The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of plants.
Plant tissue that carries nutrients, especially sucrose, by turgor pressure. Movement is bidirectional, in contrast to XYLEM where it is only upward. Phloem originates and grows outwards from meristematic cells (MERISTEM) in the vascular cambium. P-proteins, a type of LECTINS, are characteristically found in phloem.
A plant genus of the family CUCURBITACEAE, order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, which includes pumpkin, gourd and squash.
Substances released by PLANTS such as PLANT GUMS and PLANT RESINS.
Plant tissue that carries water up the root and stem. Xylem cell walls derive most of their strength from LIGNIN. The vessels are similar to PHLOEM sieve tubes but lack companion cells and do not have perforated sides and pores.
The parts of plants, including SEEDS.
Parts of plants that usually grow vertically upwards towards the light and support the leaves, buds, and reproductive structures. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990)
The gourd plant family of the order Violales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. It is sometimes placed in its own order, Cucurbitales. 'Melon' generally refers to CUCUMIS; CITRULLUS; or MOMORDICA.
Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)
A plant species of the family APIACEAE. The stalks are a food source.
Membrane-like channels of cytoplasm connecting adjacent plant cells. Plasmodesmata connect through pores in the CELL WALL and associate with the CYTOSKELETON machinery. They are essential for intercellular transport and communication.
The figwort plant family of the order Lamiales. The family is characterized by bisexual flowers with tubular corollas (fused petals) that are bilaterally symmetrical (two-lips) and have four stamens in most, two of which are usually shorter.
A creeping annual plant species of the CUCURBITACEAE family. It has a rough succulent, trailing stem and hairy leaves with three to five pointed lobes.
Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.
A form of interactive entertainment in which the player controls electronically generated images that appear on a video display screen. This includes video games played in the home on special machines or home computers, and those played in arcades.
Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.
A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.
A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.
The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.
An organized procedure carried out by a select committee of professionals in evaluating the performance of other professionals in meeting the standards of their specialty. Review by peers is used by editors in the evaluation of articles and other papers submitted for publication. Peer review is used also in the evaluation of grant applications. It is applied also in evaluating the quality of health care provided to patients.
The synthesis by organisms of organic chemical compounds, especially carbohydrates, from carbon dioxide using energy obtained from light rather than from the oxidation of chemical compounds. Photosynthesis comprises two separate processes: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In higher plants; GREEN ALGAE; and CYANOBACTERIA; NADPH and ATP formed by the light reactions drive the dark reactions which result in the fixation of carbon dioxide. (from Oxford Dictionary of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 2001)
Methods utilizing the principles of MICROFLUIDICS for sample handling, reagent mixing, and separation and detection of specific components in fluids.
The study of fluid channels and chambers of tiny dimensions of tens to hundreds of micrometers and volumes of nanoliters or picoliters. This is of interest in biological MICROCIRCULATION and used in MICROCHEMISTRY and INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES.
A phylum of photosynthetic EUKARYOTA bearing double membrane-bound plastids containing chlorophyll a and b. They comprise the classical green algae, and represent over 7000 species that live in a variety of primarily aquatic habitats. Only about ten percent are marine species, most live in freshwater.
Experimentally induced neoplasms of CONNECTIVE TISSUE in animals to provide a model for studying human SARCOMA.
The fundamental dispositions and traits of humans. (Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)
Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.
The common orally transmitted traditions, myths, festivals, songs, superstitions, and stories of all peoples.
Those psychological characteristics which differentiate individuals from one another.
The use of music as an adjunctive therapy in the treatment of neurological, mental, or behavioral disorders.
Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.
A plant genus of the family ACERACEAE, best known for trees with palmately lobed leaves.
An autosomal recessive inherited disorder with multiple forms of phenotypic expression, caused by a defect in the oxidative decarboxylation of branched-chain amino acids (AMINO ACIDS, BRANCHED-CHAIN). These metabolites accumulate in body fluids and render a "maple syrup" odor. The disease is divided into classic, intermediate, intermittent, and thiamine responsive subtypes. The classic form presents in the first week of life with ketoacidosis, hypoglycemia, emesis, neonatal seizures, and hypertonia. The intermediate and intermittent forms present in childhood or later with acute episodes of ataxia and vomiting. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p936)
A plant genus of the family POACEAE widely cultivated in the tropics for the sweet cane that is processed into sugar.
Oxidoreductases that are specific for KETONES.
The pressure at any point in an atmosphere due solely to the weight of the atmospheric gases above the point concerned.
The pressure due to the weight of fluid.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
A type of stress exerted uniformly in all directions. Its measure is the force exerted per unit area. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
A plant species of the family ACTINIDIACEAE, order Theales.
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.
The addition of descriptive information about the function or structure of a molecular sequence to its MOLECULAR SEQUENCE DATA record.
Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.
A state in south central Australia. Its capital is Adelaide. It was probably first visited by F. Thyssen in 1627. Later discoveries in 1802 and 1830 opened up the southern part. It became a British province in 1836 with this self-descriptive name and became a state in 1901. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1135)
PLANTS, or their progeny, whose GENOME has been altered by GENETIC ENGINEERING.
Proteins found in plants (flowers, herbs, shrubs, trees, etc.). The concept does not include proteins found in vegetables for which VEGETABLE PROTEINS is available.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
A plant genus of the family OLEACEAE. Members contain secoiridoid glucosides.
In the 1950s, she collaborated with botanist Vernon Cheadle on more phloem research. Her treatise The Phloem (1969) was ... This volume has been recognized as the most important of the series and was a definitive source of information about phloem. ... Katherine Esau (3 April 1898 - 4 June 1997) was a German-American botanist who received the National Medal of Science for her ... While teaching, she continued her research on viruses and specifically phloem, the food conducting tissue in plants. ...
... phloem). vasculum A container used by botanists for collecting field specimens. vein A strand of vascular tissue, e.g. in the ... phloem A specialised conducting tissue in vascular plants that transports sucrose from the leaves to other plant organs. ... stele The primary vascular system (including phloem, xylem, and ground tissue) of plant stems and roots. stellate Star-shaped. ... vascular Referring to the conducting tissues (xylem and phloem) of vascular plants. vascular bundle A bundle of vascular tissue ...
Two kinds of vascular tissue occur in plants: xylem and phloem. Phloem and xylem are closely associated with one another and ... Botanists define vascular plants by three primary characteristics: Vascular plants have vascular tissues which distribute ... "facies diploida xylem et phloem instructa" (diploid phase with xylem and phloem). One possible mechanism for the presumed ... The phloem, however, consists of living cells called sieve-tube members. Between the sieve-tube members are sieve plates, which ...
Lamoureux, Charles H. (1975). "Phloem Tissue in Angiosperms and Gymnosperms". Phloem Transport. NATO Advanced Study Institutes ... Sieve elements were first discovered by the forest botanist Theodor Hartig in 1837. Since this discovery, the structure and ... By studying the phloem of the leaves in vivo through laser microscopy and the usage of fluorescent markers (placed in both ... Phloem was introduced by Carl Nägeli in 1858 after the discovery of sieve elements. Since then, multiple studies have been ...
But, because some botanists define "true" stems, leaves, and roots by the presence of these tissues, their absence in the brown ... Whatever their form, the body of all brown algae is termed a thallus, indicating that it lacks the complex xylem and phloem of ... In some brown algae, the pith region includes a core of elongated cells that resemble the phloem of vascular plants both in ...
The stipe of a kelp often contains a central region of cells that, like the phloem of vascular plants, serves to transport ... A stipe is also a structure found in organisms that are studied by botanists but that are no longer classified as plants. It ...
A German-Polish botanist, Eduard Strasburger, described the mitotic process in plant cells and further demonstrated that new ... Phloem, Vascular cambium, Heartwood and sapwood and branch collar Root anatomy, including structure of the Root, root tip, ... In 1802, French botanist Charles-François Brisseau de Mirbel, published Traité d'anatomie et de physiologie végétale (Treatise ... In 1838 German botanist Matthias Jakob Schleiden, published Contributions to Phytogenesis, stating, "the lower plants all ...
Katherine Esau, a pioneering plant anatomist, focused much of her work on phloem, the food conducting cells in higher plants. ... Vernon Cheadle was the chancellor at UCSB between 1962 to 1977, but also a botanist who, along with Katherine Esau, contributed ...
At Cornell, Crafts was also influenced by Walter C. Muenscher (1891-1963), a botanist noted for his expertise on weeds. In 1932 ... Crafts's primary research interest-the mechanism of translocation in plants, particularly phloem translocation (e.g. Crafts, ... Crafts returned to California to work as an assistant botanist with the title "Weed Control Scientist" at the California ...
doi:10.1111/j.1095-8339.2009.00996.x. painting by the Swedish botanist C. A. M. Lindman (1856-1928), taken from his book(s) ... The minor leaf veins do not present phloem transfer cells and leaks vessels. These plants have stems without secondary ... The genus name honours Heinrich Bernhard Rupp, a German botanist (1688-1719). They are widespread outside of frigid zones and ...
... phloem present only external to the xylem) or they can be amphiphloic (with phloem both external and internal to the xylem). ... The concept of the stele was developed in the late 19th century by French botanists P. E. L. van Tieghem and H. Doultion as a ... The vascular bundles in a eustele can be collateral (with the phloem on only one side of the xylem) or bicollateral (with ... This consisted of a cylindrical strand of xylem, surrounded by a region of phloem. Around the vascular tissue there might have ...
Phloem consists of: Sieve tube Companion cell Phloem fibre Phloem parenchyma. Phloem is an equally important plant tissue as it ... English botanist Generative tissue Laser capture microdissection Plant stem cell Tissue microarray Tissue stress Ross, Michael ... The common types of complex permanent tissue are: Xylem or wood Phloem or bast. Xylem and phloem together form vascular bundles ... Primarily, phloem carries dissolved food substances throughout the plant. This conduction system is composed of sieve-tube ...
A botanist, plant scientist or phytologist is a scientist who specialises in this field. The term "botany" comes from the ... Corn has been used to study mechanisms of photosynthesis and phloem loading of sugar in C4 plants. The single celled green alga ... Botanists also study weeds, which are a considerable problem in agriculture, and the biology and control of plant pathogens in ... Nowadays, botanists (in the strict sense) study approximately 410,000 species of land plants of which some 391,000 species are ...
Due to the softer nature of the phloem, these are very rarely seen in fossil instances.[citation needed] In the Calamitaceae, ... However, the division between the horsetails and the other ferns is so ancient that many botanists, especially paleobotanists, ... Because of their unclear relationships, the rank botanists assigned to the horsetails varied from order to division. When ... secondary xylem (but not secondary phloem) was secreted as the cambium grew outwards, producing a woody stem, and allowing the ...
Wilhelm Hofmeister, one of the most brilliant botanists of his times, was the one to diverge away from the idealist way of ... Working with Vernon Cheadle, she also explained the evolutionary specialization of the phloem tissue with respect to its ...
... phloem necrosis) in trials in Italy. Following the development and release of cultivars such as 'Columella' more resistant to ... the Flemish botanist also commemorated by the genus Lobelia. North Central Regional PI Station Arboretum, ARS, Iowa State ...
... the reddish phloem, just below the outer bark, was dried, ground up and blended with wheat flour to make a traditional loaf. In ... described by the German botanist Ernst Schelle in 1903, are also lost; pendula, a cultivar with a leader and weeping branches, ...
... (1919-2017) was an American botanist who specialised in palms. The eldest of three sisters, she grew up on ... American Journal of Botany: 27 (Supplement to 19), 2s Cheadle, V.I.; Whitford, N.B. (1941). "Observations on the Phloem in the ...
A botanist, plant scientist or phytologist is a scientist who specialises in this field. The term "botany" comes from the ... Corn has been used to study mechanisms of photosynthesis and phloem loading of sugar in C4 plants.[126] The single celled green ... Nowadays, botanists (in the strict sense) study approximately 410,000 species of land plants of which some 391,000 species are ... Botanists study how plants produce food and how to increase yields, for example through plant breeding, making their work ...
Inside the phloem is a layer of undifferentiated cells one cell thick called the vascular cambium layer. The cells are ... The greatest number of these grow in tropical regions and many of these areas have not yet been fully surveyed by botanists, ... The innermost layer of bark is known as the phloem and this is involved in the transport of the sap containing the sugars made ... Because this growth ruptures the epidermis of the stem, woody plants also have a cork cambium that develops among the phloem. ...
It was described by Turkish botanists Atila Ocak and Onur Koyuncu who named the species in honor of Özcan Seçmen, a fellow ... the periderm is the main growth tissue called vascular cambium which produces xylem and another transport tissue called phloem ... all Turkish botanists. Ocak and Koyuncu gave the species the specific epithet sechmenii as an homage to the prominent Turkish ... 151 Hypericum sechmenii was first observed and collected by Turkish botanist Atila Ocak in 2006. The holotype of the species ...
They are obligate parasites of plant phloem tissue and are spread by insect vectors. They are the most common cause of phyllody ... In 1832, the German-American botanist George Engelmann described the same condition in his work De Antholysi Prodromus. He gave ... was coined by the English botanist Maxwell T. Masters in his book on plant abnormalities, Vegetable Teratology (1869). The term ... it the name "frondescence". Nineteen years later, the Belgian botanist Charles Jacques Édouard Morren also investigated the ...
Here, the ants "farm" scale insects which feed on the palm's phloem cells, and produce a sweet dew the ants feed on. The ants ... High-climbing and armed with spines, the genus is named for the Dutch botanist P. W. Korthals who first collected them from ...
This derived from the new technologies acquired as well as the better facilities available and increased number of botanists ... phloem transport, plant defenses and, respiration and photosynthesis. This book contains 17 chapters on 243 pages which ...
It is caused by phytoplasmas which infect the phloem (inner bark) of the tree. Infection and death of the phloem effectively ... It derives its name 'Dutch' from the first description of the disease and its cause in the 1920s by the Dutch botanists Bea ... Elm phloem necrosis (elm yellows) is a disease of elm trees that is spread by leafhoppers or by root grafts. This very ... Botanists who study elms and argue over elm identification and classification are called pteleologists, from the Greek πτελέα ...
The species was described by the Scottish botanist George King (1840-1909), who worked in India from 1866 to 1898. He was ... phloem-suckers and xylem-suckers. "Ficus bernaysii King". Plants of the World Online. Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. Retrieved 18 ...
The Maasai people eat both the inner bark (phloem) and the fruit pulp boiled in water. They also use this plant medicinally to ... the name given by early Greek botanist-physician Pedanius Dioscorides (ca. 40-90) to this tree as a medicinal, in his book ...
Xylem and phloem is eventually formed in the horizontal portion of the bridge with its tracheary elements extended in a ... Her paternal grandmother, Helen Jane Carey, née Sandeman, was a keen amateur botanist and specimen collector; a popular and ... Lorna Scott and her Mortar Board by Margaret Stewart, for Egham Museum, on botanist Lorna Scott, Joseph Hubert Priestley's ... 1930). "Observations on the anatomical changes in tissue bridges across rings through the phloem of trees". Proceedings of the ...
Extensive taxonomic research on palms began with botanist H.E. Moore, who organized palms into 15 major groups based mostly on ... although because it does not arise from a single vascular cambium producing xylem inwards and phloem outwards, it is often ...
Carl Wilhelm von Nägeli (26 or 27 March 1817 - 10 May 1891) was a Swiss botanist. He studied cell division and pollination but ... Nägeli also coined the terms 'Meristem', 'Xylem' and 'Phloem'(all in 1858) while he and Hofmeister gave the 'Apical Cell Theory ...
Vascular plants transport sucrose in a special tissue called the phloem. The phloem and xylem are parallel to each other, but ... and botanists have developed a rich terminology for describing leaf characteristics. Leaves almost always have determinate ... Phloem. Cells that usually move sap, with dissolved sucrose(glucose to sucrose) produced by photosynthesis in the leaf, out of ... The xylem typically lies on the adaxial side of the vascular bundle and the phloem typically lies on the abaxial side. Both are ...
The innermost layer of bark is known as the phloem and this is involved in the transport of the sap containing the sugars made ... The greatest number of these grow in tropical regions and many of these areas have not yet been fully surveyed by botanists, ... The cells are continually dividing, creating phloem cells on the outside and wood cells known as xylem on the inside.[64] ... Because this growth ruptures the epidermis of the stem, woody plants also have a cork cambium that develops among the phloem. ...
It prefers feeding on bark, particularly the secondary phloem, rather than the wood.[45] In the scheme of the succession of ... The German botanist Johann Heinrich Friedrich Link reported his observations of the structure of the hymenium (the fertile ... Coprinellus micaeus was illustrated in a woodcut by the 16th-century botanist Carolus Clusius in what is arguably the first ... The species was first described scientifically by French botanist Jean Baptiste François Pierre Bulliard in 1786 as Agaricus ...
... induces the formation and organization of phloem and xylem. When the plant is wounded, the auxin may induce the cell ... In 1928, the Dutch botanist Frits Warmolt Went showed that a chemical messenger diffuses from coleoptile tips. Went's ... For long distances, relocation occurs via the stream of fluid in phloem vessels, but, for short-distance transport, a unique ...
The xylem moves water and minerals from the root to the rest of the plant, and the phloem provides the roots with sugars and ... an idea usually credited to botanist Frederick Orpen Bower in his 1908 book "The Origin of a Land Flora". A recent alternative ... notably the vascular tissues xylem and phloem, that transport water and food throughout the organism. Root systems capable of ... called xylem and phloem. They also have roots for taking up water and minerals. ...
The soft phloem becomes crushed, but the hard wood persists and forms the bulk of the stem and branches of the woody perennial ... In each bundle, separating the xylem and phloem, is a layer of meristem or active formative tissue known as cambium. By the ... 1. pith, 2. protoxylem, 3. xylem, 4. phloem, 5. sclerenchyma (bast fibre), 6. cortex, 7. epidermis ... The vascular bundles of the stem are arranged such that the xylem and phloem form concentric rings. ...
The nectar comes from phloem with additional sugars that are secreted from the cells through vesicles packaged by the ... Their defensive functions were first recognized by the Italian botanist Federico Delpino in his important monograph Funzione ... Frey-Wyssling, A. (1955) The phloem supply to the nectaries. Acta Bot. Neerl. 4:358-369. ...
... the sap is extracted from the trees using a tap placed into a hole drilled through the phloem, just inside the bark. The ... is also treated as a variety or subspecies of sugar maple by some botanists. ...
Carl Wilhelm von Nägeli[2][3][4] (26 or 27 March 1817 - 10 May 1891)[4][5][6] was a Swiss botanist. He studied cell division ... Nägeli also coined the terms 'Meristem', 'Xylem' and 'Phloem'(all in 1858) while he and Hofmeister gave the 'Apical Cell Theory ...
In stems and roots, the xylem typically lies closer to the interior of the stem with phloem towards the exterior of the stem. ... The individual cells of phloem are connected end-to-end, just as the sections of a pipe might be. As the plant grows, new ... Between the xylem and phloem is a meristem called the vascular cambium. This tissue divides off cells that will become ... The primary components of vascular tissue are the xylem and phloem. These two tissues transport fluid and nutrients internally ...
The phloem tissue consists of sieve tubes and their companion cells. The two tissues are separated by cambium which is a tissue ... Stems have two pipe-like tissues called xylem and phloem. The xylem tissue transports water by the action of transpiration pull ... The vascular cambium cells divide to produce secondary xylem to the inside and secondary phloem to the outside. As the stem ... The vascular cambium forms between the xylem and phloem in the vascular bundles and connects to form a continuous cylinder. ...
The vascular cambium cells divide to produce secondary xylem to the inside and secondary phloem to the outside. As the stem ... The vascular cambium forms between the xylem and phloem in the vascular bundles and connects to form a continuous cylinder. ... Ep = epidermis; C = cortex; BF = bast fibres; P = phloem; X = xylem; Pi = pith ... Transport of fluids between the roots and the shoots in the xylem and phloem ...
The former forms secondary xylem and secondary phloem, while the latter forms the periderm.[citation needed] ... This stabilized transcription factor is then able to be transported to the roots of the plant through the phloem, where it ... As a result, tissues beyond the secondary phloem including the epidermis and cortex, in many cases tend to be pushed outward ... In plants with secondary growth, the vascular cambium, originating between the xylem and the phloem, forms a cylinder of tissue ...
... and are consumed at night to fuel respiration and continue sugar export into the phloem,[118] though in mature chloroplasts, it ...
They are usually associated with the xylem and phloem of the vascular bundles. The fibers of the xylem are always lignified, ... while those of the phloem are cellulosic. Reliable evidence for the fibre cells' evolutionary origin from tracheids exists.[ ...
When four, the phloem arms appear as a cross, hence, the common name "cross vine". The phloem in the arms has wider sieve tubes ... Misidentification of plants, even by botanists, continues to be a big problem for ethnobotany, and it is especially severe for ... Lianas of the tribe Bignonieae have a unique vascular structure, in which phloem arms extend downward into the xylem because ... "Evolution of disparity between the regular and variant phloem in Bignonieae (Bignoniaceae)". American Journal of Botany. 98 (4 ...
... is also treated as a variety or subspecies of sugar maple by some botanists. The sugar maple can be confused with the Norway ... the sap is extracted from the trees using a tap placed into a hole drilled through the phloem, just inside the bark. The ...
The nucleus was also described by Franz Bauer in 1804 and in more detail in 1831 by Scottish botanist Robert Brown in a talk at ... Ham BK, Lucas WJ (April 2014). "The angiosperm phloem sieve tube system: a role in mediating traits important to modern ...
In the 1950s, she collaborated with botanist Vernon Cheadle on more phloem research. Her treatise The Phloem (1969) was ... This volume has been recognized as the most important of the series and was a definitive source of information about phloem. ... Katherine Esau (3 April 1898 - 4 June 1997) was a German-American botanist who received the National Medal of Science for her ... While teaching, she continued her research on viruses and specifically phloem, the food conducting tissue in plants. ...
... phloem). vasculum A container used by botanists for collecting field specimens. vein A strand of vascular tissue, e.g. in the ... phloem A specialised conducting tissue in vascular plants that transports sucrose from the leaves to other plant organs. ... stele The primary vascular system (including phloem, xylem, and ground tissue) of plant stems and roots. stellate Star-shaped. ... vascular Referring to the conducting tissues (xylem and phloem) of vascular plants. vascular bundle A bundle of vascular tissue ...
The root comprises of the phloem, apical meristem, endodermis, xylem, root hair, and cortex cells. A group of roots and the ... Botanists differentiate between three main types of root structures: taproot, fibrous, and adventitious. ...
... those possessing conducting tissues for water and sugars like xylem and phloem) have true leaves, according to botanists. ...
The phloem, the living part of the plant vasculature that is spread throughout the plant, has been postulated as a major tissue ... transmission of electrical signals from wounded to unwounded areas in a plant has since long piqued the interest of botanists. ... A New Application of the Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG) for Acquiring and Measuring Electrical Signals in Phloem Sieve ... Environmental Sciences, Issue 101, Electrophysiology, plant physiology, phloem, electrical penetration graph, sieve element, ...
Most botanists include Lobelia and related genera in the family Campanulaceae (bluebell family); others consider them a ... The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).. ..... Click the link ...
... phloem loading and unloading. In phloem loading, sugars move from photosynthetic cells to the export conduits (the phloem). ... This process was first described by German botanist Ernst Münch in the late 1920s (Stroock et al. 2014). Despite general ... In trees, the phloem is located just below the bark. The phloem comprises cylindrical cells lying end-to-end, forming a fluidic ... PHLOEM. The phloem is the plant tissue that carries the products of photosynthesis (sugars) from sites of production (leaves ...
I suppose I was hoping for an pithy synopsis of each image, from an expert--a botanist, biologist, or a materials scientist-- ... "The xylem and phloem are surrounded by a ring of parenchyma cells.").. ...
Austrian botanist, pioneer in the development of physiological plant anatomy, and the first person to study plant tissue ... In 1913, Haberlandt discovered that a compound found in phloem had the ability to stimulate cell division.. Booklist for ... After studying for his PhD (1882) under German botanist Julius Von Sachs at the University W rzburg, he returned to England and ... Although his system was not accepted by other botanists, the analysis of the relations between structure and environment has ...
Taller plants maintain higher turgor pressures in their leaf phloem. The ability of fluid to flow through the phloem ( ... In 1930, the German botanist Ernst Münch proposed that pressure differences between the source and sink tissues are responsible ... Alongside the phloem, another type of tissue called the xylem transports water and ions away from the roots. Although the ... Furthermore, phloem tubes have higher conductivities in taller plants than in shorter plants because the pores in their sieve ...
Is also found in Isaac Bayley Balfour ( 1853-1922 ), botanist sich über die gesamte Länge Stammes... Meristematic tissue a 10- ... Das faszikuläre und das sekundäre phloem beispielsweise den Blättern, zu differenzieren that occur plants! Cambium produces ... botanist it passes through the soil an! Plant cells generally can not divide or produce cells of a lateral tissue! Meristematic ... Xylem und das sekundäre phloem seen as rings increase in length help to increase the length of plant! Branches, as well as the ...
Botanists have find more than 300 species of aloe Vera like rumex, barbadensis etc. Out of this species, only five have ... Tubes of xylem and phloem were found below the cortex and its supplied water and minerals to leaves [1]. ... Botanists have found more than 200 important nutritional constituents in aloe Vera leaf which having to perform a function. ...
WOOD IS COMPOSED OF (A) XYLEM AND PHLOEM (B) CORTEX AND PHLOEM (C) BARK. (D) SECONDARY XYLEM (E) SECONDARY PHLOEM.. 11. WHICH ... GENERALLY LACK A PITH; ROOTS OF SOME MONOCOTS HAVE A PITH--SOME BOTANISTS. INTERPRET THE PITH AS POTENTIAL XYLEM TISSUE. ... C) PHLOEM (D) PERIDERM (E) PITH.. 7. A PLANT WITH A WHORLED LEAF ARRANGEMENT WOULD HAVE HOW MANY LEAVES AT EACH. NODE? (A) ONE ... BE FOUND? (A) PHLOEM (B) CORTEX (C) EPIDERMIS (D) XYLEM (E) INTERFASCICULAR. PARENCHYMA.. 18. THE GYNOECIUM REFERS TO THE (A) ...
The single layer of plant cells that is located between the cortex and the vascular (xylem and phloem) tissues (Fig. 1). It has ... 1). "Flower" has been used broadly enough by some botanists to include the reproductive… ... Florigen is produced in leaves, where changes in day length are perceived, and migrates through the phloem… ...
Looks like water was turning to steam inside the xylem and phloem, forcing unheated sap and steam out the cut end. Phloem has ... Any botanists out there to confirm this hypothesis? All this sap with foaming potential kind of illustrates how trees in the ... Remember xylem and phloem from elementary school science class? I do. Which one do you think is responsible for making the foam ...
Florigen is produced in leaves, where changes in day length are perceived, and migrates through the phloem… ... 1). "Flower" has been used broadly enough by some botanists to include the reproductive… ...
But the structure of leaves also helps botanists and horticulturalists describe and identify one plant from another. Bean ... The edges of bean plants are smooth, with no serrations, teeth or curves (called lobes). Botanists call this edge entire. ... and phloem (nutrient transport). ... But the structure of leaves also helps botanists and ...
Phloem is another set of pipes made of living cells that moves solutions within the plant with the aid of metabolized energy. ... The xylem and the phloem together comprise the vascular system in most land plants and evolved not long after plants colonized ... Pingback: How giant pumpkins got so big: A Q&A with Jessica Savage , The Botanist in the Kitchen ... molasses is made from the combined xylem and phloem sap from both species). ...
It is possible, say botanists, to record potentials even in dead xylem vessels. These vary with the amount of water passing ... and phloem, which transports sugars. Every two seconds, the electrodes measure the bioelectric potentials of 256 trees. ... Miwa suggests that the trees were communicating electrically via their roots, but other botanists say that they could merely ... But other botanists say that varying environmental circumstances could cause the effects. ...
Phloem arranged in a central cylinder discourage nutrient uptake Late 19th century ; earliest use found in Alfred Bennett 1833â ... Origin Late 19th century; earliest use found in Alfred Bennett (1833â 1902), botanist and publisher. How to use hypertension in ... Cross section of a typical root, showing the primary xylem and the primary phloem arranged in a central cylinder. Can you spell ... botanist and publisher can trust is partially responsible the. Newsletter to get trusted stories delivered right to your inbox ...
Auxin and Gibberellin control the process of differentiation between the carrying of sap (phloem vascular tissue) and the ... This is the question that all the botanists asked for about seventy years. Some has spoken of not well defined "messengers", ... phloem), up to the bud top, where another gene recognizes the protein and starts the flowering mechanism. This is a great ...
For instance, as in the example above, phloem is found in carnations, roses, and lilies (the in-group). Phloem is also found, ... Botanists are not absolutely certain which of the algae living today are the most closely related to the land plants, but they ... Looking again at the example of presence of phloem, the hypothesis that carnations, roses, and lilies all have phloem because ... For instance, the phloem that is found in carnations, roses, and lilies is a homologous similarity because all of these plants ...
How do the biomechanics of the kelp sieve tubes differ from the phloem tubes of higher plants?. Regarding cytoplasmic ... Historically, to paraphrase a fellow botanist, we have bred needy, greedy plants that deplete resources and need lots of ... which resemble the phloem tubes of vascular plants. What is the purpose of these tubes?. In large photosynthetic organisms, not ... which led him to take a second look at some of the ideas of botanists in the 19th and early 20th century and use modern ...
Variability in the phloem restricted plant trypanosomes (Phytomonas sp.) associated with wilts of cultivated crops. Isoenzyme ... The damage caused by flagellates is so high that botanists consider Phytomonas to be a natural barrier for plant naturalization ... 1995, Hollar & Maslov 1997). Phloem inhabiting Phytomonas are the causative agents of epiphytotic plant diseases of introduced ...
Many botanists believe that the four different whorls of a flower (sepals, petals, stamens, and carpels) originated by ... Phloem cells mainly transport carbohydrates (made by photosynthesis) from the leaves to the rest of the plant. Typically, xylem ... Botanists use a large vocabulary of specialized terms to describe leaf outline, margin, apex, base, and vestiture (surface ... Many botanists believe that the four different whorls of a flower (sepals, petals, stamens, and carpels) originated by ...
A botanist, plant scientist or phytologist is a scientist who specialises in this field. The term "botany" comes from the ... Corn has been used to study mechanisms of photosynthesis and phloem loading of sugar in C4 plants.[126] The single celled green ... Nowadays, botanists (in the strict sense) study approximately 410,000 species of land plants of which some 391,000 species are ... Botanists study how plants produce food and how to increase yields, for example through plant breeding, making their work ...
Goethe, German writer, philosopher, and (in his spare time) noted botanist, proposed in 1790 that carpels evolved from leaves. ... Complex phloem - sieve tube elements w/companion cells *Herbaceous habit - rapid life cycle (some angios) ...
By profession, I am a biologist, a botanist, and a teacher. I have been doing microscopy for over 30 years. As a student of ... All tissues are visible on the sample: multilayer parenchyma, phellogen, phelloderm, vascular bundles with xylem and phloem, ...
Most are aquatic and autotrophic and lack many of the cell and tissue types, such as stomata, xylem, and phloem. ... Martinus Willem Beijerincka botanist and microbiologist. Do you really want to delete this prezi? ...
The inner bark-or phloem-is a live, spongy layer just inside the outer bark that moves sugars and other substances from the ... But unless you are a botanist, you may find that the answers dont come easily. Some common characteristics of trees, shrubs, ...
  • The phloem is the plant tissue that carries the products of photosynthesis (sugars) from sites of production (leaves and other green parts of the plant) to sites of consumption. (carlsbergfondet.dk)
  • The two primary vascular tissues in leaf veins are xylem, which is important for transport of water and soluble ions into the leaf, and phloem, which is important for transport of carbohydrates (made by photosynthesis) from the leaf to the rest of the plant. (encyclopedia.com)
  • So additional phloem will be needed to move carbohydrate from the photosynthesis in the leaves to the root. (plantphys.info)
  • They also have a specialized non-lignified tissue (the phloem ) to conduct products of photosynthesis . (kiwix.org)
  • Energy and nutrients produced via photosynthesis in the leaves are moved in solution down the plant via the phloem. (jstor.org)
  • The product of photosynthesis is transferred through the phloem to wherever it is required at the time. (goblinlights.com)
  • The phloem pipes are responsible for export of sugars, while the xylem conduits supply water taken up by the roots. (carlsbergfondet.dk)
  • Alongside the phloem, another type of tissue called the xylem transports water and ions away from the roots. (elifesciences.org)
  • Miwa suggests that the trees were communicating electrically via their roots, but other botanists say that they could merely have responded in the same way to shared local environmental conditions. (newscientist.com)
  • This zone contains dividing cells, which give rise to xylem vessels, dead tissue that carries water up from the roots, and phloem, which transports sugars. (newscientist.com)
  • The inner bark-or phloem-is a live, spongy layer just inside the outer bark that moves sugars and other substances from the leaves to the stem, roots, and other places where they are needed. (eol.org)
  • This process involves the phloem and the xylem, two of the plant's main parts that move nutrients from the leaves to the roots and across the stems and branches. (maximumyield.com)
  • In monocot roots, xylem and phloem tissue bundles are arranged in a circular fashion around the central pith, which consists of ground tissue (parenchyma). (robotcraft.ca)
  • In a plant, storage of food is a primary function of a) xylem c) roots b) phloem d) leaves 12. (sciencedocbox.com)
  • Vascular plants have lignified tissue and specialized structures termed xylem and phloem, which transport water, minerals, and nutrients upward from the roots and return sugars and other photosynthetic products. (eol.org)
  • From roots Water Tra phloem _________: carries food nsport Down from leaves. (slideread.com)
  • Pith Monocot and Dicot differ from each other in four structures: leaves, stems, roots and flowers.The difference between dicot and monocot root is, dicot root contains xylem in the middle and phloem surrounding it. (elajweb.com)
  • The shoot system is â ¦ Xylem & Phloem: In monocot roots, the xylem and phloem are numerous in numbers: In dicot roots, the xylem and phloem are limited in numbers. (elajweb.com)
  • Roots and shoots are considered by most botanists to be entirely separate organs, although some developmental processes are shared, and some inter-conversion can occur (Groff and Kaplan, 1988). (europeanmedical.info)
  • It is the science of plant life A person engaged in the study of botany is called a botanist. (slideserve.com)
  • Wilhelm Hofmeister , one of the most brilliant botanists of his times, was the one to diverge away from the idealist way of pursuing botany. (academic.ru)
  • In 1930, the German botanist Ernst Münch proposed that pressure differences between the source and sink tissues are responsible for transport through the phloem ( Münch, 1927 ). (elifesciences.org)
  • In the phloem of source tissues, sugars are highly concentrated, so water is drawn into the sieve tubes from the neighboring xylem. (elifesciences.org)
  • In sink tissues, on the other hand, sugars are consumed, which reduces their concentration in the phloem: this allows water to flow back into the xylem and leads to a decrease in the turgor pressure. (elifesciences.org)
  • The secondary vascular tissues are aligned, forming radial files of cells that are produced from a single cambium initial cell that you can locate between the xylem and phloem. (plantphys.info)
  • But it is so strong that it can even smother the host tree and cause the death of the tree by cutting down the main phloem and xylem tissues in it, thus stopping supply of food and water to different parts of the host tree. (deccanherald.com)
  • Vascular plants are considered to be more advanced than nonvascular plants because they have specialized tissues, namely xylem, which is involved in structural support and water conduction, and phloem, which functions in food conduction. (slideserve.com)
  • Xylem tissues flow water, hormones and liquids upward in the plant while downward movement of the same occurs in phloem cells. (gardenguides.com)
  • These have vascular system i.e. xylem and phloem tissues. (botanytoday.com)
  • The vascular tissues in the more advanced ferns and "fern allies" are made up of xylem and phloem, which conduct water, nutrients, and food throughout the plant body. (tulane.edu)
  • You'll sometimes see moss described as a 'lower' plant: mosses don't have any xylem & phloem (the vascular tissues that transport water & nutrients around the plant. (waikato.ac.nz)
  • A single vascular bundle, no matter how large or small, always contains both xylem and phloem tissues. (oer2go.org)
  • These lycophytes have vascular/conducting tissues (xylem and phloem) but are seedless and not ferns. (wordpress.com)
  • Phloem: Secondary Phloem and Variations in Its Structure.Chapter 15. (nhbs.com)
  • As we shall see at the end of this lecture, the epidermis will need to expand to allow for the additional growth of secondary xylem and secondary phloem. (plantphys.info)
  • Derivative cells that mature toward the outside of the cambium initial cell become secondary phloem . (plantphys.info)
  • In looking at a cross section of a one- to three-year old stem, the secondary xylem and secondary phloem cells are easy to distinguish from their primary xylem and primary phloem counterparts. (plantphys.info)
  • Each year, the cambium produces a layer of secondary xylem and an layer of secondary phloem. (plantphys.info)
  • Because more of the derivatives mature toward the inside, the layer of secondary xylem each year is much thicker than the layer of secondary phloem. (plantphys.info)
  • Thus the layers of secondary phloem are much thinner as a group than are the corresponding layers of secondary xylem. (plantphys.info)
  • This task is taken by the inner bark with its functional secondary phloem. (wisc.edu)
  • Phloem has all the nutrients in it, so I'm guessing that's the source of the foam. (spasmsofaccommodation.com)
  • Knoblauch studies the inner workings of phloem (FLOAM), the channels that transport water and nutrients throughout a plant. (wsu.edu)
  • The xylem is a tube that moves water up the plant, and the phloem is a tube that moves water and nutrients bidirectionally as needed through the plant. (jstor.org)
  • Just as the xylem and phloem of a plant's vascular system has been compared to the vein and arteries of the human circulatory system , leaves have been compared to human lungs , with both involved in the exchange of gases with the outside environment. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Most are aquatic and autotrophic and lack many of the cell and tissue types, such as stomata, xylem, and phloem. (menma.info)
  • Internal structure of a leaf margin guard cells Stoma [plural: stomata] palisade layer spongy layer xylem phloem 9. (sumy.ua)
  • Plants reduce water loss by using the a) xylem and phloem c) waxy cuticle and stomata b) mesophyll d) ground tissue 11. (sciencedocbox.com)
  • Leaf veins contain phloem and xylem tubes. (carlsbergfondet.dk)
  • To drive transport, a remarkably large cell pressure is required in the leaf phloem: 10 to 20 atm. (carlsbergfondet.dk)
  • Botanists have found more than 200 important nutritional constituents in aloe Vera leaf which having to perform a function. (ukessays.com)
  • Nestled below that layer are the various other functions of the leaf, notably the veins that hold the xylem (water transport) and phloem (nutrient transport). (gardenguides.com)
  • Botanists use a large vocabulary of specialized terms to describe leaf outline, margin, apex, base, and vestiture (surface covering). (encyclopedia.com)
  • This scanning electron micrograph shows xylem and phloem in the leaf vascular bundle. (oer2go.org)
  • In the 1950s, she collaborated with botanist Vernon Cheadle on more phloem research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Working with Cheadle , she also explained the evolutionary specialization of the phloem tissue with respect to its function. (academic.ru)
  • Sugars are believed to play a fascinating dual role in generating this pressure, acting both as an energy carrier and a motile force generator: According to the Münch hypothesis, the osmotic pressure of the phloem sap provides the necessary force to drive a convective flow from sugar sources to sinks. (carlsbergfondet.dk)
  • The long distance transport of sugars occurs in a tissue called phloem. (elifesciences.org)
  • In flowering plants, cells called sieve elements form the tubes that transport sugars and other molecules through the phloem. (elifesciences.org)
  • There is some debate about how this actually occurs, but most botanists agree that it has a lot to do with surface tension. (thedailygarden.us)
  • transport occurs through xylem, phloem, or cell-to-cell. (csbsju.edu)
  • The phloem comprises cylindrical cells lying end-to-end, forming a fluidic network spanning the entire length of the plant. (carlsbergfondet.dk)
  • Phloem is another set of pipes made of living cells that moves solutions within the plant with the aid of metabolized energy. (botanistinthekitchen.blog)
  • Phloem is comprised of parallel tubes, or sieve elements, each of which is made of long, narrow cells laid end-to-end. (wsu.edu)
  • it consists primarily of elongated tracheids (water- and mineral-conducting cells) in the xylem and vascular rays in the phloem that store materials and provide for lateral conduction. (britannica.com)
  • The fibers of the bundle cap are mature and thick walled, the inner cells towards the phloem showing their great age with tannin deposits in their walls. (phys.org)
  • These consist of four layers: toward the epidermis a "bundle cap" of fibers, functional primary phloem, vascular cambium (aka cambium), and primary xylem toward the interior. (plantphys.info)
  • It is technically challenging to perform experiments on phloem because the tissue is often deeply embedded in the plant and it is difficult to isolate sieve tubes. (elifesciences.org)
  • Furthermore, phloem tubes have higher conductivities in taller plants than in shorter plants because the pores in their sieve plates are larger. (elifesciences.org)
  • Tubes of xylem and phloem were found below the cortex and its supplied water and minerals to leaves [1]. (ukessays.com)
  • But the structure of leaves also helps botanists and horticulturalists describe and identify one plant from another. (gardenguides.com)
  • Goethe, German writer, philosopher, and (in his spare time) noted botanist, proposed in 1790 that carpels evolved from leaves. (slideserve.com)
  • Vascular plants transport sucrose in a special tissue called the phloem . (wikipedia.org)
  • Clubroot disease stimulates early steps of phloem differentiation and recruits SWEET sucrose transporters within developing galls. (ipk-gatersleben.de)
  • Botanists differentiate between three main types of root structures: taproot, fibrous, and adventitious. (maximumyield.com)
  • He's found that structures in the phloem of some plants have great potential as high-tech, microscopic valves, sensors, and motors. (wsu.edu)
  • Although botanists have described anatomical and functional compartments in plants, enhancer trap transposants have revealed additional subdivisions that do not always correspond to those previously described. (plantphysiol.org)
  • These vascular bundles , or veins, are made up of the xylem and phloem . (thedailygarden.us)
  • in Maize root there is present sclerenchyma outside the phloem bundles (Fig. In addition, most promoter regions in mitochondria of monocots may have a small upstream element in common, a purin-rich region located at position â 12 to â 9 (Rapp et al. (elajweb.com)
  • Generally, the xylem is found closer to the center of a stem, while the phloem is closer to the outer edge. (thedailygarden.us)
  • While teaching, she continued her research on viruses and specifically phloem, the food conducting tissue in plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sugar transport in plants occur in the phloem vascular system. (carlsbergfondet.dk)
  • If the Münch hypothesis is right, there should be differences in turgor pressure and phloem conductivity (the ability of fluid to move through the phloem) between tall and short plants. (elifesciences.org)
  • All of the plants have similarly low turgor pressures in the root phloem. (elifesciences.org)
  • The xylem and the phloem together comprise the vascular system in most land plants and evolved not long after plants colonized land. (botanistinthekitchen.blog)
  • Nowadays, botanists (in the strict sense) study approximately 410,000 species of land plants of which some 391,000 species are vascular plants (including ca 369,000 species of flowering plants ), [4] and ca 20,000 are bryophytes . (wikipedi0.org)
  • In the last two decades of the 20th century, botanists exploited the techniques of molecular genetic analysis , including genomics and proteomics and DNA sequences to classify plants more accurately. (wikipedi0.org)
  • This is traditional of classification of plants and is still followed by many botanists. (botanytoday.com)
  • Bryophytes are non vascular land plants, i.e., bryophytes lack xylem and phloem characteristic of higher plants. (indiastudychannel.com)
  • Botanists classify flowering plants into. (brainscape.com)
  • Nägeli also coined the terms 'Meristem', 'Xylem' and 'Phloem'(all in 1858) while he and Hofmeister gave the 'Apical Cell Theory' (1846) which aimed to explain origin and functioning of the shoot apex meristem in plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nowadays, botanists study approximately 400,000 species of living organisms [ 4 ] of which some 260,000 species are vascular plants and about 248,000 are flowering plants . (omicsgroup.org)
  • Botanists rely on the use of scientific names for plants in part because a given plant may have more than one common name, depending on what part of the country you find it in. (wordpress.com)
  • For botanists , discovering genetic links to increasing crop production and the reproductive lifespan of plants, especially long-lived ones such as trees, would be invaluable. (phys.org)
  • Cavalier-Smith (1998) treated the Tracheophyta as a phylum or botanical division encompassing two of these characteristics defined by the Latin phrase "facies diploida xylem et phloem instructa" (diploid phase with xylem and phloem). (kiwix.org)
  • These serve an important role to botanists, however, for their taxonomic placement and unique characteristics. (wordpress.com)
  • Bearded botanist Wade "Grubbycup" Brown enjoys teaching horticulture both in person and through his writing. (botanicare.com)
  • On a broader note, linked from a list of plant families present, there are Checklists of Exotic Plant Species known to be in cultivation in Australian horticulture which many botanists may value. (floridaplants.com)
  • It is possible, say botanists, to record potentials even in dead xylem vessels. (newscientist.com)
  • Native to various parts of Central America, the corn plant (Zea mays) has been grown and bred by humans for centuries, confounding botanists as to their precise native region or genetic identities. (gardenguides.com)
  • the phloem transports the photosynthetic products to the other parts of the plant. (oer2go.org)
  • Botanists divide trees into two main groups, called coniferous and broad-leaved. (britannica.com)
  • Austrian botanist , pioneer in the development of physiological plant anatomy, and the first person to study plant tissue culture (1921). (todayinsci.com)
  • Scottish botanist Robert Brown first distinguished gymnosperms from angiosperms in 1825. (britannica.com)
  • Botanist Michael Knoblauch says the long form of a forisome (left) resembles a crystal, and the plug form (right), a wad of chewing gum. (wsu.edu)
  • The sieve elements are separated by sieve plates, which contain large pores that allow fluid to flow through the phloem. (elifesciences.org)
  • Now, they have used these methods to calculate the flow of fluid through the phloem of a type of vine called Morning Glory ( Ipomea nil ), which can grow up to 15 meters in length. (elifesciences.org)
  • In 1913, Haberlandt discovered that a compound found in phloem had the ability to stimulate cell division. (todayinsci.com)
  • earliest use found in Alfred Bennett (1833â 1902), botanist and publisher. (riosdevida.com)
  • He found that they keep the phloem from leaking after it's been injured. (wsu.edu)
  • It just wasn't a question that I'd thought to ask myself, & maybe you can put that down to the fact that I'm really a zoologist by training rather than a botanist, & maybe I'd just never thought about it :-) But my goodness, once that student woke me up to the fact that here was something fairly central to the subject we were talking about, I went off & found the answer. (waikato.ac.nz)
  • Botanists who study elms and argue over elm identification and classification are called pteleologists , from the Greek πτελέα (:elm). (omicsgroup.org)
  • Cross section of a typical root, showing the primary xylem and the primary phloem arranged in a central cylinder. (riosdevida.com)
  • This volume has been recognized as the most important of the series and was a definitive source of information about phloem. (wikipedia.org)
  • Like its predecessors, 'Esau's Plant Anatomy' will serve as an important reference for students and botanists who need basic information on this subject. (nhbs.com)
  • Botanists have find more than 300 species of aloe Vera like rumex, barbadensis etc. (ukessays.com)
  • Katherine Esau (3 April 1898 - 4 June 1997) was a German-American botanist who received the National Medal of Science for her work on plant anatomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once the virus is transmitted and has successfully entered into the plant cell, it moves locally from cell to cell until it enters the phloem, which allows the virus to enter distant tissue to cause a systemic infection. (wikibooks.org)
  • Botanists normally differ between two types of geotropism: positive and negative. (maximumyield.com)
  • Phloem: Cell Types and Developmental Aspects.Chapter 14. (nhbs.com)
  • A botanist or plant scientist is a scientist who specializes in this field of study. (omicsgroup.org)
  • The plant specimens for the study were collected from the bank of the Arpa river, Bilaspur, (Chhattisgarh, India) 22°06'35.83"N and 82°08'06.23"E, and were positively identified and authenticated by the Botanist Dr. Shiddhamallaya N, Regional Research Institute (Ay. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Botanists call this edge 'entire. (gardenguides.com)
  • Botanists call the upper side the adaxial surface (or adaxis) and the lower side the abaxial surface (or abaxis). (sumy.ua)