Ulna: The inner and longer bone of the FOREARM.Ulna Fractures: Fractures of the larger bone of the forearm.Radius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.Radius FracturesPronation: Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm backward or downward. When referring to the foot, a combination of eversion and abduction movements in the tarsal and metatarsal joints (turning the foot up and in toward the midline of the body).Monteggia's Fracture: Fracture in the proximal half of the shaft of the ulna, with dislocation of the head of the radius.Supination: Applies to movements of the forearm in turning the palm forward or upward. When referring to the foot, a combination of adduction and inversion movements of the foot.Wrist Joint: The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).Wrist Injuries: Injuries to the wrist or the wrist joint.Diaphyses: The shaft of long bones.Gymnastics: Systematic physical exercise. This includes calisthenics, a system of light gymnastics for promoting strength and grace of carriage.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Pseudarthrosis: A pathologic entity characterized by deossification of a weight-bearing long bone, followed by bending and pathologic fracture, with inability to form normal BONY CALLUS leading to existence of the "false joint" that gives the condition its name. (Dorland, 27th ed)Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Forearm Injuries: Injuries to the part of the upper limb of the body between the wrist and elbow.Fractures, Malunited: Union of the fragments of a fractured bone in a faulty or abnormal position. If two bones parallel to one another unite by osseous tissue, the result is a crossunion. (From Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 4th ed)Arm Bones: The bones of the free part of the upper extremity including the HUMERUS; RADIUS; and ULNA.Forelimb: A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)Fractures, Ununited: A fracture in which union fails to occur, the ends of the bone becoming rounded and eburnated, and a false joint occurs. (Stedman, 25th ed)Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors: Compounds that inhibit HMG-CoA reductases. They have been shown to directly lower cholesterol synthesis.Diet: Regular course of eating and drinking adopted by a person or animal.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Cholesterol: The principal sterol of all higher animals, distributed in body tissues, especially the brain and spinal cord, and in animal fats and oils.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.SmokeHeart Diseases: Pathological conditions involving the HEART including its structural and functional abnormalities.AxisRadiology: A specialty concerned with the use of x-ray and other forms of radiant energy in the diagnosis and treatment of disease.Teaching Materials: Instructional materials used in teaching.Pharmacology, Clinical: The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.Competitive Behavior: The direct struggle between individuals for environmental necessities or for a common goal.Radiology Department, Hospital: Hospital department which is responsible for the administration and provision of x-ray diagnostic and therapeutic services.Radiology, Interventional: Subspecialty of radiology that combines organ system radiography, catheter techniques and sectional imaging.Nails: The thin, horny plates that cover the dorsal surfaces of the distal phalanges of the fingers and toes of primates.Legislation, Veterinary: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of veterinary medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Wit and Humor as Topic: The faculty of expressing the amusing, clever, or comical or the keen perception and cleverly apt expression of connections between ideas that awaken amusement and pleasure. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Onychomycosis: A fungal infection of the nail, usually caused by DERMATOPHYTES; YEASTS; or nondermatophyte MOLDS.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Elbow: Region of the body immediately surrounding and including the ELBOW JOINT.Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Elbow: Replacement of the ELBOW JOINT.Joints: Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.
  • Postaxial limb deficiency is characterized by absence or hypoplasia of the fifth toe/finger (sometimes also including the fourth toe/finger) with or without absence/hypoplasia of the fibula or ulna (see Fig. 4.40 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Ulnar hypoplasia is often associated with radioulnar synostosis (fusion of the radius and ulna), absence of the postaxial digits (fourth and fifth fingers) and fibular deficiency. (cdc.gov)
  • Angular limb deformities can be caused by the premature closure of a growth plate (called a "physis"), by retained cartilaginous cores or by bony bridging (synostosis) between the radius and ulna. (petwave.com)
  • It is a long, large bone that extends from the scapula of the shoulder to the ulna and radius of the lower arm. (innerbody.com)
  • The short head attaches more towards the front of the body, but also on the scapula at what's called the coracoid process - many boney bits that jut out at all are called a "process" Attached to the front, gonna pull to the front. (begin2dig.com)
  • Which of the following bony structures is found on the distal aspect of the ulnar? (studystack.com)
  • ulnar notch and head of ulna. (studystack.com)
  • The deformity varies in degree from a slight protrusion of the lower end of the ulna, to complete dislocation of the inferior radio-ulnar joint with marked radial deviation of the hand. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is on the ulnar side of the hand, but does not articulate with the ulna. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cubital tunnel is located where the ulnar nerve passes between the medial epicondyle of the humerus and the olecranon process of the ulna (Image 1). (abmp.com)
  • She experienced no pain upon palpation over the metacarpals, the anatomic snuffbox (scaphoid bone), along the first metacarpal-phalangeal (MCP) joint, along the rays of the metacarpals, over the distal radial-ulnar junction, or along the boney prominences of the radius or ulna. (jabfm.org)
  • Lateral, articulating with the ulna. (umd.edu)
  • Lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow) is a condition in which the bony bump on the outside of the elbow becomes painful and tender. (lmh.org)
  • Below, it is fixed to the upper and lateral margins of the olecranon, to the posterior part of the annular ligament, and to the ulna behind the radial notch. (theodora.com)
  • below, to the annular ligament, some of its most posterior fibers passing over that ligament, to be inserted into the lateral margin of the ulna. (theodora.com)
  • Cetacean pectoral flippers are composed of the bony elements plesiomorphic to those of tetrapods (humerus, radius, ulna, carpals, metacarpals and digits), all encased in dense connective tissues, creating a stiffened flipper ( Fig. 1 ). (biologists.org)
  • When long bones such as the radius and ulna are badly fractured, which might occur in motor vehicle accidents, such injuries might require the intervention of an orthopedic surgeon, as simple plaster or fiberglass casting of the affecting limb may be inadequate for bony healing. (boneclones.com)
  • The long bones and the innominate show significant signs of healing with irregular bony exostoses. (boneclones.com)
  • Longitudinal growth of the radius and ulna (and other long bones) comes almost entirely from the growth plates (physes), which have their own extensive blood supply that is separate from the blood supply that nourishes the central shaft (diaphysis) and the very ends (epiphyses) of the bones. (petwave.com)
  • As the nerve exits this space between these two bony prominences, it passes through another narrow canal between the two heads of the flexor carpi ulnaris (FCU) muscle. (abmp.com)
  • The description of cubital tunnel syndrome can include nerve compression in the tunnel between the two bony prominences as well as compression between the two heads of the FCU muscle. (abmp.com)