas Success Rates in Diabetic Male Dialysis Patients
http://radiology.rsna.org/content/247/2 ... gures-only Here are some images from a study on MRVs of central venous stenosis. Starting in figure 2b you see a series of stenosed internal jugular veins. I would assume that these are acute occlusions, such as what ...
veins, which are found on the arm. The brachial vein refers to the combination of the cubital fossa, the radial veins and the ulnar veins. The medial side of the arm is where the veins basilica and cephalic can be found, and they serve as the main veins of the medial arm region. The brachial vein and the basilica vein meet at the humerus point, passing through the ulna vein. This meeting ...
Diagnosis Code S45.201D information, including descriptions, synonyms, code edits, diagnostic related groups, ICD-9 conversion and references to the diseases index.
Diagnosis Code S45.299 information, including descriptions, synonyms, code edits, diagnostic related groups, ICD-9 conversion and references to the diseases index.
What is cephalic vein and what does it do? Here is its function, location and structure. The thrombosis is a condition marked by inflammation of the vein.
This is the technical name (and the common name, in so far as there is one), for the little dip on the side of your wrist that occurs when ...
Introduction. Thymoma and thymic carcinoma are a rare disease, but they are the most common tumor of the anterior mediastinum in adults. They are asymptomatic until late. There are some potentially life-threatening manifestations of thymomic neoplasms like myasthenia gravis and superior vena cava syndrome. The palliative treatment of the mediastinal malignancies have poor prognosis and radical surgical therapy is the only option. Resection and reconstruction of the great mediastinal vessels in case of involved are technically challenging.. Materials and Methods. We report the case of a 63 year-old Caucasian female patient who presented superior vena cava syndrome derived from a mediastinal neoplasm compromising intrinsically and extrinsically the superior vena cava, right and left brachiocephalic vein. After evaluation the patient underwent radical resection of the tumor en bloc with the involved vessels and reconstruction with Y-shaped gore-tex graft. Cardiopulmonary bypass wasnt used. The ...
Looking for online definition of brachial veins in the Medical Dictionary? brachial veins explanation free. What is brachial veins? Meaning of brachial veins medical term. What does brachial veins mean?
The brachiocephalic artery (or brachiocephalic trunk or innominate artery) is an artery of the mediastinum that supplies blood to the right arm and the head and neck. It is the first branch of the aortic arch, and soon after it emerges, the brachiocephalic artery divides into the right common carotid artery and the right subclavian artery. There is no brachiocephalic artery for the left side of the body. The left common carotid, and the left subclavian artery, come directly off the aortic arch. However, there are two brachiocephalic veins. It arises, on a level with the upper border of the second right costal cartilage, from the start of the aortic arch, on a plane anterior to the origin of the left carotid artery; it ascends obliquely upward, backward, and to the right to the level of the upper border of the right sternoclavicular articulation, where it divides into the right common carotid artery and right subclavian arteries. The artery then crosses the trachea in front of it obliquely from ...
Six children are reported in whom a central venous catheter from the internal jugular or the subclavian vein migrated to an anomalous position: the left superior intercostal vein in the first two cases, the thymic vein in the third, and the azygos vein in the last three. Resultant complications in five cases were: extravasation of the infusate in the first and third case; local vascular stenosis or complete vascular occlusion in the second and fifth case; and obstruction of the azygos arch due to local thrombosis and possible stenosis, with a likely extravasation of the infusate, in the sixth case. The mediastinal vascular anatomy related to these central venous catheters is reviewed with reference to similar and related cases in the literature.
RADIOLOGY: CHEST: Case# 13: LIPOSARCOMA R SUBCLAVIAN AND SVC. 45 year old male with a history of atrial fibrillation and a one year history of right anterior chest wall pain. Patient recently had a cardiac catheterization which did not show any significant coronary artery disease. There is an abnormal fat collection at the right lung apex that seems to engulf the right subclavian vein and either expands the right brachiocephalic vein or compresses and flattens it. Extensive collaterals are noted around the right shoulder and posterior chest wall with dense opacification of the azygous vein. However, the superior vena cava is patent. Liposarcoma is the second most common soft tissue sarcoma (after malignant fibrous histiocytoma) with the bulk of the tumor differentiating into adipose tissue. This tumor is common in 5-6th decade with 40-50% being myxoid type. These may be painful in 10-15% of cases and more common in the lower extremity (41%) and trunk (42%). The tumor may not be well seen on routine
RADIOLOGY: CHEST: Case# 13: LIPOSARCOMA R SUBCLAVIAN AND SVC. 45 year old male with a history of atrial fibrillation and a one year history of right anterior chest wall pain. Patient recently had a cardiac catheterization which did not show any significant coronary artery disease. There is an abnormal fat collection at the right lung apex that seems to engulf the right subclavian vein and either expands the right brachiocephalic vein or compresses and flattens it. Extensive collaterals are noted around the right shoulder and posterior chest wall with dense opacification of the azygous vein. However, the superior vena cava is patent. Liposarcoma is the second most common soft tissue sarcoma (after malignant fibrous histiocytoma) with the bulk of the tumor differentiating into adipose tissue. This tumor is common in 5-6th decade with 40-50% being myxoid type. These may be painful in 10-15% of cases and more common in the lower extremity (41%) and trunk (42%). The tumor may not be well seen on ...
The brachiocephalic trunk is another word for the brachiocephalic artery. The brachiocephalic artery supplies blood to the tissues of the brain and the head. It is the first branch of the aortic arch and rises up to a point near the junction of the sternum (breast bone) and the right clavicle (collarbone). At this point, it divides, giving rise to the common carotid artery, which carries blood to the Continue Scrolling To Read More Below... ...
STRUCTURE OF HEART AND GREAT VESSELS IN CT . CT SERIES KINDLY DONATED BY DR. MICHAEL HENSLEY (Brians Dad). LABELING BY MATT HARPER (JCESOM CLASS 2010). R Brachiocephalic vein. Brachiocephalic trunk. L Common carotid artery. L Subclavian artery. Trachea. Esophagus. Lamina of T4....
TY - JOUR. T1 - I can hear it, but where is it coming from? A case of iatrogenic arteriovenous fistula after pacemaker lead extraction.. AU - Ong, Kevin C.. AU - Asirvatham, Samuel J. AU - Rihal, Charanjit. AU - Hagler, Donald J.. AU - Pislaru, Sorin V.. PY - 2013/12. Y1 - 2013/12. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84904217297&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84904217297&partnerID=8YFLogxK. M3 - Article. C2 - 23825016. AN - SCOPUS:84904217297. VL - 14. SP - 1202. JO - European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging. JF - European Heart Journal Cardiovascular Imaging. SN - 2047-2404. IS - 12. ER - ...
The superior or descending vena cava carries to the heart the blood returned from the head and neck and upper extremities through the right and left innominate veins, and from the walls of the thorax, either directly through the greater azygos vein, ...
Looking for online definition of anatomic snuffbox in the Medical Dictionary? anatomic snuffbox explanation free. What is anatomic snuffbox? Meaning of anatomic snuffbox medical term. What does anatomic snuffbox mean?
The superficial and deep venous drainage of the upper arm will be discussed in this article with clinical reference. Learn this topic now at Kenhub.
Free, official coding info for 2018 ICD-10-CM S45.202S - includes detailed rules, notes, synonyms, ICD-9-CM conversion, index and annotation crosswalks, DRG grouping and more.
What is the definition and uses of cephalic veinuses? What problems can occur with the cephalic vein? These are frequently-asked questions by those who are suffering from the disease in Syosset. Read on to learn the answers to these questions.
The azygos vein is a blood vessel thats located along the right side of the thoracic vertebral column. It carries deoxygenated...
The axillary vein is one of the major veins of the upper limb. It is formed by the union of the paired brachial veins and the basilic vein and contributes to the drainage of the axilla, arm and superolateral chest wall. Summary origin: formed b...
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In anatomy, the radial veins are venae comitantes that accompany the radial artery through the back of the hand and the lateral aspect of the forearm. They join the ulnar veins to form the brachial veins. They follow the same course as the radial artery ...
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Superior Vena Cava Syndrome symptoms - Get information about symptoms of Superior Vena Cava Syndrome, onlymyhealth.com is providing articles related to Superior Vena Cava Syndrome symptoms.
How to avoid central venous catheter malposition?. The safe use of ultrasound is now seen as standard of care. After vessel puncture and the guidewire is inserted the vessel should be scanned again with the ultrasound probe to ensure the guidewire is seen within the vessel. Using a longitudinal view you can also make sure the wire is passing down the vein and isnt sticking in the posterior wall.. The J tip of the guidewire could theoretically be angled to ensure the guidewire passes down the vein and towards the right atrium. For subclavian vein cannulation the J tip should be angled so the tip faces caudad to encourage a turn towards the right atrium. Inserting the guidewire with the needle bevel facing down could also potentially encourage the guidewire to enter the brachiocephalic vein and subsequently the SVC. For internal jugular vein cannulation the J tip could be angled to the tip faces medially, to discourage the wire from turning into the ipsilateral subclavian vein. However in reality ...
The majority of the patients (n = 19) presented with symptomatic arm, breast, and facial swelling; and 6 patients presented with dialysis-access dysfunction and venous-line hypertension. The etiology of CVSO was before central venous catheter in all but 2 patients. Venography showed 19 cases of stenosis (4 stenoses of superior vena cava, 3 brachiocephalic, 10 subclavian, and 2 axillary veins) and 6 occlusions of the superior vena cava. After percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and primary stent angioplasty, there was an immediate regression of symptoms and arteriovenous fistula preservation in 21 cases; 4 patients received a new arteriovenous fistula after interventional treatment. No procedural major complications or patient deaths occurred. During the follow-up period, we recorded a primary patency rate of 95%, 80%, and 70%, respectively, at 6, 12, and 18 months; and a secondary patency rate of 100%, 95%, and 90%, respectively, at 6, 12, and 18 months. In conclusion, endovascular treatment ...
BACKGROUND: As the population ages and peoples living standards gradually improve, the incidence of cerebrovascular disease in China is increasing annually, posing a serious threat to peoples health. The incidence of brachiocephalic artery stenosis in ischemic cerebrovascular disease is relatively low, accounting for 0.5% to 2% of patients, but its consequences are very serious. Herein, we report a case of brachiocephalic artery stenting through the carotid artery. CASE SUMMARY: The patient was a 66-year-old man. He came to our hospital because of repeated dizziness and was diagnosed with ischemic cerebrovascular disease (stenosis at the beginning of the brachiocephalic artery). Cerebral angiography suggested that the stenosis of the brachiocephalic artery had almost occluded it. Contrast agent threaded a line through the stenosis, and there was reversed blood flow through the right vertebral artery to compensate for the subclavian steal syndrome in the right subclavian artery. To improve the ...
Discussing diagnosis of Superior Vena Cava Syndrome in female patient with multiple days of facial swelling with mild paresthesias but no pain.
Superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS) is a collection of symptoms that usually occur in patients who have lung cancer, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or other cancers. It also can occur from noncancer causes. This summary explains SVCS and its treatment in adults and children.
In this article, we are going to describe the cross-sectional anatomy of thorax which is essential in understanding cross-sectional imaging. Cross-Sectional Anatomy of Thorax Level T3: It is the level of superior mediastinum. The trachea lies in the midline with the right brachiocephalic artery, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery anteriorly. The esophagus is seen behind the trachea …. Read More » ...
azygos vein: one of a system of veins that drain the thoracic and abdominal walls; arises as a continuation of the right ascending lumbar vein and terminates in the superior vena cava
The Shih Tzu has several genetic eye diseases. One of the most important diseases in this breed is due to the brachiocephalic skull. Brachiocephalic dogs are those dogs that have shortened noses and very prominent eyes due to shallow orbits. The orbit is the bony socket that surrounds the eye. The shallow bony orbit in the short-nosed dog causes the eyeball itself to be in a more prominent position, giving the appearance of being larger than dogs of similar sizes with longer noses. Along with this skull conformation, there is the problem of lagophthalmos. Lagophthalmos is an inability to properly close the eyelid over the cornea. Lagophthalmic dogs are generally those dogs that have an enlarged palpebral fissure. The palpebral fissure is the space between the upper and lower eyelids. Brachiocephalic dogs classically have all their cornea exposed when the eyes are open and generally they have sclera (the white of the eyeball) exposed also. This conformation causes two clinically serious ...
February 7, 2018-TVA Medical, Inc. announced the presentation of an international meta-analysis of clinical experience in patients who received the companys everlinQ endovascular arteriovenous fistula (endoAVF) for hemodialysis access. The study analyzed data from 236 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) at 28 centers in seven countries. The findings were presented by Tobias Steinke, MD, at LINC 2018, the Leipzig Interventional Course held January 30 to February 2 in Leipzig, Germany.. The company stated that the everlinQ endoAVF system is designed to create an arteriovenous fistula for hemodialysis access using an endovascular approach. In the procedure, two thin, flexible magnetic catheters are inserted into an artery and vein in the arm. A small amount of radiofrequency energy is used to connect the artery and vein to create the fistula. The catheters are then removed and a brachial vein is coil embolized, enabling future dialysis.. Dr. Steinke commented in the companys ...
Although a newcomer to American medical literature, this strange vascular disease of young adult women has been recognized abroad for many years. The etiology is obscure, but the pathologic findings are fairly well documented and the clinical picture is unusually consistent. An obliterative arteritis of the branches of the aortic arch results in severe ocular and cerebral damage. The disease process is relentlessly progressive and the prognosis for sight and life is poor. The present case was treated with corticosteroids and anticoagulants with apparent benefit. This disease should be considered when cataracts are encountered in young people and when arterial pressures and pulses in the upper extremities are absent.. ...
I have recently had elective arthroscopic surgery on my right shoulder to relieve compression and Labrum tear pain. I am a 34 year old male, healthy, active, and a muscular 240 pounds. I have no underlying medical conditions that I or my Physicians are aware of. I have NKDA. Within 2 days I developed a UEDVT in both brachial veins and the vein they attach to (I cant remember its name) in my right arm. I have a small amount of swelling in the inside portion of the right bicep and some redness from under my arm in the armpit to mid forearm. I had the UEDVT confirmed via ultrasound. It appears that the clot(s) extend from in the armpit to just below my elbow. My arm is not grossly swollen and has good PMS. I have been put on 120mg Lovenox and 2.5mg Coumadin as my treatment and nothing more. I had the formation of a clot in my lower left calf following left knee surgery 7 years ago and received no anti-coagulant therapy then with complete resolution and no known problems associated with my previous ...
MATERIALS AND METHODS: To validate the model outcomes, we used supine average arterial and venous extracerebral blood flow, obtained by using phase-contrast MR imaging from 49 individuals with stenosis in the acquisition plane at the level of the disc between the second and third vertebrae of the left internal jugular vein, 20 with stenosis in the acquisition plane at the level of the disc between the fifth and sixth vertebrae of the right internal jugular vein, and 38 healthy controls without stenosis. Average data from a second group of 10 healthy volunteers screened with an echo-color Doppler technique were used to evaluate flow variations due to posture change. ...
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Im not sure I can clearly see the aortic knuckle on the PA, even though the mediastinum on the left seems prominent - could be due to rotation to the left.. On the right there seems to be a round opacity just caudal to the right paratracheal stripe - it might be a slightly enlarged azygos vein, but it might be that the vein is denser and either behind or in front of this slightly more lucent round structure.. On the lateral I cannot clearly visualize the IVC shadow near the posterior-inferior heart border ...
Abstract:. We describe a very rare case of an indwelling central venous catheter (CVC) through the left internal jugular vein that perforated the superior vena cava (SVC) wall postoperatively, although the CVC was placed in the appropriate position preoperatively. Three days after CVC insertion, a chest radiograph showed that the CVC tip had moved from the lower SVC to the upper SVC. Five days after the insertion, computed tomography showed SVC perforation and the resulting hydrothorax. In cases of CVC insertion through the left side, the CVC tip should not be placed in the upper SVC (zone B). Considering individual clinical factors and the indwelling period for the CVC, the left innominate vein (zone C) may be a suitable site for the left-sided CVC tip to reduce the risk of SVC perforation.. ...
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Read about superior vena cava syndrome, a condition caused by tumors or cancer in the chest area, blood clots, or infection (STDs or tuberculosis). The most common symptoms of superior vena cava is shortness of breath.
View Notes - Lab 8 from BIOL 1404 at Texas Tech. 9. aorta 1 0. pulmonary veins 11. innominate or brachiocephalic artery 12. left sublclavian artery 13. ligamentum arteriosum 14. coronary arteries 15.
This study was performed to investigate the impact of intima-media thickness (IMT) of radial artery on early failure of radiocephalic arteriovenous fistula (AVF) in hemodialysis (HD) patients. Ninety uremic patients undergoing radiocephalic AVF operation were included in this study. During the opera …
TY - JOUR. T1 - Anomalous azygos venous system in a south Indian cadaver. T2 - A case report. AU - Quadros, Lydia S.. AU - Potu, Bhagath Kumar. AU - Guru, Anitha. AU - Pulakunta, Thejodhar. AU - Ray, Biswabina. AU - DSilva, Suhani Sumalatha. AU - Sequeira, Sylvia. AU - Thomas, Huban. PY - 2009/9. Y1 - 2009/9. N2 - Introduction: The posterior thoracic wall, an area drained by the azygos venous system, is a common site for surgical intervention. Since the venous part of the cardiovascular system is subject to most common variation, abnormalities in the azygos venous system are often reported. Case presentation: During routine dissection classes for undergraduate medical students, we encountered a variation in the azygos venous system in a 65 years old south Indian male cadaver. We observed that there was no accessory azygos vein, and left 4 th, 5th, 6th and 7th posterior intercostal veins terminated directly into azygos vein. Conclusion: Identifying these types of variations is important during ...
Superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome results from any condition that leads to obstruction of blood flow through the SVC. Obstruction can be caused by invasion or external compression of the SVC by an adjacent pathologic process involving the right lung,
What is the definition and uses of cephalic veinuses? What problems can occur with the cephalic vein? These are frequently-asked questions by those who are suffering from the disease in Hopewell Junction. Read on to learn the answers to these questions.
The pathogenesis of the SVC stenosis in pacemaker implanted patients is thought to be from endothelial disruption caused by repeated trauma from the leads and it usually occurs above the right atrium [3]. Deposition of fibrin on the surface of the leads can result in vessel wall inflammation, fibrosis, thrombus formation and eventually these changes lead to venous stenosis and occlusion [2]. Lead infection like our case, and retained leads increase the risk of thrombosis, stenosis and subsequent SVC syndrome. Lead material, caliber, and access site either by subclavian or cephalic did not have any impact on stenosis formation [4, 5]. Stenosis due number of leads varies, but only one study report that increasing number of leads had been associated with more stenosis formation [6].. The most common clinical presentations are neck, facial and upper extremity swelling secondary to obstruction of blood flow in the SVC. Other commonly reported symptoms are dyspnea on exertion, orthopnea, headache, ...
Synonyms for anterior cardinal vein in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for anterior cardinal vein. 1 word related to anterior cardinal vein: cardinal vein. What are synonyms for anterior cardinal vein?
UNDOK, ABDUL WAHAB BIN (2012) Association Between Postoperative Troponin Levels and 30-Day Mortality Among Patients Undergoing Noncardiac Surgery. JAMA. UNDOK, ABDUL WAHAB BIN (2012) Left main bifurcation stenting in Acute myocardial infarction. UNSPECIFIED. UNDOK, ABDUL WAHAB BIN (2012) SAFARI technique in Chronic Total Occlusion of Superficial Femoral artery via Retrograde Posterior Tibial artery. UNSPECIFIED. UNDOK, ABDUL WAHAB BIN (2010) Brachiocephalic stenting of ruptured brachiocephalic artery aneurysm. UNSPECIFIED. UNDOK, ABDUL WAHAB BIN (2008) Association of Severity of Coronary Artery Disease and Peripheral Artery Disease. UNSPECIFIED. ...
DISCUSSION. Since SVCS is a rare diagnosis and considering our relevant sample of 28 symptomatic patients managed with angioplasty and stenting over a period of 10 years, it is important to report our experience of the technical and clinical success of this management approach. To accomplish this, we reviewed the medical records of symptomatic patients with Standford type III SVCS only.. Fifty years ago, the main etiology of SVCS was attributed to infectious causes, particularly syphilitic aneurysm of the thoracic aorta or tuberculosis, but this has been replaced by malignant diseases, especially lung tumors.8 Currently, benign causes resulting from increasing use of intravascular catheters and pacemaker electrodes are responsible for at least 35% of cases, and this is an ascending curve.9 In fact, SVCS in 10 of the 28 patients (35.7%) in our sample was derived from benign causes, more frequently in more recent years.. SVCS is a clinical diagnosis confirmed by computed tomography (CT) with ...
I also had weakness in my arms legs etc and my doctor checked my Potassium and found it to be on the low side and he gave me potassium supplements and now i dont have the weakness in my arms but stilll some in my right leg. Keen H, Payan J, AllawiJ, et al. 8 , 9 peripheral neuropathy dress shoes enters the arm with the axillary artery and passes posterior and medial to the brachial artery, traveling between the brachial artery and the brachial vein. It was revealed that the difference sensitivity and specificity of Monofilament in three and four points with sensitivity and specificity in eight and ten point is not statistically significant.
Right basilic vein transposition. End-stage renal disease with need for a long-term hemodialysis access. Excellent flow through fistula following the procedure.
4. Place your left forearm across the chicken and use your left hand to spread out the left wing of the chicken.. 5. Use your right hand to bleed the chicken as described above.. The brachial vein (wing vein) is usually the most convenient site to obtain blood samples of broilers, broiler breeders, layers and turkeys. Heart puncture can also be used, but it is usually used as a method for obtaining blood from small chickens (one to several days old).. Chickens can also be sent live to the lab for blood collection. It is also very convenient to collect blood samples at processing plant.. Obtain at least 2 ml of blood from each bird. Do not fill more than half of the capacity of the tube. After the collection, lay the tube down so that it is horizontal or nearly so. Leave it until the blood clots. After the clot is firm, the vial may be returned to a vertical position. An occasional sample may require a long time to clot. A fresh blood sample should never be refrigerated immediately after ...
Synonyms for Central vein in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for Central vein. 33 synonyms for central: inner, middle, mid, interior, main, chief, key, essential, primary, principal, fundamental, focal, center, medial, median, mid, middle. What are synonyms for Central vein?
An internal jugular vein is one of two veins that are located on both sides of the neck. The main function of these veins is to...
The arterial supply to the upper limb begins in the chest as the subclavian artery. The right subclavian artery arises from the brachiocephalic trunk, while the left subclavian branches directly off the arch of aorta.
Inflammation or infection involving an artery or arteries. [L. arteria, artery, + G. itis, inflammation] brachiocephalic a. giant cell a. seen in older adults; characterized by inflammatory lesions in medium sized arteries, most commonly in the…
Svc Spec-Cable Spooling (Associate - 1) 18 September, 2019 from Job Capsule: Under general supervision, responsible for professionally installing cable in...
Ok I have AVG Anti-Virus (free version). Just curious if anyone else uses it and if they do, have they gotten good results with it. Also, if anyone knows if it is equal/better/worse please post it.
A 69-year-old woman with end-stage renal failure discontinued continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis and commenced temporary haemodialysis because of resistant peritonitis. Right internal jugular vein haemodialysis catheter placement was performed. The cuffed, tunnelled haemodialysis catheter was inserted using the modified Seldinger technique. When haemodialysis was initiated the following day, blood could not be aspirated from the catheter and the patient complained of central chest pain during the aspiration. Subsequent venography and computed tomography scan of the thorax showed that the catheter was placed extraluminally into the posterior mediastinum. The importance of a chest radiograph after placement of a central venous catheter is highlighted by this case report. Subtle deviations in catheter position from normal should alert the physician to the possibility of catheter misplacement and lead to further investigation ...
Animals were sedated with ketamine hydrochloride (10 mg/kg IM initially and supplemental doses as needed) and anesthetized with pentobarbital (20 mg/kg IV). Studies were performed under sterile conditions in an animal catheterization laboratory. A polyethylene catheter with multiple side holes and a 60° directional Doppler ultrasound transducer was inserted via an arteriotomy into the right axillary artery. The catheter was passed retrogradely under fluoroscopic visualization to the origin of the right subclavian artery, ie, to the bifurcation of the right brachiocephalic artery into the right common carotid and subclavian arteries. Mean and phasic arterial pressure and Doppler frequency were recorded continuously. Cineangiograms of the right internal carotid artery were obtained in a projection that was 45° to the anteroposterior plane. Power injections of nonionic contrast (iohexol, Sanofi-Winthrop Pharmaceuticals) were made at a rate of 15 mL/s through the catheter in the brachiocephalic ...
Objective To investigate if the respiratory variation of the inferior vena cava diameter (?DIVC) and right internal jugular vein diameter (?DRIJ) are correlated in mechanically ventilated patients. patients were responders and 32 measurements showed agreement (weighted Kappa = 0.65). The area under the ROC 1561178-17-3 IC50 curve was 0.903 (95%CI 0.765 - 0.973; cut-off value = 11.86). Conclusion The respiratory variation of the inferior vena cava and the right internal jugular veins are correlated and showed significant agreement. Evaluation of right internal jugular vein distensibility appears to be a surrogate marker for inferior vena cava vein distensibility for evaluating fluid responsiveness. Research Ethics Committee approved this study (no 38077214.1.0000.5335 - Plataforma Brasil) without the need for a consent form. Measurements A single critical care physician with a certificate of ultrasound evaluation (basic competence),(18) performed all of the ultrasound examinations (Siemens ...
Chaudhary K, Gupta A, Wadhawan S, Jain D, Bhadoria P. Anesthetic management of superior vena cava syndrome due to anterior mediastinal mass. J Anaesthesiol Clin Pharmacol [serial online] 2012 [cited 2016 Jul 19];28:242-6. Available from: http://www.joacp.org/text.asp?2012/28/2/242/94910. ...
Superior Vena Cava Obstruction is also known as superior vena cava syndrome. Obstruction of the superior vena cava (SVC) can be due to external pressure.
Definition of basilic vein of forearm. Provided by Stedmans medical dictionary and Drugs.com. Includes medical terms and definitions.
As it pushes toward its goal of being a top 5 animal health player by 2020, Ceva Animal Health has signed a pheromone R&D pact with insect repellant specialist M2i Life Sciences.. The 10-year arrangement between the two companies will center around the development of "formulations and innovative systems" to utilize pheromones in animal health, according to a press release. M2i is a top player in pheromone applications for agriculture, according to the release.. Ceva is already a player in pheromone products with Feliway and Adaptil to treat behavior issues in cats and dogs, respectively. The products are synthetic version of pheromones, which are naturally-occurring molecules suspected to have a calming impact on animals. As of 2014, Cevas pheromone-based products were supported by 42 clinical studies, the companys website says.. For Ceva, the partnership comes in quick succession after its deal last week to buy Frances Biovac. Through that purchase, Ceva picked up Biovacs "autogeneous" ...
The external jugular vein is increasingly being used as the recipient vein in head and neck tissue transfers, and for cannulation to conduct diagnostic procedures or intravenous therapies. The variations in the patterns of its course, and knowledge o
Differentiation of superior vena cava syndrome from fatty liver deposition. Axial contrast-enhanced CT images obtained during the arterial phase at the level of the ...
not to mean any demeanor; but there is no left nor right azygos vein. That why it is called so. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azygos_vein
Tip in the superior vena cava | Value provided by RadRef.org, the comprehensive online repository of normal values in diagnostic imaging.
LALWANI, Rekha; RANA, Kum Kum; DAS, Srijit y KHAN, Riyazul Qamar. Communication of the External and Internal Jugular Veins: A Case Report . Int. J. Morphol. [online]. 2006, vol.24, n.4, pp.721-722. ISSN 0717-9502. http://dx.doi.org/10.4067/S0717-95022006000500033.. The external jugular vein, which traverses the sternocleidomastoid muscle superficially, is known to exhibit variations in its formation and course. There are less reports on the communication of the external and internal jugular vein. During routine cadaveric dissection, we detected an abnormal communication of the external jugular vein and the internal jugular vein, in a 45 year male cadaver. The knowledge of both normal and abnormal anatomy of the superficial veins of the neck may be important for clinicians performing catheterization and surgeons operating in the region of the neck. The presence of such anomalous communications may also be important for radiologists performing angiographic and sonographic studies. Palabras clave : ...
PURPOSE: To investigate the neovascularization after exposure of the external jugular venous endothelium in an experimental model. METHODS: The sample was composed of 60 male rats of Wistar OUT B breed provided by animal colony of the Medicine College of Juazeiro do Norte, weighing 250 to 350g, aged 90-120 days. Randomized study in OUT B Wistar rats, open, with 60 days duration. The animals were distributed into three groups of 20 specimens and were subjected to the following: Group 1: neck incision with dissection, ligation and section of the external jugular vein. Group 2: neck incision with dissection and ligation of the external jugular vein. Group 3: cervicotomy without dissection of the external jugular vein without ligation or section. The animals were sacrificed, half of them in 30 days and the other half within 60 days. The material in block harvested from the operated site were sectioned and stained for immunohistochemistry with CD34 marker. RESULTS: Neovascularization occurred with ...
Editors Note: This is a series of extremely cogent presentations delivered by ISECT (Indian Society of Extracorporeal Circulation). The source article can be viewed here- http://www.isect.org/ASD.pdf. Right Superior Vena Cava Draining to Roof of Left Atrium The preoperative diagnosis in this patient was sinus venosus ASD with possible partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection. = - […]. ...
During the fourth week of gestation, a pair of anterior cardinal veins form that drain the cephalic part of the embryo and a pair of posterior cardinal veins form that drain the rest. Anterior and posterior cardinal veins join to form a short common cardinal vein (duct of Cuvier), which opens into the respective horns of sinus venosus. The proximal portions of the right anterior cardinal veins and right common cardinal vein form the RSVC. The left anterior cardinal veins normally obliterate to form the ligament of Marshall, whereas the left horn of the sinus venosus and adjacent portion of the left common cardinal vein form the CS. Persistence of the left anterior cardinal vein forms the left SVC, which always continues with the CS as the left common cardinal vein that is part of both the CS and left SVC. Flow of PLSVC blood into the CS results in its enlargement, and a dilated CS is often the first clue for the diagnosis of PLSVC during echocardiography. In 82% to 90% of cases, PLSVC is ...
Boyd et al. reported an incidence of 0.2% for catheter looping(7). Identified risk factors that increase likelihood of loop formation,knotting of the catheter are blind introduction and small diameter of catheter, incomplete balloon inflation before advancing it, several tries to wedge it, bending of the catheter by heat, and enlarged right heart chambers. More frequent sites of knotting are right atrium and ventricle, subclavian vein, and pulmonary artery and its branches. Diagnostic confirmation is made by chest radiography, fluoroscopy, and echocardiography(8). Chest radiography should be used to specifically ascertain that the catheter is not in a dangerous location(9).. To avoid from knotting during PAC procedures,it must be known that insertion point of the catheter is on right internal jugular vein and right atrium is 20cm and pulmonary artery tracing is 40-45cm away from this point.If you cant reach the appropriate pressure tracing despite advancing the catheter 10cm further than ...
The internal jugular vein is a major blood vessel that drains blood from important body organs and parts, such as the brain, face, and neck. Anatomically, there are two of these veins that lie along each side of the neck. They each rest beside the thyroid gland at the center
There was a predominance of male gender (65%), and the group mean age was 68.1 ± 8.3 years. The mean follow-up period was 29.6 ± 26.3 months. The operative mortality (30 days) rate was 7.5%. The main alternative conduit was non-spliced cephalic vein (37.5%). Composite grafts included GSV + AVC (45.2%), AVC + AVC (43.3%) and small saphenous vein + AVC (11.5%). The 5-year primary and secondary patency (SP) rates were 45.2 ± 5.6% and 56.5 ± 5.0%, respectively. The 5-year SP rate was greatest when using non-spliced cephalic vein (65.8 ± 7.6%), but there was no difference in cumulative patency between spliced and non-spliced veins (49.5 ± 8.0% vs. 61.2 ± 6.4%; p = 0.501). The 5-year limb salvage and survival rates were 70.6 ± 5.9% and 59.6 ± 5.8%, respectively ...
Shopping for highboys and snuffboxes on opening night at the Winter Antiques Show was as hectic as hitting Rodeo Drive at high noon on Dec. 23. Arie Kopelman, Chanel CEO and show chairman, could
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The patient, who had a history of duodenocephalopancreasectomy, came to our attention when she developed bowel occlusion. She underwent emergency bowel resection due to bowel necrosis caused by adhesions. A central venous catheter (CVC) was then positioned in the right internal jugular vein. Since bleeding was recorded from the abdominal drainage, antithrombotic prophylaxis with enoxaparin was started on day 3. On postoperative day 4 the patients right arm became edematous. A Duplex ultrasound scan (DUS) showed mural thrombosis of the right internal jugular vein. A intravenous infusion of heparin sodium was started. A DUS performed 36 hours later showed recanalization of the vessel was almost complete. The edema in the arm gradually subsided and after 4 days had resolved. Enoxaparin was therefore substituted for heparin sodium. Successive DUS showed complete resolution of the thrombus, and the CVC was removed. Enoxaparin was replaced by warfarin continued for another 2 months.. ...
Anomalous pulmonary venous connection (partiel) | Surgical correction of partiel anomalous pulmonary venous connection. Cardiosurgery: Treatment in Würzburg, Germany ✈. Prices on BookingHealth.com - booking treatment online!
The persistence of left superior vena cava (PLSVC) is the most common congenital anomaly of the venous return system to the heart. Because of the increasing number of patients referred for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) devices implantations, it is expected to encounter this venous anatomic variation. Left ventricular lead placement at an appropriate site is an integral and technically challenging part of successful CRT. In case of cardiac abnormalities could be difficult to achieve an optimal cardiac rhythm management devices implantation. Previous reports in patients with PLSVC highlighted the challenges to achieve an optimal cardiac rhythm device implantation. Recently, a new quadripolar active fixation left ventricular lead is available for CRT device implantation. Hereby we report a case of a device upgrading from dual-chamber pacemaker to CRT with defibrillator backup using the active fixation left ventricular quadripolar lead in a patient with PLSVC and right superior vena cava atresia.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Use of radiofrequency energy and covered stents in patients with an occluded superior vena cava and requiring endocardial pacemaker implantation. AU - Butera, Gianfranco. AU - Aimè, Ezio. AU - Carminati, Mario. PY - 2008/2. Y1 - 2008/2. N2 - OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the radiofrequency energy and covered stents in the percutaneous reconstruction of an interrupted superior vena cava in patients needing endocardial lead implantation. BACKGROUND: Patients with a history of multiple cardiac surgical procedures or with an history of infections of the pacemaker (PM) site and electrodes may develop iatrogenic occlusion of the venous access. METHODS: Three patients (40, 48 and 74 years old, respectively) needing endocardial pacemaker implantation had complete obstruction of the superior vena cava. Recanalization of the superior vena cava (SVC) was undertaken under general anesthesia with orotracheal intubation. RESULTS: A total of 7 balloon-expandable Cheatham-Platinum 8 Zig covered ...

Brachiocephalic vein - WikipediaBrachiocephalic vein - Wikipedia

Right Brachiocephalic vein Right& Left Brachiocephalic vein Right& Left Brachiocephalic vein The brachiocephalic veins, ... The brachiocephalic veins are the major veins returning blood to the superior vena cava. The brachiocephalic vein is formed by ... drains into the left brachiocephalic vein The left brachiocephalic vein forms from the anastomosis formed between the left and ... The left brachiocephalic vein is usually longer than the right. These veins merge to form the superior vena cava, a great ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brachiocephalic_vein

Anomalous subaortic position of the brachiocephalic vein (innominate vein): an echocardiographic study. | HeartAnomalous subaortic position of the brachiocephalic vein (innominate vein): an echocardiographic study. | Heart

Anomalous subaortic position of the brachiocephalic vein (innominate vein): an echocardiographic study. ... Anomalous subaortic position of the brachiocephalic vein (innominate vein): an echocardiographic study. ... The anomalous course of the brachiocephalic vein from the neck to the junction of the superior vena cava was shown by cross ... In 24 (0.98%) of 2457 patients with congenital heart disease the brachiocephalic vein was in an anomalous position below the ...
more infohttp://heart.bmj.com/content/64/6/385

Brachiocephalic artery - WikipediaBrachiocephalic artery - Wikipedia

However, there are two brachiocephalic veins. It arises, on a level with the upper border of the second right costal cartilage ... The brachiocephalic artery (or brachiocephalic trunk or innominate artery) is an artery of the mediastinum that supplies blood ... Brachiocephalic artery Brachiocephalic trunk This article incorporates text in the public domain from the 20th edition of ... There is no brachiocephalic artery for the left side of the body. The left common carotid, and the left subclavian artery, come ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brachiocephalic_artery

Superior vena cava syndrome: endovascular managementSuperior vena cava syndrome: endovascular management

... or one of the brachiocephalic veins, or the jugular vein. Some situations required the hydrophilic guidewire to be replaced ... Technical options in such cases include kissing stents (double stents) or choosing one of the brachiocephalic veins (generally ... with retrograde azygos vein flow; (IV) occlusion of both superior vena cava and azygos vein. All patients included in this ... and dominance of the jugular vein. In some cases, with a very swollen arm making puncture of a vein difficult, the ...
more infohttp://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1677-54492019000100313&tlng=en

Plus itPlus it

... right and left brachiocephalic vein. After evaluation the patient underwent radical resection of the tumor en bloc with the ...
more infohttp://erj.ersjournals.com/content/40/Suppl_56/P2935

Malignancy-related superior vena cava syndromeMalignancy-related superior vena cava syndrome

Thromboembolic disease involving the superior vena cava and brachiocephalic veins. Chest 2003; 123:809. ... Primary (spontaneous) upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. *Systemic therapy for the initial management of advanced non-small ... A three-dimensional gadolinium-enhanced MR venography technique for imaging central veins. AJR Am J Roentgenol 1999; 173:999. ... The management of central vein thrombosis in the setting of hemodialysis and other indwelling intravascular catheters in ...
more infohttps://www.uptodate.com/contents/malignancy-related-superior-vena-cava-syndrome

Unilateral hemothorax in a 46 year old South Indian male due to a giant arteriovenous hemodialysis fistula: a case report |...Unilateral hemothorax in a 46 year old South Indian male due to a giant arteriovenous hemodialysis fistula: a case report |...

... who presented with a giant brachiocephalic AV fistula in his left arm and progressive breathlessness. Radiological imaging ... stenosis and/or thrombosis of the brachiocephalic and/or subclavian veins can occur. A stenosis of the brachiocephalic vein, in ... subclavian/brachiocephalic vein stenosis/thrombosis, a complication of central venous catheterization, or excessive flow ... This leads to unilateral pleural effusion over the same side as the vein stenosis/thrombosis [9]. Doppler study in our patient ...
more infohttps://casesjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1757-1626-1-225

Brachiocephalic veins | definition of brachiocephalic veins by Medical dictionaryBrachiocephalic veins | definition of brachiocephalic veins by Medical dictionary

What is brachiocephalic veins? Meaning of brachiocephalic veins medical term. What does brachiocephalic veins mean? ... Looking for online definition of brachiocephalic veins in the Medical Dictionary? brachiocephalic veins explanation free. ... brachiocephalic veins. Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.. Related to brachiocephalic veins: innominate vein, vena ... Formed by the union of the internal jugular and subclavian veins; other tributaries of the right brachiocephalic vein are the ...
more infohttp://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/brachiocephalic+veins

Synonyms and Antonyms for brachiocephalic-vein | Synonym.comSynonyms and Antonyms for brachiocephalic-vein | Synonym.com

1. brachiocephalic vein (n.). veins formed by the union of the internal jugular and subclavian veins ... 5. vein (n.). any of the vascular bundles or ribs that form the branching framework of conducting and supporting tissues in a ... 7. vein (n.). one of the horny ribs that stiffen and support the wing of an insect ... 2. vein (n.). a blood vessel that carries blood from the capillaries toward the heart ...
more infohttp://www.synonym.com/synonyms/brachiocephalic-vein

Malposition of central venous catheter in a small tributary of left brachiocephalic vein.Malposition of central venous catheter in a small tributary of left brachiocephalic vein.

We describe two such unusual incidents involving cannulation of the small tributaries of left brachiocephalic vein. Malposition ... Erroneous positioning of central venous catheters in small tributaries of large central veins is a rare occurrence. ... We describe two such unusual incidents involving cannulation of the small tributaries of left brachiocephalic vein. Malposition ... Erroneous positioning of central venous catheters in small tributaries of large central veins is a rare occurrence. ...
more infohttp://www.biomedsearch.com/nih/Malposition-central-venous-catheter-in/22090752.html

Accessory hemiazygos vein draining into left brachiocephalic vein | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.orgAccessory hemiazygos vein draining into left brachiocephalic vein | Radiology Case | Radiopaedia.org

Accessory hemiazygos vein draining into left brachiocephalic vein. Case contributed by Assistant Prof. Essam G Ghonaim ... reaching upwards to drain into left brachio-cephalic vein (white arrows). Right sided azygous lobe and fissure are also noted. ...
more infohttps://radiopaedia.org/cases/accessory-hemiazygos-vein-draining-into-left-brachiocephalic-vein

Supraclavicular central catheterization of the brachiocephalic veinSupraclavicular central catheterization of the brachiocephalic vein

You are at:Home»Intravenous Literature»Supraclavicular central catheterization of the brachiocephalic vein ... Placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) in the brachiocephalic vein (BCV) via the ultrasound (US)-guided supraclavicular ... Placement of a central venous catheter (CVC) in the brachiocephalic vein (BCV) via the ultrasound (US)-guided supraclavicular ... Ultrasound (US)-guided supraclavicular catheterization of the brachiocephalic vein (BCV) is feasible in infants and children. ...
more infohttps://www.ivteam.com/intravenous-literature/supraclavicular-central-catheterization-of-the-brachiocephalic-vein/

Central venous catheter insertion and brachiocephalic vein perforationCentral venous catheter insertion and brachiocephalic vein perforation

Dialysis catheter placement via the left internal jugular vein: risk of brachiocephalic vein perforation. The Journal of ... You are at:Home»Intravenous Literature»Central venous catheter insertion and brachiocephalic vein perforation ... We discuss a case of a brachiocephalic vein (BCV) perforation after Tesio® central venous catheter insertion" Winkes et al ( ... Purpose: We discuss a case of a brachiocephalic vein (BCV) perforation after Tesio® central venous catheter insertion. ...
more infohttps://www.ivteam.com/intravenous-literature/central-venous-catheter-insertion-and-brachiocephalic-vein-perforation/

Lab 8 - 9 aorta 1 0 pulmonary veins 11 innominate or brachiocephalic artery 12 left sublclavian artery 13 ligamentum arteriosum...Lab 8 - 9 aorta 1 0 pulmonary veins 11 innominate or brachiocephalic artery 12 left sublclavian artery 13 ligamentum arteriosum...

innominate or brachiocephalic artery 12. left sublclavian artery 13. ligamentum arteriosum 14. coronary arteries 15. ... Unformatted text preview: 9. aorta 1 0. pulmonary veins 11. innominate or brachiocephalic artery 12. left sublclavian artery 13 ... Lab 8 - 9 aorta 1 0 pulmonary veins 11 innominate or.... This preview shows document pages 1 - 40. Sign up to view the full ... 6 Thoracic duct 7 Thoracic aorta 8 Diaphragm 9 Brachiocephalic a 10 Left ...
more infohttps://www.coursehero.com/file/5877608/Lab-8/

Right brachiocephalic vein (Vena brachiocephalica dextra) | KenhubRight brachiocephalic vein (Vena brachiocephalica dextra) | Kenhub

Right brachiocephalic vein aka Vena brachiocephalica dextra in the latin terminology and part of lungs in situ seen from the ... AnatomyThoraxLungsLungs in situRight brachiocephalic vein Right brachiocephalic vein This feature is available to Premium ... Right brachiocephalic vein This feature is available to Premium subscribers only.. More Info data-html=true data-placement= ... Pulmonary Arteries and Veins This is an article covering the anatomy, function and related clinical notes of the pulmonary ...
more infohttps://www.kenhub.com/en/atlas/vena-brachiocephalica-dextra-2

Searching for brachiocephalic veinsSearching for "brachiocephalic veins"

The Orthopedics PERL Channel contains hundreds of items, including full-color medical illustrations, medical animations and patient education articles. The Orthopedics Channel covers topics relevant to skeletal and muscular anatomy, orthopedic injury and repair, and general sports medicine. Health Animation channels are produced by Nucleus Medical Media, Inc.
more infohttp://prenateperl.com/search?q=brachiocephalic%20veins

anatomyEXPERT - Brachiocephalic vein - Structure DetailanatomyEXPERT - Brachiocephalic vein - Structure Detail

Brachiocephalic vein. Other Terms: Innominate vein, Brachiocephalic venous tree, Vena brachiocephalica, Veines ... The brachiocephalic veins, right and left, are formed by the union of the subclavian and internal jugular veins of the ... The left brachiocephalic vein, is longer and larger than the right, being about 7 1/2 centimeters (3 inches) in length, and ... The right brachiocephalic vein is the shorter and smaller, being about 3 3/4 centimeters (1 1/2 inches) in length; it commences ...
more infohttp://www.anatomyexpert.com/app/structure/8665/1495/

Anatomy Tables-Veins of the Head and Neck | Neck | VeinAnatomy Tables-Veins of the Head and Neck | Neck | Vein

Anatomy Tables-Veins of the Head and Neck - Free download as PDF File (.pdf), Text File (.txt) or view presentation slides ... head; neck; upper at its origin, the left brachiocephalic v. receives limb; anterior chest the thoracic duct; at its origin, ... ANATOMY TABLES , VEINS OF THE HEAD AND NECK. Med.bramjnet.com. Selected Veins of the Head and Neck - Listed Alphabetically. ... Vein angular v. Tributaries supraorbital v., supratrochlear v. Drains Into facial vein at the inferior margin of the orbit ...
more infohttps://www.scribd.com/document/138105338/Anatomy-Tables-Veins-of-the-Head-and-Neck

Subclavian vein - WikipediaSubclavian vein - Wikipedia

From here it joins with the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein (also known as "innominate vein"). The angle ... Subclavian vein. The thyroid gland and its relations. (Right subclavian vein visible at bottom left, left subclavian vein ... Each subclavian vein is a continuation of the axillary vein and runs from the outer border of the first rib to the medial ... The subclavian vein is a paired large vein, one on either side of the body. Their diameter is approximately that of the ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subclavian_vein

Internal thoracic vein - WikipediaInternal thoracic vein - Wikipedia

Veins of the thorax and abdomen. The internal thoracic veins drain into the brachiocephalic veins.] ... In human anatomy, the internal thoracic vein (previously known as the internal mammary vein) is a vessel that drains the chest ... accompanies the internal thoracic artery along its course and terminates in the brachiocephalic vein. ... Bilaterally, it arises from the superior epigastric vein, ... Smallest cardiac veins. *Right atrial veins. *Right ventricular ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Internal_thoracic_vein

Great saphenous vein | definition of great saphenous vein by Medical dictionaryGreat saphenous vein | definition of great saphenous vein by Medical dictionary

What is great saphenous vein? Meaning of great saphenous vein medical term. What does great saphenous vein mean? ... Looking for online definition of great saphenous vein in the Medical Dictionary? great saphenous vein explanation free. ... brachiocephalic vein. The brachiocephalic vein is formed by the merger of the subclavian and internal jugular veins in the root ... Labbé vein. See: Labbé vein. lesser saphenous vein. Short saphenous vein.. lingual vein. The dorsal or the deep lingual vein, ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/great+saphenous+vein

Massive thrombosis of brachiocephalic veins and superior vena cava syndrome in a patient with non-small cell lung carcinoma...Massive thrombosis of brachiocephalic veins and superior vena cava syndrome in a patient with non-small cell lung carcinoma...

Massive thrombosis of brachiocephalic veins and superior vena cava syndrome in a patient with non-small cell lung carcinoma ... Massive thrombosis of brachiocephalic veins and superior vena cava syndrome in a patient with non-small cell lung carcinoma ... The possible pathogenetic causes of thrombosis of the brachiocephalic veins and SVC syndrome in this case are discussed. It is ... The possible pathogenetic causes of thrombosis of the brachiocephalic veins and SVC syndrome in this case are discussed. It is ...
more infohttps://iris.unife.it/handle/11392/495084

NAVER Academic | Migration of jugular or subclavian venous catheters into inferior tributaries of the brachiocephalic veins or...NAVER Academic | Migration of jugular or subclavian venous catheters into inferior tributaries of the brachiocephalic veins or...

... the left superior intercostal vein in the first two cases, the thymic vein in the third, and the azygos vein in the last three ... Six children are reported in whom a central venous catheter from the internal jugular or the subclavian vein migrated to an ... Adolescent, Azygos Vein, anatomy & histology, Brachiocephalic Veins, Catheterization, Central Venous, adverse effects, ... the left superior intercostal vein in the first two cases, the thymic vein in the third, and the azygos vein in the last three ...
more infohttp://academic.naver.com/article.naver?doc_id=139542568
  • See 'Thrombosis associated with chronic hemodialysis vascular catheters' and 'Central vein stenosis associated with hemodialysis access' and 'Catheter-related upper extremity venous thrombosis' . (uptodate.com)
  • Collateral veins may arise from the azygos, internal mammary, lateral thoracic, paraspinous, and esophageal venous systems ( image 1 ). (uptodate.com)
  • More recently, the incidence of SVC syndrome due to thrombosis has risen, largely because of increased use of intravascular devices, such as central vein catheters and pacemaker wires. (uptodate.com)
  • The management of central vein thrombosis in the setting of hemodialysis and other indwelling intravascular catheters in patients who do not have cancer is addressed elsewhere. (uptodate.com)
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