Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They drain blood from the head, neck, and upper extremities, and unite to form the superior vena cava.
The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.
A condition that occurs when the obstruction of the thin-walled SUPERIOR VENA CAVA interrupts blood flow from the head, upper extremities, and thorax to the RIGHT ATRIUM. Obstruction can be caused by NEOPLASMS; THROMBOSIS; ANEURYSM; or external compression. The syndrome is characterized by swelling and/or CYANOSIS of the face, neck, and upper arms.
The venous trunk which returns blood from the head, neck, upper extremities and chest.
A vein which arises from the right ascending lumbar vein or the vena cava, enters the thorax through the aortic orifice in the diaphragm, and terminates in the superior vena cava.
Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins.
Radiographic visualization or recording of a vein after the injection of contrast medium.
Placement of an intravenous CATHETER in the subclavian, jugular, or other central vein.
The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.
The vessels carrying blood away from the capillary beds.
Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.
Surgical shunt allowing direct passage of blood from an artery to a vein. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.
The continuation of the axillary vein which follows the subclavian artery and then joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein.
A bone on the ventral side of the shoulder girdle, which in humans is commonly called the collar bone.
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.
The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.
The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.
Nerve fibers that are capable of rapidly conducting impulses away from the neuron cell body.

Right atrial bypass grafting for central venous obstruction associated with dialysis access: another treatment option. (1/149)

PURPOSE: Central venous obstruction is a common problem in patients with chronic renal failure who undergo maintenance hemodialysis. We studied the use of right atrial bypass grafting in nine cases of central venous obstruction associated with upper extremity venous hypertension. To better understand the options for managing this condition, we discuss the roles of surgery and percutaneous transluminal angioplasty with stent placement. METHODS: All patients had previously undergone placement of bilateral temporary subclavian vein dialysis catheters. Severe arm swelling, graft thrombosis, or graft malfunction developed because of central venous stenosis or obstruction in the absence of alternative access sites. A large-diameter (10 to 16 mm) externally reinforced polytetrafluoroethylene (GoreTex) graft was used to bypass the obstructed vein and was anastomosed to the right atrial appendage. This technique was used to bypass six lesions in the subclavian vein, two lesions at the innominate vein/superior vena caval junction, and one lesion in the distal axillary vein. RESULTS: All patients except one had significant resolution of symptoms without operative mortality. Bypass grafts remained patent, allowing the arteriovenous grafts to provide functional access for 1.5 to 52 months (mean, 15.4 months) after surgery. CONCLUSION: Because no mortality directly resulted from the procedure and the morbidity rate was acceptable, this bypass grafting technique was adequate in maintaining the dialysis access needed by these patients. Because of the magnitude of the procedure, we recommend it only for the occasional patient in whom all other access sites are exhausted and in whom percutaneous dilation and/or stenting has failed.  (+info)

Volume flow measurement in hemodialysis shunts using time-domain correlation. (2/149)

Volume flow was measured in 58 hemodialysis shunts (32 grafts and 26 radial fistulas) using the color velocity imaging-quantification method. This method is based on time-domain correlation for velocity calculation and integration of time-varying velocity profiles generated by M-mode sampling. Measurements were made in the brachial artery to estimate radial fistula flow or directly in the grafts. Intraoperator reproducibility was 14.9% for fistulas and 11.6% for grafts. Flow rate was significantly lower in abnormal shunts associated with a functional disorder or a morphologic complication (808 ml/min +/- 484) than in shunts associated with no abnormalities (1401 ml/min +/- 562). Receiver operating characteristic curves showed that a flow rate of 900 ml/min for fistulas and 1300 ml/min for grafts provided 81% and 79% sensitivity and 79% and 67% specificity, respectively. A functional disorder or a morphologic complication was associated with all fistulas and grafts in which flow rates were lower than 500 ml/min and 800 ml/min, respectively.  (+info)

The snuffbox arteriovenous fistula for vascular access. (3/149)

OBJECTIVES: to determine the applicability, patency rates and factors influencing patency of snuffbox arteriovenous fistulae for haemodialysis access. DESIGN: retrospective non-randomised study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: patency was determined by reference to an ongoing database and dialysis records of 645 vascular access procedures between 1985 and 1997, including 210 snuffbox fistulae in 201 patients. RESULTS: snuffbox fistulae comprised 189/376 (50%) primary procedures. Records of 208 snuffbox fistulae were available for patency analysis by the life-table method. Twenty-two (11%) thrombosed within 24 hours of operation. After six weeks 80% were used for dialysis. Cumulative patency was 65% at 1 year and 45% at 5 years. After thrombosis of snuffbox fistulae, ipsilateral wrist fistulae could be constructed in 45%. Fistula patency was significantly better in men than women (p<0.001) and for left- than right-sided fistulae (p<0.001). Diabetes, age >70 years, and the prior commencement of haemodialysis did not significantly affect fistula survival. CONCLUSIONS: the snuffbox AV fistula gives a long segment of arterialised vein for needling and preserves proximal vessels. It is feasible in 50% of patients requiring primary access and has good long-term patency, especially in men. A more proximal fistula may be preferable in women with smaller vessels.  (+info)

Minimally invasive thymoma with extensive intravascular growth. (4/149)

A 70-year-old male with grossly non-invasive thymic tumor associated with myasthenia gravis was subjected to thymothymectomy. Microscopic examination showed extensive intravascular tumor extensions into veins of thymic tissue and surrounding muscles and a minute direct invasion of the thymic tissue. Histologically, the tumor showed mixed-type thymoma with polygonal epithelial cells. These pathological findings indicated that the tumor cells extended mainly into vessels beyond the tumor capsule via tumor drainage veins rather than invading neighboring structures. After chemotherapy and mediastinal irradiation, the patient is now in complete remission of myasthenia gravis and is recurrence-free 15 months after surgery.  (+info)

Occlusion of azygos vein via direct percutaneous puncture of innominate vein following cavopulmonary anastomosis. (5/149)

A 2-year-10-month-old boy was diagnosed with a complex congenital heart disease: right atrial isomerism, left superior vena cava (LSVC), complete atrioventricular septal defect, secundum type atrial septal defect, transposition of the great arteries with pulmonary atresia, patent ductus arteriosus, absence of a right superior vena cava (RSVC), and dextrocardia. He had received a left Blalock-Taussig (BT) shunt at the age of 3 months and a left bidirectional Glenn shunt one year after BT shunt. Progressive cyanosis was noted after the second operation and cardiac catheterization showed a functional Glenn shunt with an engorged azygos vein, which was inadvertently skipped for ligation. Because of the absence of RSVC, transcatheter occlusion of the azygos vein was performed successfully via direct puncture of the innominate vein.  (+info)

Crushed stents in benign left brachiocephalic vein stenoses. (6/149)

Two hemodialysis patients presenting with left venous arm congestion due to benign catheter-induced stenosis of the left brachiocephalic vein were treated by angioplasty and stent placement. External compression of the stents was responsible for rapid recurrence of the symptoms. No osseous or vascular malformation could be identified. Mechanical constraints induced by respiratory chest wall motion and aortic arch flow-related pulsation are proposed to explain this observation. This potential hazard should be considered when stent placement into the left brachiocephalic vein is advocated.  (+info)

Stent placement for treatment of central and peripheral venous obstruction: a long-term multi-institutional experience. (7/149)

PURPOSE: The clinical success and patency of central and peripheral venous stents in patients with symptomatic venous obstruction (SVO) were assessed. METHODS: The records of patients with SVO treated with venous stents from 1992 to 1999 were reviewed. Demographic and procedural variables were analyzed to determine their effect on clinical success, primary patency, and secondary patency. Patency was determined by means of a follow-up duplex scan or venogram. RESULTS: Forty central venous (CV) and 14 peripheral venous (PV) obstructions were treated in 49 patients. Sixty-five stents were placed (50 CV and 15 PV), 54 in previously unstented lesions and 11 in previously stented lesions. Causes of CV lesions included catheter placement (82%), tumor compression (6%), arteriovenous fistula (AVF) and no prior catheter (2%), and other (10%). All PV lesions resulted from complications of dialysis. Indications for CV stents included limb edema (46%), AVF malfunction (30%), both limb edema and AVF malfunction (14%), and other (10%). PV stent indications were AVF malfunction (86%) and limb edema (14%). Thirteen CV stents indicated to treat tumor compression (three cases), May-Thurner syndrome (one case), deep venous thrombosis (three cases), superior vena cava syndrome (one case), and lower-extremity catheter-related lesions (five cases) were excluded from the analysis of clinical outcome. Fifty-two stents (37 CV and 15 PV) were included in the analysis of clinical outcome. All CV lesions included in the analysis were complications of prolonged catheterization. Eighty-nine percent of patients had end-stage renal disease and an AVF. Complications developed in 26% of patients with PV stents and in no patients with CV stents (P <.002). The mean follow-up period was 16 months. Sixty-two percent of patients required a reintervention for recurrent SVO. Only 32% of the interventions resulted in sustained symptomatic improvement. For CV stents, the primary patency rate was 85%, 27%, and 9% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively; the secondary patency rate was 91%, 71%, and 39% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively; and the clinical success rate was 94%, 94%, and 79%, at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively. For PV stents, the primary patency rate was 73%, 17% and 17% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively; the secondary patency rate was 80%, 56%, and 35% at 3, 12, and 24 months, respectively; and the clinical success rate was 92%, 75%, and 42% at 3, 12 and 24 months, respectively. CONCLUSION: Stents provide a temporary benefit in most patients with central or peripheral upper-extremity SVO. Regular follow-up and reinterventions are required to maintain patency and achieve long-term clinical success. Stents used for CV lesions have higher clinical success rates than stents used for PV lesions. Patients with a reasonable life expectancy or who are unable to return for subsequent procedures should be considered for undergoing alternative therapy.  (+info)

Arteriovenous fistulae complicating cardiac pacemaker lead extraction: recognition, evaluation, and management. (8/149)

Transvenous pacemaker lead extraction has become a commonly performed procedure that is associated with a small but significant risk. We report two cases where lead extraction was complicated by arteriovenous fistulae between branches of the aortic arch and the left brachiocephalic vein. Presenting signs and symptoms included severe chest or back pain, persistent or copious bleeding from the venous puncture site, unexplained hypotension or anemia, superior vena cava syndrome, and signs of central venous hypertension or acute heart failure. One patient whose injury was not recognized immediately and who did not undergo repair died rapidly, whereas the other patient who was diagnosed quickly underwent successful repair. Immediate diagnosis with arteriography and rapid intervention with surgery or percutaneous techniques are indicated and may prevent mortality.  (+info)

The syndrome can be caused by a variety of factors, including:

* Compression from a tumor or other mass in the chest or neck
* Injury to the vein from trauma or surgery
* Blood clots or thrombophlebitis (inflammation of the vein wall)
* Infection or inflammation of the vein
* Cardiac tamponade (fluid accumulation in the pericardial sac surrounding the heart)

Symptoms of SVC syndrome can vary depending on the location and severity of the compression. They may include:

* Swelling of the face, neck, and arms
* Shortness of breath
* Difficulty speaking or swallowing
* Pain in the head, neck, or chest
* Fatigue or weakness
* Decreased consciousness or confusion

If you suspect that you or someone else may be experiencing SVC syndrome, it is important to seek medical attention immediately. A healthcare provider will perform a physical examination and order diagnostic tests, such as imaging studies or blood tests, to determine the cause of the symptoms and develop an appropriate treatment plan.

Treatment for SVC syndrome may include:

* Anticoagulation medications to prevent blood clots from forming
* Pain management medications to relieve swelling and discomfort
* Surgery to remove a tumor or other mass compressing the vein
* Endovascular procedures, such as angioplasty or stenting, to open up the vein and restore blood flow
* Supportive care, such as oxygen therapy or mechanical ventilation, in severe cases.

Early diagnosis and treatment are critical to prevent complications and improve outcomes for patients with SVC syndrome. If you suspect that you or someone else may be experiencing symptoms of this condition, do not hesitate to seek medical attention right away.

Some examples of pathologic constrictions include:

1. Stenosis: A narrowing or constriction of a blood vessel or other tubular structure, often caused by the buildup of plaque or scar tissue.
2. Asthma: A condition characterized by inflammation and constriction of the airways, which can make breathing difficult.
3. Esophageal stricture: A narrowing of the esophagus that can cause difficulty swallowing.
4. Gastric ring constriction: A narrowing of the stomach caused by a band of tissue that forms in the upper part of the stomach.
5. Anal fissure: A tear in the lining of the anus that can cause pain and difficulty passing stools.

Pathologic constrictions can be caused by a variety of factors, including inflammation, infection, injury, or genetic disorders. They can be diagnosed through imaging tests such as X-rays, CT scans, or endoscopies, and may require surgical treatment to relieve symptoms and improve function.

Right Brachiocephalic vein Right& Left Brachiocephalic vein Right& Left Brachiocephalic vein The brachiocephalic veins, ... The brachiocephalic veins are the major veins returning blood to the superior vena cava. The brachiocephalic vein is formed by ... The left and right brachiocephalic veins (previously called innominate veins) are major veins in the upper chest, formed by the ... drains into the left brachiocephalic vein The left brachiocephalic vein forms from the anastomosis formed between the left and ...
... left brachiocephalic vein and thymus posterior - trachea right - superior vena cava, right brachiocephalic vein, and pleura ... However, there are two brachiocephalic veins. The brachiocephalic artery arises, on a level with the upper border of the second ... Woodhouse P, Waheed A, Bordoni B (2022). "Anatomy, Thorax, Brachiocephalic (Innominate) Veins". StatPearls. Treasure Island (FL ... The brachiocephalic artery (or brachiocephalic trunk or innominate artery) is an artery of the mediastinum that supplies blood ...
... brachiocephalic, and vertebral veins; thyroid vessels), and nervous system anatomy (spinal cord, cranial nerves, peripheral ...
It terminates in the brachiocephalic vein. It has a width of 2-3 mm. There is either one or two internal thoracic veins ... The left internal thoracic vein may bifurcate between ribs 3-4 or remain as a single vein. The right internal thoracic vein may ... The internal thoracic vein drains the chest wall and the breasts. Knowledge on the course of internal thoracic vein and artery ... Internal thoracic vein runs just lateral to the sternum. The internal thoracic vein can act as a collateral circulation for ...
It usually drains into the brachiocephalic vein. Alternatively, it drains into the superior intercostal vein, or the vertebral ... superior intercostal vein posterior intercostal vein azygos vein Instant Anatomy - Thorax - Vessels - Veins - Upper intercostal ... The supreme intercostal vein (highest intercostal vein) is a paired vein that drains the first intercostal space on its ... This vein does not have valves, this is an important point when it comes to spread of cancerous secondaries. Diagram showing ...
... are veins which drain the thymus. They are tributaries of the left brachiocephalic vein. Keynes, G (1967). "The ... Thymic Vein". British Medical Journal. 1 (5540): 634. doi:10.1136/bmj.1.5540.634-b. PMC 1841430. "Thymic vein". Medcyclopaedia ... Veins of the head and neck, All stub articles, Cardiovascular system stubs). ... http://www.instantanatomy.net/thorax/vessels/vinsuperiormediastinum.html https://radiopaedia.org/cases/thymic-vein-on-ct v t e ...
It usually drains into the left brachiocephalic vein. It may also communicate with the accessory hemiazygos vein. As it passes ... The superior intercostal veins are two veins that drain the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th intercostal spaces, one vein for each side of the ... It flows into the azygos vein. The left superior intercostal vein drains the 2nd and 3rd posterior intercostal veins on the ... The right superior intercostal vein drains the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th posterior intercostal veins on the right side of the body. ...
... and the left brachiocephalic vein. The deep cardiac plexus and lymph nodes are also positioned in front of the lower trachea. ... Several other structures pass over or sit on the trachea; the jugular arch, which joins the two anterior jugular veins, sits in ... The upper part of trachea receives and drains blood through the inferior thyroid arteries and veins; the lower trachea receives ... The 18-hour procedure included harvesting a trachea from a donor and implanting it in the patient, connecting numerous veins ...
Axillary, subclavian and brachiocephalic vein obstruction. Surgery 1977; 82:816. Comerota, AJ; Katz, ML et al. Venous duplex ... Deep vein thrombosis: US assessment using vein compression. Radiology 1987;162:191. Cohan, RH; Leder, RA et al. Extravascular ... To strip or not to strip the long saphenous vein: a varicose veins trial. Br J Surg 1981;68:426-8. Nicolaides, AN; Zukowski, A ... Surgery for primary troncular varicose veins without stripping the saphenous vein: pre- and post-operative evaluationby duplex ...
The vein drains into the internal thoracic vein, or brachiocephalic vein. Moore, Keith L.; Dalley, Arthur F. (17 June 1999). ... pericardiacophrenic vein drain into?. v t e (Anatomy NAV infobox with use of other NAV parameters, Articles with TA98 ... Pericardiacophrenic veins are the vena comitans of the pericardiacophrenic arteries. Pericardiacophrenic vessels accompany the ... identifiers, Veins of the torso, All stub articles, Cardiovascular system stubs). ...
The anastomosis between the two anterior cardinal veins develops into the left brachiocephalic vein. Human embryo of about ... The anterior cardinal veins (precardinal veins) contribute to the formation of the internal jugular veins and together with the ... common cardinal vein form the superior vena cava. ...
The veins of the thymus end in the left brachiocephalic vein, internal thoracic vein, and in the inferior thyroid veins. ... The left brachiocephalic vein may even be embedded within the thymus. In the neck, it lies on the front and sides of the ... Lymphatic vessels travel only away from the thymus, accompanying the arteries and veins. These drain into the brachiocephalic, ... Sometimes the veins end directly in the superior vena cava. ...
"Vein wall dissection: a rare puncture-related complication of brachiocephalic fistula. Gray-scale and color Doppler sonographic ... Usually, a dissection is an arterial wall dissection, but rarely it may be a vein wall dissection (VWD). By separating a ...
The inferior thyroid veins originate in a network of veins and drain into the left and right brachiocephalic veins. Both ... The venous blood is drained via superior and middle thyroid veins, which drain to the internal jugular vein, and via the ... arteries and veins form a plexus between the two layers of the capsule of the thyroid gland. Lymphatic drainage frequently ...
The internal jugular veins join with the subclavian veins more medially to form the brachiocephalic veins. Finally, the left ... The jugular vein is prominent in heart failure. They can look at the veins pulses to tell if the heart is keeping up with what ... The jugular veins are veins that take deoxygenated blood from the head back to the heart via the superior vena cava. The ... The external jugular vein runs superficially to sternocleidomastoid. There is also another minor jugular vein, the anterior ...
The external vertebral venous plexuses travel inferiorly from this suboccipital region to drain into the brachiocephalic vein. ... The occipital vein joins in the formation of the plexus deep to the musculature of the back and from here drains into the ... v t e (Articles with TA98 identifiers, Veins of the head and neck, All stub articles, Cardiovascular system stubs). ... external jugular vein. The plexus surrounds segments of the vertebral artery. ...
There are four variants: Supracardiac (50%): blood drains to one of the innominate veins (brachiocephalic veins) or the ... Normally, pulmonary veins return oxygenated blood from the lungs to the left atrium where it can then be pumped to the rest of ... The four pulmonary veins are reconnected to the left atrium, and any associated heart defects such as atrial septal defect, ... of the pulmonary veins.[citation needed] It is less severe than total anomalous pulmonary venous connection which is a life- ...
The diaphragm drains blood into the brachiocephalic veins, azygos veins, and veins that drain into the inferior vena cava and ... Arteries and veins above and below the diaphragm supply and drain blood. From above, the diaphragm receives blood from branches ... left suprarenal vein. The sternal portion of the muscle is sometimes wanting and more rarely defects occur in the lateral part ...
From this plexus, the left vein descends and joins the left brachiocephalic vein, and the right vein passes obliquely downward ... the inferior thyroid veins drain directly to the brachiocephalic veins. The inferior thyroid veins form a plexus in front of ... and inferior laryngeal veins, and are provided with valves at their terminations in the brachiocephalic veins. The arch of the ... and to the right across the brachiocephalic artery to open into the right brachiocephalic vein, just at its junction with the ...
A shallower groove in front of the artery and near the edge of the lung, lodges the left brachiocephalic vein. The esophagus ... and above this is a wide groove for the superior vena cava and right brachiocephalic vein; behind this, and close to the top of ... The lungs filter out small blood clots from veins and prevent them from entering arteries and causing strokes. The lungs also ... The majority of emboli arise because of deep vein thrombosis in the legs. Pulmonary emboli may be investigated using a ...
... and the inferior thyroid vein drains into the brachiocephalic vein. Lymphatic vessels from the parathyroid glands drain into ... Each parathyroid vein drains into the superior, middle and inferior thyroid veins. The superior and middle thyroid veins drain ... "a small compact yellow glandular body attached to the thyroid at the point where the veins emerged". The glands were first ...
The brachiocephalic artery supplies blood to the right arm, head and neck. The left and right brachiocephalic veins merge to ... Brachiocephalic is not an alternate spelling but misspelling of brachycephalic, a grouping within the cephalic index describing ... This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Brachiocephalic. If an internal link led you here, you may ...
The thoracic duct drains lymph into the circulatory system at the left brachiocephalic vein between the left subclavian and ... A lymph duct is a great lymphatic vessel that empties lymph into one of the subclavian veins. There are two lymph ducts in the ... left internal jugular veins. Lymphatic system Right lymphatic duct Thoracic duct v t e (Lymphatic system, All stub articles, ...
... drains into the brachiocephalic vein or the vertebral vein. The 2nd and 3rd (and often 4th) posterior intercostal veins drain ... The posterior intercostal veins are veins that drain the intercostal spaces posteriorly. They run with their corresponding ... The remaining posterior intercostal veins drain into the azygos vein on the right, or the hemiazygos and accessory hemiazygos ... Their patterns are variable, but they are commonly arranged as: The 1st posterior intercostal vein, supreme intercostal vein, ...
... which joins the thoracic duct on the left side and the brachiocephalic vein on the right side. This article incorporates text ... lymph nodes lie under the sternocleidomastoid muscle in close relation with the accessory nerve and the internal jugular vein. ...
... at the commencement of the brachiocephalic vein. When the duct ruptures, the resulting flood of liquid into the pleural cavity ... at the commencement of the brachiocephalic vein. The thoracic duct originates in the abdomen from the confluence of the right ... circulation at the venous angle of the left subclavian and internal jugular veins i.e. the commencement of the brachiocephalic ... in the vicinity where the thoracic duct empties into the left brachiocephalic vein, right between where the left subclavian ...
From here it joins with the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein (also known as "innominate vein"). The angle ... Subclavian vein Subclavian vein - right view Subclavian vein Subclavian vein "Subclavian Vein Anatomy, Function & Location , ... and the right subclavian vein. As the subclavian vein is large, central and relatively superficial, the right subclavian vein ... The subclavian vein is a paired large vein, one on either side of the body, that is responsible for draining blood from the ...
... (from Latin: innominatus "nameless") may refer to: The brachiocephalic artery The brachiocephalic veins The three ...
... this drains via the internal jugular veins. The rush of blood from these veins to the brachiocephalic vein can cause the vein ... Venous hum is a benign auscultatory phenomenon caused by the normal flow of blood through the jugular veins. At rest, 20% of ... The difference is easily detected by placing light pressure on the internal jugular vein when listening to the heart, which ... it has been suggested that the hum occurs when otherwise silent laminar flow through the internal jugular vein is disturbed by ...
... covered by the endothoracic fascia and parietal pleura right stellate ganglion is in relation with right brachiocephalic vein ...
1 Aortic arch gives rise to: Brachiocephalic trunk Left Common Carotid Left Subclavian Toilet Paper My Ass, or They Pay Me ... SICVD:p. 34 Symmetry of leg musculature Integrity of skin Color of toenails Varicose veins Distribution of hair PATCH MED:p. 34 ... 30 Diminished heart sounds Distended jugular veins Decreased arterial pressure Betablockers Acting Exclusively At Myocardium:p ...
... veins at each side of the neck merge to form the corresponding brachiocephalic vein. The left venous angle receives lymph from ...
... blood brain barrier body bone bone marrow bony labyrinth Bowman's capsule brachial artery brachial plexus brachiocephalic vein ... internal carotid artery internal cerebral vein internal ear internal iliac artery internal iliac vein internal jugular vein ... trigone colliculus collum colon columns of the fornix commissure common carotid artery common facial vein communicating veins ... pons pontine nuclei pontocerebellum popliteal artery popliteal bursa popliteal fossa popliteal vein popliteus portal vein ...
It is crossed by the internal jugular vein and the vertebral vein, by the vagus nerve and the cardiac branches of the vagus and ... The first part of the right subclavian artery arises from the brachiocephalic trunk, behind the upper part of the right ... and anterior jugular veins, which frequently form a plexus in front of the artery. Behind the veins, the nerve to the ... left internal jugular and vertebral veins, and the commencement of the left innominate vein. It is covered by the sternothyroid ...
... usually a brachiocephalic fistula, where the brachial artery is anastomosed to the cephalic vein). Though less common, fistulas ... which is inserted into a large vein (usually the vena cava, via the internal jugular vein or the femoral vein) to allow large ... This can cause problems with severe venous congestion in the area drained by the vein and may also render the vein, and the ... The catheter is a foreign body in the vein and often provokes an inflammatory reaction in the vein wall. This results in ...
The superior vena cava is formed by the left and right brachiocephalic veins, which receive blood from the upper limbs, head ... It is a large-diameter (24 mm) short length vein that receives venous return from the upper half of the body, above the ... Obstruction can lead to enlarged veins in the head and neck, and may also cause breathlessness, cough, chest pain, and ... As a result, the (right) atrial and (right) ventricular contractions are conducted up into the internal jugular vein and, ...
The growing tumor can cause compression of a brachiocephalic vein, subclavian artery, phrenic nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve ... vein, branches of the brachial plexus, ribs and vertebral bodies), as well as mediastinal lymphadenectomy. Surgical access may ... causes facial swelling cyanosis and dilatation of the veins of the head and neck.[citation needed] A Pancoast tumor is an ...
Along its course, it is accompanied by a similarly named vein, the superior epigastric vein.[citation needed] Where it ... brachiocephalic are collateral vessels to the thoracic aorta and abdominal aorta. If the abdominal aorta develops a significant ...
... thoracic duct and right lymphatic duct into the systemic venous system at the venous angle and into the brachiocephalic veins, ... Because of their thinner walls, veins are more frequently invaded than are arteries, and metastasis tends to follow the pattern ... For example, colorectal cancer spreads primarily through the portal vein to the liver. Some tumors, especially carcinomas may ...
Both the artery and the vein dilate and elongate in response to the greater blood flow and shear stress, but the vein dilates ... A brachiocephalic fistula above the elbow has a greater flow rate than a radiocephalic fistula at the wrist. ... blood may be aspirated from veins. The problem is that the walls of the veins are thin compared to those of the arteries. The ... When the vein is large enough to allow cannulation, the fistula is defined as "mature". An arteriovenous fistula can increase ...
In persistent left superior vena cava, the left brachiocephalic vein does not develop fully and the left upper limb and head ...
... vein Oblique vein of left atrium Middle cardiac vein Small cardiac vein Pulmonary veins Superior vena cava Brachiocephalic vein ... veins Lumbar veins Ascending lumbar vein Hepatic veins Renal veins Left suprarenal vein Left ovarian vein Left testicular vein ... vein Popliteal vein Sural veins Anterior tibial veins Posterior tibial veins Fibular veins Hepatic portal vein Cystic vein Para ... Diploic veins Emissary veins Cerebral veins Superficial cerebral veins Deep cerebral veins Basal vein Great cerebral vein Veins ...
... creating enough repetitive pressure against the brachiocephalic and external jugular veins to cause thrombosis. Symptoms may ... These DVTs typically occur in the axillary and/or subclavian veins. The condition is relatively rare. It usually presents in ... Paget-Schroetter disease (also known as venous thoracic outlet syndrome) is a form of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT ... Drapanas, T; Curran, WL (1966). "Thrombectomy in the treatment of "effort" thrombosis of the axillary and subclavian veins". ...
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Start Over You searched for: Subjects Brachiocephalic Veins -- surgery ✖Remove constraint Subjects: Brachiocephalic Veins -- ... 1. History of the ligature applied to the brachio-cephalic artery: with statistics of the operation : paper read before the ... History of the ligature applied to the brachio-cephalic artery: with statistics of the operation : paper read before the ...
Ventricular septal defect with uncommon three left brachiocephalic veins. Li, Zihao; Yu, Lina; Zhang, Hongwei. Afiliação *Li Z ... Ventricular septal defect with uncommon three left brachiocephalic veins. ...
Fetal left brachiocephalic vein diameters in normal and growth restricted fetuses. Didem Kaymak, Verda Alpay, Ebru Alıcı ... Objectives To develop a nomogram for fetal left brachiocephalic vein (LBCV) diameters during a healthy pregnancy and to assess ... and those above the gestational age 95th percentile were considered wide vein. Cerebroplacental ratio (CPR) and umbilical ...
... the subclavian vein; the brachiocephalic vein; and the superior vena cava-an area poorly visualized on ultrasonography. ... CT scan in a patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma shows a soft tissue mass surrounding a hyperintense right brachiocephalic vein. ... CT scan in a patient with non-Hodgkin lymphoma shows a soft tissue mass surrounding a hyperintense right brachiocephalic vein. ... Contrast-enhanced venogram shows circumferential narrowing of the right brachiocephalic vein in a patient with non-Hodgkin ...
Distal internal jugular vein/brachiocephalic vein (supraclavicular access). Right. 306. Left. 209. ... Results: Ultrasound guided technique was used in 646 cases, cephalic vein cutdown in 102 patients and percutaneous blind ...
Anomalous subaortic course of the left brachiocephalic (innominate) vein: echocardiographic diagnosis and report of an unusual ... RUPV, right upper pulmonary vein; RMPV (asterisk), right middle pulmonary vein; RLPV, right lower pulmonary vein; SVC, superior ... SVC, superior vena cava; RIV, retroaortic innominate vein; RUPV, right upper pulmonary vein; RMPV (asterisk), right middle ... AAo, ascending aorta; RIV, retroaortic innominate vein; RUPV, right upper pulmonary vein; RMPV (asterisk), right middle ...
8. Lipoma in the Brachiocephalic Vein.. Iqbal N; Tiwari A. Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg; 2017 May; 53(5):694. PubMed ID: 28238644. ... Cavernous transformation of the portal vein in primary portal vein thrombosis].. Tuma J. Praxis (Bern 1994); 2011 Feb; 100(3): ... Assessment of portal vein invasion in pancreatic cancer by fusion 3-dimensional ultrasonography.. Kobayashi A; Yamaguchi T; ... 1. A Tumor Localized in the Portal Vein.. Nakayama Y; Fukuda A; Kodama Y. Gastroenterology; 2017 Apr; 152(5):e7-e9. PubMed ID: ...
Isolated aneurysms involving the brachiocephalic/innominate vein are extremely rare. We describe detection of a saccular ... Isolated left innominate vein aneurysm: A rare cause of mediastinal widening. SG Dua, AV Kulkarni, NC Purandare, S Kulkarni. ... aneurysm of the innominate vein, as the underlying cause of mediastinal widening seen on a chest radiograph in a 42-year-old ...
Tetralogy of Fallot with an Anomalous Course of the Brachiocephalic Vein. Larissa Alves Leite Matos, Isaac Azevedo Silva, ... A 30-Year Two-Center Comparison between Homografts and Bovine Jugular Vein ...
Arm DVT, which includes the axillary, subclavian and/or innominate (brachiocephalic) veins. (Note: jugular [internal or ... Cerebral vein thrombosis (includes cerebral or dural sinus or vein, saggital sinus or vein, and/or transverse sinus or vein ... and/or popliteal veins. (Note: greater and lesser saphenous veins, or other superficial or perforator veins, were not included ... Note: gastrocnemius, soleal and/or sural [e.g., "deep muscular veins" of the calf] vein thrombosis was not included as distal ...
Innominate Vein (1966-1990). Public MeSH Note. 91; INNOMINATE VEIN was heading 1963-90. Online Note. use BRACHIOCEPHALIC VEINS ... Brachiocephalic Veins Preferred Concept UI. M0024625. Scope Note. Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by ... Brachiocephalic Veins Preferred Term Term UI T047891. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1991). ... Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They ...
Veins A07.015.908.077 Axillary Vein A07.015.908.106 Azygos Vein A07.015.908.130 Brachiocephalic Veins A07.015.908.155 Cerebral ... Femoral Vein A07.015.908.380 Hepatic Veins A07.015.908.427 Iliac Vein A07.015.908.498 Jugular Veins A07.015.908.641 Popliteal ... Renal Veins A07.015.908.783 Retinal Vein A07.015.908.819 Saphenous Vein A07.015.908.877 Subclavian Vein A07.015.908.949 Venae ... Mesenteric Veins A07.015.908.670.567 Portal Vein A07.015.908.670.730 Splenic Vein A07.015.908.670.874 Umbilical Veins A07.015. ...
Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins. ... Brachiocephalic vein compression with jugular venous reflux may mimic cavernous dural arteriovenous fistula on arterial spin ... "Jugular Veins" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ... Internal Jugular Vein Compression Collar Mitigates Histopathological Alterations after Closed Head Rotational Head Impact in ...
... the brachiocephalic veins, the left upper lobe, and the chest wall. Serum β-D-glucan was positive (306 pg/mL). A first ...
The SVC is formed by the junction of the left and right brachiocephalic veins in the mid third of the mediastinum. The SVC ... If the obstruction is below the entry of the azygos vein, more florid symptoms and signs are seen because the blood must be ... The SVC is joined posteriorly by the azygos vein as it loops over the right mainstem bronchus and lies posterior to and to the ... If the obstruction is above the entry of the azygos vein, the syndrome is less pronounced because the azygous venous system can ...
Venous overlap was related to a venous enhancement of jugular veins or brachiocephalic veins with superimposition of cervical ... a rapid fall-off of signal intensity at inferior part of imaging volume and a moderate enhancement of left brachiocephalic vein ... After the patient was positioned within the coil with a 20-gauge intravenous catheter inserted into the antecubital vein, scout ... the brachiocephalic artery, the proximal portion of the internal carotid artery, and the midportion of the vertebral artery. ...
... with both left and right brachiocephalic veins, both of which merge into the superior vena cava. ... Blood returning to the heart is mostly parallel to the arteries, with subclavian veins, vertebral veins, and (parallel to the ... The spleen, which is on the left side of the upper abdomen, next to the stomach, has the splenic artery and splenic vein that ... The renal arteries and renal veins (renal means kidney) are thus kind of short, although the left and right vessels for each ...
The location of the target lesion would require that the COVERA™ Vascular Covered Stent be placed in the central veins ( ... subclavian, brachiocephalic, superior vena cava (SVC)) or under the clavicle at the thoracic outlet. ... The reference vessel diameter of the adjacent non-stenotic vein must be between 5.0 and 9.0mm. ...
... are not uncommon in the upper limb and neck deep veins. Other types of venous thrombosis, such as intra-abdominal and ... Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) most commonly occurs in the lower limbs, however, ... upper limb/extremity DVT involves the radial, ulnar, brachial, axillary, subclavian, internal jugular and/or brachiocephalic ... The majority of lower extremity DVTs develop in the veins of the calf, namely the peroneal veins, posterior tibial veins and ...
Innominate Vein (1966-1990). Public MeSH Note. 91; INNOMINATE VEIN was heading 1963-90. Online Note. use BRACHIOCEPHALIC VEINS ... Brachiocephalic Veins Preferred Concept UI. M0024625. Scope Note. Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by ... Brachiocephalic Veins Preferred Term Term UI T047891. Date01/01/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1991). ... Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They ...
nerves of the brachial plexus, proximal; brachiocephalic artery; subclavian artery & vein. Axillary Area (armpit) brachial ... external iliac artery; femoral artery; great saphenous vein; femoral vein; femoral nerve. ... carotid artery, jugular vein, vagus nerve; under sternocleidomastoid. Posterior Triangle of the Neck (side of the throat). ... artery, axillary vein & artery, cephalic vein; nerves of brachial plexus, distal. Medial Epicondyle, Humerus (inside elbow). ...
The vein that drains the axillary vein and joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic vein. It runs parallel ... Vein Subclavian Vein The vein that drains the axillary vein and joins the internal jugular vein to form the brachiocephalic ... C33343 Portal Vein Portal Vein Hepatic Portal Vein,Portal Vein A short thick trunk vein that transports blood containing the ... NCI) C32221 Body Part C74456 CDISC SDTM Anatomical Location Terminology C12716 Femoral Vein Femoral Vein Femoral Vein A vein ...
Classify works on surgery of arteries and veins in general here. Cf. WG 410 Aorta and numbers for other specific vessels. ... Classify works on coronary veins in WG 300; on the portal system in WI 720. ...
Brachiocephalic Vein Innominate Vein Innominate Veins Vein, Brachiocephalic Vein, Innominate Veins, Brachiocephalic Veins, ... Brachiocephalic Vein. Innominate Vein. Innominate Veins. Vein, Brachiocephalic. Vein, Innominate. Veins, Brachiocephalic. Veins ... Brachiocephalic Veins - Preferred Concept UI. M0024625. Scope note. Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed ... Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They ...
An ascending vertical vein usually passes anterior to the left pulmonary artery, connecting to the brachiocephalic vein without ... Angiography of the right brachiocephalic vein revealed internal jugular vein valves in only 15 of 38 patients (39%), and in 34 ... The ascending vertical veins of both cases are compressed between left pulmonary artery and left main bronchus and then the ... Internal jugular vein valves can restrict the flow of CRCP. We performed a study of internal jugular valves, morphologically in ...
R Retrospective evaluation of 599 brachiocephalic vein cannulations in neonates and preterm infants. Br J Anaesth. 2022; 129(5 ...
A Retrospective Analysis of the Clinical Effectiveness of Supraclavicular, Ultrasound-guided Brachiocephalic Vein Cannulations ... One was in the vein of the liver (2.6%), 2 were in the common iliac vein (5.1%), 6 were in the right atrium (15.4%), and 30 ... 1 catheter tip was positioned in the vein of the liver (2.6%), 2 were in the common iliac vein (5.1%), 6 were in the right ... 11also reported a low morbidity for femoral vein catheterization when compared with subclavian and antecubital vein ...
  • [ 1 ] Upper extremity DVT should be considered in patients with isolated unilateral upper limb swelling and primarily involves the brachial, axillary, and subclavian veins. (medscape.com)
  • A thrombus has propagated peripherally from the tip of the catheter in the superior vena cava into both subclavian veins. (medscape.com)
  • Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. (nih.gov)
  • Veins in the neck which drain the brain, face, and neck into the brachiocephalic or subclavian veins. (harvard.edu)
  • Blood returning to the heart is mostly parallel to the arteries, with subclavian veins, vertebral veins , and (parallel to the carotids) internal and external jugular veins . (factmonster.com)
  • Blood returning from the head enters the torso through the left and right jugular veins while blood returning from the arms enters through the left and right subclavian veins. (innerbody.com)
  • The jugular and subclavian veins on each side merge to form the left and right brachiocephalic trunks, which go on to merge into the superior vena cava. (innerbody.com)
  • His prior shunts placed in the right internal jugular and subclavian veins became thrombosed repeatedly. (americanjir.com)
  • Retroaortic innominate vein (RIV) is a rare vascular abnormality. (nih.gov)
  • Later in this section I explore another parallel track-although not a complete circuit as it only goes one way-called the lymphatic system , which follows the pathway of the major arteries and veins. (factmonster.com)
  • As long as the blood travels over the pancreas, there are, of course, little pancreatic arteries and pancreatic veins . (factmonster.com)
  • The renal arteries and renal veins (renal means kidney) are thus kind of short, although the left and right vessels for each kidney will be slightly different, as the right kidney is closer to the vena cava than it is to aorta, and vice versa (refer to Figure 12.1). (factmonster.com)
  • A capillary is an extremely small blood vessel located within the tissues of the body, that transports blood from arteries to veins. (mthelpinghand.com)
  • The pulmonary arteries and pulmonary veins provide vital but short distance blood flow between the heart and the lungs. (innerbody.com)
  • The arch of the aorta branches off into three major arteries - the brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery, and left subclavian artery. (innerbody.com)
  • The actual return to the superior vena cava, which is on the right side of the heart, is more symmetrical than the aorta, with both left and right brachiocephalic veins , both of which merge into the superior vena cava. (factmonster.com)
  • Several smaller veins carrying blood from the organs, muscles, and skin of the upper torso also merge into the superior vena cava. (innerbody.com)
  • Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein , internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion. (lookformedical.com)
  • Klippel-Trénaunay syndrome, etc.), heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, or a mechanical cause for DVT (e.g., arm DVT or SVC thrombosis related to a central venous catheter or transvenous pacemaker, portal and/or splenic vein thrombosis related to liver cirrhosis, IVC thrombosis related to retroperitoneal fibrosis, etc.), with hemodialysis arteriovenous fistula thrombosis, or with prior liver or bone marrow transplantation were excluded. (nih.gov)
  • The spleen, which is on the left side of the upper abdomen, next to the stomach, has the splenic artery and splenic vein that travel to and from the spleen, directly over the pancreas. (factmonster.com)
  • A short thick vein formed by union of the superior mesenteric vein and the splenic vein . (lookformedical.com)
  • the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein , the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein . (lookformedical.com)
  • A vein on either side of the body which is formed by the union of the external and internal iliac veins and passes upward to join with its fellow of the opposite side to form the inferior vena cava. (lookformedical.com)
  • Blood returning to the heart from the lower torso and legs enters the upper torso in a large vein called the inferior vena cava. (innerbody.com)
  • The inferior vena cava picks up deoxygenated blood from the hepatic and phrenic veins before entering the right atrium of the heart. (innerbody.com)
  • This contrast-enhanced study was obtained through a Mediport placed through the chest wall through the internal jugular vein to facilitate chemotherapy. (medscape.com)
  • Anastomosis to the Internal Jugular Vein Stump: A Highly Reliable Technique in Head and Neck Reconstruction. (harvard.edu)
  • Occlusion of the internal jugular vein in differentiated thyroid carcinoma: Causes and diagnosis. (harvard.edu)
  • Internal Jugular Vein Compression Collar Mitigates Histopathological Alterations after Closed Head Rotational Head Impact in Swine: A Pilot Study. (harvard.edu)
  • For anatomical reasons, the internal jugular vein is usually preferred in heavier babies. (asahq.org)
  • 1,000 g), percutaneous cannulation of the internal jugular vein can be difficult because of the small size of the vessel and its close proximity to the carotid artery. (asahq.org)
  • Revision of the Denver shunt could therefore only be done by directly cannulating into the proximal SVC away from the thrombosed right internal jugular vein. (americanjir.com)
  • The name of the right branch, which must go to both the right arm and the right side of the head is called the brachiocephalic ( brachio = arm, cephalic = head) artery. (factmonster.com)
  • The internal mammary artery is escorted by 2 venae comitantes, which unify in the level of 3rd costal cartilage to create the internal thoracic (mammary) vein, which runs upwards along the medial side of the artery to terminate into the brachiocephalic vein in the root of the neck . (earthslab.com)
  • Proximal leg deep vein thrombosis (DVT), which includes the common iliac, internal iliac, external iliac, common femoral, superficial [now termed "femoral"] femoral, deep femoral [sometimes referred to as "profunda" femoral] and/or popliteal veins. (nih.gov)
  • Note: greater and lesser saphenous veins, or other superficial or perforator veins, were not included as proximal or distal leg DVT). (nih.gov)
  • With central venous catheterization, upper extremity and brachiocephalic venous thrombosis has become a more common problem. (medscape.com)
  • 9. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy in differential diagnosis of portal vein tumor thrombosis. (nih.gov)
  • Cavernous transformation of the portal vein in primary portal vein thrombosis]. (nih.gov)
  • VTE cases were consecutive Mayo Clinic outpatients with objectively-diagnosed deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and/or pulmonary embolism (PE) residing in the upper Midwest and referred by Mayo Clinic physician to the Mayo Clinic Special Coagulation Laboratory for clinical diagnostic testing to evaluate for an acquired or inherited thrombophilia, or to the Mayo Clinic Thrombophilia Center. (nih.gov)
  • Note: gastrocnemius, soleal and/or sural [e.g., "deep muscular veins" of the calf] vein thrombosis was not included as distal leg DVT). (nih.gov)
  • Note: ovarian, testicular, peri-prostatic and/or pelvic vein thrombosis was not included). (nih.gov)
  • Cerebral vein thrombosis (includes cerebral or dural sinus or vein, saggital sinus or vein, and/or transverse sinus or vein thrombosis). (nih.gov)
  • Lemierre Syndrome: Unusual Presentation With Superior Ophthalmic Vein Thrombosis. (harvard.edu)
  • Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) most commonly occurs in the lower limbs, however, are not uncommon in the upper limb and neck deep veins . (radiopaedia.org)
  • Treatment of varicose veins , hemorrhoids, gastric and esophageal varices, and peptic ulcer hemorrhage by injection or infusion of chemical agents which cause localized thrombosis and eventual fibrosis and obliteration of the vessels. (lookformedical.com)
  • Arm DVT, which includes the axillary, subclavian and/or innominate (brachiocephalic) veins. (nih.gov)
  • 20. A rare case of hemangioma arising from the azygos vein: Informative procedure with endobronchial ultrasonography. (nih.gov)
  • Ultrasound guided technique was used in 646 cases, cephalic vein cutdown in 102 patients and percutaneous blind technique in 48 patients. (medscape.com)
  • Distal leg DVT (or "isolated calf DVT"), which includes the anterior tibial, posterior tibial and/or peroneal veins. (nih.gov)
  • The majority of lower extremity DVTs develop in the veins of the calf, namely the peroneal veins , posterior tibial veins and the veins of the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles 10,11 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • it is a continuation of the popliteal vein and becomes the external iliac vein . (lookformedical.com)
  • it courses through the popliteal space and becomes the femoral vein . (lookformedical.com)
  • For children, an ultrasound-guided supraclavicular approach of the brachiocephalic vein was recommended to reduce the number of attempts for cannulation and mechanical complications. (bvsalud.org)
  • 15. EUS-guided FNA of a portal vein thrombus in hepatocellular carcinoma. (nih.gov)
  • 1. A Tumor Localized in the Portal Vein. (nih.gov)
  • 2. A case of unresectable ectopic acinar cell carcinoma developed in the portal vein in complete response to FOLFIRINOX therapy. (nih.gov)
  • 3. Color Doppler ultrasonography in the diagnosis of portal vein invasion in patients with pancreatic cancer. (nih.gov)
  • 18. Assessment of portal vein invasion in pancreatic cancer by fusion 3-dimensional ultrasonography. (nih.gov)
  • The graft most often utilized is taken from great saphenous vein of the leg. (earthslab.com)
  • Retrospective evaluation of 599 brachiocephalic vein cannulations in neonates and preterm infants. (medunigraz.at)
  • His left subclavian vein was resected with subsequent occlusion of the graft. (americanjir.com)
  • On physical examination, the affected leg is often tender and warm, and there may be dilation of superficial veins. (radiopaedia.org)
  • Each pulmonary vein carries blood from a lung back to the heart where it reenters through the left atrium. (innerbody.com)
  • Brachiocephalic vein compression with jugular venous reflux may mimic cavernous dural arteriovenous fistula on arterial spin labeling. (harvard.edu)
  • Retroaortic Course and Azygous Continuation of an Aberrant Left Brachiocephalic Vein. (sanko.edu.tr)
  • Ventricular septal defect with uncommon three left brachiocephalic veins. (bvsalud.org)
  • Jugular Veins" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (harvard.edu)
  • A patient with left brachiocephalic vein UEDVT initially diagnosed radiographically as an acute aortic syndrome and referred to a cardiothoracic unit is presented. (bvsalud.org)
  • Short thick veins which return blood from the kidneys to the vena cava. (lookformedical.com)
  • The brachiocephalic vein was narrowed likely after his mediastinal lymph node dissection. (americanjir.com)
  • Venogram of the right upper extremity shows a hemodynamically significant, notchlike stenotic defect in the subclavian vein with the patient's arm in the neutral position. (medscape.com)
  • Functioning at the end of the circulatory cycle, the veins of the upper torso carry deoxygenated blood from the tissues of the body back to the heart to be pumped through the body again. (innerbody.com)
  • These capillaries converge into larger venules, which further converge to form the left and right pulmonary veins. (innerbody.com)
  • This narrative review describes the main applications of de la ultrasonografía en ultrasound in anesthesia, ultrasound-guided techniques, and current trends in the perioperative anesthetic management of anestesia the surgical patient. (bvsalud.org)
  • El uso de ecografía ha entrado en el campo de la medicina del dolor, anestesia regional y del bibliographic search, data intervencionismo analgésico durante la última década, e incluso es el estándar de la práctica, por tanto, la capacitación y analysis, writing, revision and un adecuado aprendizaje en la ecografía deben ser parte del plan de estudios de cualquier programa de anestesiología. (bvsalud.org)