Ankylosis: Fixation and immobility of a joint.Tooth Ankylosis: Solid fixation of a tooth resulting from fusion of the cementum and alveolar bone, with obliteration of the periodontal ligament. It is uncommon in the deciduous dentition and very rare in permanent teeth. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)AxisAtlanto-Occipital Joint: The point of articulation between the OCCIPITAL BONE and the CERVICAL ATLAS.Cervical Atlas: The first cervical vertebra.Arthrodesis: The surgical fixation of a joint by a procedure designed to accomplish fusion of the joint surfaces by promoting the proliferation of bone cells. (Dorland, 28th ed)Atlanto-Axial Joint: The joint involving the CERVICAL ATLAS and axis bones.Zygapophyseal Joint: The joint that occurs between facets of the interior and superior articular processes of adjacent VERTEBRAE.Spinal Cord Diseases: Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.Phosphate Transport Proteins: Membrane proteins that are involved in the active transport of phosphate.Temporomandibular Joint Disorders: A variety of conditions affecting the anatomic and functional characteristics of the temporomandibular joint. Factors contributing to the complexity of temporomandibular diseases are its relation to dentition and mastication and the symptomatic effects in other areas which account for referred pain to the joint and the difficulties in applying traditional diagnostic procedures to temporomandibular joint pathology where tissue is rarely obtained and x-rays are often inadequate or nonspecific. Common diseases are developmental abnormalities, trauma, subluxation, luxation, arthritis, and neoplasia. (From Thoma's Oral Pathology, 6th ed, pp577-600)Temporomandibular Joint: An articulation between the condyle of the mandible and the articular tubercle of the temporal bone.Tooth Replantation: Reinsertion of a tooth into the alveolus from which it was removed or otherwise lost.Arthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Micrognathism: Abnormally small jaw.Stapes: One of the three ossicles of the middle ear. It transmits sound vibrations from the INCUS to the internal ear (Ear, Internal see LABYRINTH).Spondylitis, Ankylosing: A chronic inflammatory condition affecting the axial joints, such as the SACROILIAC JOINT and other intervertebral or costovertebral joints. It occurs predominantly in young males and is characterized by pain and stiffness of joints (ANKYLOSIS) with inflammation at tendon insertions.Synostosis: A union between adjacent bones or parts of a single bone formed by osseous material, such as ossified connecting cartilage or fibrous tissue. (Dorland, 27th ed)Facial Asymmetry: Congenital or acquired asymmetry of the face.Spondylarthritis: Inflammation of the joints of the SPINE, the intervertebral articulations.Temporomandibular Joint Dysfunction Syndrome: A symptom complex consisting of pain, muscle tenderness, clicking in the joint, and limitation or alteration of mandibular movement. The symptoms are subjective and manifested primarily in the masticatory muscles rather than the temporomandibular joint itself. Etiologic factors are uncertain but include occlusal dysharmony and psychophysiologic factors.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Temporomandibular Joint Disc: A plate of fibrous tissue that divides the temporomandibular joint into an upper and lower cavity. The disc is attached to the articular capsule and moves forward with the condyle in free opening and protrusion. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p92)Sacroiliac Joint: The immovable joint formed by the lateral surfaces of the SACRUM and ILIUM.Facial Pain: Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.Ossification, Heterotopic: The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Elbow: Region of the body immediately surrounding and including the ELBOW JOINT.Contracture: Prolonged shortening of the muscle or other soft tissue around a joint, preventing movement of the joint.Myositis Ossificans: A disease characterized by bony deposits or the ossification of muscle tissue.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Osteoarthritis, Hip: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Early Termination of Clinical Trials: Earlier than planned termination of clinical trials.Methotrexate: An antineoplastic antimetabolite with immunosuppressant properties. It is an inhibitor of TETRAHYDROFOLATE DEHYDROGENASE and prevents the formation of tetrahydrofolate, necessary for synthesis of thymidylate, an essential component of DNA.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Foot Joints: The articulations extending from the ANKLE distally to the TOES. These include the ANKLE JOINT; TARSAL JOINTS; METATARSOPHALANGEAL JOINT; and TOE JOINT.Wrist Joint: The joint that is formed by the distal end of the RADIUS, the articular disc of the distal radioulnar joint, and the proximal row of CARPAL BONES; (SCAPHOID BONE; LUNATE BONE; triquetral bone).Hand Bones: The CARPAL BONES; METACARPAL BONES; and FINGER PHALANGES. In each hand there are eight carpal bones, five metacarpal bones, and 14 phalanges.Arthritis, Rheumatoid: A chronic systemic disease, primarily of the joints, marked by inflammatory changes in the synovial membranes and articular structures, widespread fibrinoid degeneration of the collagen fibers in mesenchymal tissues, and by atrophy and rarefaction of bony structures. Etiology is unknown, but autoimmune mechanisms have been implicated.Trismus: Spasmodic contraction of the masseter muscle resulting in forceful jaw closure. This may be seen with a variety of diseases, including TETANUS, as a complication of radiation therapy, trauma, or in association with neoplastic conditions.Spasm: An involuntary contraction of a muscle or group of muscles. Spasms may involve SKELETAL MUSCLE or SMOOTH MUSCLE.Molar, Third: The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.Mastication: The act and process of chewing and grinding food in the mouth.Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Trigeminal Nerve: The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.Collagen Diseases: Historically, a heterogeneous group of acute and chronic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, progressive systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, etc. This classification was based on the notion that "collagen" was equivalent to "connective tissue", but with the present recognition of the different types of collagen and the aggregates derived from them as distinct entities, the term "collagen diseases" now pertains exclusively to those inherited conditions in which the primary defect is at the gene level and affects collagen biosynthesis, post-translational modification, or extracellular processing directly. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1494)Anemia, Hypochromic: Anemia characterized by a decrease in the ratio of the weight of hemoglobin to the volume of the erythrocyte, i.e., the mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration is less than normal. The individual cells contain less hemoglobin than they could have under optimal conditions. Hypochromic anemia may be caused by iron deficiency from a low iron intake, diminished iron absorption, or excessive iron loss. It can also be caused by infections or other diseases, therapeutic drugs, lead poisoning, and other conditions. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Miale, Laboratory Medicine: Hematology, 6th ed, p393)Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic: A chronic, relapsing, inflammatory, and often febrile multisystemic disorder of connective tissue, characterized principally by involvement of the skin, joints, kidneys, and serosal membranes. It is of unknown etiology, but is thought to represent a failure of the regulatory mechanisms of the autoimmune system. The disease is marked by a wide range of system dysfunctions, an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and the formation of LE cells in the blood or bone marrow.
  • This can lead to the development of syndesmophytes, perivertebral bone formation, ankylosis of the zygapophyseal joints, and pathologic new bone formation in the ligamentous apparatus. (jrheum.org)
  • These diseases cause spinal instability, spinal cord compression, kyphosis and a bony disruption. (brighamandwomens.org)
  • Ankylosis Spondylitis is defined as a chronic and generally progressive inflammatory arthritic disease affecting the spinal joints and adjacent connective tissues. (ecopolitan.com)
  • Radiographic documentation showed the co-existence of metaphyseal enchondromatosis and development of spinal bony ankylosis. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Standard radiographic examination showed spinal bony ankylosis only. (biomedcentral.com)
  • However, the hallmark of axSpA is sacroiliitis and spinal damage due to both bony erosion and abnormal bone formation. (jrheum.org)
  • Here, we used mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) from AS patients (AS MSCs) within the enthesis involved in spinal ankylosis to delineate that the HLA-B27-mediated spliced X-box-binding protein 1 (sXBP1)/retinoic acid receptor-β (RARB)/tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) axis accelerated the mineralization of AS MSCs, which was independent of Runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). (jci.org)
  • We conclude that treatment using interpositional arthroplasty with temporalis muscle flap and costochondral graft is an excellent alternative for treating patients with TMJ ankylosis during growth because the costochondral graft has morphological characteristics similar to the mandibular condyle growth potential, which allows the graft to track the growth spurt in the case of pediatric patients. (bvsalud.org)
  • The above findings suggested that osseous ankylosis that occurs in the developmental period inhibits tooth eruption because of the lack of a periodontal ligament and that it inhibits development of the jaw in the labial and vertical direction. (nii.ac.jp)
  • The first order of living Reptiles is that of the Chelonia , comprising the Tortoises and Turtles, and distinguished by the following characters: - There is an osseous exoskeleton which is combined with the endoskeleton to form a kind of bony case or box in which the body of the animal is enclosed, and which is covered by a leathery skin, or, more usually, by horny epidermic plates. (chestofbooks.com)
  • Ankylosis of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) refers to the fusion of the complex intracapsular disc-condyle and the articular fossa of the temporal bone, with restriction of joint movement and consequent limitation of mouth opening, restricted masticatory capacity, difficulty in speech, and poor oral hygiene, in addition to psychological disorders such as difficulty with social interaction. (bvsalud.org)
  • This progressive bony fusion is called ankylosis. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Artificial ankylosis (arthrodesis), fusion of a joint by surgical operation, is sometimes done to ameliorate the pain experienced in a severe joint condition. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Occipitalization of the atlas is defined as congenital bony fusion of the atlas vertebra to the base of the occipital bone of the skull. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Stiffening or fusion of the jawbones (bony ankylosis). (uwhealth.org)
  • Computed tomography of the jaw at 3 months of age revealed no evidence of bony dysplasia, fusion, or dislocation. (aappublications.org)
  • Jaw-opening exercises must be done for months to years to maintain the surgical correction, but forced opening of the jaws without surgery is generally not indicated and is usually ineffective because of bony fusion. (merckmanuals.com)
  • Incomplete posterior fusion can be seen in normal children up to the age of 10, with bony fusion typically occurring by age 5. (clinical-mri.com)
  • may move throughout range of movement- (2)Fulcrum : lies parallel to the longitudinal axis (fulcrum) of the FIXED distal joint or will point toward a distal bony prominence (3)Stationary arm lies parallel to the longitudinal axis of the MOVING distal joint segment and. (proprofs.com)
  • After removing the pulp, ankylosis was experimentally induced in the immature teeth by applying calcium hydroxide to the root canal and replanting the teeth, and the teeth were compared with the healthy opposite side. (nii.ac.jp)
  • The median palatine suture was interposed, and bony ankylosis of the experimental teeth seldom affected the opposite side. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Dental ankylosis can affect both primary and permanent teeth, may occur at any time during eruption and can lead to submergence. (nih.gov)
  • En terobacteriaceae species such as E. coli (particularly in patients with concurrent urinary tract infections as a source of infection), P. aeruginosa (particularly in patients with a history of IV drug abuse as well as in nosocomial infections), less commonly S. pneumoniae (particularly in patients with diabetes), and more rarely Salmonella species (particularly in those patients with sickle cell disease or asplenia). (appliedradiology.com)
  • It remains the case that no current treatments have been shown to lead to disease remissions or to halt the progression of the bony ankylosis that causes the major morbidity associated with this condition. (mja.com.au)
  • Surgery sometimes is performed to treat this problem, and published reports differ regarding the factors that are associated with success or failure after this operation and whether the procedure is effective for patients with elbow ankylosis. (northwestern.edu)