Bowhead Whale: The species Balaena mysticetus, in the family Balaenidae, found in the colder waters of the Northern Hemisphere. The common name is derived from the extreme arching of the lower jaw.Whales: Large marine mammals of the order CETACEA. In the past, they were commercially valued for whale oil, for their flesh as human food and in ANIMAL FEED and FERTILIZERS, and for baleen. Today, there is a moratorium on most commercial whaling, as all species are either listed as endangered or threatened.Fin Whale: The species Balaenoptera physalus, in the family Balaenopteridae, characterized by a large, strongly curved, dorsal fin. It is the second largest of the WHALES, highly migratory, but rarely seen near the shore.Humpback Whale: The species Megaptera novaeangliae, in the family Balaenopteridae, characterized by its huge flippers and the arching of their back when diving. They are also known for their breaching and singing.Singing: Modulation of human voice to produce sounds augmented by musical tonality and rhythm.Minke Whale: The species Balaenoptera acutorostrata, in the family Balaenopteridae. It is the smallest of the WHALES in the family and though mainly oceanic, is often found in coastal waters including bays and estuaries.Sperm Whale: The species Physeter catodon (also called Physeter macrocephalus), in the family Physeteridae. The common name is derived from the milky wax substance in its head (spermaceti). The species also produces an intestinal secretion AMBERGRIS, which was previously used in perfumes. The sperm whale is the largest toothed MAMMAL in the world.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.AlaskaAnimal DiseasesMuseumsVocalization, Animal: Sounds used in animal communication.Nature: The system of all phenomena in space and time; the totality of physical reality. It is both a scientific and philosophic concept appearing in all historic eras. (Webster 2d; Dr. James H. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Planets: Celestial bodies orbiting around the sun or other stars.Archaea: One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and Eukarya), formerly called Archaebacteria under the taxon Bacteria, but now considered separate and distinct. They are characterized by: (1) the presence of characteristic tRNAs and ribosomal RNAs; (2) the absence of peptidoglycan cell walls; (3) the presence of ether-linked lipids built from branched-chain subunits; and (4) their occurrence in unusual habitats. While archaea resemble bacteria in morphology and genomic organization, they resemble eukarya in their method of genomic replication. The domain contains at least four kingdoms: CRENARCHAEOTA; EURYARCHAEOTA; NANOARCHAEOTA; and KORARCHAEOTA.Dental Devices, Home Care: Devices used in the home by persons to maintain dental and periodontal health. The devices include toothbrushes, dental flosses, water irrigators, gingival stimulators, etc.Earth (Planet): Planet that is the third in order from the sun. It is one of the four inner or terrestrial planets of the SOLAR SYSTEM.Oral Hygiene: The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.Rhodobacter: A genus of gram-negative bacteria widely distributed in fresh water as well as marine and hypersaline habitats.Alteromonas: A genus of gram-negative, straight or curved rods which are motile by means of a single, polar flagellum. Members of this genus are found in coastal waters and the open ocean. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)Portraits as Topic: Graphic representations, especially of the face, of real persons, usually posed, living or dead. (From Thesaurus for Graphic Materials II, p540, 1995)Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Sarcoptes scabiei: A species of mite that causes SCABIES in humans and sarcoptic mange in other animals. Specific variants of S. scabiei exist for humans and animals, but many have the ability to cross species and cause disease.Scabies: A contagious cutaneous inflammation caused by the bite of the mite SARCOPTES SCABIEI. It is characterized by pruritic papular eruptions and burrows and affects primarily the axillae, elbows, wrists, and genitalia, although it can spread to cover the entire body.Soman: An organophosphorus compound that inhibits cholinesterase. It causes seizures and has been used as a chemical warfare agent.Vacuum: A space in which the pressure is far below atmospheric pressure so that the remaining gases do not affect processes being carried on in the space.Mite Infestations: Infestations with arthropods of the subclass ACARI, superorder Acariformes.Metal Ceramic Alloys: The fusion of ceramics (porcelain) to an alloy of two or more metals for use in restorative and prosthodontic dentistry. Examples of metal alloys employed include cobalt-chromium, gold-palladium, gold-platinum-palladium, and nickel-based alloys.Antiparasitic Agents: Drugs used to treat or prevent parasitic infections.HandbooksAnnual Reports as Topic: Annual statements reviewing the status of the administrative and operational functions and accomplishments of an institution or organization.BooksPeriodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Manuals as Topic: Books designed to give factual information or instructions.Social Change: Social process whereby the values, attitudes, or institutions of society, such as education, family, religion, and industry become modified. It includes both the natural process and action programs initiated by members of the community.Snow: Frozen water crystals that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Arctic Regions: The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)RussiaWalruses: The family Odobenidae, suborder PINNIPEDIA, order CARNIVORA. It is represented by a single species of large, nearly hairless mammal found on Arctic shorelines, whose upper canines are modified into tusks.Ice: The solid substance formed by the FREEZING of water.Balaenoptera: A genus of WHALES in the family Balaenopteridae, consisting of five species: Blue Whale, Bryde's Whale, FIN WHALE, Sei Whale, and MINKE WHALE. They are distinguished by a relatively slender body, a compressed tail stock, and a pointed snout.Cetacea: An order of wholly aquatic MAMMALS occurring in all the OCEANS and adjoining seas of the world, as well as in certain river systems. They feed generally on FISHES, cephalopods, and crustaceans. Most are gregarious and most have a relatively long period of parental care and maturation. Included are DOLPHINS; PORPOISES; and WHALES. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, pp969-70)DNA, Mitochondrial: Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.Ambergris: A gray substance found in the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT of the SPERM WHALE.Perfume: A substance, extract, or preparation for diffusing or imparting an agreeable or attractive smell, especially a fluid containing fragrant natural oils extracted from flowers, woods, etc., or similar synthetic oils. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Animals, ZooPapua New Guinea: A country consisting of the eastern half of the island of New Guinea and adjacent islands, including New Britain, New Ireland, the Admiralty Islands, and New Hanover in the Bismarck Archipelago; Bougainville and Buka in the northern Solomon Islands; the D'Entrecasteaux and Trobriand Islands; Woodlark (Murua) Island; and the Louisiade Archipelago. It became independent on September 16, 1975. Formerly, the southern part was the Australian Territory of Papua, and the northern part was the UN Trust Territory of New Guinea, administered by Australia. They were administratively merged in 1949 and named Papua and New Guinea, and renamed Papua New Guinea in 1971.Macropodidae: A family of herbivorous leaping MAMMALS of Australia, New Guinea, and adjacent islands. Members include kangaroos, wallabies, quokkas, and wallaroos.Lemur: A genus of the family Lemuridae consisting of five species: L. catta (ring-tailed lemur), L. fulvus, L. macaco (acoumba or black lemur), L. mongoz (mongoose lemur), and L. variegatus (white lemur). Most members of this genus occur in forested areas on Madagascar and the Comoro Islands.New Guinea: Originally an island of the Malay Archipelago, the second largest island in the world. It divided, West New Guinea becoming part of Indonesia and East New Guinea becoming Papua New Guinea.Indonesia: A republic stretching from the Indian Ocean east to New Guinea, comprising six main islands: Java, Sumatra, Bali, Kalimantan (the Indonesian portion of the island of Borneo), Sulawesi (formerly known as the Celebes) and Irian Jaya (the western part of New Guinea). Its capital is Djakarta. The ethnic groups living there are largely Chinese, Arab, Eurasian, Indian, and Pakistani; 85% of the peoples are of the Islamic faith.Dipodomys: A genus of the family Heteromyidae which contains 22 species. Their physiology is adapted for the conservation of water, and they seldom drink water. They are found in arid or desert habitats and travel by hopping on their hind limbs.

Increasing abundance of bowhead whales in West Greenland. (1/6)

In April 2006, a dedicated survey of bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) was conducted on the former whaling ground in West Greenland to determine the current wintering population abundance. This effort included a double platform aerial survey design, satellite tracking of the movements of nine whales, and estimation of high-resolution surface time from 14 whales instrumented with time-depth recorders. Bowhead whales were estimated to spend an average of 24% (cv=0.03) of the time at or above 2m depth, the maximum depth at which they can be seen on the trackline. This resulted in a fully corrected abundance estimate of 1229 (95% CI: 495-2939) bowhead whales when the availability factor was applied and sightings missed by observers were corrected. This surprisingly large population estimate is puzzling given that the change in abundance cannot be explained by a recent or rapid growth in population size. One possible explanation is that the population, which demonstrates high age and sex segregation, has recently attained a certain threshold size elsewhere, and a higher abundance of mature females appears on the winter and spring feeding ground in West Greenland. This in combination with the latest severe reduction in sea ice facilitating access to coastal areas might explain the surprising increase in bowhead whale abundance in West Greenland.  (+info)

The effect of inappropriate calibration: three case studies in molecular ecology. (2/6)

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The Northwest Passage opens for bowhead whales. (3/6)

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High source levels and small active space of high-pitched song in bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus). (4/6)

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An intraoral thermoregulatory organ in the bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus), the corpus cavernosum maxillaris. (5/6)

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Flow-dependent porosity and other biomechanical properties of mysticete baleen. (6/6)

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  • Serum samples from 21 of 36 Eskimo harvested bowhead whales ( Balaena mysticetus ) were positive by virus neutralization (50% endpoint titer ≥1:28 and/or 100% endpoint titer ≥1:20) for antibodies to at least one virus serotype from the calicivirus family, vesicular exanthema of swine virus (VESV) and San Miguel sea lion virus (SMSV). (bioone.org)
  • But little is known about the bowhead whales' singing: whether only males make these sounds, whether individuals can share songs, and, most importantly, why their tune changes all the time. (phys.org)
  • A University of Washington study has published the largest set of recordings for bowhead whales , to discover that these marine mammals have a surprisingly diverse, constantly shifting vocal repertoire. (phys.org)
  • Diving with whales, walruses and polar bears, Heinerth and Cyr bring viewers into a majestic underwater world threatened by disappearing ice and rapid climate change. (cbc.ca)
  • The new paper extends that initial five-month dataset, and confirms that bowhead whales sing in this region regularly from late fall to early spring. (phys.org)
  • Singing whales, like birds, may be doing some combination of acoustic competition with other animals and attracting mates, Stafford said. (phys.org)
  • The new data suggest bowhead whales may be similar to cowbirds and meadowlarks, birds that learn a diverse, ever-changing repertoire of songs, maybe because novelty offers some advantage. (phys.org)
  • Magalhães said whale cells must have a much lower metabolic rate than those of smaller mammals. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Killer whales have been recorded in Baffin Bay and the Davis Strait for over a century, but spotting the mammals near Kugaaruk is "pretty unusual" and points to a loss of sea ice, Ferguson said. (vancourier.com)
  • Comparison of the bowhead whale transcriptome with that of the related minke whale and other mammals enabled us to identify candidate genes for the exceptional longevity of the bowhead whale. (fightaging.org)
  • The number of genes differentially expressed in the bowhead whale liver (45 genes) and kidney (53 genes) compared to other mammals is similar, albeit using a different computational method. (fightaging.org)
  • Whales have evolved from land-living mammals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though whales have many traits in common with fish (including fins and tails) they are classified as mammals under the Linnaean taxonomy classification system because they breathe air and lactate. (conservapedia.com)
  • File:Whale evolution.jpg The question of how whales and their relatives could have evolved from terrestrial mammals has taxed evolutionary biologists since Darwin's suggestion that they may have evolved from ancient bears. (conservapedia.com)
  • Whales are the largest mammals, the largest vertebrates , and the largest known animals in the world. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Like all mammals , whales breathe air into lungs , are warm-blooded , breast-feed their young, and have hair (although very little). (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • but a few, like the killer whale, feed on large mammals and birds, such as penguins and seals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most mammals are terrestrial, but a number are secondarily aquatic, including whales which are the largest of all animals. (fact-index.com)
  • Whales range in size from the 2.6 metres (8.5 ft) and 135 kilograms (298 lb) dwarf sperm whale to the 29.9 metres (98 ft) and 190 metric tons (210 short tons) blue whale , which is the largest creature that has ever lived. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sperm whale is the largest toothed predator on earth. (wikipedia.org)
  • SCRIMSHAW PIE CRIMPERS/JAGGING WHEELS c. 1850, American, figural pie crimper in the form of a shark with a fluted, whale ivory wheel all carved from the center core of a large sperm whale tooth depicting one of the whaler's dreaded nemeses at sea. (angelfire.com)
  • Unlike their cousins the rorquals (including the blue whale and the fin whale), bowhead whales do not feed by gulping prey-laden water and then expelling it, catching food on the plates as the water is ejected. (mentalfloss.com)
  • Caperea might be the sister group to balaenopterids (rorquals) and Eschrichtius (gray whale) (Arnason and Gulberg 1994), or to balaenids (Gatesy 1998). (tolweb.org)
  • Rozhnov, V. 2018-02-24 00:00:00 Epidermal molting in the bowhead whales that regularly enter Ulbanskiy Bay of the Sea of Okhotsk in summer has been reported and proven by histological methods. (deepdyve.com)
  • The photos also show rake marks on the whales' sides, which Ferguson said could be from killer whale teeth. (vancourier.com)
  • Ferguson described how a killer whale might bite a bowhead's tail to keep it from swimming away or ram into its side to cause internal damage. (vancourier.com)
  • Scientists on Monday unveiled the genetic blueprint for the bowhead whale, a genome chock full of clues behind this creature's exceptional longevity and remarkable disease resistance. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Scientists don't know how whales will adapt to the changing environment. (eurekalert.org)
  • Some scientists have speculated that the whales could live even longer than that. (listverse.com)
  • This was quite a shocking discovery, as up to this point scientists believed that humpback whales were generally unsociable towards each other. (listverse.com)
  • Scientists have found that a genetic mutation in the eyes of right whales that hampers their ability to see in bright light may make them more susceptible to fatal entanglements in fishing gear, one of the major causes of death for this critically endangered mammal. (phys.org)
  • Unexpectedly, however, the cone opsin mutation thought by scientists to hinder operation of the retina may actually enhance dim-light vision in these whales-a finding that provides insight into the effects of mutations on the health and function of the human retina. (phys.org)
  • What's more, scientists warn that the future of the bowhead, which is thriving, is increasingly uncertain as its habitat transforms. (eenews.net)
  • The availability of a single heart tissue sample from the bowhead whale precluded identification of distinct gene expression patterns in the long-lived bowhead whale, but revealed that argininosuccinate lyase (Asl) may protect the heart of cetaceans during hypoxic events such as diving. (fightaging.org)
  • Cetaceans have been extensively hunted by commercial industries for their products, although hunting the largest whales is now forbidden by international law. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are one of the largest whales, and are known to have long lifespans, in fact one of the longest lifespans of any animal in the world at about 200 years. (rcinet.ca)