The first and largest artery branching from the aortic arch. It distributes blood to the right side of the head and neck and to the right arm.
Large veins on either side of the root of the neck formed by the junction of the internal jugular and subclavian veins. They drain blood from the head, neck, and upper extremities, and unite to form the superior vena cava.
Artery arising from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right side and from the arch of the aorta on the left side. It distributes to the neck, thoracic wall, spinal cord, brain, meninges, and upper limb.
A double gliding joint formed by the CLAVICLE, superior and lateral parts of the manubrium sterni at the clavicular notch, and the cartilage of the first rib.
The two principal arteries supplying the structures of the head and neck. They ascend in the neck, one on each side, and at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage, each divides into two branches, the external (CAROTID ARTERY, EXTERNAL) and internal (CAROTID ARTERY, INTERNAL) carotid arteries.
Either of the two principal arteries on both sides of the neck that supply blood to the head and neck; each divides into two branches, the internal carotid artery and the external carotid artery.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)

Percutaneous revascularization of atherosclerotic obstruction of aortic arch vessels. (1/176)

OBJECTIVES: To compare stenting of aortic arch vessel obstruction with surgical therapy and to establish recommendations for treatment. BACKGROUND: Though surgery has been considered to be the procedure of choice for subclavian and brachiocephalic obstruction, little work has been done to compare it with stenting. METHODS: Eighteen patients with symptomatic aortic arch vessel stenosis or occlusion were treated with stenting, followed by periodic clinical follow-up and noninvasive arterial Doppler studies. Data were compared with the results as shown in a systematic review of a published series of surgery and stenting procedures which included comparison of technical success, complications, mortality and patency. RESULTS: Primary success in our series was 100% with improvement in mean stenosis from 84+/-11% to 1+/-5% and mean arm systolic blood pressure difference from 44+/-16 mm Hg to 3+/-3 mm Hg. There were no major complications (death, stroke, TIA, stent thrombosis or myocardial infarction). At follow-up (mean 17 months), all patients were asymptomatic with 100% primary patency. Literature review demonstrates equivalent patency and complications in the other published series of stenting. In contrast, there was a similar patency but overall incidence of stroke of 3+/-4% and death of 2+/-2% in the published surgical series. CONCLUSIONS: Subclavian or brachiocephalic artery obstruction can be effectively treated by primary stenting or surgery. Comparison of stenting and the surgical experience demonstrates equal effectiveness but fewer complications and suggests that stenting should be considered as first line therapy for subclavian or brachiocephalic obstruction.  (+info)

Long-term results and outcomes of crossover axilloaxillary bypass grafting: A 24-year experience. (2/176)

OBJECTIVE: The outcome of crossover axilloaxillary bypass grafting in patients with stenosis or occlusion of the innominate or subclavian arteries was investigated. METHODS: The study was designed as a retrospective clinical study in a university hospital setting with 61 patients as the basis of the study. Fifty-eight patients (95.1%) had at least two risk factors or associated medical illnesses for atherosclerosis, and 35 patients (57.4%) had concomitant carotid artery stenosis that necessitated a staged procedure in 12 patients (19.7%). The patients underwent a total of 63 crossover axilloaxillary bypass grafting procedures. Demographics, risk factors and associated medical illnesses, preoperative symptoms and angiographic data, blood flow inversion in the vertebral artery, concomitant carotid artery disease, graft shape, caliber and material, and intraoperative and postoperative complications were studied to assess the specific influence in determining the outcome. RESULTS: One postoperative death (1.6%), four early graft thromboses (6.2%), and six minor complications (9. 8%) occurred. The overall mortality and morbidity rates were 1.6% and 16.1%, respectively. During the follow-up period (mean, 97.3 +/- 7.9 months), we observed five graft thromboses (8.3%). Primary and secondary patency rates at 5 and 10 years were 86.5% and 82.8% and 88.1% and 84.3%, respectively. Overall, two patients (3.3%) had recurrence of upper limb symptoms and none had recurrence of symptoms in the carotid or vertebrobasilar territory. The 5-year and 10-year symptom-free interval rates were 97.7% and 93.5%, respectively. Nine patients (15%) died of unrelated causes. The 5-year and 10-year survival rates were 93.2% and 67.3%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that no specific variables exerted an influence in the short-term and long-term results and the outcome. CONCLUSION: The optimal outcome of axilloaxillary bypass grafting supports its use as the most valuable surgical alternative to transthoracic anatomic reconstructions for innominate lesion, long stenosis of the subclavian artery, and short subclavian artery stenosis associated with ispilateral carotid artery lesions.  (+info)

Central venous injuries of the subclavian-jugular and innominate-caval confluences. (3/176)

Injuries to the central venous system can result from penetrating trauma or iatrogenic causes. Injuries to major venous confluences can be particularly problematic, because the clavicle and sternum seriously limit exposure of the injury site. We report our institution's experience with central venous injuries of the subclavian-jugular and innominate-caval venous confluences. Significant injuries of the subclavian-jugular venous confluence frequently result from penetrating trauma, while injuries to the innominate-caval confluence are usually catheter-related. Median sternotomy provides adequate exposure of the innominate-caval confluence, while exposure of the subclavian-jugular venous confluence requires extension of the median sternotomy incision into the neck and resection of the clavicle. The literature is reviewed.  (+info)

Respiratory distress due to tracheal compression by the dilated innominate artery. (4/176)

The case reported is of an 88 yr old female with hypertension and respiratory distress. A chest radiograph revealed a widening of the upper mediastinum. Computed tomographic scanning revealed tracheal compression by the innominate artery, which was elongated and curved. After intubation, she was treated with antihypertensive drugs. This resulted in the remarkable recovery of the patient from respiratory distress. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of respiratory distress owing to tracheal compression by elongation and curvature of the innominate artery.  (+info)

Atherothrombotic cerebellar infarction: vascular lesion-MRI correlation of 31 cases. (5/176)

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Correlation of MRI findings with atherosclerotic vascular lesions has rarely been attempted in patients with cerebellar infarction. The aim of this study was to correlate the MRI lesions with the vascular lesions seen on conventional cerebral angiography in cerebellar infarction. METHODS: The subjects included 31 patients with cerebellar infarcts who underwent both MRI and conventional cerebral angiography. We analyzed the risk factors, clinical findings, imaging study, and angiography results. We attempted to correlate MRI lesions with the vascular lesions shown in the angiograms. RESULTS: The vascular lesions seen on angiograms were subdivided into 3 groups: large-artery disease (n=22), in situ branch artery disease (n=6), and no angiographic disease with hypertension (n=3). The proximal segment (V1) lesions of vertebral artery were the most common angiographic features in patients with large-artery disease in which stroke most commonly involved the posterior inferior cerebellar artery (PICA) cerebellum. The V1 lesions with coexistent occlusive lesions of the intracranial vertebral and basilar arteries were correlated with cerebellar infarcts, which had no predilection for certain cerebellar territory. The intracranial occlusive disease without V1 lesion was usually correlated with small cerebellar lesions in PICA and superior cerebellar artery (SCA) cerebellum. The subclavian artery or brachiocephalic trunk lesion was associated with small cerebellar infarcts. The in situ branch artery disease was correlated with the PICA cerebellum lesions, which were territorial or nonterritorial infarct. No angiographic disease with hypertension was associated with small-sized cerebellar infarcts within the SCA, anterior inferior cerebellar artery, or SCA cerebellum. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the topographic heterogeneity of cerebellar infarcts are correlated with diverse angiographic findings. The result that large-artery disease, in which nonterritorial infarcts are more common than territorial infarcts, is more prevalent than in situ branch artery disease or small-artery disease, suggest that even a small cerebellar infarct can be a clue to the presence of large-artery disease.  (+info)

Minimally invasive approach for aortic arch branch vessel reconstruction. (6/176)

Minimally invasive aortic arch branch vessel reconstruction was successfully accomplished in four patients over the past 3 years. There were no operative complications. Three patients had an uneventful hospital course, ranging from 3 to 5 days. The fourth patient with multiple medical problems and severe peripheral vascular disease had a prolonged hospital course for reasons unrelated to the surgical procedure. This minimally invasive surgical exposure can be used to effectively and safely repair innominate and left common carotid artery lesions.  (+info)

The influence of aortic baroreceptors on venous tone in the perfused hind limb of the dog. (7/176)

1. The aortic arch and both carotid sinuses were vascularly isolated and perfused. A hind limb was vascularly isolated and blood was pumped at constant flows into the femoral artery and the central end of a superficial metatarsal vein. 2. Large increases in aortic arch pressure resulted in decreases in arterial blood pressure, heart rate and femoral arterial perfusion pressure. The average response of the vein was a decrease of 11% in the pressure gradient between the perfused vein and the femoral vein. Similar responses were obtained when carotid sinus pressure was increased. 3. Crushing or cooling the lumbar sympathetic trunk caused responsed similar to those induced by increasing baroreceptor perfusion pressure. Stimulation at 1 HZ resulted in venous responses four times as great as the average reflex response, whereas frequencies of 2-5 Hz were required to produce changes in arterial resistance as great as those induced reflexly. 4. These experiments indicate, that although the large superficial veins of the dog's hind limb participate in the baroreceptor reflexes, the activities in the nerves supplying arterioles and veins must have been different.  (+info)

Advanced atherosclerotic lesions in the innominate artery of the ApoE knockout mouse. (8/176)

Most previous studies of atherosclerosis in hyperlipidemic mouse models have focused their investigations on lesions within the aorta or aortic sinus in young animals. None of these studies has demonstrated clinically significant advanced lesions. We previously mapped the distribution of lesions throughout the arterial tree of apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE(-/-)) mice between the ages of 24 and 60 weeks. We found that the innominate artery, a small vessel connecting the aortic arch to the right subclavian and right carotid artery, exhibits a highly consistent rate of lesion progression and develops a narrowed vessel characterized by atrophic media and perivascular inflammation. The present study reports the characteristics of advanced lesions in the innominate artery of apoE(-/-) mice aged 42 to 60 weeks. In animals aged 42 to 54 weeks, there is a very high frequency of intraplaque hemorrhage and a fibrotic conversion of necrotic zones accompanied by loss of the fibrous cap. By 60 weeks of age, the lesions are characterized by the presence of collagen-rich fibrofatty nodules often flanked by lateral xanthomas. The processes underlying these changes in the innominate artery of older apoE(-/-) mice could well be a model for the critical processes leading to the breakdown and healing of the human atherosclerotic plaque.  (+info)

The brachiocephalic trunk, also known as the brachiocephalic artery or innominate artery, is a large vessel that branches off the aorta and divides into the right common carotid artery and the right subclavian artery. It supplies blood to the head, neck, and arms on the right side of the body.

The brachiocephalic veins, also known as the innominate veins, are large veins in the human body. They are formed by the union of the subclavian vein and the internal jugular vein on each side of the body. The resulting vein then carries blood from the upper limbs, head, and neck to the superior vena cava, which is the large vein that returns blood to the heart.

Here's a more detailed medical definition:

The brachiocephalic veins are paired venous structures that result from the union of the subclavian vein and the internal jugular vein on each side of the body. These veins are located in the superior mediastinum, near the base of the neck, and are typically about 2 to 3 centimeters in length. The brachiocephalic veins receive blood from several sources, including the upper extremities, head, neck, and thoracic wall. They then transport this blood to the superior vena cava, which is a large vein that returns blood to the right atrium of the heart.

It's worth noting that the brachiocephalic veins are subject to various pathological conditions, including thrombosis (blood clots), stenosis (narrowing), and compression by nearby structures such as the first rib or the scalene muscles. These conditions can lead to a variety of symptoms, including swelling, pain, and difficulty breathing.

The subclavian artery is a major blood vessel that supplies the upper limb and important structures in the neck and head. It arises from the brachiocephalic trunk (in the case of the right subclavian artery) or directly from the aortic arch (in the case of the left subclavian artery).

The subclavian artery has several branches, including:

1. The vertebral artery, which supplies blood to the brainstem and cerebellum.
2. The internal thoracic artery (also known as the mammary artery), which supplies blood to the chest wall, breast, and anterior mediastinum.
3. The thyrocervical trunk, which gives rise to several branches that supply the neck, including the inferior thyroid artery, the suprascapular artery, and the transverse cervical artery.
4. The costocervical trunk, which supplies blood to the neck and upper back, including the posterior chest wall and the lower neck muscles.

The subclavian artery is a critical vessel in maintaining adequate blood flow to the upper limb, and any blockage or damage to this vessel can lead to significant morbidity, including arm pain, numbness, weakness, or even loss of function.

The sternoclavicular joint is the joint where the clavicle (collarbone) meets the sternum (breastbone). It is the only joint that connects the upper limb to the trunk of the body. This joint allows for movement in multiple directions, including elevation and depression of the shoulder, as well as some degree of protraction and retraction. The sternoclavicular joint is supported by several ligaments, which provide stability and strength to the joint.

The common carotid artery is a major blood vessel in the neck that supplies oxygenated blood to the head and neck. It originates from the brachiocephalic trunk or the aortic arch and divides into the internal and external carotid arteries at the level of the upper border of the thyroid cartilage. The common carotid artery is an important structure in the circulatory system, and any damage or blockage to it can have serious consequences, including stroke.

The carotid arteries are a pair of vital blood vessels in the human body that supply oxygenated blood to the head and neck. Each person has two common carotid arteries, one on each side of the neck, which branch off from the aorta, the largest artery in the body.

The right common carotid artery originates from the brachiocephalic trunk, while the left common carotid artery arises directly from the aortic arch. As they ascend through the neck, they split into two main branches: the internal and external carotid arteries.

The internal carotid artery supplies oxygenated blood to the brain, eyes, and other structures within the skull, while the external carotid artery provides blood to the face, scalp, and various regions of the neck.

Maintaining healthy carotid arteries is crucial for overall cardiovascular health and preventing serious conditions like stroke, which can occur when the arteries become narrowed or blocked due to the buildup of plaque or fatty deposits (atherosclerosis). Regular check-ups with healthcare professionals may include monitoring carotid artery health through ultrasound or other imaging techniques.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

The brachiocephalic artery (or brachiocephalic trunk) is an artery of the mediastinum that supplies blood to the right arm and ... Brachiocephalic artery Brachiocephalic trunk Hip bone (Innominate bone) This article incorporates text in the public domain ... "Brachiocephalic trunk , Radiology Reference Article , Radiopaedia.org". Radiopaedia. Retrieved 2022-12-27. Di Tullio MR, Homma ... Brachiocephalic artery has relation with: anterior - left brachiocephalic vein and thymus posterior - trachea right - superior ...
The right common carotid originates in the neck from the brachiocephalic trunk; the left from the aortic arch in the thorax. ... To its right side below is the brachiocephalic trunk, and above, the trachea, the inferior thyroid veins, and the remains of ... In the majority of abnormal cases it arises with the brachiocephalic trunk; if that artery is absent, the two carotids arise ... the sympathetic trunk being interposed between it and the muscles. The inferior thyroid artery crosses behind the lower part of ...
It mostly arises from the brachiocephalic trunk, but may also originate from the aortic arch, the right common carotid, the ... "Arteria thyroidea ima arising from the brachiocephalic trunk with bilateral absence of inferior thyroid arteries: a case report ... subclavian, the pericardiacophrenic artery, the thyrocervical trunk, the transverse scapular or the internal thoracic artery. ...
The subclavian artery arises from the brachiocephalic trunk on the right and directly from the aorta from the left.[citation ... Depending on locomotor style, a bone connects the shoulder girdle to the trunk in some animals; the coracoid bone in reptiles ... both branches of the thyrocervical trunk which itself is a branch of the subclavian artery. The blood vessels form a network ( ... the forelimb's attachment to the trunk is instead mainly controlled by serratus lateralis and levator scapulae. ...
The first part of the right subclavian artery arises from the brachiocephalic trunk, behind the upper part of the right ... instead of brachiocephalic trunk. This condition occurs in about 0.4 to 1.8% of the general population. The aberrant right ... forming a left brachiocephalic trunk. The left subclavian artery is more deeply placed than the right in the first part of its ... they can be thought of as arising from the brachiocephalic trunk. The subclavian arteries vary in their origin, their course, ...
... brachiocephalic trunk or brachiocephalic artery) and the trachea. A TIF is a rare but life-threatening iatrogenic injury, ... and/or massive hemorrhage which result from the formation of a fistula between the trachea and the brachiocephalic artery. The ...
... left lie the large blood vessels the aortic arch and its branches the left common carotid artery and the brachiocephalic trunk ... and the left brachiocephalic vein. The deep cardiac plexus and lymph nodes are also positioned in front of the lower trachea. ...
The brachiocephalic artery or trunk is the first and largest artery that branches to form the right common carotid artery and ... the thyrocervical trunk, and the costocervical trunk. The subclavian becomes the axillary artery at the lateral border of the ... Blood circulates from the upper systemic loop originating at the aortic arch, and includes: the brachiocephalic artery, left ...
... they are the brachiocephalic trunk, the left common carotid artery, and the left subclavian artery. The brachiocephalic trunk ... These two blood vessels twist around each other, causing the aorta to start out posterior to the pulmonary trunk, but end by ... Between the aortic arch and the pulmonary trunk is a network of autonomic nerve fibers, the cardiac plexus or aortic plexus. ... It runs through a common pericardial sheath with the pulmonary trunk. ...
The aortic sac eventually forms right and left horns, which subsequently give rise to the brachiocephalic trunk and the ...
... the peripheral baroreceptors and chemoreceptors found in the aortic arch and the bifurcation of the right brachiocephalic trunk ...
1 Aortic arch gives rise to: Brachiocephalic trunk Left Common Carotid Left Subclavian Toilet Paper My Ass, or They Pay Me ...
... and along the brachiocephalic trunk to the back of the arch of the aorta, where it joins the deep part of the cardiac plexus. ... and occasionally receives a filament from the trunk between the first and second cervical ganglia. It runs down the neck behind ...
Both rat and human aortic arches exhibit subsequent branching of the brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery, and ...
... artery Left pulmonary artery Aorta Ascending aorta Right coronary artery Left coronary artery Aortic arch Brachiocephalic trunk ... Sympathetic part Sympathetic trunk Rami communicantes Superior cervical ganglion Middle cervical ganglion Cervicothoracic ... vein Left gastro-omental vein Inferior mesenteric vein Left colic vein Sigmoid veins Superior rectal vein Lymphatic trunks and ... vein Oblique vein of left atrium Middle cardiac vein Small cardiac vein Pulmonary veins Superior vena cava Brachiocephalic vein ...
The surgical treatment of aneurysms of the brachiocephalic trunk and of the aortic arch'; research that is still held as a ...
The first, and largest, branch of the arch of the aorta is the brachiocephalic trunk, which is to the right and slightly ... Next, the left common carotid artery originates from the aortic arch to the left of the brachiocephalic trunk, then ascends ... In others, the brachiocephalic artery and left common carotid artery share an origin. This variant is found in approximately a ... The first few centimeters of the ascending aorta and pulmonary trunk lies in the same pericardial sheath. and runs at first ...
... brachiocephalic trunk MeSH A07.231.114.158 - bronchial arteries MeSH A07.231.114.186 - carotid arteries MeSH A07.231.114.186. ... brachiocephalic veins MeSH A07.231.908.155 - cerebral veins MeSH A07.231.908.194 - coronary vessels MeSH A07.231.908.224 - ...
... deoxygenated blood flows through the patent duct and directly into the descending aorta while sparing the brachiocephalic trunk ...
... brachiocephalic trunk shares a common origin with left common carotid artery). If such abnormality is present, it results it ... "Brachiocephalic and Vertebral Arteriography: Technical Considerations". HMP Global Learning Network. Brachiocephalic and ... Amin A. "Brachiocephalic and Vertebral Arteriography: Technical Considerations". Cardiovascular Learning Network. Archived from ...
Sympathetic trunk (truncus Sympaticus) Celiac artery (truncus coeliacus) Brachiocephalic artery (truncus brachiocephalicus) ... Lumbosacral trunk (truncus lumbosacralis) Costocervical trunk (truncus costocervicalis) ... Trunk (anatomy) (truncus) Truncus (mathematics), a particular algebraic curve This disambiguation page lists articles ...
The right ventricle tapers into the pulmonary trunk, into which it ejects blood when contracting. The pulmonary trunk branches ... It usually then travels in front of the ascending aorta and then ends in a brachiocephalic node. The heart receives nerve ... In crocodilians, there is a small opening, the foramen of Panizza, at the base of the arterial trunks and there is some degree ... The pulmonary valve lies between the right heart and the pulmonary trunk. The left heart has two chambers: the left atrium and ...
... oesophagus thoracic duct apices of the lungs nerves phrenic nerve vagus nerve recurrent laryngeal nerves sympathetic trunks ... vessels arteries left and right common carotid arteries left subclavian arteries veins internal jugular veins brachiocephalic ...
From this plexus, the left vein descends and joins the left brachiocephalic vein, and the right vein passes obliquely downward ... sometimes the right and left veins open by a common trunk in the latter situation. The inferior thyroid veins receive ... and to the right across the brachiocephalic artery to open into the right brachiocephalic vein, just at its junction with the ... the inferior thyroid veins drain directly to the brachiocephalic veins. The inferior thyroid veins form a plexus in front of ...
In such cases, dilation of the lumbar trunks may be present instead. Number of ducts A bifid inferior portion of the thoracic ... in the vicinity where the thoracic duct empties into the left brachiocephalic vein, right between where the left subclavian ... From here, it passes anteroinferiorly to the thyrocervical trunk, and phrenic nerve. It descends until reaching and draining at ... the cisterna chyli fails to develop when the fusion of lumbar trunk during embryologic development occurs above the vertebral ...
The inferior thyroid veins originate in a network of veins and drain into the left and right brachiocephalic veins. Both ... The gland receives sympathetic nerve supply from the superior, middle and inferior cervical ganglion of the sympathetic trunk. ... a branch of the thyrocervical trunk, and sometimes by an anatomical variant the thyroid ima artery, which has a variable origin ...
This vein also has a common trunk into which drains the anterior branch of the retromandibular vein, the facial vein, and the ... it unites with the subclavian vein to form the brachiocephalic vein (innominate vein); a little above its termination is a ...
Remember To Drink Cold Beer - Roots, Trunks, Divisions, Cords, Branches 5 main nerves of brachial plexus. "My Aunty Rocks My ... brachiocephalic vein, left superior intercostal vein) Nerves (Vagus nerve, phrenic nerve, left recurrent laryngeal nerve) ... Vagal trunks, Oesophagus Aortic hiatus (3: ATA): (descending) Aorta, Thoracic duct, Azygos vein I = IVC ate = T8 10 = T10 Eggs ... Heart Pulmonary trunk bifurcation L2 : Left Recurrent Laryngeal (Looping under Aorta); Ligamentum Arteriosum: Connects Aortic ...
... drains into the brachiocephalic vein or the vertebral vein. The 2nd and 3rd (and often 4th) posterior intercostal veins drain ... The Sympathetic Ganglion and Sympathetic Trunk" v t e (Anatomy NAV infobox with use of other NAV parameters, Articles with TA98 ...
... caudate nucleus cava cavernous sinus cavum tympani cavum subdurale cecum celiac celiac artery celiac ganglion celiac trunk ... blood blood brain barrier body bone bone marrow bony labyrinth Bowman's capsule brachial artery brachial plexus brachiocephalic ... ganglion ptosis puberty pubic hair pubic symphysis pubis pudendal nerve pulmonary pulmonary alveolus pulmonary trunk pulmonary ... suture sweat glands sylvian fissure sympathetic chain ganglion sympathetic nerve sympathetic nervous system sympathetic trunk ...
The brachiocephalic trunk (BCT) (also known as the brachiocephalic artery, and previously as the innominate artery) is the ... The brachiocephalic trunk is the first and rightmost of the three main branches of the aortic arch. It measures 4-5 cm in ... the brachiocephalic trunk may share a common origin with the left common carotid artery, which is called a bovine arch ... absent brachiocephalic trunk due to separate origins of the right subclavian and right common carotid arteries from the aortic ...
... common brachiocephalic trunk (CBT) from where the left carotid and innominate arteries bifurcate. PATIENT AND RESULTS: Here we ... "common brachiocephalic trunk (CBT)" from where the left carotid and innominate arteries bifurcate. PATIENT AND RESULTS: Here we ... Repair of Fungal Pseudoaneurysm of the Common Brachiocephalic Trunk. https://doi.org/10.1111/jocs.16676 ...
Brachiocephalic (arterial) trunk. [TA] origin, arch of aorta; branches, right subclavian and right common carotid; occasionally ...
The brachiocephalic artery (or brachiocephalic trunk) is an artery of the mediastinum that supplies blood to the right arm and ... Brachiocephalic artery Brachiocephalic trunk Hip bone (Innominate bone) This article incorporates text in the public domain ... "Brachiocephalic trunk , Radiology Reference Article , Radiopaedia.org". Radiopaedia. Retrieved 2022-12-27. Di Tullio MR, Homma ... Brachiocephalic artery has relation with: anterior - left brachiocephalic vein and thymus posterior - trachea right - superior ...
Anomalous innominate artery (brachiocephalic [arterial] trunk). When an anatomic abnormality of the innominate artery is noted ... In this abnormality, the brachiocephalic vessels arise from the left-sided arch in the normal arrangement. The left arch then ... 20] Late vascular complications, such as subclavian steal, may be noted in cases in which division of the brachiocephalic ... The right subclavian artery originates as the last brachiocephalic branch from the descending aorta and runs in the ...
We provided the first report of a brachiocephalic trunk perforation using a radial approach, causing mediastinal and neck ... Urgent computerized tomography showed brachiocephalic artery trunk dissection and perforation with extravascular hemorrhage in ... and a covered self-expanding stent was successfully positioned in the brachiocephalic trunk, sealing the perforation and ... Iatrogenic Brachiocephalic Artery Trunk Perforation Successfully Treated with Percutaneous Implantation of Covered Stent. ...
Dilated brachiocephalic trunk. 4.8 (0.5)b. [0.0-3.1]. Absent aortic arch. 4.3 (0.5) ...
However, it did mean that the differences in the EINC and EP seen between the brachiocephalic trunk and medial descending aorta ... Segments (5 cm long; marked by adventitious sutures) were dissected from the right carotid artery, the brachiocephalic trunk, ... 1 indicates the carotid artery; 2, the brachiocephalic trunk; 3, the ascending aorta; 4, the proximal descending thoracic aorta ... Pressure and diameter were measured in seven arterial segments (carotid, brachiocephalic trunk, ascending aorta, proximal, ...
Brachiocephalic Trunk * Hemoptysis * Diverticulum Explore _. Co-Authors (1) People in Profiles who have published with this ...
Brachiocephalic trunk disease (atherosclerosis, Takayasu arteritis). *Buerger disease (thromboangiitis obliterans). *Crutch ...
f) Annulus of the left jugular vein, JVl (IJVl, arrow) at the junction with the brachiocephalic trunk (BCT). (g) Closed ... azygous arch and descending trunk (AZY); H, heart; SVC, superior vena cava. (b) Twisting (arrow) just below the azygous arch. ( ...
The first branch of the aorta is normally the innominate artery, which is also referred to as the brachiocephalic trunk. ... The arch of the aorta has three branches: the brachiocephalic artery (which divides into right common carotid artery and the ...
... bilateral carotid body and bilateral brachiocephalic trunk) through imaging studies. She reported suffering relatives of ...
... usually from aortic arch or brachiocephalic trunk b. Passes superiorly near midline to reach isthmus B. .Veins 1. Superior and ... often unite to drain inferiorly into left brachiocephalic vein or stay separate to drain into both brachiocephalic veins ... From thyrocervical trunk b. Passes superiorly, then turns medially to run deep to carotid sheath; branches closely associated ... from T1 through sympathetic trunk to superior cervical ganglion 3. Postsynaptic sympathetic fibers: leave superior cervical ...
Approximately half of TAAs occur in the portion of the aorta that precedes the brachiocephalic trunk, the ascending aorta ( ... distal to the pulmonary trunk). The average of 3 measurements at each location was plotted with Prism. ...
Devices that cover the brachiocephalic trunk and left common carotid arteries protect only 9 of 28 brain regions, considering ... protect only the brachiocephalic and left common carotid arteries, which supply only 9 of 28 brain regions as a consequence of ...
... lymph nodes is into the jugular trunk and then into the thoracic duct on the left or directly into the brachiocephalic vein on ... All lymphatic drainage from region V and region IV on the internal jugular chain collect into the jugular trunk (ie, a group of ... from the right side of the head and neck drain directly into the right brachiocephalic vein via the right jugular trunk. ... The apical axillary nodes drain into the thoracic duct on the left or directly into the brachiocephalic vein on the right. ...
Complex multivascular patient with occluded brachiocephalic trunk Case of the month: September 2023. Endovascular / Carotid / ...
Complex multivascular patient with occluded brachiocephalic trunk Case of the month: September 2023. Endovascular / Carotid / ...
... and brachiocephalic trunk. ...
Review of the aortic arch, brachiocephalic trunk, common carotid, carotid bifurcation, internal carotid, external carotid, ...
Anomalous brachiocephalic trunk]], [[Anomalous left common carotid artery]], [[Anomalous left pulmonary artery]], [[Double ... Anomalous brachiocephalic trunk]] *[[Anomalous left common carotid artery]] *[[Anomalous left pulmonary artery]] *[[Anterior ...
Ligature of the brachiocephalic trunk Artist Jacob, Nicolas Henri, 1781-1871 Part of Book Traité complet de lanatomie de ...
This is likely to occur especially in cases in which the take-off of the brachiocephalic trunk from the aorta is more distal. ... Left and right descending veins enter the respective brachiocephalic veins. The 2 veins may form a common trunk entering the ... The most common vascular anomaly is compression from the brachiocephalic trunk. ... the trachea is in relation with the pleura and right vagus and near the root of the neck with the brachiocephalic trunk. ...
This is likely to occur especially in cases in which the take-off of the brachiocephalic trunk from the aorta is more distal. ... Left and right descending veins enter the respective brachiocephalic veins. The 2 veins may form a common trunk entering the ... The most common vascular anomaly is compression from the brachiocephalic trunk. ... the trachea is in relation with the pleura and right vagus and near the root of the neck with the brachiocephalic trunk. ...
... brachiocephalic trunk. ... 척추동맥 기시부 바로 바깥쪽에서 갑상목동맥(thyrocervical trunk)이 쇄골하동맥에서 기시하여 혼동을 ... 내경정맥은 빗장밑정맥(subclavian vein)으로 합류되어 팔머리정맥(brachiocephalic vein)을 구성하고 양쪽의 팔머리정맥이 위대정맥(superior vena cava)으로 이어져 대뇌정맥혈을 우심방으로 ... 우측에서는 대동맥궁(aortic arch)으로부터 팔머리동맥(brachiocephalic, innominate artery)이 나온 후 쇄골하동맥(subclavian artery)과 총경동맥(common carotid ...
On right it is a branch of brachiocephalic trunk and on left, it is a branch of arch of the aorta. ... Celiac trunk. It is a short thick trunk that arises from the front of the aorta, just below the aortic hiatus of the diaphragm. ... Right common carotid is branch of brachiocephalic trunk behind the sternoclavicular joint whereas the left is from the highest ... The pulmonary trunk is a vessel that arises from the right ventricle of the heart, extends upward, and divides into the right ...
Brachiocephalic trunk. The brachiocephalic trunk, the first branch off the aortic arch, splits into the right common carotid ... Celiac trunk. The celiac trunk is the first branch of the abdominal aorta and has three branches: the left gastric artery ... Brachiocephalic veins. The right and left brachiocephalic veins are large veins that receive venous drainage from the ... Lumbar arteries. The lumbar arteries are several pairs of arteries serving the heavy muscles of the abdomen and trunk walls. ...
Aorta → Brachiocephalic trunk → Right costocervical trunk → Right internal thoracic artery → Anterior intercostal arteries ... Aorta → Brachiocephalic trunk → Right Subclavian artery → Right superior thoracic artery → Anterior intercostal arteries ... Aorta → Brachiocephalic trunk → Right Subclavian artery → Right internal thoracic artery → Anterior intercostal arteries ... Anterior to aorta, pulmonary trunk, and superior vena cava *Anterior to the aorta/pulmonary trunk and posterior to the superior ...
Read Brachiocephalic Trunk. Coracobrachialis muscle side view. Coracobrachialis Muscle Summery. Origin. The coracoid processs ... At the shoulder joint, the coracobrachialis muscle primarily bends the arm (flexion) and pulls the arm towards the trunk ( ...
  • Eventually, brachiocephalic artery is derived from ventral aorta, same as ascending aorta. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pressure and diameter were measured in seven arterial segments (carotid, brachiocephalic trunk, ascending aorta, proximal, middle and distal descending thoracic aorta, and femoral artery) from six sheep. (revespcardiol.org)
  • The arch of the aorta has three branches: the brachiocephalic artery (which divides into right common carotid artery and the right subclavian artery), the left common carotid artery, and the left subclavian artery. (onteenstoday.com)
  • The first branch of the aorta is normally the innominate artery, which is also referred to as the brachiocephalic trunk. (onteenstoday.com)
  • Systemic arteries have a common trunk - the aorta which receives blood from the left ventricle. (medcaretips.com)
  • Aorta is a large trunk that commences at the left ventricle and goes all the way to the abdomen. (medcaretips.com)
  • Right common carotid is branch of brachiocephalic trunk behind the sternoclavicular joint whereas the left is from the highest part of the arch of the aorta. (medcaretips.com)
  • One approach is to catheterize the right common carotid artery and advance the catheter until the tip is positioned in the aorta or the proximal brachiocephalic trunk. (ku.dk)
  • Type II (35%): These dissections start in and are confined to the ascending aorta (proximal to the brachiocephalic or innominate artery). (msdmanuals.com)
  • The brachiocephalic trunk ( BCT ) (also known as the brachiocephalic artery , and previously as the innominate artery ) is the first branch of the aortic arch and supplies the head, neck and right arm. (radiopaedia.org)
  • The brachiocephalic artery originates from incorporation by the right fourth aortic arch and persistence of a proximal additional part of the right fourth innominate artery, leading to elongation of the artery 2 . (radiopaedia.org)
  • The brachiocephalic artery (or brachiocephalic trunk) is an artery of the mediastinum that supplies blood to the right arm and the head and neck. (wikipedia.org)
  • Soon after it emerges, the brachiocephalic artery divides into the right common carotid artery and the right subclavian artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is no brachiocephalic artery for the left side of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • The brachiocephalic artery arises, on a level with the upper border of the second right costal cartilage, from the start of the aortic arch, on a plane anterior to the origin of the left carotid artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brachiocephalic artery has relation with: anterior - left brachiocephalic vein and thymus posterior - trachea right - superior vena cava, right brachiocephalic vein, and pleura left - left common carotid artery and thymus Thymus typically sits atop the brachiocephalic artery, and separates the artery from the posterior surface of the manubrium of sternum. (wikipedia.org)
  • Between the two horns of aortic sac, right horn gives rise to the brachiocephalic artery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brachiocephalic artery brings blood from heart to right arm, head, and neck. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several abnormalities of brachiocephalic artery have been reported. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brachiocephalic artery Brachiocephalic trunk Hip bone (Innominate bone) This article incorporates text in the public domain from page 548 of the 20th edition of Gray's Anatomy (1918) Olivier, Marlyson. (wikipedia.org)
  • Urgent computerized tomography showed brachiocephalic artery trunk dissection and perforation with extravascular hemorrhage in the mediastinum and neck with venous compression without any sign of aortic, carotid, or subclavian dissection. (cikd.ca)
  • Iatrogenic Brachiocephalic Artery Trunk Perforation Successfully Treated with Percutaneous Implantation of Covered Stent', Canadian Journal of Medicine , 3(Issue 2), pp. 61-64. (cikd.ca)
  • As you read about circular pathways, notice that there is an occasional, very large artery referred to as a trunk , a term indicating that the vessel gives rise to several smaller arteries. (cuny.edu)
  • Here's how we know: From the aortic arch (red arrow) emerge three branches, (i) the left subclavian artery, (ii) the left common carotid artery, and (iii) the brachiocephalic trunk (green arrow). (imm-recherche.com)
  • The brachiocephalic trunk bifurcates into the right subclavian artery and the right common carotid artery. (imm-recherche.com)
  • Subclavian steal syndrome (SSS) occurs when proximal part of one of the subclavian artery or brachio-cephalic trunk is significantly narrowed or obstruced. (czytelniamedyczna.pl)
  • Between 2004-2012 in the Department of Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Medical University of Lublin, 112 procedures expand/unblocking of the subclavian artery or brachiocephalic trunk-cephalic were performed in patients with SSS. (czytelniamedyczna.pl)
  • It fits perfectly with the aortic wall and it covers all three main branches of the aortic arch (brachiocephalic trunk, left common carotid artery and left subclavian artery) and the systemic circulation. (aorticlab.ch)
  • The brachiocephalic trunk is the first and rightmost of the three main branches of the aortic arch . (radiopaedia.org)
  • BACKGROUND AND AIM: To date, little is known about the aneurysms of the bovine aortic arch, known as a "common brachiocephalic trunk (CBT)" from where the left carotid and innominate arteries bifurcate. (touro.edu)
  • In the present study, implantation of a carotid catheter with catheter tip placement in the proximal brachiocephalic trunk had minimal influence on cardiac and aortic physiology and did not induce significant cardiac changes. (ku.dk)
  • Case report: A female patient of 32 years old complaining of tinnitus and diagnosed with five paragangliomas (jugulo-timpanic, bilateral carotid body and bilateral brachiocephalic trunk) through imaging studies. (scirp.org)
  • The size of upper airway anatomical structures in a young child, elasticity and mobility of larynx and trachea, adjacent large cervical vessels, high situation of the pleural cupula and large vascular trunks (arterial and venous brachiocephalic trunk) and a highly situated mediastinum increase the risk of complications. (czytelniamedyczna.pl)
  • The left subclavian vein allows blood to travel along the brachiocephalic vein back to the heart. (innerbody.com)
  • Rami from the CTG was distributed to the brachial plexus, the subclavian and vertebral arteries, the brachiocephalic trunk, and the cardiac plexus. (edu.au)
  • The pulmonary trunk is a vessel that arises from the right ventricle of the heart, extends upward, and divides into the right and left pulmonary arteries that carry deoxygenated blood to the lungs. (medcaretips.com)
  • All lymphatic drainage from region V and region IV on the internal jugular chain collect into the jugular trunk (ie, a group of nodes positioned at the internal jugular anterior brachiocephalic veins) and subsequently into the thoracic duct on the left or directly into the brachiocephalic vein on the right. (medscape.com)
  • The capillary vessels further form venules which then gradually drain to larger veins and finally the large venous trunk - vena cava and return the deoxygenated blood to the right atrium of the heart. (medcaretips.com)
  • Repair of Fungal Pseudoaneurysm of the Common Brachiocephalic Trunk" by Rahim Hirani, Suguru Ohira et al. (touro.edu)
  • The pulmonary trunk splits into the right and left pulmonary arteries, which carry blood to the lungs, where oxygen is picked up and carbon dioxide is unloaded. (nurseslabs.com)
  • For example, the celiac trunk gives rise to the left gastric, common hepatic, and splenic arteries. (cuny.edu)
  • However, there are two brachiocephalic veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • The heart receives relatively oxygen-poor blood from the veins of the body through the large superior and inferior vena cava and pumps it through the pulmonary trunk . (nurseslabs.com)
  • Two days later, the percutaneous endovascular repair was performed, and a covered self-expanding stent was successfully positioned in the brachiocephalic trunk, sealing the perforation and treating the dissection. (cikd.ca)
  • The present study compared cardiac function of catheterized mice, with catheter tip placement in the brachiocephalic trunk, with sham-operated mice and non-operated control mice. (ku.dk)
  • Clinical examination is characterized by edema in the upper trunk (face, neck and upper limbs) and jugular engorgement (4, 5). (hvt-journal.com)
  • We provided the first report of a brachiocephalic trunk perforation using a radial approach, causing mediastinal and neck hematoma treated with percutaneous endovascular repair showing that vascular complications can be successfully treated percutaneously if be performed by an experienced team. (cikd.ca)
  • Brachiocephalic trunk is commonly at risk of erosion because of its close relation with the trachea. (bvsalud.org)
  • The internal or abdominal branch, usually less bulky than the external one, continues the direction of the principal trunk, leaves the thoracic cavity while passing in the cellulous interstice which separates the sternal beams from the costal beams of the diaphragm and penetrates in the sheath of the right muscle. (cloudaccess.net)
  • The right internal jugular branches off the right and left brachiocephalic veins, which lie outside the brachiocephalic trunk. (angelahuntbooks.com)
  • The frozen elephant trunk (FET) technique was developed to facilitate the conventional surgical two-stage approach. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The thorax was dissected and the topographical location of brachiocephalic trunk was determined relative to the ribs and intercostals spaces. (ac.ir)