Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Tooth Loss: The failure to retain teeth as a result of disease or injury.Tooth Germ: The collective tissues from which an entire tooth is formed, including the DENTAL SAC; ENAMEL ORGAN; and DENTAL PAPILLA. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Tooth Crown: The upper part of the tooth, which joins the lower part of the tooth (TOOTH ROOT) at the cervix (TOOTH CERVIX) at a line called the cementoenamel junction. The entire surface of the crown is covered with enamel which is thicker at the extremity and becomes progressively thinner toward the cervix. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p216)Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Tooth Root: The part of a tooth from the neck to the apex, embedded in the alveolar process and covered with cementum. A root may be single or divided into several branches, usually identified by their relative position, e.g., lingual root or buccal root. Single-rooted teeth include mandibular first and second premolars and the maxillary second premolar teeth. The maxillary first premolar has two roots in most cases. Maxillary molars have three roots. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p690)Tooth Eruption: The emergence of a tooth from within its follicle in the ALVEOLAR PROCESS of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE into the ORAL CAVITY. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Tooth, Supernumerary: An extra tooth, erupted or unerupted, resembling or unlike the other teeth in the group to which it belongs. Its presence may cause malposition of adjacent teeth or prevent their eruption.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Tooth Wear: Loss of the tooth substance by chemical or mechanical processesTooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)Bone Development: The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Tooth, Nonvital: A tooth from which the dental pulp has been removed or is necrotic. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Tooth, Impacted: A tooth that is prevented from erupting by a physical barrier, usually other teeth. Impaction may also result from orientation of the tooth in an other than vertical position in the periodontal structures.Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Tooth, Unerupted: A normal developing tooth which has not yet perforated the oral mucosa or one that fails to erupt in the normal sequence or time interval expected for the type of tooth in a given gender, age, or population group.Bone Regeneration: Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Tooth Cervix: The constricted part of the tooth at the junction of the crown and root or roots. It is often referred to as the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), the line at which the cementum covering the root of a tooth and the enamel of the tooth meet. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p530, p433)Odontogenesis: The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).Bone Matrix: Extracellular substance of bone tissue consisting of COLLAGEN fibers, ground substance, and inorganic crystalline minerals and salts.Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Tooth Exfoliation: Physiologic loss of the primary dentition. (Zwemer, Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth Avulsion: Partial or complete displacement of a tooth from its alveolar support. It is commonly the result of trauma. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p312)Cuspid: The third tooth to the left and to the right of the midline of either jaw, situated between the second INCISOR and the premolar teeth (BICUSPID). (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p817)Fused Teeth: Two teeth united during development by the union of their tooth germs; the teeth may be joined by the enamel of their crowns, by their root dentin, or by both.Tooth Socket: A hollow part of the alveolar process of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE where each tooth fits and is attached via the periodontal ligament.Tooth Calcification: The process whereby calcium salts are deposited in the dental enamel. The process is normal in the development of bones and teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p43)Tooth DiseasesBicuspid: One of the eight permanent teeth, two on either side in each jaw, between the canines (CUSPID) and the molars (MOLAR), serving for grinding and crushing food. The upper have two cusps (bicuspid) but the lower have one to three. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p822)Maxilla: One of a pair of irregularly shaped bones that form the upper jaw. A maxillary bone provides tooth sockets for the superior teeth, forms part of the ORBIT, and contains the MAXILLARY SINUS.Bone Substitutes: Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Ankylosis: Solid fixation of a tooth resulting from fusion of the cementum and alveolar bone, with obliteration of the periodontal ligament. It is uncommon in the deciduous dentition and very rare in permanent teeth. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.Tooth Erosion: Progressive loss of the hard substance of a tooth by chemical processes that do not involve bacterial action. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p296)Bone Diseases, MetabolicFractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tooth Replantation: Reinsertion of a tooth into the alveolus from which it was removed or otherwise lost.Tooth Resorption: Resorption of calcified dental tissue, involving demineralization due to reversal of the cation exchange and lacunar resorption by osteoclasts. There are two types: external (as a result of tooth pathology) and internal (apparently initiated by a peculiar inflammatory hyperplasia of the pulp). (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p676)Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Root Canal Therapy: A treatment modality in endodontics concerned with the therapy of diseases of the dental pulp. For preparatory procedures, ROOT CANAL PREPARATION is available.Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2: A potent osteoinductive protein that plays a critical role in the differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells into OSTEOBLASTS.Alveolar Bone Loss: Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.Odontometry: Measurement of tooth characteristics.Osteogenesis: The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.Dentition, Permanent: The 32 teeth of adulthood that either replace or are added to the complement of deciduous teeth. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Tooth Demineralization: A tooth's loss of minerals, such as calcium in hydroxyapatite from the tooth matrix, caused by acidic exposure. An example of the occurrence of demineralization is in the formation of dental caries.Dental Restoration, Permanent: A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Temporal Bone: Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).Periodontal Ligament: The fibrous CONNECTIVE TISSUE surrounding the TOOTH ROOT, separating it from and attaching it to the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS).Anodontia: Congenital absence of the teeth; it may involve all (total anodontia) or only some of the teeth (partial anodontia, hypodontia), and both the deciduous and the permanent dentition, or only teeth of the permanent dentition. (Dorland, 27th ed)Parietal Bone: One of a pair of irregularly shaped quadrilateral bones situated between the FRONTAL BONE and OCCIPITAL BONE, which together form the sides of the CRANIUM.Tooth Preparation, Prosthodontic: The selected form given to a natural tooth when it is reduced by instrumentation to receive a prosthesis (e.g., artificial crown or a retainer for a fixed or removable prosthesis). The selection of the form is guided by clinical circumstances and physical properties of the materials that make up the prosthesis. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239)Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Osteoblasts: Bone-forming cells which secrete an EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. HYDROXYAPATITE crystals are then deposited into the matrix to form bone.Age Determination by Teeth: A means of identifying the age of an animal or human through tooth examination.Osteoclasts: A large multinuclear cell associated with the BONE RESORPTION. An odontoclast, also called cementoclast, is cytomorphologically the same as an osteoclast and is involved in CEMENTUM resorption.X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Dental Cementum: The bonelike rigid connective tissue covering the root of a tooth from the cementoenamel junction to the apex and lining the apex of the root canal, also assisting in tooth support by serving as attachment structures for the periodontal ligament. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Ameloblasts: Cylindrical epithelial cells in the innermost layer of the ENAMEL ORGAN. Their functions include contribution to the development of the dentinoenamel junction by the deposition of a layer of the matrix, thus producing the foundation for the prisms (the structural units of the DENTAL ENAMEL), and production of the matrix for the enamel prisms and interprismatic substance. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)OdontoblastsDental Pulp Cavity: The space in a tooth bounded by the dentin and containing the dental pulp. The portion of the cavity within the crown of the tooth is the pulp chamber; the portion within the root is the pulp canal or root canal.Bone Cysts: Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Dental Pulp Necrosis: Death of pulp tissue with or without bacterial invasion. When the necrosis is due to ischemia with superimposed bacterial infection, it is referred to as pulp gangrene. When the necrosis is non-bacterial in origin, it is called pulp mummification.Calcification, Physiologic: Process by which organic tissue becomes hardened by the physiologic deposit of calcium salts.Radiography, Panoramic: Extraoral body-section radiography depicting an entire maxilla, or both maxilla and mandible, on a single film.Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4: A bone morphogenetic protein that is a potent inducer of bone formation. It also functions as a regulator of MESODERM formation during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Tooth Remineralization: Therapeutic technique for replacement of minerals in partially decalcified teeth.Periapical Periodontitis: Inflammation of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE. It includes general, unspecified, or acute nonsuppurative inflammation. Chronic nonsuppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL GRANULOMA. Suppurative inflammation is PERIAPICAL ABSCESS.Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Osteocalcin: Vitamin K-dependent calcium-binding protein synthesized by OSTEOBLASTS and found primarily in BONES. Serum osteocalcin measurements provide a noninvasive specific marker of bone metabolism. The protein contains three residues of the amino acid gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla), which, in the presence of CALCIUM, promotes binding to HYDROXYAPATITE and subsequent accumulation in BONE MATRIX.Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7: A bone morphogenetic protein that is widely expressed during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT. It is both a potent osteogenic factor and a specific regulator of nephrogenesis.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Frontal Bone: The bone that forms the frontal aspect of the skull. Its flat part forms the forehead, articulating inferiorly with the NASAL BONE and the CHEEK BONE on each side of the face.Paleodontology: The study of the teeth of early forms of life through fossil remains.Dental Enamel Proteins: The proteins that are part of the dental enamel matrix.Bone Marrow DiseasesDental Cavity Preparation: An operation in which carious material is removed from teeth and biomechanically correct forms are established in the teeth to receive and retain restorations. A constant requirement is provision for prevention of failure of the restoration through recurrence of decay or inadequate resistance to applied stresses. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239-40)Jaw, Edentulous, Partially: Absence of teeth from a portion of the mandible and/or maxilla.Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Periodontium: The structures surrounding and supporting the tooth. Periodontium includes the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Diastema: An abnormal opening or fissure between two adjacent teeth.Dental Enamel Hypoplasia: An acquired or hereditary condition due to deficiency in the formation of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS). It is usually characterized by defective, thin, or malformed DENTAL ENAMEL. Risk factors for enamel hypoplasia include gene mutations, nutritional deficiencies, diseases, and environmental factors.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Molar, Third: The aftermost permanent tooth on each side in the maxilla and mandible.Periodontal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.Enamel Organ: Epithelial cells surrounding the dental papilla and differentiated into three layers: the inner enamel epithelium, consisting of ameloblasts which eventually form the enamel, and the enamel pulp and external enamel epithelium, both of which atrophy and disappear before and upon eruption of the tooth, respectively.Alkaline Phosphatase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of an orthophosphoric monoester and water to an alcohol and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.1.Leg Bones: The bones of the free part of the lower extremity in humans and of any of the four extremities in animals. It includes the FEMUR; PATELLA; TIBIA; and FIBULA.Bone Marrow Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the bone marrow. They are differentiated from neoplasms composed of bone marrow cells, such as MULTIPLE MYELOMA. Most bone marrow neoplasms are metastatic.Bone Marrow Examination: Removal of bone marrow and evaluation of its histologic picture.Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Dental Bonding: An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.Oral Hygiene: The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Post and Core Technique: Use of a metal casting, usually with a post in the pulp or root canal, designed to support and retain an artificial crown.Mouth, Edentulous: Total lack of teeth through disease or extraction.Jaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Mastication: The act and process of chewing and grinding food in the mouth.Dental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.Osteocytes: Mature osteoblasts that have become embedded in the BONE MATRIX. They occupy a small cavity, called lacuna, in the matrix and are connected to adjacent osteocytes via protoplasmic projections called canaliculi.Stress, Mechanical: A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.Pulpectomy: Dental procedure in which the entire pulp chamber is removed from the crown and roots of a tooth.Metacarpal Bones: The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.Root Canal Filling Materials: Materials placed inside a root canal for the purpose of obturating or sealing it. The materials may be gutta-percha, silver cones, paste mixtures, or other substances. (Dorland, 28th ed, p631 & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p187)Mesial Movement of Teeth: Migration of the teeth toward the midline or forward in the DENTAL ARCH. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)DMF Index: "Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.Dental Papilla: Mesodermal tissue enclosed in the invaginated portion of the epithelial enamel organ and giving rise to the dentin and pulp.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Diphosphonates: Organic compounds which contain P-C-P bonds, where P stands for phosphonates or phosphonic acids. These compounds affect calcium metabolism. They inhibit ectopic calcification and slow down bone resorption and bone turnover. Technetium complexes of diphosphonates have been used successfully as bone scanning agents.Resin Cements: Dental cements composed either of polymethyl methacrylate or dimethacrylate, produced by mixing an acrylic monomer liquid with acrylic polymers and mineral fillers. The cement is insoluble in water and is thus resistant to fluids in the mouth, but is also irritating to the dental pulp. It is used chiefly as a luting agent for fabricated and temporary restorations. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p159)MSX1 Transcription Factor: A homeodomain protein that interacts with TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN. It represses GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of target GENES and plays a critical role in ODONTOGENESIS.Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Denture, Partial, Removable: A partial denture designed and constructed to be removed readily from the mouth.Denture Design: The plan, delineation, and location of actual structural elements of dentures. The design can relate to retainers, stress-breakers, occlusal rests, flanges, framework, lingual or palatal bars, reciprocal arms, etc.Orthodontic Appliances: Devices used for influencing tooth position. Orthodontic appliances may be classified as fixed or removable, active or retaining, and intraoral or extraoral. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p19)Periapical Diseases: Diseases of the PERIAPICAL TISSUE surrounding the root of the tooth, which is distinguished from DENTAL PULP DISEASES inside the TOOTH ROOT.Dental Prosthesis: An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)Root Canal Preparation: Preparatory activities in ROOT CANAL THERAPY by partial or complete extirpation of diseased pulp, cleaning and sterilization of the empty canal, enlarging and shaping the canal to receive the sealing material. The cavity may be prepared by mechanical, sonic, chemical, or other means. (From Dorland, 28th ed, p1700)Radiography, Bitewing: Technique involving the passage of X-rays through oral structures to create a film record while a central tab or wing of dental X-ray film is being held between upper and lower teeth.Pulpitis: Inflammation of the DENTAL PULP, usually due to bacterial infection in dental caries, tooth fracture, or other conditions causing exposure of the pulp to bacterial invasion. Chemical irritants, thermal factors, hyperemic changes, and other factors may also cause pulpitis.Dental Sac: Dense fibrous layer formed from mesodermal tissue that surrounds the epithelial enamel organ. The cells eventually migrate to the external surface of the newly formed root dentin and give rise to the cementoblasts that deposit cementum on the developing root, fibroblasts of the developing periodontal ligament, and osteoblasts of the developing alveolar bone.Metatarsal Bones: The five long bones of the METATARSUS, articulating with the TARSAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF TOES distally.Tarsal Bones: The seven bones which form the tarsus - namely, CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid, navicular, and the internal, middle, and external cuneiforms.Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Dental Cements: Substances used to bond COMPOSITE RESINS to DENTAL ENAMEL and DENTIN. These bonding or luting agents are used in restorative dentistry, ROOT CANAL THERAPY; PROSTHODONTICS; and ORTHODONTICS.Dental Leakage: The seepage of fluids, debris, and micro-organisms between the walls of a prepared dental cavity and the restoration.Root Canal Obturation: Phase of endodontic treatment in which a root canal system that has been cleaned is filled through use of special materials and techniques in order to prevent reinfection.Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Bone Demineralization Technique: Removal of mineral constituents or salts from bone or bone tissue. Demineralization is used as a method of studying bone strength and bone chemistry.Forensic Dentistry: The application of dental knowledge to questions of law.Foot Bones: The TARSAL BONES; METATARSAL BONES; and PHALANGES OF TOES. The tarsal bones consists of seven bones: CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid; navicular; internal; middle; and external cuneiform bones. The five metatarsal bones are numbered one through five, running medial to lateral. There are 14 phalanges in each foot, the great toe has two while the other toes have three each.Amelogenin: A major dental enamel-forming protein found in mammals. In humans the protein is encoded by GENES found on both the X CHROMOSOME and the Y CHROMOSOME.Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Malocclusion: Such malposition and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth as to interfere with the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Mice, Inbred C57BLDental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Osseointegration: The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Denture, Partial, Fixed: A partial denture attached to prepared natural teeth, roots, or implants by cementation.PAX9 Transcription Factor: A paired box transcription factor that is involved in ODONTOGENESIS.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Radius: The outer shorter of the two bones of the FOREARM, lying parallel to the ULNA and partially revolving around it.RANK Ligand: A transmembrane protein belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that specifically binds RECEPTOR ACTIVATOR OF NUCLEAR FACTOR-KAPPA B and OSTEOPROTEGERIN. It plays an important role in regulating OSTEOCLAST differentiation and activation.Bone Cysts, Aneurysmal: Fibrous blood-filled cyst in the bone. Although benign it can be destructive causing deformity and fractures.Periosteum: Thin outer membrane that surrounds a bone. It contains CONNECTIVE TISSUE, CAPILLARIES, nerves, and a number of cell types.Gingivitis: Inflammation of gum tissue (GINGIVA) without loss of connective tissue.Photography, Dental: Photographic techniques used in ORTHODONTICS; DENTAL ESTHETICS; and patient education.Technetium Tc 99m Medronate: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used primarily in skeletal scintigraphy. Because of its absorption by a variety of tumors, it is useful for the detection of neoplasms.Bone Morphogenetic Protein 6: A bone morphogenetic protein that is a potent inducer of BONE formation. It plays additional roles in regulating CELL DIFFERENTIATION of non-osteoblastic cell types and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions.Periodontal Index: A numerical rating scale for classifying the periodontal status of a person or population with a single figure which takes into consideration prevalence as well as severity of the condition. It is based upon probe measurement of periodontal pockets and on gingival tissue status.Fossils: Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.Dental Amalgam: An alloy used in restorative dentistry that contains mercury, silver, tin, copper, and possibly zinc.Dentin SensitivityCells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Orthodontic Brackets: Small metal or ceramic attachments used to fasten an arch wire. These attachments are soldered or welded to an orthodontic band or cemented directly onto the teeth. Bowles brackets, edgewise brackets, multiphase brackets, ribbon arch brackets, twin-wire brackets, and universal brackets are all types of orthodontic brackets.Periodontal Splints: Fixed or removable devices that join teeth together. They are used to repair teeth that are mobile as a result of PERIODONTITIS.Compressive Strength: The maximum compression a material can withstand without failure. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed, p427)Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Calcium Hydroxide: A white powder prepared from lime that has many medical and industrial uses. It is in many dental formulations, especially for root canal filling.Glass Ionomer Cements: A polymer obtained by reacting polyacrylic acid with a special anion-leachable glass (alumino-silicate). The resulting cement is more durable and tougher than others in that the materials comprising the polymer backbone do not leach out.Bone Plates: Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)Minerals: Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Acid Etching, Dental: Preparation of TOOTH surfaces and DENTAL MATERIALS with etching agents, usually phosphoric acid, to roughen the surface to increase adhesion or osteointegration.Periodontitis: Inflammation and loss of connective tissues supporting or surrounding the teeth. This may involve any part of the PERIODONTIUM. Periodontitis is currently classified by disease progression (CHRONIC PERIODONTITIS; AGGRESSIVE PERIODONTITIS) instead of age of onset. (From 1999 International Workshop for a Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions, American Academy of Periodontology)Parathyroid Hormone: A polypeptide hormone (84 amino acid residues) secreted by the PARATHYROID GLANDS which performs the essential role of maintaining intracellular CALCIUM levels in the body. Parathyroid hormone increases intracellular calcium by promoting the release of CALCIUM from BONE, increases the intestinal absorption of calcium, increases the renal tubular reabsorption of calcium, and increases the renal excretion of phosphates.Inlays: Restorations of metal, porcelain, or plastic made to fit a cavity preparation, then cemented into the tooth. Onlays are restorations which fit into cavity preparations and overlay the occlusal surface of a tooth or teeth. Onlays are retained by frictional or mechanical factors.Calcium Phosphates: Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.Integrin-Binding Sialoprotein: A highly glycosylated and sulfated phosphoprotein that is found almost exclusively in mineralized connective tissues. It is an extracellular matrix protein that binds to hydroxyapatite through polyglutamic acid sequences and mediates cell attachment through an RGD sequence.Dentinogenesis: The formation of dentin. Dentin first appears in the layer between the ameloblasts and odontoblasts and becomes calcified immediately. Formation progresses from the tip of the papilla over its slope to form a calcified cap becoming thicker by the apposition of new layers pulpward. A layer of uncalcified dentin intervenes between the calcified tissue and the odontoblast and its processes. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Arm Bones: The bones of the free part of the upper extremity including the HUMERUS; RADIUS; and ULNA.Periodontal Pocket: An abnormal extension of a gingival sulcus accompanied by the apical migration of the epithelial attachment and bone resorption.Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.Gutta-Percha: Coagulated exudate isolated from several species of the tropical tree Palaquium (Sapotaceae). It is the trans-isomer of natural rubber and is used as a filling and impression material in dentistry and orthopedics and as an insulator in electronics. It has also been used as a rubber substitute.
"An Audit of the Pathologies associated with impacted wisdom tooth". Pakistan Oral & Dental Journal Vol: 26 No.2 December - 2006 ... "Retrospective study of facial bone fractures in Lahore, Pakistan." Pakistan Journal of Medical Research: Volume 32, No. 2, ...
Their teeth were thick and robust, built for grabbing prey and breaking bone. Megalodon probably had a profound impact on the ... Megalodon (nominated by User:Dunkleosteus77) meaning "big tooth", is an extinct species of shark that lived approximately 23 to ... He requested additional brass players for the climax in the last movement when four trumpets and four trombones play the melody ...
"THE ALMOST: 'Fear Inside Our Bones' Set For June 2013 Release On Tooth & Nail; First Single "I'm Down" To Impact Alternative ... "Tooth and Nail No Gift To Bring". Toothandnail.com. Retrieved October 16, 2011. Billboard "The Almost Announces New Album Name ... The band has released three albums and two EPs on Tooth & Nail Records, with 2009's Monster Monster peaking at No. 67 on the ... In the November 2008 Tooth & Nail Records podcast, Aaron stated "the new album will be more of a complete band effort", ...
The impact was violent, and Bodine suffered a broken collar bone and damaged teeth. He recovered from his injuries and tried ...
There may be a painless swelling, and it is often concurrent with an impacted tooth. On radiographs, it appears as a ... Intraosseous tumors (tumors within the bone) are more likely (94%) versus extraosseus tumors (6%). It is more common in the ... Ameloblastoma ODAM (gene) Proteopathy Tooth development Ida Marie Tabangay-Lim; Raymund Noel C. Mallari; Noelito M. Lacsamana; ...
... an impacted tooth is involved. Microscopically, there are many cells that are described as "ghost cells", enlarged eosinophilic ... may perforate cortical bones also it extends to soft tissue maybe asymptomatic. Epithelial lining has ability to induce ...
... had 13 impacts in the head and died of septicemia resulting from broken teeth. In his upper left jaw there is an important bone ... "pit of bones") site in the Sierra de Atapuerca in northern Spain. The excavators suggest that this concentration of bones in ... According to Arsuaga, a tooth had been broken in life by a strong blow, so that the flesh had been exposed and led to an ... A competing theory cites the lack of small bones in the assemblage and suggests that the remains were washed into the pit by ...
... migration of the molar teeth. Sometimes molars are distalized to make space for other impacted teeth, such as premolars or ... Distalization in the maxillary arch is easier than the mandibular arch because maxillary bone has more trabecular bone than the ... The cause is often the result of loss of E space in an arch due to early loss of primary molar teeth and mesial (forward) ... It has been reported in the literature that eruption stage of 2nd molar has an impact on the distalization of the 1st permanent ...
Alveolar Bone[edit]. In periodontal health, the alveolar bone surrounds the teeth and forms the bony socket that supports each ... Pro-inflammatory cytokines are produced inside the gingival tissues and further escalate inflammation which impacts the ... Untreated, these diseases can lead to alveolar bone loss and tooth loss. As of 2013[update], Periodontal disease accounted for ... The inflammation of the gums and irreversible destruction of the alveolar bone and surrounding structures of the teeth, usually ...
The thickness of the limb bones in OH 62 is more similar to chimps than H. ergaster / H. erectus and modern humans, which may ... In modern humans, lateralisation is weakly associated with language.[26] The tooth rows of H. habilis were V-shaped as opposed ... Other selective pressures, including diet, can also dramatically impact dental anatomy.[38] The spatial distribution of tools ... The hand bones of OH 7 suggest precision gripping, important in dexterity, as well as adaptations for climbing. In regard to ...
Evidence of human modification of the bones including cut marks, conchoidal impact, scars and burning, is consistently present ... All of the teeth found had complete crowns with developed roots. The varying size of the roots in each tooth make it difficult ... The Parietal bone has a stronger likeness to anatomically modern humans, while other bones of the skull can be linked to ... They consist of 6 isolated permanent upper teeth and 121 cranial fragments from a single juvenile. Six isolated permanent teeth ...
... because of its negative impact on bone mineralization and teeth mineralization. The "tetracycline teeth" have brown or grey ... The same pattern is observed among infants with excessive number of ribs, vertebrae, teeth and other organs which in a process ... Rubella is known to cause abnormalities of the eye, internal ear, heart, and sometimes the teeth. More specifically, fetal ... The most typical disorder induced by thalidomide were reductional deformities of the long bones of the extremities. Phocomelia ...
An impacted tooth occupies space that is usually filled with bone. This weakens that area of bone and renders the jaw more ... Teeth may become impacted because of adjacent teeth, dense overlying bone, excessive soft tissue or a genetic abnormality. Most ... Erupted teeth that are adjacent to impacted teeth are predisposed to periodontal disease. Since the most difficult tooth ... Relationship of tooth to anterior border of ramus[edit]. This type of classification is based on the amount of impacted tooth ...
Alveolar bone[edit]. The alveolar bone is the bone of the jaw which forms the alveolus around teeth.[36] Like any other bone in ... the tooth is said to be impacted. The most common cause of tooth impaction is lack of space in the mouth for the tooth.[69] ... Bottom teeth of a seven-year-old, showing primary teeth (left), a lost primary tooth (middle), and a permanent tooth (right) ... Histologic slide of tooth erupting into the mouth A: tooth B: gingiva C: bone D: periodontal ligaments ...
Occlusal Trauma Trauma Non-functional tooth Unopposed tooth (and impacted teeth, embedded teeth, teeth without antagonists) ... Periapical granuloma Arthritis Calcinosis Rheumatic fever It may be one of the complications of Paget's disease of bone in the ... A thicker layer of cementum can give the tooth an enlarged appearance, which mainly occurs at the apex or apices of the tooth. ... It is experienced as an uncomfortable sensation in the tooth, followed by an aching pain. It may be noted on radiographs as a ...
"Tooth puncture marks on a 30 million year old Dinictis skull." Geo News. July 2011. p12-17. Wang, Xiaoming, Qiu, Zhanxiang, and ... Naoko Egi (2001) Body Mass Estimates in Extinct Mammals from Limb Bone Dimensions: the Case of North American Hyaenodontids _ ... Impact Factor: 1.1). 10/2013; 88:481-494. DOI: 10.1007/s12542-013-0207-z. ... Hyaenodon ("hyena-tooth") is the type genus of Hyaenodontidae, a group of extinct carnivorous fossil mammals from Eurasia and ...
KCOTs are thought to arise from the dental lamina and are associated with impacted teeth. Multiple odontogenic keratocysts are ... Yet, ameloblastomas show more bone expansion and seldom show high density areas.[9] ... Classic look to a keratocyctic odontogenic tumor in the right mandible in the place of a former wisdom tooth. Unicystic lesion ...
He wore flashy clothes and picked the guitar with his teeth or his feet or played it behind his neck or between his legs. He ... He had considerable impact on Hooker, with both his playing and his showmanship. Walker's swing-influenced blues guitar, ... Hooker was a flamboyant showman in the style of T-Bone Walker and predated others with a similar approach, such as Guitar Slim ... An early player of the electric guitar, Hooker was influenced by the modern urban styles of T-Bone Walker and Robert Nighthawk ...
... cystectomy or the removal of impacted teeth repairing bone defects surrounding dental implant caused by peri-implantitis ... There are several uses of bone regeneration: Fenestration and Dehiscence building up bone around implants placed in tooth ... Bone grafting used in conjunction with sound surgical technique, GBR is a reliable and validated procedure.Guided bone ... false teeth or prosthetics Sinus Lift Elevation prior to implant placement filling of bone after removing the root of a tooth, ...
... surgery to remove impacted teeth, difficult tooth extractions, extractions on medically compromised patients, bone grafting or ... impacted teeth, cysts and tumours of the jaws as well as numerous problems affecting the oral mucosa such as mouth ulcers and ... bone fused) dental implants and maxillofacial implants for attaching craniofacial prostheses and bone anchored hearing aids. ... soft and hard tissue trauma of the oral and maxillofacial region (jaw fractures, cheek bone fractures, nasal fractures, LeFort ...
... is the planned extraction of certain deciduous teeth and specific permanent teeth in an orderly sequence and ... basal bone discrepancy. Patients with straight profile and pleasing appearance. Class 2 and class 3 malocclusion with skeletal ... and the state of health of the investing tissues are factors that continually impact the occlusal guidance program. Sometimes ... Judicious reproximation disking of primary teeth with no tooth extraction is an occasional option. This decision depends on the ...
... bone resorption) Preventive/prophylactic removal of asymptomatic impacted wisdom teeth. Although many dentists remove ... Displacement of tooth or part of the tooth into the maxillary sinus (upper teeth only). In such cases, the tooth or tooth ... is a procedure to reduce bone loss after tooth extraction to preserve the dental alveolus (tooth socket) in the alveolar bone. ... This bone can range from thick to thin, from tooth to tooth, from patient to patient. In some cases it is absent and the root ...
The ratio of calcium to phosphorus is essential to bone and teeth health; if there is excessive phosphorus within a diet, it ... Vitamin D deficiencies affect calcium homeostasis which in turn negatively impacts parts of the teeth including the gingivae, ... Each tooth is made up of a crown, which is above the gum line and covered in enamel, and roots that anchor the tooth to the ... can lead to tooth loss. Studies have also shown that periodontal disease can negatively affect systemic health which impacts ...
Pain can originate from the maxillary sinus because there is only a thin plate of bone separating the maxillary teeth from the ... Dental restoration falling out or fracturing can also be considered a dental emergency as these can impact on function in ... Fractures (dental trauma) can occur anywhere on the tooth or to the surrounding bone, depending on the site and extent of ... The tooth prognosis includes the tooth's vitality and restorability. Crack, fracture and mobility A crack, fracture and the ...
SoundBite Intraoral bone conduction which uses bone conduction via the teeth. One component resembles a conventional behind-the ... minimizing the impacts of the SSD and the quality of life of the patient. As of 2012 there has only been one small-scale study ... BAHA transcranial CROS Bone Anchored Hearing Aid (BAHA): a surgically implanted abutment transmits sound from the deaf ear by ... Vibration of the bony walls of the ear canal and middle ear stimulates the normal ear by means of bone conduction through the ...
"The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. 100 (3): 236-242. doi:10.2106/JBJS.17.00279. PMID 29406345.. ... The lottery enabled studies to accurately measure the impact of health insurance on an individual's health and eliminate ... restoration of teeth and maintenance for dental health. Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnostic and Treatment (EPSDT) is a ... Zewde, Naomi; Wimer, Christopher (January 2019). "Antipoverty Impact Of Medicaid Growing With State Expansions Over Time". ...
... in which bone tissue regeneration is a crucial part [3]. The periodontal ligament (PDL) is located between teeth and alveolar ... PDL cells were isolated individually from impacted third molars or premolars extracted for orthodontic treatment from three ... Enhanced bone regeneration with a gold nanoparticle-hydrogel complex. J Mater Chem B Mater Biol Med. 2014;2:1584-93 ... J Bone Miner Res. 2013;28:2414-30 24. Li J, Li JJ, Zhang J, Wang X, Kawazoe N, Chen G. Gold nanoparticle size and shape ...
Most people have an impacted third molar or canine that does not cause occlusion and usually have the impacted tooth extracted ... Dental follicle stem cellsBone regenerationBone regeneration on titanium implantsImpacted canineImpacted molarOsteogenic ... We removed the bone covering the crown of the impacted left canine. Immediately after exposure of the impacted left canine, we ... impacted tooth extraction or even less invasive tooth disclosure. The search for alternative sources of mesenchymal stem cells ...
Removal of benign cyst and extraction of full bone impacted tooth #17. ... left mandible associated with full bone impacted wisdom tooth #17. ... Bone Impacted Tooth Removal Description: Dentigerous cyst, left mandible associated with full bone impacted wisdom tooth #17. ... Keywords: dentistry, dentigerous, wisdom tooth, extraction, bone impacted tooth, nasal endotracheal, dentigerous cyst, cyst, ...
Extraction of Impacted 3rd Molars, Can Bone Support of the Second Molar be Promoted by a Bio-Oss Graft?. *Impacted Third Molar ... Perioperative Acupuncture for Impacted Mandibular Third Molar Extractions. *Extraction of Third Molar Teeth ... 20 Studies found for: Recruiting, Not yet recruiting, Available Studies , Tooth, Impacted ... Interceptive Study of Ectopic Eruption of Permanent Maxillary Canine Teeth. *Tooth Eruption,Ectopic ...
Tooth Eruption, Ectopic/etiology , Tooth Movement Techniques/methods , Tooth Root/diagnostic imaging , Tooth, Impacted/ ... Full text: Available Index: LILACS (Americas) Main subject: Tooth, Impacted / Tooth Movement Techniques / Tooth Root / Cuspid ... Tooth Root/pathology , Tooth, Impacted/therapy , Alveolar Bone Loss/etiology , Alveolar Process/diagnostic imaging , Cone-Beam ... Teeth from the impacted-canine side were assigned as Group I (GI), and contralateral teeth as control, Group II (GII). The mean ...
See picutres of different canine tooth problems and advice for correcting these problems. ... Learn about orthodontic treatment of impacted canine teeth and other canine teeth problems. ... Dog Bones and Teeth. There are pluses and minuses to giving dogs bones to chew on. The plus is that you see less tarter on the ... Orthodontic treatment of impacted canine teeth may be necessary when the roots become impacted. This can be caused by tug-of- ...
... tooth, hospital, dentures, stitches - Answer: Probably the worst thing you could do is take the dentures out.... ... All 31 teeth pulled including by impacted wisdom teeth. Did pain. Medicine last with you?. Updated 29 Oct 2015 • 6 answers ... Having terrible pain from Lower Dentures put in over stitches and bone grafts?. Updated 12 Oct 2015 • 2 answers ... pain, mouth, tooth, hospital, dentures, stitches. Details:. Got home I was in pain,my husband went to get my meds what Ive ...
An impacted tooth is a tooth that does not break through the gum. ... An impacted tooth remains stuck in gum tissue or bone for ... This results in impacted teeth.. Impacted wisdom teeth are very common. They are often painless and do not cause problems. ... No treatment may be needed if an impacted wisdom tooth is not causing any problems. If the impacted tooth is somewhere towards ... However, some professionals believe an impacted tooth pushes on the next tooth, which pushes the next tooth. Eventually, this ...
These teeth are called impacted wisdom teeth, and it may be necessary to remove them. Learn more in this article. ... Most people have four wisdom teeth, which usually appear in early adulthood. There is not always enough room for them so they ... If a wisdom tooth is painful or troublesome, or if it causes damage to other teeth or the jaw bone, it will be taken out. ... Depending on how the teeth grow through, impacted wisdom teeth can have: Share on Pinterest. Impacted wisdom teeth can lead to ...
Dental X-rays that can reveal the presence of impacted teeth, as well as signs of damage to teeth or bone ... Impacted wisdom teeth can result in pain, damage to other teeth and other dental problems. In some cases, impacted wisdom teeth ... Impacted wisdom teeth dont always cause symptoms. However, when an impacted wisdom tooth becomes infected, damages other teeth ... Impacted wisdom teeth can cause several problems in the mouth:. *Damage to other teeth. If the wisdom tooth pushes against the ...
DNA was extracted from bones and teeth (54); DNA extracts were converted into blunt-end Illumina libraries (55). All samples ... Bone collagen was isolated from bone samples following a modified Longin method (56, 57), and amino acids were prepared via ... The impact of post-Neolithic migrations on Iberia was much smaller than for the rest of the continent, showing little external ... These data were supplemented by bulk δ13C and δ15N values provided with the radiocarbon dates of the bone collagen. See SI ...
Impacted teeth. * Infections of bone, teeth, or implants. * Ciguatera neurotoxin exposure [49] ... Dental examination may reveal damage to enamel or worn teeth (a sign of bruxism/clenching) or protrusion of the front teeth/ ... Other signs of bruxism include worn tooth enamel, tooth sensitivity, or superficial ulceration of buccal mucosa. ... Some tooth pastes or mouth rinses containing mint flavoring may also cause or aggravate burning mouth syndrome (BMS) symptoms. ...
Impacted Teeth. *Fat Grafting. *Bone Grafting. Academic Appointments. * Clinical Assistant Professor, Surgery - Plastic & ...
Bone Grafting. *Dental Implant. *Dentofacial Anomalies. *Extraction of Wisdom Tooth. *Impacted Teeth ... I had a tooth surgically extracted due to an abscess last week and can not say enough good things about both the doctor and his ... I got all four wisdom teeth extracted here. I never waited more than a couple of minutes in the waiting room, the staff was ... I recently had two wisdom teeth and a small growth removed under sedation by Dr. Chaudhry. From the first phone call I found ...
Impacted Teeth. *Infuse® Bone Graft *Jaw Cyst. *Jaw Fracture. *Jaw Irregularities. *Local Anesthesia ... My primary dentist referred me here to have my wisdom teeth removed. The office squeezed me at last minute on a Friday, since I ...
Osteoporosis weakens bones, leading to periodontal bone loss and tooth loss.. Among emergency room visits from 2005 to 2016 ... "There are significant impacts to your overall health if you dont take care of your oral health," Ireland says. "We cant say ... Those two times were to have a tooth extracted.. When the third time came around and he got the $4,000 quote, he and his wife ... Daryl Ruby, left, and and Bertha Gonzalez, right work to extract a decayed tooth for Juan Sevilla at the Saint Agnes Medical ...
Our services: Dental implants, Wisdom teeth, impacted teeth, anesthesia, bone grafting, Sinus lift procedure, TMJ disorders, ... If the lack of bone structure is in the upper jaw, we may perform a sinus bone graft. Another alternative is guided bone (or ... BONE GRAFTING Bone grafting may be necessary for a number of reasons: If you are having dental implants and it is determined ... We always try to utilize your own bone, which may be harvested from your skull, your hip or your tibia. Certain Bone grafts can ...
List of causes of Calcaneal bone redness and Infection, alternative diagnoses, rare causes, misdiagnoses, patient stories, and ... Impacted tooth. 557. Incontinentia Pigmenti. 558. India tick typhus. 559. Indian tick fever. 560. Infantile dysphagia. 561. ... Bone redness (12 causes) *Calcaneal *Bone *Bone symptoms (2907 causes) *Bone disease (2907 causes) *Bone disorder *Bone pain ( ... More Searches: Calcaneal bone redness. *Calcaneal bone redness: Add a 3rd symptom *Calcaneal bone redness: Remove a symptom * ...
My teeth are slowly degrading, also, I didnt mention that before. Teeth, bones, gut. Im still pissed off. I have gardened ... but it was obviously not nourishing my bones and teeth. a higher carb diet with plenty of starch and fruit has made my teeth ... "Czar, my teeth dont seem to be worse so maybe my bones are not that bad off." ... Then I went to the doctor for a routine bone scan and was shocked to find that I had lost even more bone mass. I expected it to ...
Buried and impacted teeth. The Maxillofacial Clinic is located in the basement of the Jones Pavilion, Suite 300. For more ... Jaw and facial bone fractures. *Diseases of the mouth and salivary glands ...
The impact of bisphosphonate bone burden in retarding tooth movement was even greater, with 77% and 86% reductions in tooth ... Impact of bisphosphonate drug burden in alveolar bone during orthodontic tooth movement in a rat model: A pilot study. ... Impact of bisphosphonate drug burden in alveolar bone during orthodontic tooth movement in a rat model: A pilot study. American ... It has provided evidence that the bone burden of previous bisphosphonate use will significantly inhibit orthodontic tooth ...
Wisdom TeethBone Grafting • Dental Implants • Facial Trauma • Oral Pathology • Impacted Canines • Referral Only. ... Young removed my daughters wisdom teeth & performed bone grafts as she did not have sufficient bone mass to support the ... At Mission Oral Surgery in Calgary, our dental surgeons offer services related to dental implants, bone grafting, wisdom teeth, ... At Mission Oral Surgery in Calgary, our dental surgeons offer services related to dental implants, bone grafting, wisdom teeth ...
Learn more about Impacted Tooth at Grand Strand Medical Center DefinitionCausesRisk ... An impacted tooth is a tooth that is positioned against another tooth, bone, or soft tissue so that it is unlikely to fully ... Some people with impacted teeth have no pain or other symptoms. In those who have symptoms, impacted teeth may cause:. *Pain or ... An impacted tooth remains embedded in soft gum tissue or bone beyond its normal eruption time. The cause may be overcrowding. ...
Malerman on tooth extraction with bone graft: Bone grafting after an extraction is a non-invasive and cost-effective way to ... Grafting is usually not needed to replace wisdom teeth, baby teeth, or when teeth were taken out for braces. ... make sure your jaw bone is preserved. For most cases, it is very helpful. ... if it is interfering with the dentists ability to access and remove teeth. If a tooth is fully impacted in the jaw, then bone ...
Eating disorders have a significant impact on the body. Symptoms of anorexia include low blood pressure, reduced bone density, ... Symptoms of bulimia include irregular heartbeat, dehydration, esophageal inflammation, ulcers and tooth decay. ... "Some medical facilities treat eating disorders as they do any other physical illness, dealing only with the impact on the body ...
  • These findings revealed that AuNPs affected the osteogenic differentiation of PDLPs in a size-dependent manner with autophagy as a potential explanation, which suggested AuNPs with defined size could be a promising material for periodontal bone regeneration. (thno.org)
  • 11 ] showed that AuNPs facilitated the differentiation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) towards osteoblast over adipocytes through activating the p38 MAPK signaling pathway. (thno.org)
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