Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.
A potent osteoinductive protein that plays a critical role in the differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells into OSTEOBLASTS.
A bone morphogenetic protein that is a potent inducer of bone formation. It also functions as a regulator of MESODERM formation during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT.
A bone morphogenetic protein that is widely expressed during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT. It is both a potent osteogenic factor and a specific regulator of nephrogenesis.
A subtype of bone morphogenetic protein receptors with high affinity for BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEINS. They can interact with and undergo PHOSPHORYLATION by BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN RECEPTORS, TYPE II. They signal primarily through RECEPTOR-REGULATED SMAD PROTEINS.
A family of CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS that bind BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEINS. They are PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES that mediate SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS through SMAD PROTEINS.
A bone morphogenetic protein that is a potent inducer of BONE formation. It plays additional roles in regulating CELL DIFFERENTIATION of non-osteoblastic cell types and epithelial-mesenchymal interactions.
A subtype of bone morphogenetic protein receptors with low affinity for BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEINS. They are constitutively active PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES that can interact with and phosphorylate TYPE I BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN RECEPTORS.
A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.
A bone morphogenetic protein that may play a role in CARTILAGE formation. It is a potent regulator of the growth of CHONDROCYTES and the synthesis of cartilage matrix proteins. Evidence for its role in cartilage formation can be seen in MICE, where genetic mutations that cause loss of bone morphogenetic protein 5 function result in the formation of small malformed ears.
A receptor-regulated smad protein that undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN RECEPTORS. It regulates BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN signaling and plays an essential role in EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT.
A family of proteins that are involved in the translocation of signals from TGF-BETA RECEPTORS; BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN RECEPTORS; and other surface receptors to the CELL NUCLEUS. They were originally identified as a class of proteins that are related to the mothers against decapentaplegic protein, Drosophila and sma proteins from CAENORHABDITIS ELEGANS.
A bone morphogenetic protein that is found at high concentrations in a purified osteoinductive protein fraction from BONE. Bone morphogenetic protein 3 is referred to as osteogenin, however it may play a role in variety of developmental processes.
A receptor-regulated smad protein that undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN RECEPTORS. It regulates BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN signaling and is essential for PHYSIOLOGICAL ANGIOGENESIS.
A protein that plays a role in GRANULOSA CELLS where it regulates folliculogenesis. Mutations in the gene for bone morphogenetic protein 15 are linked to reproductive abnormalities such as PREMATURE OVARIAN FAILURE.
A bone morphogenetic protein family member that includes an active tolloid-like metalloproteinase domain. The metalloproteinase activity of bone morphogenetic protein 1 is specific for the removal of the C-propeptide of PROCOLLAGEN and may act as a regulator of EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX deposition. Alternative splicing of MRNA for bone morphogenetic protein 1 results in the production of several PROTEIN ISOFORMS.
A factor synthesized in a wide variety of tissues. It acts synergistically with TGF-alpha in inducing phenotypic transformation and can also act as a negative autocrine growth factor. TGF-beta has a potential role in embryonal development, cellular differentiation, hormone secretion, and immune function. TGF-beta is found mostly as homodimer forms of separate gene products TGF-beta1, TGF-beta2 or TGF-beta3. Heterodimers composed of TGF-beta1 and 2 (TGF-beta1.2) or of TGF-beta2 and 3 (TGF-beta2.3) have been isolated. The TGF-beta proteins are synthesized as precursor proteins.
The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.
An inhibitory Smad protein that negatively regulates the SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS from BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN RECEPTORS. Smad6 inhibits PHOSPHORYLATION of SMAD2 PROTEIN and SMAD3 PROTEIN.
A receptor-regulated smad protein that undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN RECEPTORS and regulates BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN signaling.
The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.
The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.
A growth differentiation factor that plays a regulatory role as a paracrine factor for a diverse array of cell types during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT and in the adult tissues. Growth differentiation factor 2 is also a potent regulator of CHONDROGENESIS and was previously referred to as bone morphogenetic protein 9.
Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.
Bone-forming cells which secrete an EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. HYDROXYAPATITE crystals are then deposited into the matrix to form bone.
Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.
The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.
Cell surface receptors that bind growth or trophic factors with high affinity, triggering intracellular responses which influence the growth, differentiation, or survival of cells.
A family of BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN-related proteins that are primarily involved in regulation of CELL DIFFERENTIATION.
A growth differentiation factor that plays a role in early CHONDROGENESIS and joint formation.
The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action during the developmental stages of an organism.
A bone morphogenetic protein that plays an essential role in the regulation of ovarian folliculogenesis.
Extracellular substance of bone tissue consisting of COLLAGEN fibers, ground substance, and inorganic crystalline minerals and salts.
Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.
One of the two types of ACTIVIN RECEPTORS or activin receptor-like kinases (ALK'S). There are several type I activin receptors. The major active ones are ALK-2 (ActR-IA) and ALK-4 (ActR-IB).
A growth differentiation factor that plays a role in the neural differentiation, specifically in the retinal development of the EYE.
Activins are produced in the pituitary, gonads, and other tissues. By acting locally, they stimulate pituitary FSH secretion and have diverse effects on cell differentiation and embryonic development. Activins are glycoproteins that are hetero- or homodimers of INHIBIN-BETA SUBUNITS.
Regulatory proteins and peptides that are signaling molecules involved in the process of PARACRINE COMMUNICATION. They are generally considered factors that are expressed by one cell and are responded to by receptors on another nearby cell. They are distinguished from HORMONES in that their actions are local rather than distal.
A signal transducing adaptor protein and tumor suppressor protein. It forms a complex with activated RECEPTOR-REGULATED SMAD PROTEINS. The complex then translocates to the CELL NUCLEUS and regulates GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of target GENES.
Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.
One of the two types of ACTIVIN RECEPTORS. They are membrane protein kinases belonging to the family of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES. The major type II activin receptors are ActR-IIA and ActR-IIB.
Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.
Diseases of BONES.
Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.
A broadly distributed protein that binds directly to ACTIVINS. It functions as an activin antagonist, inhibits FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE secretion, regulates CELL DIFFERENTIATION, and plays an important role in embryogenesis. Follistatin is a single glycosylated polypeptide chain of approximately 37-kDa and is not a member of the inhibin family (INHIBINS). Follistatin also binds and neutralizes many members of the TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA family.
The processes occurring in early development that direct morphogenesis. They specify the body plan ensuring that cells will proceed to differentiate, grow, and diversify in size and shape at the correct relative positions. Included are axial patterning, segmentation, compartment specification, limb position, organ boundary patterning, blood vessel patterning, etc.
The middle germ layer of an embryo derived from three paired mesenchymal aggregates along the neural tube.
Receptors for ACTIVINS are membrane protein kinases belonging to the family of PROTEIN-SERINE-THREONINE KINASES, thus also named activin receptor-like kinases (ALK's). Activin receptors also bind TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA. As those transmembrane receptors of the TGF-beta superfamily (RECEPTORS, TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA), ALK's consist of two different but related protein kinases, Type I and Type II. Activins initiate cellular signal transduction by first binding to the type II receptors (ACTIVIN RECEPTORS, TYPE II ) which then recruit and phosphorylate the type I receptors (ACTIVIN RECEPTORS, TYPE I ) with subsequent activation of the type I kinase activity.
A negative regulator of BASIC HELIX-LOOP-HELIX TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS that blocks activation of CYCLIN-DEPENDENT KINASE INHIBITOR P16 and is de-regulated in a variety of NEOPLASMS.
Transport proteins that carry specific substances in the blood or across cell membranes.
A family of smad proteins that undergo PHOSPHORYLATION by CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS in response to TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA; ACTIVIN; or BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN signaling.
A technique that localizes specific nucleic acid sequences within intact chromosomes, eukaryotic cells, or bacterial cells through the use of specific nucleic acid-labeled probes.
An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of an orthophosphoric monoester and water to an alcohol and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.1.
A family of metalloproteases that are related to the DROSOPHILA protein tolloid, which is a gene product necessary for dorsal-ventral patterning in early Drosophila embryogenesis. Many members of the group may play a significant role in intercellular signaling.
Diffusible gene products that act on homologous or heterologous molecules of viral or cellular DNA to regulate the expression of proteins.
The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.
A homeodomain protein that interacts with TATA-BOX BINDING PROTEIN. It represses GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION of target GENES and plays a critical role in ODONTOGENESIS.
Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.
Proteins obtained from various species of Xenopus. Included here are proteins from the African clawed frog (XENOPUS LAEVIS). Many of these proteins have been the subject of scientific investigations in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.
The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.
A transcription factor that dimerizes with CORE BINDING FACTOR BETA SUBUNIT to form core binding factor. It contains a highly conserved DNA-binding domain known as the runt domain and is involved in genetic regulation of skeletal development and CELL DIFFERENTIATION.
The formation of cartilage. This process is directed by CHONDROCYTES which continually divide and lay down matrix during development. It is sometimes a precursor to OSTEOGENESIS.
Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.
Process by which organic tissue becomes hardened by the physiologic deposit of calcium salts.
Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.
A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.
A disease characterized by bony deposits or the ossification of muscle tissue.
An inhibitory smad protein that associates with TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA RECEPTORS and BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN RECEPTORS. It negatively regulates SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS by inhibiting PHOSPHORYLATION of RECEPTOR-REGULATED SMAD PROTEINS.
A family of intercellular signaling proteins that play and important role in regulating the development of many TISSUES and organs. Their name derives from the observation of a hedgehog-like appearance in DROSOPHILA embryos with genetic mutations that block their action.
Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.
Wnt proteins are a large family of secreted glycoproteins that play essential roles in EMBRYONIC AND FETAL DEVELOPMENT, and tissue maintenance. They bind to FRIZZLED RECEPTORS and act as PARACRINE PROTEIN FACTORS to initiate a variety of SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS. The canonical Wnt signaling pathway stabilizes the transcriptional coactivator BETA CATENIN.
Forms of hepcidin, a cationic amphipathic peptide synthesized in the liver as a prepropeptide which is first processed into prohepcidin and then into the biologically active hepcidin forms, including in human the 20-, 22-, and 25-amino acid residue peptide forms. Hepcidin acts as a homeostatic regulators of iron metabolism and also possesses antimicrobial activity.
Polymorphic cells that form cartilage.
Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).
Vitamin K-dependent calcium-binding protein synthesized by OSTEOBLASTS and found primarily in BONES. Serum osteocalcin measurements provide a noninvasive specific marker of bone metabolism. The protein contains three residues of the amino acid gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla), which, in the presence of CALCIUM, promotes binding to HYDROXYAPATITE and subsequent accumulation in BONE MATRIX.
The developmental entity of a fertilized chicken egg (ZYGOTE). The developmental process begins about 24 h before the egg is laid at the BLASTODISC, a small whitish spot on the surface of the EGG YOLK. After 21 days of incubation, the embryo is fully developed before hatching.
All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.
Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.
The outer of the three germ layers of an embryo.
The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.
A non-vascular form of connective tissue composed of CHONDROCYTES embedded in a matrix that includes CHONDROITIN SULFATE and various types of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are three major types: HYALINE CARTILAGE; FIBROCARTILAGE; and ELASTIC CARTILAGE.
The developmental history of specific differentiated cell types as traced back to the original STEM CELLS in the embryo.
Endogenous substances, usually proteins, which are effective in the initiation, stimulation, or termination of the genetic transcription process.
The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.
Inbred C57BL mice are a strain of laboratory mice that have been produced by many generations of brother-sister matings, resulting in a high degree of genetic uniformity and homozygosity, making them widely used for biomedical research, including studies on genetics, immunology, cancer, and neuroscience.
The developmental entity of a fertilized egg (ZYGOTE) in animal species other than MAMMALS. For chickens, use CHICK EMBRYO.
Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.
Proteins which bind to DNA. The family includes proteins which bind to both double- and single-stranded DNA and also includes specific DNA binding proteins in serum which can be used as markers for malignant diseases.
A Wnt protein subtype that plays a role in cell-cell signaling during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT and the morphogenesis of the developing NEURAL TUBE.
Proteins obtained from the ZEBRAFISH. Many of the proteins in this species have been the subject of studies involving basic embryological development (EMBRYOLOGY).
Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
Cell-surface proteins that bind transforming growth factor beta and trigger changes influencing the behavior of cells. Two types of transforming growth factor receptors have been recognized. They differ in affinity for different members of the transforming growth factor beta family and in cellular mechanisms of action.
Breaks in bones.
Metabolic bone diseases are a group of disorders that affect the bones' structure and strength, caused by disturbances in the normal metabolic processes involved in bone formation, resorption, or mineralization, including conditions like osteoporosis, osteomalacia, Paget's disease, and renal osteodystrophy.
Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.
The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.
A Wnt protein subtype that plays a role in cell-cell signaling during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT and the morphogenesis of the developing NEURAL TUBE. Defects in Wnt3 protein are associated with autosomal recessive tetra-AMELIA in humans.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
An exotic species of the family CYPRINIDAE, originally from Asia, that has been introduced in North America. They are used in embryological studies and to study the effects of certain chemicals on development.
Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.
Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.
The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.
The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.
The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.
A receptor-regulated smad protein that undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by ACTIVIN RECEPTORS, TYPE I. It regulates TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA and ACTIVIN signaling.
Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.
A group of enzymes that catalyzes the phosphorylation of serine or threonine residues in proteins, with ATP or other nucleotides as phosphate donors.
A family of small polypeptide growth factors that share several common features including a strong affinity for HEPARIN, and a central barrel-shaped core region of 140 amino acids that is highly homologous between family members. Although originally studied as proteins that stimulate the growth of fibroblasts this distinction is no longer a requirement for membership in the fibroblast growth factor family.
The physiological restoration of bone tissue and function after a fracture. It includes BONY CALLUS formation and normal replacement of bone tissue.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
Thin outer membrane that surrounds a bone. It contains CONNECTIVE TISSUE, CAPILLARIES, nerves, and a number of cell types.
The two longitudinal ridges along the PRIMITIVE STREAK appearing near the end of GASTRULATION during development of nervous system (NEURULATION). The ridges are formed by folding of NEURAL PLATE. Between the ridges is a neural groove which deepens as the fold become elevated. When the folds meet at midline, the groove becomes a closed tube, the NEURAL TUBE.
The founding member of the nodal signaling ligand family of proteins. Nodal protein was originally discovered in the region of the mouse embryo primitive streak referred to as HENSEN'S NODE. It is expressed asymmetrically on the left side in chordates and plays a critical role in the genesis of left-right asymmetry during vertebrate development.
X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.
The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.
The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.
Signal molecules that are involved in the control of cell growth and differentiation.
Cells derived from the BLASTOCYST INNER CELL MASS which forms before implantation in the uterine wall. They retain the ability to divide, proliferate and provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
Identification of proteins or peptides that have been electrophoretically separated by blot transferring from the electrophoresis gel to strips of nitrocellulose paper, followed by labeling with antibody probes.
The developmental stage that follows BLASTULA or BLASTOCYST. It is characterized by the morphogenetic cell movements including invagination, ingression, and involution. Gastrulation begins with the formation of the PRIMITIVE STREAK, and ends with the formation of three GERM LAYERS, the body plan of the mature organism.
The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.
The complex processes of initiating CELL DIFFERENTIATION in the embryo. The precise regulation by cell interactions leads to diversity of cell types and specific pattern of organization (EMBRYOGENESIS).
An aquatic genus of the family, Pipidae, occurring in Africa and distinguished by having black horny claws on three inner hind toes.
Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.
The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.
Congenital structural deformities of the upper and lower extremities collectively or unspecified.
Glycoproteins that inhibit pituitary FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE secretion. Inhibins are secreted by the Sertoli cells of the testes, the granulosa cells of the ovarian follicles, the placenta, and other tissues. Inhibins and ACTIVINS are modulators of FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE secretions; both groups belong to the TGF-beta superfamily, as the TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA. Inhibins consist of a disulfide-linked heterodimer with a unique alpha linked to either a beta A or a beta B subunit to form inhibin A or inhibin B, respectively
Supporting cells for the developing female gamete in the OVARY. They are derived from the coelomic epithelial cells of the gonadal ridge. Granulosa cells form a single layer around the OOCYTE in the primordial ovarian follicle and advance to form a multilayered cumulus oophorus surrounding the OVUM in the Graafian follicle. The major functions of granulosa cells include the production of steroids and LH receptors (RECEPTORS, LH).
Small cationic peptides that are an important component, in most species, of early innate and induced defenses against invading microbes. In animals they are found on mucosal surfaces, within phagocytic granules, and on the surface of the body. They are also found in insects and plants. Among others, this group includes the DEFENSINS, protegrins, tachyplesins, and thionins. They displace DIVALENT CATIONS from phosphate groups of MEMBRANE LIPIDS leading to disruption of the membrane.
Cell surface proteins that bind signalling molecules external to the cell with high affinity and convert this extracellular event into one or more intracellular signals that alter the behavior of the target cell (From Alberts, Molecular Biology of the Cell, 2nd ed, pp693-5). Cell surface receptors, unlike enzymes, do not chemically alter their ligands.
Formation of differentiated cells and complicated tissue organization to provide specialized functions.
A large multinuclear cell associated with the BONE RESORPTION. An odontoclast, also called cementoclast, is cytomorphologically the same as an osteoclast and is involved in CEMENTUM resorption.
The introduction of a phosphoryl group into a compound through the formation of an ester bond between the compound and a phosphorus moiety.
Macromolecular organic compounds that contain carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, nitrogen, and usually, sulfur. These macromolecules (proteins) form an intricate meshwork in which cells are embedded to construct tissues. Variations in the relative types of macromolecules and their organization determine the type of extracellular matrix, each adapted to the functional requirements of the tissue. The two main classes of macromolecules that form the extracellular matrix are: glycosaminoglycans, usually linked to proteins (proteoglycans), and fibrous proteins (e.g., COLLAGEN; ELASTIN; FIBRONECTINS; and LAMININ).
The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.
They are glycopeptides and subunits in INHIBINS and ACTIVINS. Inhibins and activins belong to the transforming growth factor beta superfamily.
A subtype of transforming growth factor beta that is synthesized by a wide variety of cells. It is synthesized as a precursor molecule that is cleaved to form mature TGF-beta 1 and TGF-beta1 latency-associated peptide. The association of the cleavage products results in the formation a latent protein which must be activated to bind its receptor. Defects in the gene that encodes TGF-beta1 are the cause of CAMURATI-ENGELMANN SYNDROME.
The inner of the three germ layers of an embryo.
A positive regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
Genes whose expression is easily detectable and therefore used to study promoter activity at many positions in a target genome. In recombinant DNA technology, these genes may be attached to a promoter region of interest.
The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.
The inner and longer bone of the FOREARM.
Removal of mineral constituents or salts from bone or bone tissue. Demineralization is used as a method of studying bone strength and bone chemistry.
Cellular signaling in which a factor secreted by a cell affects other cells in the local environment. This term is often used to denote the action of INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS on surrounding cells.
Short sequences (generally about 10 base pairs) of DNA that are complementary to sequences of messenger RNA and allow reverse transcriptases to start copying the adjacent sequences of mRNA. Primers are used extensively in genetic and molecular biology techniques.
Congenital anomaly of abnormally short fingers or toes.
Inhibitor of differentiation proteins are negative regulators of BASIC HELIX-LOOP-HELIX TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS. They inhibit CELL DIFFERENTIATION and induce CELL PROLIFERATION by modulating different CELL CYCLE regulators.
Proteins that originate from insect species belonging to the genus DROSOPHILA. The proteins from the most intensely studied species of Drosophila, DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER, are the subject of much interest in the area of MORPHOGENESIS and development.
The biosynthesis of RNA carried out on a template of DNA. The biosynthesis of DNA from an RNA template is called REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION.
Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.
A tube-like invagination of the EPIDERMIS from which the hair shaft develops and into which SEBACEOUS GLANDS open. The hair follicle is lined by a cellular inner and outer root sheath of epidermal origin and is invested with a fibrous sheath derived from the dermis. (Stedman, 26th ed) Follicles of very long hairs extend into the subcutaneous layer of tissue under the SKIN.
A growth differentiation factor that is closely-related in structure to BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN 3. Growth differentiation factor 10 is found at high levels in BONE, however it plays an additional roles in regulating EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT.
A multi-functional catenin that participates in CELL ADHESION and nuclear signaling. Beta catenin binds CADHERINS and helps link their cytoplasmic tails to the ACTIN in the CYTOSKELETON via ALPHA CATENIN. It also serves as a transcriptional co-activator and downstream component of WNT PROTEIN-mediated SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION PATHWAYS.
A negative regulatory effect on physiological processes at the molecular, cellular, or systemic level. At the molecular level, the major regulatory sites include membrane receptors, genes (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION), mRNAs (RNA, MESSENGER), and proteins.
Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.
Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS.
A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.
Breaks in CARTILAGE.
Mature osteoblasts that have become embedded in the BONE MATRIX. They occupy a small cavity, called lacuna, in the matrix and are connected to adjacent osteocytes via protoplasmic projections called canaliculi.
The uptake of naked or purified DNA by CELLS, usually meaning the process as it occurs in eukaryotic cells. It is analogous to bacterial transformation (TRANSFORMATION, BACTERIAL) and both are routinely employed in GENE TRANSFER TECHNIQUES.
CELL LINES derived from the CV-1 cell line by transformation with a replication origin defective mutant of SV40 VIRUS, which codes for wild type large T antigen (ANTIGENS, POLYOMAVIRUS TRANSFORMING). They are used for transfection and cloning. (The CV-1 cell line was derived from the kidney of an adult male African green monkey (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS).)
The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.
Dioxoles are organic compounds containing a five-membered ring consisting of two oxygen atoms and two carbon atoms, often found as substructures in various natural and synthetic molecules, including certain pharmaceuticals and toxic dioxin pollutants.
A protective layer of firm, flexible cartilage over the articulating ends of bones. It provides a smooth surface for joint movement, protecting the ends of long bones from wear at points of contact.
A SOXE transcription factor that plays a critical role in regulating CHONDROGENESIS; OSTEOGENESIS; and male sex determination. Loss of function of the SOX9 transcription factor due to genetic mutations is a cause of CAMPOMELIC DYSPLASIA.
The reproductive organ (GONADS) in female animals. In vertebrates, the ovary contains two functional parts: the OVARIAN FOLLICLE for the production of female germ cells (OOGENESIS); and the endocrine cells (GRANULOSA CELLS; THECA CELLS; and LUTEAL CELLS) for the production of ESTROGENS and PROGESTERONE.
The most common form of fibrillar collagen. It is a major constituent of bone (BONE AND BONES) and SKIN and consists of a heterotrimer of two alpha1(I) and one alpha2(I) chains.
The process of TOOTH formation. It is divided into several stages including: the dental lamina stage, the bud stage, the cap stage, and the bell stage. Odontogenesis includes the production of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS), dentin (DENTINOGENESIS), and dental cementum (CEMENTOGENESIS).
Non-striated, elongated, spindle-shaped cells found lining the digestive tract, uterus, and blood vessels. They are derived from specialized myoblasts (MYOBLASTS, SMOOTH MUSCLE).
Broadly distributed glycoproteins that are homologous to the activin-binding protein, FOLLISTATIN. These follistatin-related proteins are encoded by a number of genes.
DNA sequences which are recognized (directly or indirectly) and bound by a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase during the initiation of transcription. Highly conserved sequences within the promoter include the Pribnow box in bacteria and the TATA BOX in eukaryotes.
One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.
Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.
'Nerve tissue proteins' are specialized proteins found within the nervous system's biological tissue, including neurofilaments, neuronal cytoskeletal proteins, and neural cell adhesion molecules, which facilitate structural support, intracellular communication, and synaptic connectivity essential for proper neurological function.
Connective tissue cells of an organ found in the loose connective tissue. These are most often associated with the uterine mucosa and the ovary as well as the hematopoietic system and elsewhere.
The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.
A fibroblast growth factor that preferentially activates FIBROBLAST GROWTH FACTOR RECEPTOR 4. It was initially identified as an androgen-induced growth factor and plays a role in regulating growth of human BREAST NEOPLASMS and PROSTATIC NEOPLASMS.
Culture media containing biologically active components obtained from previously cultured cells or tissues that have released into the media substances affecting certain cell functions (e.g., growth, lysis).
A union between adjacent bones or parts of a single bone formed by osseous material, such as ossified connecting cartilage or fibrous tissue. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.
A TGF-beta subtype that plays role in regulating epithelial-mesenchymal interaction during embryonic development. It is synthesized as a precursor molecule that is cleaved to form mature TGF-beta3 and TGF-beta3 latency-associated peptide. The association of the cleavage products results in the formation a latent protein which must be activated to bind its receptor.
A gene silencing phenomenon whereby specific dsRNAs (RNA, DOUBLE-STRANDED) trigger the degradation of homologous mRNA (RNA, MESSENGER). The specific dsRNAs are processed into SMALL INTERFERING RNA (siRNA) which serves as a guide for cleavage of the homologous mRNA in the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX. DNA METHYLATION may also be triggered during this process.
The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.
The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).
A TGF-beta subtype that was originally identified as a GLIOBLASTOMA-derived factor which inhibits the antigen-dependent growth of both helper and CYTOTOXIC T LYMPHOCYTES. It is synthesized as a precursor molecule that is cleaved to form mature TGF-beta2 and TGF-beta2 latency-associated peptide. The association of the cleavage products results in the formation a latent protein which must be activated to bind its receptor.
The entire nerve apparatus, composed of a central part, the brain and spinal cord, and a peripheral part, the cranial and spinal nerves, autonomic ganglia, and plexuses. (Stedman, 26th ed)
An OOCYTE-containing structure in the cortex of the OVARY. The oocyte is enclosed by a layer of GRANULOSA CELLS providing a nourishing microenvironment (FOLLICULAR FLUID). The number and size of follicles vary depending on the age and reproductive state of the female. The growing follicles are divided into five stages: primary, secondary, tertiary, Graafian, and atretic. Follicular growth and steroidogenesis depend on the presence of GONADOTROPINS.
Proteins which are found in membranes including cellular and intracellular membranes. They consist of two types, peripheral and integral proteins. They include most membrane-associated enzymes, antigenic proteins, transport proteins, and drug, hormone, and lectin receptors.
Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).
The granulosa cells of the cumulus oophorus which surround the OVUM in the GRAAFIAN FOLLICLE. At OVULATION they are extruded with OVUM.
A receptor-regulated smad protein that undergoes PHOSPHORYLATION by ACTIVIN RECEPTORS, TYPE I. Activated Smad3 can bind directly to DNA, and it regulates TRANSFORMING GROWTH FACTOR BETA and ACTIVIN signaling.
Odontoblasts are columnar, highly differentiated, dentin-forming cells that originate from the ectodermal neural crest and reside within the pulp cavity of teeth, characterized by their production and secretion of the organic matrix component of dentin during amelogenesis.
Mice bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.
An early embryonic developmental process of CHORDATES that is characterized by morphogenic movements of ECTODERM resulting in the formation of the NEURAL PLATE; the NEURAL CREST; and the NEURAL TUBE. Improper closure of the NEURAL GROOVE results in congenital NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS.
Cell growth support structures composed of BIOCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS. They are specially designed solid support matrices for cell attachment in TISSUE ENGINEERING and GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION uses.
The region in the dorsal ECTODERM of a chordate embryo that gives rise to the future CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Tissue in the neural plate is called the neuroectoderm, often used as a synonym of neural plate.

Growth differentiation factor-9 stimulates proliferation but suppresses the follicle-stimulating hormone-induced differentiation of cultured granulosa cells from small antral and preovulatory rat follicles. (1/115)

In addition to pituitary gonadotropins and paracrine factors, ovarian follicle development is also modulated by oocyte factors capable of stimulating granulosa cell proliferation but suppressing their differentiation. The nature of these oocyte factors is unclear. Because growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF-9) enhanced preantral follicle growth and was detected in the oocytes of early antral and preovulatory follicles, we hypothesized that this oocyte hormone could regulate the proliferation and differentiation of granulosa cells from these advanced follicles. Treatment with recombinant GDF-9, but not FSH, stimulated thymidine incorporation into cultured granulosa cells from both early antral and preovulatory follicles, accompanied by increases in granulosa cell number. Although GDF-9 treatment alone stimulated basal steroidogenesis in granulosa cells, cotreatment with GDF-9 suppressed FSH-stimulated progesterone and estradiol production. In addition, GDF-9 cotreatment attentuated FSH-induced LH receptor formation. The inhibitory effects of GDF-9 on FSH-induced granulosa cell differentiation were accompanied by decreases in the FSH-induced cAMP production. These data suggested that GDF-9 is a proliferation factor for granulosa cells from early antral and preovulatory follicles but suppresses FSH-induced differentiation of the same cells. Thus, oocyte-derived GDF-9 could account, at least partially, for the oocyte factor(s) previously reported to control cumulus and granulosa cell differentiation.  (+info)

Expression of growth and differentiation factor-9 in the ovaries of fetal sheep homozygous or heterozygous for the inverdale prolificacy gene (FecX(I)). (2/115)

Abnormal follicular and oocyte growth in ovaries of sheep homozygous (II) for the Inverdale gene, FecX(I), suggest that this gene may influence a fundamental event in initiation of folliculogenesis, with two copies of the gene inhibiting growth at the primordial/primary stage. In addition, striking similarities in ovarian morphology between mice deficient in growth and differentiation factor-9 (GDF-9) and II sheep suggest a relationship between the FecX(I) gene and GDF-9 function in the ovary. Therefore, it was hypothesized that GDF-9 mRNA expression would be inhibited in ovaries of II fetal sheep. To test this hypothesis, in situ hybridization was used to characterize GDF-9 mRNA expression in ovaries of homozygous (II), heterozygous (I+), and control (++) fetal sheep at Day 135 of gestation. GDF-9 mRNA expression was localized exclusively to oocytes from the type 1 follicle stage onward in all genotypes and is the first demonstration of GDF-9 mRNA expression in ovaries of fetal sheep. In addition, GDF-9 mRNA expression was detected in oocytes of abnormal type 2 follicles in the ovaries of II sheep. Thus, it does not appear that inhibition of GDF-9 gene expression is the mechanism of action whereby the FecX(I) gene exerts its influence. However, the possibility of translation at specific stages of follicular development cannot presently be ruled out. In addition, the FecX(I) gene may be involved, either directly or indirectly, in regulating expression of receptors for GDF-9. At present, however, neither the FecX(I) gene product nor the GDF-9 receptor has been isolated or characterized.  (+info)

Growth differentiation factor-9 stimulates progesterone synthesis in granulosa cells via a prostaglandin E2/EP2 receptor pathway. (3/115)

Growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF-9), an oocyte-secreted member of the transforming growth factor beta superfamily, progesterone receptor, cyclooxygenase 2 (Cox2; Ptgs2), and the EP2 prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) receptor (EP2; Ptgerep2) are required for fertility in female but not male mice. To define the interrelationship of these factors, we used a preovulatory granulosa cell culture system in which we added recombinant GDF-9, prostaglandins, prostaglandin receptor agonists, or cyclooxygenase inhibitors. GDF-9 stimulated Cox2 mRNA within 2 h, and PGE(2) within 6 h; however, progesterone was not increased until 12 h after addition of GDF-9. This suggested that Cox2 is a direct downstream target of GDF-9 but that progesterone synthesis required an intermediate. To determine whether prostaglandin synthesis was required for progesterone production, we analyzed the effects of PGE(2) and cyclooxygenase inhibitors on this process. PGE(2) can stimulate progesterone synthesis by itself, although less effectively than GDF-9 (3-fold vs. 6-fold increase over 24 h, respectively). Furthermore, indomethacin or NS-398, inhibitors of Cox2, block basal and GDF-9-stimulated progesterone synthesis. However, addition of PGE(2) to cultures containing both GDF-9 and NS-398 overrides the NS-398 block in progesterone synthesis. To further define the PGE(2)-dependent pathway, we show that butaprost, a specific EP2 agonist, stimulates progesterone synthesis and overrides the NS-398 block. In addition, GDF-9 stimulates EP2 mRNA synthesis by a prostaglandin- and progesterone-independent pathway. Thus, GDF-9 induces an EP2 signal transduction pathway which appears to be required for progesterone synthesis in cumulus granulosa cells. These studies further demonstrate the importance of oocyte-somatic cell interactions in female reproduction.  (+info)

Growth differentiation factor-9 stimulates rat theca-interstitial cell androgen biosynthesis. (4/115)

Growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF-9) was shown recently to be essential for early follicular development, including the appearance of the theca layer. Theca cells provide the androgen substrate for aromatization and estrogen production by granulosa cells. Using biologically active recombinant GDF-9 (rGDF-9) and an androgen-producing immortalized theca-interstitial cell (TIC) line or primary TIC, we have examined the action of this paracrine hormone on theca cell steroidogenesis. The effect of GDF-9 on TIC progesterone synthesis was marginal and inconsistent in the primary cultures. In immortalized theca cells, GDF-9 attenuated the forskolin-stimulated progesterone accumulation. More significantly, this oocyte-derived growth factor enhanced both basal and stimulated androstenedione accumulation in the primary and transformed TIC cultures. The effects of GDF-9 on steroidogenesis by preovulatory follicles were relatively modest. Likewise, it did not affect the maturation of follicle-enclosed oocytes. The effect of GDF-9, an oocyte product, on TIC androgen production suggests a regulatory role of the oocyte on theca cell function and hence on follicle development and differentiation. This direct effect of GDF-9 on thecal steroidogenesis is consistent with its recently demonstrated actions on thecal cell recruitment and differentiation.  (+info)

Bone morphogenetic protein-15. Identification of target cells and biological functions. (5/115)

In developing ovarian follicles, the regulation of cell proliferation and differentiation is tightly coordinated. Precisely how this coordination is achieved is unknown, but recent observations have suggested that molecules emitted by the oocyte are involved in the process. The newly discovered oocyte-specific growth factor, bone morphogenetic protein-15 (BMP-15), is one such molecule. At present, nothing is known about the target cells and biological functions of BMP-15. To fill this gap in our knowledge, recombinant BMP-15 and its antibody were produced and used to determine BMP-15 expression and bioactivity. BMP-15 mRNA and protein were shown to be co-expressed in oocytes throughout folliculogenesis, supporting the idea that BMP-15 is a physiological regulator of follicle cell proliferation and/or differentiation. To test this, we used primary cultures of rat granulosa cells (GCs). We found that BMP-15 is a potent stimulator of GC proliferation, and importantly, the mitogenic effect was follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-independent. By contrast, BMP-15 alone had no effect on steroidogenesis. However, it produced a marked decrease in FSH-induced progesterone production, but had no effect on FSH-stimulated estradiol production. This result indicates that BMP-15 is a selective modulator of FSH action. In summary, this study identifies GCs as the first target cells for BMP-15. Moreover, it identifies the stimulation of GC proliferation and the differential regulation of two crucial steroid hormones as the first biological functions of BMP-15. Significantly, BMP-15 is the first growth factor that can coordinate GC proliferation and differentiation in a way that reflects normal physiology.  (+info)

Comparison of recombinant growth differentiation factor-9 and oocyte regulation of KIT ligand messenger ribonucleic acid expression in mouse ovarian follicles. (6/115)

Oocytes secrete factors that regulate the development of the surrounding granulosa cells in ovarian follicles. KIT ligand (KL) mRNA expression in granulosa cells is thought to be regulated by oocytes; however, the factor(s) that mediate this effect are not known. One candidate is the oocyte-specific gene product growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF-9). This study examined the effect of recombinant GDF-9 (rGDF-9) on steady-state KL mRNA expression levels in preantral and mural granulosa cells in vitro. Furthermore, the study compared the effect of rGDF-9 with that of coculture with oocytes at different developmental stages. As determined by RNase protection assay, both KL-1 and KL-2 mRNA levels in preantral and mural granulosa cells were suppressed by 25-250 ng/ml rGDF-9. Fully grown oocytes also suppressed both KL-1 and KL-2 mRNA expression levels. Partly grown oocytes isolated from 7-, 10-, or 12-day-old mice either had no effect on KL mRNA levels or promoted KL-1 mRNA steady-state expression. It is concluded that GDF-9 is likely to mediate the action of fully grown, but not partly grown, oocytes on granulosa cell KL mRNA expression.  (+info)

Bone morphogenetic protein-15 inhibits follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) action by suppressing FSH receptor expression. (7/115)

We have recently reported that oocyte-derived bone morphogenetic protein-15 (BMP-15) can directly modulate follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) action in rat granulosa cells. Here, we investigate underlying mechanisms of this BMP-15 effect. Treatment with BMP-15 alone exerted no significant effect on the basal expression of mRNAs encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, P450 side chain cleavage enzyme, P450 aromatase, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, luteinization hormone receptor, and inhibin/activin subunits. However, BMP-15 markedly inhibited the FSH-induced increases in these messages. In striking contrast, BMP-15 did not change the forskolin-induced levels of these transcripts. Thus, the inhibitory effect of BMP-15 on FSH action must be upstream of cAMP signaling. We next examined changes in FSH receptor mRNA expression. Interestingly, BMP-15 severely reduced the levels of FSH receptor mRNA in both basal and FSH-stimulated cells. To determine whether this effect was at the level of FSH function, we investigated the effect of BMP-15 on FSH bioactivity. Consistent with the mRNA data, BMP-15 inhibited the biological response of FSH, but not that of forskolin. Based on these results, we propose that BMP-15 is an important determinant of FSH action through its ability to inhibit FSH receptor expression. Because FSH plays an essential role in follicle growth and development, our findings could have new implications for understanding how oocyte growth factors contribute to folliculogenesis.  (+info)

Biological function and cellular mechanism of bone morphogenetic protein-6 in the ovary. (8/115)

The process of ovarian folliculogenesis is composed of proliferation and differentiation of the constitutive cells in developing follicles. Growth factors emitted by oocytes integrate and promote this process. Growth differentiation factor-9 (GDF-9), bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-15, and BMP-6 are oocyte-derived members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. In contrast to the recent studies on GDF-9 and BMP-15, nothing is known about the biological function of BMP-6 in the ovary. Here we show that, unlike BMP-15 and GDF-9, BMP-6 lacks mitogenic activity on rat granulosa cells (GCs) and produces a marked decrease in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-induced progesterone (P(4)) but not estradiol (E(2)) production, demonstrating not only the first identification of GCs as BMP-6 targets in the ovary but also its selective modulation of FSH action in steroidogenesis. This BMP-6 activity resembles BMP-15 but differs from GDF-9 activities. BMP-6 also exhibited similar action to BMP-15 by attenuating the steady state mRNA levels of FSH-induced steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), without affecting P450 aromatase mRNA level, supporting its differential function on FSH-regulated P(4) and E(2) production. However, unlike BMP-15, BMP-6 inhibited forskolin- but not 8-bromo-cAMP-induced P(4) production and StAR and P450scc mRNA expression. BMP-6 also decreased FSH- and forskolin-stimulated cAMP production, suggesting that the underlying mechanism by which BMP-6 inhibits FSH action most likely involves the down-regulation of adenylate cyclase activity. This is clearly distinct from the mechanism of BMP-15 action, which causes the suppression of basal FSH receptor (FSH-R) expression, without affecting adenylate cyclase activity. As assumed, BMP-6 did not alter basal FSH-R mRNA levels, whereas it inhibited FSH- and forskolin- but not 8-bromo-cAMP-induced FSH-R mRNA accumulation. These studies provide the first insight into the biological function of BMP-6 in the ovary and demonstrate its unique mechanism of regulating FSH action.  (+info)

Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMPs) are a group of growth factors that play crucial roles in the development, growth, and repair of bones and other tissues. They belong to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily and were first discovered when researchers found that certain proteins extracted from demineralized bone matrix had the ability to induce new bone formation.

BMPs stimulate the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts, which are the cells responsible for bone formation. They also promote the recruitment and proliferation of these cells, enhancing the overall process of bone regeneration. In addition to their role in bone biology, BMPs have been implicated in various other biological processes, including embryonic development, wound healing, and the regulation of fat metabolism.

There are several types of BMPs (BMP-2, BMP-4, BMP-7, etc.) that exhibit distinct functions and expression patterns. Due to their ability to stimulate bone formation, recombinant human BMPs have been used in clinical applications, such as spinal fusion surgery and non-healing fracture treatment. However, the use of BMPs in medicine has been associated with certain risks and complications, including uncontrolled bone growth, inflammation, and cancer development, which necessitates further research to optimize their therapeutic potential.

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 (BMP-2) is a growth factor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily. It plays a crucial role in bone and cartilage formation, as well as in the regulation of wound healing and embryonic development. BMP-2 stimulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts, which are cells responsible for bone formation.

BMP-2 has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a medical device to promote bone growth in certain spinal fusion surgeries and in the treatment of open fractures that have not healed properly. It is usually administered in the form of a collagen sponge soaked with recombinant human BMP-2 protein, which is a laboratory-produced version of the natural protein.

While BMP-2 has shown promising results in some clinical applications, its use is not without risks and controversies. Some studies have reported adverse effects such as inflammation, ectopic bone formation, and increased rates of cancer, which have raised concerns about its safety and efficacy. Therefore, it is essential to weigh the benefits and risks of BMP-2 therapy on a case-by-case basis and under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional.

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 (BMP-4) is a growth factor that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily. It plays crucial roles in various biological processes, including embryonic development, cell growth, and differentiation. In the skeletal system, BMP-4 stimulates the formation of bone and cartilage by inducing the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes and osteoblasts. It also regulates the maintenance and repair of bones throughout life. An imbalance in BMP-4 signaling has been associated with several skeletal disorders, such as heterotopic ossification and osteoarthritis.

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 (BMP-7) is a growth factor belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily. It plays crucial roles in the development and maintenance of various tissues, including bones, cartilages, and kidneys. In bones, BMP-7 stimulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, thereby promoting bone formation and regeneration. It also has potential therapeutic applications in the treatment of various musculoskeletal disorders, such as fracture healing, spinal fusion, and osteoporosis.

Bone morphogenetic protein receptors (BMPRs) are a group of transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors that play a crucial role in the signaling pathway of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which are growth factors involved in various biological processes including cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis.

Type I BMPRs include three subtypes: activin receptor-like kinase 2 (ALK2), ALK3 (also known as BMPR-IA), and ALK6 (also known as BMPR-IB). These receptors form a complex with type II BMPRs upon binding of BMP ligands to their extracellular domains. The activation of the receptor complex leads to the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules, such as SMAD proteins, which then translocate to the nucleus and regulate gene expression.

Mutations in type I BMPRs have been associated with several genetic disorders, including hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), a vascular dysplasia disorder characterized by the formation of abnormal blood vessels. Additionally, alterations in BMP signaling pathways have been implicated in various human diseases, such as cancer, fibrosis, and bone disorders.

Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that play a crucial role in bone and cartilage development, as well as in other biological processes such as wound healing and embryonic development. These receptors are part of the TGF-β (transforming growth factor-beta) superfamily and are composed of two types of subunits: type I and type II.

Type I BMP receptors include BMPR1A, BMPR1B, and ACTRIIA/B. Type II BMP receptors include BMPR2, ACVR2A, and ACVR2B. When BMPs bind to these receptors, they initiate a signaling cascade that leads to the activation of downstream targets involved in bone formation, cartilage development, and other processes.

Mutations in BMP receptor genes have been associated with various genetic disorders, including fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a rare condition characterized by the abnormal formation of bone in muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Additionally, dysregulation of BMP signaling has been implicated in diseases such as cancer, where it can contribute to tumor growth and metastasis.

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 6 (BMP-6) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily of proteins. It plays crucial roles in bone and cartilage formation, as well as in the regulation of iron metabolism. BMP-6 stimulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells, and contributes to the maintenance of bone homeostasis. Additionally, BMP-6 is involved in the process of hepcidin regulation, a hormone that controls iron absorption and recycling in the body. Dysregulation of BMP-6 has been implicated in various diseases, including skeletal disorders and iron metabolism-related conditions.

Bone morphogenetic protein receptors, type II (BMPR2) are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which are growth factors involved in the regulation of various cellular processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. BMPR2 is a serine/threonine kinase receptor and forms a complex with type I BMP receptors upon BMP binding. This complex activation leads to the phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling molecules, including SMAD proteins, which ultimately regulate gene transcription.

Mutations in the BMPR2 gene have been associated with several genetic disorders, most notably pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a rare but life-threatening condition characterized by increased pressure in the pulmonary arteries that supply blood to the lungs. In addition, BMPR2 mutations have also been linked to Marfan syndrome, a genetic disorder that affects connective tissue and can cause skeletal, cardiovascular, and ocular abnormalities.

"Bone" is the hard, dense connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrate animals. It provides support and protection for the body's internal organs, and serves as a attachment site for muscles, tendons, and ligaments. Bone is composed of cells called osteoblasts and osteoclasts, which are responsible for bone formation and resorption, respectively, and an extracellular matrix made up of collagen fibers and mineral crystals.

Bones can be classified into two main types: compact bone and spongy bone. Compact bone is dense and hard, and makes up the outer layer of all bones and the shafts of long bones. Spongy bone is less dense and contains large spaces, and makes up the ends of long bones and the interior of flat and irregular bones.

The human body has 206 bones in total. They can be further classified into five categories based on their shape: long bones, short bones, flat bones, irregular bones, and sesamoid bones.

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 5 (BMP-5) is a growth factor belonging to the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily. It plays crucial roles in bone and cartilage formation during embryonic development, as well as in fracture healing and tissue repair in adults. BMP-5 stimulates the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes and osteoblasts, which are essential for the production of cartilage and bone tissues, respectively. Additionally, BMP-5 has been implicated in regulating cell proliferation, apoptosis, and migration during various developmental and repair processes.

Smad1 is a protein that belongs to the Smad family, which are intracellular signaling proteins that play a critical role in the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway. Smad1 is primarily involved in the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) branch of the TGF-β superfamily.

When BMPs bind to their receptors on the cell surface, they initiate a signaling cascade that leads to the phosphorylation and activation of Smad1. Once activated, Smad1 forms a complex with other Smad proteins, known as a Smad complex, which then translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, the Smad complex interacts with various DNA-binding proteins and transcription factors to regulate gene expression.

Smad1 plays crucial roles in several biological processes, including embryonic development, cell differentiation, and tissue homeostasis. Dysregulation of Smad1 signaling has been implicated in a variety of human diseases, such as cancer, fibrosis, and skeletal disorders.

Smad proteins are a family of intracellular signaling molecules that play a crucial role in the transmission of signals from the cell surface to the nucleus in response to transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) superfamily ligands. These ligands include TGF-βs, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), activins, and inhibins.

There are eight mammalian Smad proteins, which are categorized into three classes based on their function: receptor-regulated Smads (R-Smads), common mediator Smads (Co-Smads), and inhibitory Smads (I-Smads). R-Smads include Smad1, Smad2, Smad3, Smad5, and Smad8/9, while Smad4 is the only Co-Smad. The I-Smads consist of Smad6 and Smad7.

Upon TGF-β superfamily ligand binding to their transmembrane serine/threonine kinase receptors, R-Smads are phosphorylated and form complexes with Co-Smad4. These complexes then translocate into the nucleus, where they regulate the transcription of target genes involved in various cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and extracellular matrix production. I-Smads act as negative regulators of TGF-β signaling by competing with R-Smads for receptor binding or promoting the degradation of receptors and R-Smads.

Dysregulation of Smad protein function has been implicated in various human diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and developmental disorders.

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3 (BMP-3) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily of proteins. It plays crucial roles in regulating bone and cartilage development, as well as homeostasis. BMP-3 inhibits the differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts (cells responsible for bone formation), while promoting the differentiation of chondrocytes (cells responsible for cartilage formation). Additionally, BMP-3 has been implicated in wound healing, tissue regeneration, and cancer progression. Genetic variations in the BMP-3 gene have been associated with several skeletal disorders, including osteoporosis and scoliosis.

Smad5 protein is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in the intracellular signaling pathway of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily members. It is a key player in TGF-β-mediated signal transduction, which regulates various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis.

When TGF-β binds to its receptor on the cell surface, it triggers a cascade of phosphorylation events that ultimately lead to the activation of Smad5 protein. Once activated, Smad5 forms a complex with other Smad proteins (Smad4 and Smad2/3) and translocates into the nucleus, where it binds to specific DNA sequences and regulates the expression of target genes involved in various cellular responses.

Dysregulation of the TGF-β signaling pathway and Smad5 protein function has been implicated in several human diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, understanding the role of Smad5 protein in TGF-β signaling is crucial for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 (BMP-15) is a growth factor belonging to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily. It plays crucial roles in the development and function of the reproductive system, particularly in the ovary. BMP-15 is primarily produced by the oocytes (egg cells) and stimulates the growth and differentiation of granulosa cells, which surround and support the oocytes during follicular development.

BMP-15 has been shown to promote follicular development, increase ovulation rate, and improve embryo quality in various animal models. In humans, mutations in the BMP15 gene have been associated with ovarian dysfunction, including premature ovarian failure and primary ovarian insufficiency. However, the role of BMP-15 in human reproductive physiology is not yet fully understood, and further research is needed to clarify its exact functions and potential clinical applications.

Bone Morphogenetic Protein 1 (BMP-1) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily of proteins, which are signaling molecules involved in various biological processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and development. BMP-1 plays a crucial role in bone and cartilage formation during embryonic development and fracture healing in adults. It is also known to be involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and tissue homeostasis.

BMP-1 functions by binding to specific receptors on the cell surface, leading to the activation of intracellular signaling pathways that regulate gene expression and cell behavior. BMP-1 is synthesized as a preproprotein and undergoes proteolytic processing to generate the mature, active form of the protein.

Defects in BMP-1 function have been implicated in various human diseases, including skeletal disorders, fibrotic conditions, and cancer. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying BMP-1 signaling is important for developing therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) is a type of cytokine, which is a cell signaling protein involved in the regulation of various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). TGF-β plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and wound healing. It also has been implicated in several pathological conditions such as fibrosis, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

TGF-β exists in multiple isoforms (TGF-β1, TGF-β2, and TGF-β3) that are produced by many different cell types, including immune cells, epithelial cells, and fibroblasts. The protein is synthesized as a precursor molecule, which is cleaved to release the active TGF-β peptide. Once activated, TGF-β binds to its receptors on the cell surface, leading to the activation of intracellular signaling pathways that regulate gene expression and cell behavior.

In summary, Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-β) is a multifunctional cytokine involved in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and wound healing. It has been implicated in several pathological conditions such as fibrosis, cancer, and autoimmune diseases.

Bone remodeling is the normal and continuous process by which bone tissue is removed from the skeleton (a process called resorption) and new bone tissue is formed (a process called formation). This ongoing cycle allows bones to repair microdamage, adjust their size and shape in response to mechanical stress, and maintain mineral homeostasis. The cells responsible for bone resorption are osteoclasts, while the cells responsible for bone formation are osteoblasts. These two cell types work together to maintain the structural integrity and health of bones throughout an individual's life.

During bone remodeling, the process can be divided into several stages:

1. Activation: The initiation of bone remodeling is triggered by various factors such as microdamage, hormonal changes, or mechanical stress. This leads to the recruitment and activation of osteoclast precursor cells.
2. Resorption: Osteoclasts attach to the bone surface and create a sealed compartment called a resorption lacuna. They then secrete acid and enzymes that dissolve and digest the mineralized matrix, creating pits or cavities on the bone surface. This process helps remove old or damaged bone tissue and releases calcium and phosphate ions into the bloodstream.
3. Reversal: After resorption is complete, the osteoclasts undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death), and mononuclear cells called reversal cells appear on the resorbed surface. These cells prepare the bone surface for the next stage by cleaning up debris and releasing signals that attract osteoblast precursors.
4. Formation: Osteoblasts, derived from mesenchymal stem cells, migrate to the resorbed surface and begin producing a new organic matrix called osteoid. As the osteoid mineralizes, it forms a hard, calcified structure that gradually replaces the resorbed bone tissue. The osteoblasts may become embedded within this newly formed bone as they differentiate into osteocytes, which are mature bone cells responsible for maintaining bone homeostasis and responding to mechanical stress.
5. Mineralization: Over time, the newly formed bone continues to mineralize, becoming stronger and more dense. This process helps maintain the structural integrity of the skeleton and ensures adequate calcium storage.

Throughout this continuous cycle of bone remodeling, hormones, growth factors, and mechanical stress play crucial roles in regulating the balance between resorption and formation. Disruptions to this delicate equilibrium can lead to various bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, where excessive resorption results in weakened bones and increased fracture risk.

Smad6 protein is a negative regulator of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling pathway. It belongs to the Smad family of proteins, which are intracellular signal transducers and transcriptional modulators that mediate TGF-β superfamily signaling.

Smad6 functions by inhibiting the formation of active Smad complexes and promoting their degradation, thereby preventing the transcription of TGF-β target genes. It also plays a role in regulating other signaling pathways, including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Wnt signaling.

Mutations in the gene that encodes Smad6 have been associated with certain human diseases, such as craniosynostosis and osteochondroma. Additionally, altered expression of Smad6 has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, fibrosis, and inflammation.

Smad8 protein, also known as Smad3b or DPC4, is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in the TGF-β (transforming growth factor-beta) signaling pathway. This pathway regulates various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Smad8 protein is primarily located in the cytoplasm, but upon activation by TGF-β ligands, it translocates to the nucleus where it binds to DNA and modulates gene expression. Smad8 forms a complex with other Smad proteins (such as Smad4) and regulates the transcription of target genes involved in various cellular responses. Mutations in the Smad8 gene have been associated with certain types of cancer, including colorectal and pancreatic cancers.

Signal transduction is the process by which a cell converts an extracellular signal, such as a hormone or neurotransmitter, into an intracellular response. This involves a series of molecular events that transmit the signal from the cell surface to the interior of the cell, ultimately resulting in changes in gene expression, protein activity, or metabolism.

The process typically begins with the binding of the extracellular signal to a receptor located on the cell membrane. This binding event activates the receptor, which then triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling molecules, such as second messengers, protein kinases, and ion channels. These molecules amplify and propagate the signal, ultimately leading to the activation or inhibition of specific cellular responses.

Signal transduction pathways are highly regulated and can be modulated by various factors, including other signaling molecules, post-translational modifications, and feedback mechanisms. Dysregulation of these pathways has been implicated in a variety of diseases, including cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Osteogenesis is the process of bone formation or development. It involves the differentiation and maturation of osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells that synthesize and deposit the organic matrix of bone tissue, composed mainly of type I collagen. This organic matrix later mineralizes to form the inorganic crystalline component of bone, primarily hydroxyapatite.

There are two primary types of osteogenesis: intramembranous and endochondral. Intramembranous osteogenesis occurs directly within connective tissue, where mesenchymal stem cells differentiate into osteoblasts and form bone tissue without an intervening cartilage template. This process is responsible for the formation of flat bones like the skull and clavicles.

Endochondral osteogenesis, on the other hand, involves the initial development of a cartilaginous model or template, which is later replaced by bone tissue. This process forms long bones, such as those in the limbs, and occurs through several stages involving chondrocyte proliferation, hypertrophy, and calcification, followed by invasion of blood vessels and osteoblasts to replace the cartilage with bone tissue.

Abnormalities in osteogenesis can lead to various skeletal disorders and diseases, such as osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease), achondroplasia (a form of dwarfism), and cleidocranial dysplasia (a disorder affecting skull and collarbone development).

Growth Differentiation Factor 2 (GDF2), also known as Bone Morphogenetic Protein 9 (BMP9), is a protein that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily. It is a cytokine with important roles in various biological processes, including angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), cardiovascular development, and skeletal muscle regeneration. GDF2/BMP9 is primarily produced by liver cells called hepatocytes and circulates in the bloodstream. It exerts its effects by binding to specific receptors on the cell surface, which triggers intracellular signaling pathways that regulate gene expression and ultimately influence cell behavior.

Cell differentiation is the process by which a less specialized cell, or stem cell, becomes a more specialized cell type with specific functions and structures. This process involves changes in gene expression, which are regulated by various intracellular signaling pathways and transcription factors. Differentiation results in the development of distinct cell types that make up tissues and organs in multicellular organisms. It is a crucial aspect of embryonic development, tissue repair, and maintenance of homeostasis in the body.

Osteoblasts are specialized bone-forming cells that are derived from mesenchymal stem cells. They play a crucial role in the process of bone formation and remodeling. Osteoblasts synthesize, secrete, and mineralize the organic matrix of bones, which is mainly composed of type I collagen.

These cells have receptors for various hormones and growth factors that regulate their activity, such as parathyroid hormone, vitamin D, and transforming growth factor-beta. When osteoblasts are not actively producing bone matrix, they can become trapped within the matrix they produce, where they differentiate into osteocytes, which are mature bone cells that play a role in maintaining bone structure and responding to mechanical stress.

Abnormalities in osteoblast function can lead to various bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, and Paget's disease of bone.

Bone regeneration is the biological process of new bone formation that occurs after an injury or removal of a portion of bone. This complex process involves several stages, including inflammation, migration and proliferation of cells, matrix deposition, and mineralization, leading to the restoration of the bone's structure and function.

The main cells involved in bone regeneration are osteoblasts, which produce new bone matrix, and osteoclasts, which resorb damaged or old bone tissue. The process is tightly regulated by various growth factors, hormones, and signaling molecules that promote the recruitment, differentiation, and activity of these cells.

Bone regeneration can occur naturally in response to injury or surgical intervention, such as fracture repair or dental implant placement. However, in some cases, bone regeneration may be impaired due to factors such as age, disease, or trauma, leading to delayed healing or non-union of the bone. In these situations, various strategies and techniques, including the use of bone grafts, scaffolds, and growth factors, can be employed to enhance and support the bone regeneration process.

Bone density refers to the amount of bone mineral content (usually measured in grams) in a given volume of bone (usually measured in cubic centimeters). It is often used as an indicator of bone strength and fracture risk. Bone density is typically measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans, which provide a T-score that compares the patient's bone density to that of a young adult reference population. A T-score of -1 or above is considered normal, while a T-score between -1 and -2.5 indicates osteopenia (low bone mass), and a T-score below -2.5 indicates osteoporosis (porous bones). Regular exercise, adequate calcium and vitamin D intake, and medication (if necessary) can help maintain or improve bone density and prevent fractures.

Growth factor receptors are a type of cell surface receptor that bind to specific growth factors, which are signaling molecules that play crucial roles in regulating various cellular processes such as growth, differentiation, and survival. These receptors have an extracellular domain that can recognize and bind to the growth factor and an intracellular domain that can transduce the signal into the cell through a series of biochemical reactions.

There are several types of growth factors, including fibroblast growth factors (FGFs), epidermal growth factors (EGFs), vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGFs), and transforming growth factors (TGFs). Each type of growth factor has its own specific receptor or family of receptors.

Once a growth factor binds to its receptor, it triggers a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately lead to changes in gene expression, protein synthesis, and other cellular responses. These responses can include the activation of enzymes, the regulation of ion channels, and the modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics.

Abnormalities in growth factor receptor signaling have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and autoimmune diseases. For example, mutations in growth factor receptors can lead to uncontrolled cell growth and division, which is a hallmark of cancer. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of growth factor receptors has important implications for the development of new therapies for these diseases.

Growth differentiation factors (GDFs) are a subfamily of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily of cytokines. They play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Specifically, GDFs are involved in the development and maintenance of the skeletal, reproductive, and nervous systems. Some members of this family include GDF5, GDF6, and GDF7, which are essential for normal joint formation and cartilage development; GDF8 (also known as myostatin) is a negative regulator of muscle growth; and GDF11 has been implicated in the regulation of neurogenesis and age-related changes.

Growth Differentiation Factor 5 (GDF5) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily of proteins, which are involved in various developmental processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and migration. GDF5 plays crucial roles in skeletal development, joint formation, and cartilage maintenance. It is a secreted signaling molecule that binds to specific receptors on the cell surface, activating intracellular signaling pathways that regulate gene expression and ultimately influence cell behavior.

GDF5 has been associated with several genetic disorders affecting the musculoskeletal system, such as brachydactyly type C (shortened fingers or toes), Grebe's recessive chondrodysplasia (disproportionate short stature and joint deformities), and Hunter-Thompson syndrome (a rare skeletal disorder characterized by abnormal bone growth, joint laxity, and other features). Additionally, GDF5 has been implicated in osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, due to its role in maintaining cartilage homeostasis.

Bone development, also known as ossification, is the process by which bone tissue is formed and grows. This complex process involves several different types of cells, including osteoblasts, which produce new bone matrix, and osteoclasts, which break down and resorb existing bone tissue.

There are two main types of bone development: intramembranous and endochondral ossification. Intramembranous ossification occurs when bone tissue forms directly from connective tissue, while endochondral ossification involves the formation of a cartilage model that is later replaced by bone.

During fetal development, most bones develop through endochondral ossification, starting as a cartilage template that is gradually replaced by bone tissue. However, some bones, such as those in the skull and clavicles, develop through intramembranous ossification.

Bone development continues after birth, with new bone tissue being laid down and existing tissue being remodeled throughout life. This ongoing process helps to maintain the strength and integrity of the skeleton, allowing it to adapt to changing mechanical forces and repair any damage that may occur.

Developmental gene expression regulation refers to the processes that control the activation or repression of specific genes during embryonic and fetal development. These regulatory mechanisms ensure that genes are expressed at the right time, in the right cells, and at appropriate levels to guide proper growth, differentiation, and morphogenesis of an organism.

Developmental gene expression regulation is a complex and dynamic process involving various molecular players, such as transcription factors, chromatin modifiers, non-coding RNAs, and signaling molecules. These regulators can interact with cis-regulatory elements, like enhancers and promoters, to fine-tune the spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development.

Dysregulation of developmental gene expression can lead to various congenital disorders and developmental abnormalities. Therefore, understanding the principles and mechanisms governing developmental gene expression regulation is crucial for uncovering the etiology of developmental diseases and devising potential therapeutic strategies.

Growth Differentiation Factor 9 (GDF9) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily, which plays crucial roles in various biological processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Specifically, GDF9 is primarily expressed in oocytes and has essential functions during follicular development and ovulation in the ovary. It regulates granulosa cell proliferation, differentiation, and steroidogenesis, contributing to the maintenance of follicular integrity and promoting follicle growth. Additionally, GDF9 is involved in embryonic development and has been implicated in several reproductive disorders when its expression or function is disrupted.

Bone matrix refers to the non-cellular component of bone that provides structural support and functions as a reservoir for minerals, such as calcium and phosphate. It is made up of organic and inorganic components. The organic component consists mainly of type I collagen fibers, which provide flexibility and tensile strength to the bone. The inorganic component is primarily composed of hydroxyapatite crystals, which give bone its hardness and compressive strength. Bone matrix also contains other proteins, growth factors, and signaling molecules that regulate bone formation, remodeling, and repair.

Bone resorption is the process by which bone tissue is broken down and absorbed into the body. It is a normal part of bone remodeling, in which old or damaged bone tissue is removed and new tissue is formed. However, excessive bone resorption can lead to conditions such as osteoporosis, in which bones become weak and fragile due to a loss of density. This process is carried out by cells called osteoclasts, which break down the bone tissue and release minerals such as calcium into the bloodstream.

Activin receptors, type I are serine/threonine kinase receptors that play a crucial role in the activin signaling pathway. There are two types of activin receptors, Type I (ALK2, ALK4, and ALK7) and Type II (ActRII and ActRIIB). Activin receptors, type I are transmembrane proteins that bind to activins, which are cytokines belonging to the TGF-β superfamily.

Once activated by binding to activins, activin receptors, type I recruit and phosphorylate type II receptors, leading to the activation of downstream signaling pathways, including SMAD proteins. Activated SMAD proteins then translocate to the nucleus and regulate gene expression, thereby mediating various cellular responses such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration.

Mutations in activin receptors, type I have been implicated in several human diseases, including cancer, fibrosis, and developmental disorders. Therefore, understanding the structure and function of activin receptors, type I is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to treat these diseases.

Growth Differentiation Factor 6 (GDF6) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily, which plays crucial roles in various biological processes such as cell growth, differentiation, and development. Specifically, GDF6 is involved in the regulation of skeletal development, joint formation, and limb morphogenesis. It has been shown to inhibit chondrogenic differentiation and promote osteogenic differentiation during bone development. Genetic variations in the GDF6 gene have been associated with certain musculoskeletal disorders, such as osteoarthritis and joint laxity.

Activins are a type of protein that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily. They are produced and released by various cells in the body, including those in the ovaries, testes, pituitary gland, and other tissues. Activins play important roles in regulating several biological processes, such as cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis (programmed cell death).

Activins bind to specific receptors on the surface of cells, leading to the activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control gene expression. They are particularly well-known for their role in reproductive biology, where they help regulate follicle stimulation and hormone production in the ovaries and testes. Activins also have been implicated in various disease processes, including cancer, fibrosis, and inflammation.

There are three main isoforms of activin in humans: activin A, activin B, and inhibin A. While activins and inhibins share similar structures and functions, they have opposite effects on the activity of the pituitary gland. Activins stimulate the production of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), while inhibins suppress it. This delicate balance between activins and inhibins helps regulate reproductive function and other physiological processes in the body.

Intercellular signaling peptides and proteins are molecules that mediate communication and interaction between different cells in living organisms. They play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, migration, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). These signals can be released into the extracellular space, where they bind to specific receptors on the target cell's surface, triggering intracellular signaling cascades that ultimately lead to a response.

Peptides are short chains of amino acids, while proteins are larger molecules made up of one or more polypeptide chains. Both can function as intercellular signaling molecules by acting as ligands for cell surface receptors or by being cleaved from larger precursor proteins and released into the extracellular space. Examples of intercellular signaling peptides and proteins include growth factors, cytokines, chemokines, hormones, neurotransmitters, and their respective receptors.

These molecules contribute to maintaining homeostasis within an organism by coordinating cellular activities across tissues and organs. Dysregulation of intercellular signaling pathways has been implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, and neurodegenerative conditions. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms underlying intercellular signaling is essential for developing targeted therapies to treat these disorders.

Smad4 protein is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the signaling pathways of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), and activins. These signaling pathways are involved in various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration.

Smad4 is the common mediator of these pathways and forms a complex with Smad2 or Smad3 upon TGF-β/activin stimulation or with Smad1, Smad5, or Smad8 upon BMP stimulation. The resulting complex then translocates to the nucleus, where it regulates gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences and interacting with other transcription factors.

Smad4 also plays a role in negative feedback regulation of TGF-β signaling by promoting the expression of inhibitory Smads (Smad6 and Smad7), which compete for receptor binding and prevent further signal transduction. Mutations in the Smad4 gene have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer and vascular disorders.

Bone neoplasms are abnormal growths or tumors that develop in the bone. They can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). Benign bone neoplasms do not spread to other parts of the body and are rarely a threat to life, although they may cause problems if they grow large enough to press on surrounding tissues or cause fractures. Malignant bone neoplasms, on the other hand, can invade and destroy nearby tissue and may spread (metastasize) to other parts of the body.

There are many different types of bone neoplasms, including:

1. Osteochondroma - a benign tumor that develops from cartilage and bone
2. Enchondroma - a benign tumor that forms in the cartilage that lines the inside of the bones
3. Chondrosarcoma - a malignant tumor that develops from cartilage
4. Osteosarcoma - a malignant tumor that develops from bone cells
5. Ewing sarcoma - a malignant tumor that develops in the bones or soft tissues around the bones
6. Giant cell tumor of bone - a benign or occasionally malignant tumor that develops from bone tissue
7. Fibrosarcoma - a malignant tumor that develops from fibrous tissue in the bone

The symptoms of bone neoplasms vary depending on the type, size, and location of the tumor. They may include pain, swelling, stiffness, fractures, or limited mobility. Treatment options depend on the type and stage of the tumor but may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or a combination of these treatments.

Activin receptors, type II, are a subgroup of serine/threonine kinase receptors that play a crucial role in signal transduction pathways involved in various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. There are two types of activin receptors, Type IIA (ACVR2A) and Type IIB (ACVR2B), which are single-pass transmembrane proteins with an extracellular domain that binds to activins and a cytoplasmic domain with kinase activity.

Activins are dimeric proteins that belong to the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily, and they play essential roles in regulating developmental processes, reproduction, and homeostasis. Activin receptors, type II, function as primary binding sites for activins, forming a complex with Type I activin receptors (ALK4, ALK5, or ALK7) to initiate downstream signaling cascades.

Once the activin-receptor complex is formed, the intracellular kinase domain of the Type II receptor phosphorylates and activates the Type I receptor, which in turn propagates the signal by recruiting and phosphorylating downstream effectors such as SMAD proteins. Activated SMADs then form a complex and translocate to the nucleus, where they regulate gene expression.

Dysregulation of activin receptors, type II, has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, fibrosis, and developmental disorders. Therefore, understanding their function and regulation is essential for developing novel therapeutic strategies to target these diseases.

"Cells, cultured" is a medical term that refers to cells that have been removed from an organism and grown in controlled laboratory conditions outside of the body. This process is called cell culture and it allows scientists to study cells in a more controlled and accessible environment than they would have inside the body. Cultured cells can be derived from a variety of sources, including tissues, organs, or fluids from humans, animals, or cell lines that have been previously established in the laboratory.

Cell culture involves several steps, including isolation of the cells from the tissue, purification and characterization of the cells, and maintenance of the cells in appropriate growth conditions. The cells are typically grown in specialized media that contain nutrients, growth factors, and other components necessary for their survival and proliferation. Cultured cells can be used for a variety of purposes, including basic research, drug development and testing, and production of biological products such as vaccines and gene therapies.

It is important to note that cultured cells may behave differently than they do in the body, and results obtained from cell culture studies may not always translate directly to human physiology or disease. Therefore, it is essential to validate findings from cell culture experiments using additional models and ultimately in clinical trials involving human subjects.

Bone marrow is the spongy tissue found inside certain bones in the body, such as the hips, thighs, and vertebrae. It is responsible for producing blood-forming cells, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. There are two types of bone marrow: red marrow, which is involved in blood cell production, and yellow marrow, which contains fatty tissue.

Red bone marrow contains hematopoietic stem cells, which can differentiate into various types of blood cells. These stem cells continuously divide and mature to produce new blood cells that are released into the circulation. Red blood cells carry oxygen throughout the body, white blood cells help fight infections, and platelets play a crucial role in blood clotting.

Bone marrow also serves as a site for immune cell development and maturation. It contains various types of immune cells, such as lymphocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, which help protect the body against infections and diseases.

Abnormalities in bone marrow function can lead to several medical conditions, including anemia, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, and various types of cancer, such as leukemia and multiple myeloma. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy are common diagnostic procedures used to evaluate bone marrow health and function.

Bone diseases is a broad term that refers to various medical conditions that affect the bones. These conditions can be categorized into several groups, including:

1. Developmental and congenital bone diseases: These are conditions that affect bone growth and development before or at birth. Examples include osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bone disease), achondroplasia (dwarfism), and cleidocranial dysostosis.
2. Metabolic bone diseases: These are conditions that affect the body's ability to maintain healthy bones. They are often caused by hormonal imbalances, vitamin deficiencies, or problems with mineral metabolism. Examples include osteoporosis, osteomalacia, and Paget's disease of bone.
3. Inflammatory bone diseases: These are conditions that cause inflammation in the bones. They can be caused by infections, autoimmune disorders, or other medical conditions. Examples include osteomyelitis, rheumatoid arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.
4. Degenerative bone diseases: These are conditions that cause the bones to break down over time. They can be caused by aging, injury, or disease. Examples include osteoarthritis, avascular necrosis, and diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH).
5. Tumors and cancers of the bone: These are conditions that involve abnormal growths in the bones. They can be benign or malignant. Examples include osteosarcoma, chondrosarcoma, and Ewing sarcoma.
6. Fractures and injuries: While not strictly a "disease," fractures and injuries are common conditions that affect the bones. They can result from trauma, overuse, or weakened bones. Examples include stress fractures, compound fractures, and dislocations.

Overall, bone diseases can cause a wide range of symptoms, including pain, stiffness, deformity, and decreased mobility. Treatment for these conditions varies depending on the specific diagnosis but may include medication, surgery, physical therapy, or lifestyle changes.

Bone marrow cells are the types of cells found within the bone marrow, which is the spongy tissue inside certain bones in the body. The main function of bone marrow is to produce blood cells. There are two types of bone marrow: red and yellow. Red bone marrow is where most blood cell production takes place, while yellow bone marrow serves as a fat storage site.

The three main types of bone marrow cells are:

1. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs): These are immature cells that can differentiate into any type of blood cell, including red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. They have the ability to self-renew, meaning they can divide and create more hematopoietic stem cells.
2. Red blood cell progenitors: These are immature cells that will develop into mature red blood cells, also known as erythrocytes. Red blood cells carry oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide back to the lungs.
3. Myeloid and lymphoid white blood cell progenitors: These are immature cells that will develop into various types of white blood cells, which play a crucial role in the body's immune system by fighting infections and diseases. Myeloid progenitors give rise to granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils), monocytes, and megakaryocytes (which eventually become platelets). Lymphoid progenitors differentiate into B cells, T cells, and natural killer (NK) cells.

Bone marrow cells are essential for maintaining a healthy blood cell count and immune system function. Abnormalities in bone marrow cells can lead to various medical conditions, such as anemia, leukopenia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, or thrombocytosis, depending on the specific type of blood cell affected. Additionally, bone marrow cells are often used in transplantation procedures to treat patients with certain types of cancer, such as leukemia and lymphoma, or other hematologic disorders.

Follistatin is a glycoprotein that is naturally produced in various tissues, including the ovaries, pituitary gland, and skeletal muscle. It plays an essential role in regulating the activity of members of the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily, particularly the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and activins.

Follistatin binds to these signaling molecules with high affinity, preventing them from interacting with their receptors and thereby inhibiting their downstream signaling pathways. By doing so, follistatin helps regulate processes such as follicle stimulation in the ovaries, neurogenesis, muscle growth, and inflammation.

Increased levels of follistatin have been associated with muscle hypertrophy, while its deficiency can lead to impaired fertility and developmental abnormalities.

"Body patterning" is a general term that refers to the process of forming and organizing various tissues and structures into specific patterns during embryonic development. This complex process involves a variety of molecular mechanisms, including gene expression, cell signaling, and cell-cell interactions. It results in the creation of distinct body regions, such as the head, trunk, and limbs, as well as the organization of internal organs and systems.

In medical terminology, "body patterning" may refer to specific developmental processes or abnormalities related to embryonic development. For example, in genetic disorders such as Poland syndrome or Holt-Oram syndrome, mutations in certain genes can lead to abnormal body patterning, resulting in the absence or underdevelopment of certain muscles, bones, or other structures.

It's important to note that "body patterning" is not a formal medical term with a specific definition, but rather a general concept used in developmental biology and genetics.

In medical and embryological terms, the mesoderm is one of the three primary germ layers in the very early stages of embryonic development. It forms between the ectoderm and endoderm during gastrulation, and it gives rise to a wide variety of cell types, tissues, and organs in the developing embryo.

The mesoderm contributes to the formation of structures such as:

1. The connective tissues (including tendons, ligaments, and most of the bones)
2. Muscular system (skeletal, smooth, and cardiac muscles)
3. Circulatory system (heart, blood vessels, and blood cells)
4. Excretory system (kidneys and associated structures)
5. Reproductive system (gonads, including ovaries and testes)
6. Dermis of the skin
7. Parts of the eye and inner ear
8. Several organs in the urogenital system

Dysfunctions or abnormalities in mesoderm development can lead to various congenital disorders and birth defects, highlighting its importance during embryogenesis.

Activin receptors are a type of serine/threonine kinase receptor that play a crucial role in various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. They are activated by members of the TGF-β (transforming growth factor-beta) superfamily, particularly activins.

There are two main types of activin receptors: ActR-I and ActR-II. ActR-I exists in two isoforms, ALK2 and ALK4, while ActR-II has two isoforms, ActR-IIA and ActR-IIB. Activation of these receptors leads to the phosphorylation of intracellular signaling molecules, which then translocate to the nucleus and regulate gene expression.

Abnormalities in activin receptor function have been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, fibrosis, and developmental disorders. Therefore, activin receptors are an important target for therapeutic intervention in these conditions.

ID-1 (Inhibitor of Differentiation protein 1) is a gene that encodes for a protein involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, and migration. The ID-1 protein belongs to the family of helix-loop-helix proteins, which are transcription factors that regulate gene expression.

ID-1 functions as a dominant negative inhibitor of basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors, which promote cell differentiation and are essential for the development and maintenance of tissues and organs. ID-1 binds to these bHLH factors and prevents them from forming functional complexes with their partner proteins, thereby inhibiting their ability to activate target genes involved in differentiation.

ID-1 is widely expressed during embryonic development and plays critical roles in various biological processes, including neurogenesis, hematopoiesis, and vasculogenesis. In adults, ID-1 expression is usually restricted to stem cells and proliferating cells, where it helps maintain the undifferentiated state and promotes cell proliferation and migration.

Abnormal ID-1 expression has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, where increased ID-1 levels have been associated with tumor progression, metastasis, and poor clinical outcomes. Therefore, ID-1 is an attractive target for therapeutic intervention in various pathological conditions.

Carrier proteins, also known as transport proteins, are a type of protein that facilitates the movement of molecules across cell membranes. They are responsible for the selective and active transport of ions, sugars, amino acids, and other molecules from one side of the membrane to the other, against their concentration gradient. This process requires energy, usually in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate).

Carrier proteins have a specific binding site for the molecule they transport, and undergo conformational changes upon binding, which allows them to move the molecule across the membrane. Once the molecule has been transported, the carrier protein returns to its original conformation, ready to bind and transport another molecule.

Carrier proteins play a crucial role in maintaining the balance of ions and other molecules inside and outside of cells, and are essential for many physiological processes, including nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, and nutrient uptake.

Receptor-regulated Smad proteins (R-Smads) are a subgroup of the Smad family of intracellular signaling proteins that play a critical role in mediating signals from the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily of cytokines and hormones. In humans, there are three types of R-Smads: Smad1, Smad2, Smad3, Smad5, and Smad8/9.

R-Smads are directly phosphorylated by the type I TGF-β receptor kinases upon ligand binding, which leads to their activation and subsequent translocation into the nucleus. Once in the nucleus, R-Smads form complexes with other transcription factors and co-regulators to regulate the expression of target genes involved in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and extracellular matrix production.

R-Smad signaling is tightly regulated by several mechanisms, including inhibitory Smads (I-Smads), ubiquitination, and phosphatases, to ensure proper signal transduction and prevent aberrant activation of the pathway. Dysregulation of R-Smad signaling has been implicated in various human diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and developmental disorders.

In situ hybridization (ISH) is a molecular biology technique used to detect and localize specific nucleic acid sequences, such as DNA or RNA, within cells or tissues. This technique involves the use of a labeled probe that is complementary to the target nucleic acid sequence. The probe can be labeled with various types of markers, including radioisotopes, fluorescent dyes, or enzymes.

During the ISH procedure, the labeled probe is hybridized to the target nucleic acid sequence in situ, meaning that the hybridization occurs within the intact cells or tissues. After washing away unbound probe, the location of the labeled probe can be visualized using various methods depending on the type of label used.

In situ hybridization has a wide range of applications in both research and diagnostic settings, including the detection of gene expression patterns, identification of viral infections, and diagnosis of genetic disorders.

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is an enzyme found in various body tissues, including the liver, bile ducts, digestive system, bones, and kidneys. It plays a role in breaking down proteins and minerals, such as phosphate, in the body.

The medical definition of alkaline phosphatase refers to its function as a hydrolase enzyme that removes phosphate groups from molecules at an alkaline pH level. In clinical settings, ALP is often measured through blood tests as a biomarker for various health conditions.

Elevated levels of ALP in the blood may indicate liver or bone diseases, such as hepatitis, cirrhosis, bone fractures, or cancer. Therefore, physicians may order an alkaline phosphatase test to help diagnose and monitor these conditions. However, it is essential to interpret ALP results in conjunction with other diagnostic tests and clinical findings for accurate diagnosis and treatment.

Tolloid-like metalloproteinases are a group of enzymes that belong to the metzincin superfamily, which includes matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinases (ADAMs). Tolloids are zinc-dependent endopeptidases that play crucial roles in various biological processes such as tissue morphogenesis, cell differentiation, and extracellular matrix remodeling.

There are two main types of Tolloid-like metalloproteinases: Tolloid (TLD) and Tolloid-like 1 (TLL1), also known as BMP-1 (Bone Morphogenetic Protein-1). These enzymes share a conserved structure, including an N-terminal prodomain, a metalloprotease domain, a disintegrin-like domain, and a C-terminal domain.

Tolloid-like metalloproteinases are primarily known for their ability to cleave and activate several substrates, such as the BMP (Bone Morphogenetic Protein) family members, which are essential regulators of embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. By processing these growth factors, Tolloid-like metalloproteinases help regulate various signaling pathways involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis.

Dysregulation of Tolloid-like metalloproteinases has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, fibrosis, and neurodegenerative disorders. Therefore, understanding their functions and regulation is crucial for developing potential therapeutic strategies targeting these enzymes.

Trans-activators are proteins that increase the transcriptional activity of a gene or a set of genes. They do this by binding to specific DNA sequences and interacting with the transcription machinery, thereby enhancing the recruitment and assembly of the complexes needed for transcription. In some cases, trans-activators can also modulate the chromatin structure to make the template more accessible to the transcription machinery.

In the context of HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus) infection, the term "trans-activator" is often used specifically to refer to the Tat protein. The Tat protein is a viral regulatory protein that plays a critical role in the replication of HIV by activating the transcription of the viral genome. It does this by binding to a specific RNA structure called the Trans-Activation Response Element (TAR) located at the 5' end of all nascent HIV transcripts, and recruiting cellular cofactors that enhance the processivity and efficiency of RNA polymerase II, leading to increased viral gene expression.

Bone transplantation, also known as bone grafting, is a surgical procedure in which bone or bone-like material is transferred from one part of the body to another or from one person to another. The graft may be composed of cortical (hard outer portion) bone, cancellous (spongy inner portion) bone, or a combination of both. It can be taken from different sites in the same individual (autograft), from another individual of the same species (allograft), or from an animal source (xenograft). The purpose of bone transplantation is to replace missing bone, provide structural support, and stimulate new bone growth. This procedure is commonly used in orthopedic, dental, and maxillofacial surgeries to repair bone defects caused by trauma, tumors, or congenital conditions.

MSX1 (Homeobox protein MSX-1) is a transcription factor that belongs to the muscle segment homebox gene family, also known as the msh homeobox genes. These genes are involved in the development and differentiation of various tissues, including muscle, bone, and neural crest derivatives.

MSX1 plays crucial roles during embryonic development, such as regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. It is widely expressed in the developing embryo, particularly in the oral ectoderm, neural crest, and mesenchyme. In the oral region, MSX1 helps control tooth development by interacting with other transcription factors and signaling molecules.

As a transcription factor, MSX1 binds to specific DNA sequences called homeobox response elements (HREs) in the promoter regions of its target genes. This binding either activates or represses gene expression, depending on the context and interacting partners. Dysregulation of MSX1 has been implicated in various developmental disorders and diseases, such as tooth agenesis, cleft lip/palate, and cancer.

Proteins are complex, large molecules that play critical roles in the body's functions. They are made up of amino acids, which are organic compounds that are the building blocks of proteins. Proteins are required for the structure, function, and regulation of the body's tissues and organs. They are essential for the growth, repair, and maintenance of body tissues, and they play a crucial role in many biological processes, including metabolism, immune response, and cellular signaling. Proteins can be classified into different types based on their structure and function, such as enzymes, hormones, antibodies, and structural proteins. They are found in various foods, especially animal-derived products like meat, dairy, and eggs, as well as plant-based sources like beans, nuts, and grains.

"Xenopus proteins" refer to the proteins that are expressed or isolated from the Xenopus species, which are primarily used as model organisms in biological and biomedical research. The most commonly used Xenopus species for research are the African clawed frogs, Xenopus laevis and Xenopus tropicalis. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes and functions, and they serve as valuable tools to study different aspects of molecular biology, developmental biology, genetics, and biochemistry.

Some examples of Xenopus proteins that are widely studied include:

1. Xenopus Histones: These are the proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, which are the fundamental units of chromatin in eukaryotic cells. They play a significant role in gene regulation and epigenetic modifications.
2. Xenopus Cyclins and Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs): These proteins regulate the cell cycle and control cell division, differentiation, and apoptosis.
3. Xenopus Transcription factors: These proteins bind to specific DNA sequences and regulate gene expression during development and in response to various stimuli.
4. Xenopus Signaling molecules: These proteins are involved in intracellular signaling pathways that control various cellular processes, such as cell growth, differentiation, migration, and survival.
5. Xenopus Cytoskeletal proteins: These proteins provide structural support to the cells and regulate their shape, motility, and organization.
6. Xenopus Enzymes: These proteins catalyze various biochemical reactions in the cell, such as metabolic pathways, DNA replication, transcription, and translation.

Overall, Xenopus proteins are essential tools for understanding fundamental biological processes and have contributed significantly to our current knowledge of molecular biology, genetics, and developmental biology.

Heterotopic ossification (HO) is a medical condition where bone tissue forms outside the skeleton, in locations where it does not typically exist. This process can occur in various soft tissues, such as muscles, tendons, ligaments, or even inside joint capsules. The abnormal bone growth can lead to pain, stiffness, limited range of motion, and, in some cases, loss of function in the affected area.

There are several types of heterotopic ossification, including:

1. Myositis ossificans - This form is often associated with trauma or injury, such as muscle damage from a fracture, surgery, or direct blow. It typically affects young, active individuals and usually resolves on its own within months to a few years.
2. Neurogenic heterotopic ossification (NHO) - Also known as "traumatic heterotopic ossification," this form is often linked to spinal cord injuries, brain injuries, or central nervous system damage. NHO can cause significant impairment and may require surgical intervention in some cases.
3. Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) - This rare, genetic disorder causes progressive heterotopic ossification throughout the body, starting in early childhood. The condition significantly impacts mobility and quality of life, with no known cure.

The exact mechanisms behind heterotopic ossification are not fully understood, but it is believed that a combination of factors, including inflammation, tissue injury, and genetic predisposition, contribute to its development. Treatment options may include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), radiation therapy, physical therapy, or surgical removal of the abnormal bone growth, depending on the severity and location of the HO.

Core Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit, also known as CBF-A1 or RUNX1, is a protein that plays a crucial role in hematopoiesis, which is the process of blood cell development. It is a member of the core binding factor (CBF) complex, which regulates gene transcription and is essential for the differentiation and maturation of hematopoietic stem cells into mature blood cells.

The CBF complex consists of three subunits: CBF-A, CBF-B, and a histone deacetylase (HDAC). The CBF-A subunit can have several isoforms, including CBF-A1, which is encoded by the RUNX1 gene. Mutations in the RUNX1 gene have been associated with various hematological disorders, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML), familial platelet disorder with propensity to develop AML, and thrombocytopenia with absent radii syndrome.

CBF-A1/RUNX1 functions as a transcription factor that binds to DNA at specific sequences called core binding factors, thereby regulating the expression of target genes involved in hematopoiesis. Proper regulation of these genes is essential for normal blood cell development and homeostasis.

Chondrogenesis is the process of cartilage formation during embryonic development and in the healing of certain types of injuries. It involves the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells into chondrocytes, which are the specialized cells that produce and maintain the extracellular matrix of cartilage.

During chondrogenesis, the mesenchymal stem cells condense and form a template for the future cartilaginous tissue. These cells then differentiate into chondrocytes, which begin to produce and deposit collagen type II, proteoglycans, and other extracellular matrix components that give cartilage its unique biochemical and mechanical properties.

Chondrogenesis is a critical process for the development of various structures in the body, including the skeletal system, where it plays a role in the formation of articular cartilage, growth plates, and other types of cartilage. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate chondrogenesis is important for developing therapies to treat cartilage injuries and degenerative diseases such as osteoarthritis.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), stem cells are "initial cells" or "precursor cells" that have the ability to differentiate into many different cell types in the body. They can also divide without limit to replenish other cells for as long as the person or animal is still alive.

There are two main types of stem cells: embryonic stem cells, which come from human embryos, and adult stem cells, which are found in various tissues throughout the body. Embryonic stem cells have the ability to differentiate into all cell types in the body, while adult stem cells have more limited differentiation potential.

Stem cells play an essential role in the development and repair of various tissues and organs in the body. They are currently being studied for their potential use in the treatment of a wide range of diseases and conditions, including cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and neurological disorders. However, more research is needed to fully understand the properties and capabilities of these cells before they can be used safely and effectively in clinical settings.

Messenger RNA (mRNA) is a type of RNA (ribonucleic acid) that carries genetic information copied from DNA in the form of a series of three-base code "words," each of which specifies a particular amino acid. This information is used by the cell's machinery to construct proteins, a process known as translation. After being transcribed from DNA, mRNA travels out of the nucleus to the ribosomes in the cytoplasm where protein synthesis occurs. Once the protein has been synthesized, the mRNA may be degraded and recycled. Post-transcriptional modifications can also occur to mRNA, such as alternative splicing and addition of a 5' cap and a poly(A) tail, which can affect its stability, localization, and translation efficiency.

Physiologic calcification is the normal deposit of calcium salts in body tissues and organs. It is a natural process that occurs as part of the growth and development of the human body, as well as during the repair and remodeling of tissues.

Calcium is an essential mineral that plays a critical role in many bodily functions, including bone formation, muscle contraction, nerve impulse transmission, and blood clotting. In order to maintain proper levels of calcium in the body, excess calcium that is not needed for these functions may be deposited in various tissues as a normal part of the aging process.

Physiologic calcification typically occurs in areas such as the walls of blood vessels, the lungs, and the heart valves. While these calcifications are generally harmless, they can sometimes lead to complications, particularly if they occur in large amounts or in sensitive areas. For example, calcification of the coronary arteries can increase the risk of heart disease, while calcification of the lung tissue can cause respiratory symptoms.

It is important to note that pathologic calcification, on the other hand, refers to the abnormal deposit of calcium salts in tissues and organs, which can be caused by various medical conditions such as chronic kidney disease, hyperparathyroidism, and certain infections. Pathologic calcification is not a normal process and can lead to serious health complications if left untreated.

Pulmonary hypertension is a medical condition characterized by increased blood pressure in the pulmonary arteries, which are the blood vessels that carry blood from the right side of the heart to the lungs. This results in higher than normal pressures in the pulmonary circulation and can lead to various symptoms and complications.

Pulmonary hypertension is typically defined as a mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) greater than or equal to 25 mmHg at rest, as measured by right heart catheterization. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies pulmonary hypertension into five groups based on the underlying cause:

1. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH): This group includes idiopathic PAH, heritable PAH, drug-induced PAH, and associated PAH due to conditions such as connective tissue diseases, HIV infection, portal hypertension, congenital heart disease, and schistosomiasis.
2. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease: This group includes conditions that cause elevated left atrial pressure, such as left ventricular systolic or diastolic dysfunction, valvular heart disease, and congenital cardiovascular shunts.
3. Pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia: This group includes chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), interstitial lung disease, sleep-disordered breathing, alveolar hypoventilation disorders, and high altitude exposure.
4. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH): This group includes persistent obstruction of the pulmonary arteries due to organized thrombi or emboli.
5. Pulmonary hypertension with unclear and/or multifactorial mechanisms: This group includes hematologic disorders, systemic disorders, metabolic disorders, and other conditions that can cause pulmonary hypertension but do not fit into the previous groups.

Symptoms of pulmonary hypertension may include shortness of breath, fatigue, chest pain, lightheadedness, and syncope (fainting). Diagnosis typically involves a combination of medical history, physical examination, imaging studies, and invasive testing such as right heart catheterization. Treatment depends on the underlying cause but may include medications, oxygen therapy, pulmonary rehabilitation, and, in some cases, surgical intervention.

Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences. This technique is particularly useful for the detection and quantification of RNA viruses, as well as for the analysis of gene expression.

The process involves two main steps: reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In the first step, reverse transcriptase enzyme is used to convert RNA into complementary DNA (cDNA) by reading the template provided by the RNA molecule. This cDNA then serves as a template for the PCR amplification step.

In the second step, the PCR reaction uses two primers that flank the target DNA sequence and a thermostable polymerase enzyme to repeatedly copy the targeted cDNA sequence. The reaction mixture is heated and cooled in cycles, allowing the primers to anneal to the template, and the polymerase to extend the new strand. This results in exponential amplification of the target DNA sequence, making it possible to detect even small amounts of RNA or cDNA.

RT-PCR is a sensitive and specific technique that has many applications in medical research and diagnostics, including the detection of viruses such as HIV, hepatitis C virus, and SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19). It can also be used to study gene expression, identify genetic mutations, and diagnose genetic disorders.

Myositis ossificans is a medical condition characterized by the formation of bone tissue within the soft tissues, particularly in the muscles. It is also known as heterotopic ossification, which means "bone formation in an abnormal location." This condition usually occurs after trauma or injury to the muscle, such as a severe contusion (bruise) or a muscle strain or tear.

In myositis ossificans, the body's repair process goes awry, and instead of healing the muscle with normal scar tissue, bone tissue forms within the muscle. This can cause pain, stiffness, and limited mobility in the affected area. In some cases, the bone tissue may continue to grow and harden over time, leading to further complications.

Myositis ossificans is typically diagnosed through imaging tests such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans, which can show the presence of bone tissue within the muscle. Treatment may include physical therapy, pain management, and in some cases, surgery to remove the excess bone tissue. Preventive measures such as early mobilization and protection of the affected area may help reduce the risk of developing myositis ossificans after an injury.

Smad7 protein is a intracellular signaling molecule that plays a role in negative regulation of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily of cytokines. It is a member of the Smad family, which are proteins that transduce signals from the cell membrane to the nucleus in response to TGF-β ligands binding to their receptors.

Smad7 functions as an inhibitory Smad by blocking the formation of active Smad complexes and targeting the activated type I TGF-β receptor for degradation, thus preventing the activation of TGF-β signaling pathways. It also interacts with other signaling molecules, such as tumor necrosis factor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) and transforming growth factor-beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1), to inhibit their activity and downregulate TGF-β signaling.

Abnormal regulation of Smad7 protein has been implicated in various human diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and autoimmune disorders.

Hedgehog proteins are a group of signaling molecules that play crucial roles in the development and regulation of various biological processes in animals. They are named after the hedgehog mutant fruit flies, which have spiky bristles due to defects in this pathway. These proteins are involved in cell growth, differentiation, and tissue regeneration. They exert their effects by binding to specific receptors on the surface of target cells, leading to a cascade of intracellular signaling events that ultimately influence gene expression and cell behavior.

There are three main types of Hedgehog proteins in mammals: Sonic hedgehog (Shh), Indian hedgehog (Ihh), and Desert hedgehog (Dhh). These protecules undergo post-translational modifications, including cleavage and lipid modification, which are essential for their activity. Dysregulation of Hedgehog signaling has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, developmental abnormalities, and degenerative disorders.

Bone substitutes are materials that are used to replace missing or damaged bone in the body. They can be made from a variety of materials, including natural bone from other parts of the body or from animals, synthetic materials, or a combination of both. The goal of using bone substitutes is to provide structural support and promote the growth of new bone tissue.

Bone substitutes are often used in dental, orthopedic, and craniofacial surgery to help repair defects caused by trauma, tumors, or congenital abnormalities. They can also be used to augment bone volume in procedures such as spinal fusion or joint replacement.

There are several types of bone substitutes available, including:

1. Autografts: Bone taken from another part of the patient's body, such as the hip or pelvis.
2. Allografts: Bone taken from a deceased donor and processed to remove any cells and infectious materials.
3. Xenografts: Bone from an animal source, typically bovine or porcine, that has been processed to remove any cells and infectious materials.
4. Synthetic bone substitutes: Materials such as calcium phosphate ceramics, bioactive glass, and polymer-based materials that are designed to mimic the properties of natural bone.

The choice of bone substitute material depends on several factors, including the size and location of the defect, the patient's medical history, and the surgeon's preference. It is important to note that while bone substitutes can provide structural support and promote new bone growth, they may not have the same strength or durability as natural bone. Therefore, they may not be suitable for all applications, particularly those that require high load-bearing capacity.

Wnt proteins are a family of secreted signaling molecules that play crucial roles in the regulation of fundamental biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival. They were first discovered in 1982 through genetic studies in Drosophila melanogaster (fruit flies) and have since been found to be highly conserved across various species, from invertebrates to humans.

Wnt proteins exert their effects by binding to specific receptors on the target cell surface, leading to the activation of several intracellular signaling pathways:

1. Canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway: In the absence of Wnt ligands, β-catenin is continuously degraded by a destruction complex consisting of Axin, APC (Adenomatous polyposis coli), and GSK3β (Glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta). When Wnt proteins bind to their receptors Frizzled and LRP5/6, the formation of a "signalosome" complex leads to the inhibition of the destruction complex, allowing β-catenin to accumulate in the cytoplasm and translocate into the nucleus. Here, it interacts with TCF/LEF (T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor) transcription factors to regulate the expression of target genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.
2. Non-canonical Wnt pathways: These include the Wnt/Ca^2+^ pathway and the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. In the Wnt/Ca^2+^ pathway, Wnt ligands bind to Frizzled receptors and activate heterotrimeric G proteins, leading to an increase in intracellular Ca^2+^ levels and activation of downstream targets such as protein kinase C (PKC) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CAMKII). These signaling events ultimately regulate cell movement, adhesion, and gene expression. In the PCP pathway, Wnt ligands bind to Frizzled receptors and coreceptor complexes containing Ror2 or Ryk, leading to activation of small GTPases such as RhoA and Rac1, which control cytoskeletal organization and cell polarity.

Dysregulation of Wnt signaling has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative conditions. In cancer, aberrant activation of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway contributes to tumor initiation, progression, and metastasis by promoting cell proliferation, survival, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Inhibitors targeting different components of the Wnt signaling pathway are currently being developed as potential therapeutic strategies for cancer treatment.

Hepcidin is a peptide hormone primarily produced in the liver that plays a crucial role in regulating iron homeostasis within the body. It acts by inhibiting the absorption of dietary iron in the intestines and the release of iron from storage sites, such as macrophages, into the bloodstream. By reducing the amount of iron available for use, hepcidin helps prevent excessive iron accumulation in tissues, which can be harmful and contribute to the development of various diseases, including iron overload disorders and certain types of anemia. The production of hepcidin is regulated by several factors, including iron levels, inflammation, and erythropoiesis (the production of red blood cells).

Chondrocytes are the specialized cells that produce and maintain the extracellular matrix of cartilage tissue. They are responsible for synthesizing and secreting the collagen fibers, proteoglycans, and other components that give cartilage its unique properties, such as elasticity, resiliency, and resistance to compression. Chondrocytes are located within lacunae, or small cavities, in the cartilage matrix, and they receive nutrients and oxygen through diffusion from the surrounding tissue fluid. They are capable of adapting to changes in mechanical stress by modulating the production and organization of the extracellular matrix, which allows cartilage to withstand various loads and maintain its structural integrity. Chondrocytes play a crucial role in the development, maintenance, and repair of cartilaginous tissues throughout the body, including articular cartilage, costal cartilage, and growth plate cartilage.

Homeodomain proteins are a group of transcription factors that play crucial roles in the development and differentiation of cells in animals and plants. They are characterized by the presence of a highly conserved DNA-binding domain called the homeodomain, which is typically about 60 amino acids long. The homeodomain consists of three helices, with the third helix responsible for recognizing and binding to specific DNA sequences.

Homeodomain proteins are involved in regulating gene expression during embryonic development, tissue maintenance, and organismal growth. They can act as activators or repressors of transcription, depending on the context and the presence of cofactors. Mutations in homeodomain proteins have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer, congenital abnormalities, and neurological disorders.

Some examples of homeodomain proteins include PAX6, which is essential for eye development, HOX genes, which are involved in body patterning, and NANOG, which plays a role in maintaining pluripotency in stem cells.

Osteocalcin is a protein that is produced by osteoblasts, which are the cells responsible for bone formation. It is one of the most abundant non-collagenous proteins found in bones and plays a crucial role in the regulation of bone metabolism. Osteocalcin contains a high affinity for calcium ions, making it essential for the mineralization of the bone matrix.

Once synthesized, osteocalcin is secreted into the extracellular matrix, where it binds to hydroxyapatite crystals, helping to regulate their growth and contributing to the overall strength and integrity of the bones. Osteocalcin also has been found to play a role in other physiological processes outside of bone metabolism, such as modulating insulin sensitivity, energy metabolism, and male fertility.

In summary, osteocalcin is a protein produced by osteoblasts that plays a critical role in bone formation, mineralization, and turnover, and has been implicated in various other physiological processes.

A chick embryo refers to the developing organism that arises from a fertilized chicken egg. It is often used as a model system in biological research, particularly during the stages of development when many of its organs and systems are forming and can be easily observed and manipulated. The study of chick embryos has contributed significantly to our understanding of various aspects of developmental biology, including gastrulation, neurulation, organogenesis, and pattern formation. Researchers may use various techniques to observe and manipulate the chick embryo, such as surgical alterations, cell labeling, and exposure to drugs or other agents.

Cell proliferation is the process by which cells increase in number, typically through the process of cell division. In the context of biology and medicine, it refers to the reproduction of cells that makes up living tissue, allowing growth, maintenance, and repair. It involves several stages including the transition from a phase of quiescence (G0 phase) to an active phase (G1 phase), DNA replication in the S phase, and mitosis or M phase, where the cell divides into two daughter cells.

Abnormal or uncontrolled cell proliferation is a characteristic feature of many diseases, including cancer, where deregulated cell cycle control leads to excessive and unregulated growth of cells, forming tumors that can invade surrounding tissues and metastasize to distant sites in the body.

A cell line is a culture of cells that are grown in a laboratory for use in research. These cells are usually taken from a single cell or group of cells, and they are able to divide and grow continuously in the lab. Cell lines can come from many different sources, including animals, plants, and humans. They are often used in scientific research to study cellular processes, disease mechanisms, and to test new drugs or treatments. Some common types of human cell lines include HeLa cells (which come from a cancer patient named Henrietta Lacks), HEK293 cells (which come from embryonic kidney cells), and HUVEC cells (which come from umbilical vein endothelial cells). It is important to note that cell lines are not the same as primary cells, which are cells that are taken directly from a living organism and have not been grown in the lab.

Ectoderm is the outermost of the three primary germ layers in a developing embryo, along with the endoderm and mesoderm. The ectoderm gives rise to the outer covering of the body, including the skin, hair, nails, glands, and the nervous system, which includes the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. It also forms the lining of the mouth, anus, nose, and ears. Essentially, the ectoderm is responsible for producing all the epidermal structures and the neural crest cells that contribute to various derivatives such as melanocytes, adrenal medulla, smooth muscle, and peripheral nervous system components.

Morphogenesis is a term used in developmental biology and refers to the process by which cells give rise to tissues and organs with specific shapes, structures, and patterns during embryonic development. This process involves complex interactions between genes, cells, and the extracellular environment that result in the coordinated movement and differentiation of cells into specialized functional units.

Morphogenesis is a dynamic and highly regulated process that involves several mechanisms, including cell proliferation, death, migration, adhesion, and differentiation. These processes are controlled by genetic programs and signaling pathways that respond to environmental cues and regulate the behavior of individual cells within a developing tissue or organ.

The study of morphogenesis is important for understanding how complex biological structures form during development and how these processes can go awry in disease states such as cancer, birth defects, and degenerative disorders.

Cartilage is a type of connective tissue that is found throughout the body in various forms. It is made up of specialized cells called chondrocytes, which are embedded in a firm, flexible matrix composed of collagen fibers and proteoglycans. This unique structure gives cartilage its characteristic properties of being both strong and flexible.

There are three main types of cartilage in the human body: hyaline cartilage, elastic cartilage, and fibrocartilage.

1. Hyaline cartilage is the most common type and is found in areas such as the articular surfaces of bones (where they meet to form joints), the nose, trachea, and larynx. It has a smooth, glassy appearance and provides a smooth, lubricated surface for joint movement.
2. Elastic cartilage contains more elastin fibers than hyaline cartilage, which gives it greater flexibility and resilience. It is found in structures such as the external ear and parts of the larynx and epiglottis.
3. Fibrocartilage has a higher proportion of collagen fibers and fewer chondrocytes than hyaline or elastic cartilage. It is found in areas that require high tensile strength, such as the intervertebral discs, menisci (found in joints like the knee), and the pubic symphysis.

Cartilage plays a crucial role in supporting and protecting various structures within the body, allowing for smooth movement and providing a cushion between bones to absorb shock and prevent wear and tear. However, cartilage has limited capacity for self-repair and regeneration, making damage or degeneration of cartilage tissue a significant concern in conditions such as osteoarthritis.

'Cell lineage' is a term used in biology and medicine to describe the developmental history or relationship of a cell or group of cells to other cells, tracing back to the original progenitor or stem cell. It refers to the series of cell divisions and differentiation events that give rise to specific types of cells in an organism over time.

In simpler terms, cell lineage is like a family tree for cells, showing how they are related to each other through a chain of cell division and specialization events. This concept is important in understanding the development, growth, and maintenance of tissues and organs in living beings.

Transcription factors are proteins that play a crucial role in regulating gene expression by controlling the transcription of DNA to messenger RNA (mRNA). They function by binding to specific DNA sequences, known as response elements, located in the promoter region or enhancer regions of target genes. This binding can either activate or repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the properties and interactions of the particular transcription factor. Transcription factors often act as part of a complex network of regulatory proteins that determine the precise spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression during development, differentiation, and homeostasis in an organism.

The skull is the bony structure that encloses and protects the brain, the eyes, and the ears. It is composed of two main parts: the cranium, which contains the brain, and the facial bones. The cranium is made up of several fused flat bones, while the facial bones include the upper jaw (maxilla), lower jaw (mandible), cheekbones, nose bones, and eye sockets (orbits).

The skull also provides attachment points for various muscles that control chewing, moving the head, and facial expressions. Additionally, it contains openings for blood vessels, nerves, and the spinal cord to pass through. The skull's primary function is to protect the delicate and vital structures within it from injury and trauma.

C57BL/6 (C57 Black 6) is an inbred strain of laboratory mouse that is widely used in biomedical research. The term "inbred" refers to a strain of animals where matings have been carried out between siblings or other closely related individuals for many generations, resulting in a population that is highly homozygous at most genetic loci.

The C57BL/6 strain was established in 1920 by crossing a female mouse from the dilute brown (DBA) strain with a male mouse from the black strain. The resulting offspring were then interbred for many generations to create the inbred C57BL/6 strain.

C57BL/6 mice are known for their robust health, longevity, and ease of handling, making them a popular choice for researchers. They have been used in a wide range of biomedical research areas, including studies of cancer, immunology, neuroscience, cardiovascular disease, and metabolism.

One of the most notable features of the C57BL/6 strain is its sensitivity to certain genetic modifications, such as the introduction of mutations that lead to obesity or impaired glucose tolerance. This has made it a valuable tool for studying the genetic basis of complex diseases and traits.

Overall, the C57BL/6 inbred mouse strain is an important model organism in biomedical research, providing a valuable resource for understanding the genetic and molecular mechanisms underlying human health and disease.

A nonmammalian embryo refers to the developing organism in animals other than mammals, from the fertilized egg (zygote) stage until hatching or birth. In nonmammalian species, the developmental stages and terminology differ from those used in mammals. The term "embryo" is generally applied to the developing organism up until a specific stage of development that is characterized by the formation of major organs and structures. After this point, the developing organism is referred to as a "larva," "juvenile," or other species-specific terminology.

The study of nonmammalian embryos has played an important role in our understanding of developmental biology and evolutionary developmental biology (evo-devo). By comparing the developmental processes across different animal groups, researchers can gain insights into the evolutionary origins and diversification of body plans and structures. Additionally, nonmammalian embryos are often used as model systems for studying basic biological processes, such as cell division, gene regulation, and pattern formation.

'Gene expression regulation' refers to the processes that control whether, when, and where a particular gene is expressed, meaning the production of a specific protein or functional RNA encoded by that gene. This complex mechanism can be influenced by various factors such as transcription factors, chromatin remodeling, DNA methylation, non-coding RNAs, and post-transcriptional modifications, among others. Proper regulation of gene expression is crucial for normal cellular function, development, and maintaining homeostasis in living organisms. Dysregulation of gene expression can lead to various diseases, including cancer and genetic disorders.

DNA-binding proteins are a type of protein that have the ability to bind to DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid), the genetic material of organisms. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as regulation of gene expression, DNA replication, repair and recombination.

The binding of DNA-binding proteins to specific DNA sequences is mediated by non-covalent interactions, including electrostatic, hydrogen bonding, and van der Waals forces. The specificity of binding is determined by the recognition of particular nucleotide sequences or structural features of the DNA molecule.

DNA-binding proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, such as transcription factors, histones, and restriction enzymes. Transcription factors are a major class of DNA-binding proteins that regulate gene expression by binding to specific DNA sequences in the promoter region of genes and recruiting other proteins to modulate transcription. Histones are DNA-binding proteins that package DNA into nucleosomes, the basic unit of chromatin structure. Restriction enzymes are DNA-binding proteins that recognize and cleave specific DNA sequences, and are widely used in molecular biology research and biotechnology applications.

Wnt3A is a type of Wnt protein, which is a secreted signaling molecule that plays crucial roles in the regulation of cell-to-cell communication during embryonic development and tissue homeostasis in adults. Specifically, Wnt3A is a member of the Wnt family that binds to Frizzled receptors and activates the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

In this pathway, Wnt3A binding to its receptor leads to the inhibition of the β-catenin destruction complex, resulting in the stabilization and accumulation of β-catenin in the cytoplasm. β-catenin then translocates to the nucleus, where it interacts with TCF/LEF transcription factors to regulate the expression of target genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

Wnt3A has been extensively studied in various biological contexts, including developmental biology, cancer research, and stem cell biology. In particular, Wnt3A has been shown to play important roles in the regulation of embryonic axis formation, neural crest development, and adult tissue regeneration. Dysregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, including aberrant activation by Wnt3A, has been implicated in various human diseases, such as cancer, degenerative disorders, and fibrotic diseases.

Zebrafish proteins refer to the diverse range of protein molecules that are produced by the organism Danio rerio, commonly known as the zebrafish. These proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes such as growth, development, reproduction, and response to environmental stimuli. They are involved in cellular functions like enzymatic reactions, signal transduction, structural support, and regulation of gene expression.

Zebrafish is a popular model organism in biomedical research due to its genetic similarity with humans, rapid development, and transparent embryos that allow for easy observation of biological processes. As a result, the study of zebrafish proteins has contributed significantly to our understanding of protein function, structure, and interaction in both zebrafish and human systems.

Some examples of zebrafish proteins include:

* Transcription factors that regulate gene expression during development
* Enzymes involved in metabolic pathways
* Structural proteins that provide support to cells and tissues
* Receptors and signaling molecules that mediate communication between cells
* Heat shock proteins that assist in protein folding and protect against stress

The analysis of zebrafish proteins can be performed using various techniques, including biochemical assays, mass spectrometry, protein crystallography, and computational modeling. These methods help researchers to identify, characterize, and understand the functions of individual proteins and their interactions within complex networks.

Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cells found in various tissues, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, and umbilical cord blood. They have the ability to differentiate into multiple cell types, such as osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes, under specific conditions. MSCs also possess immunomodulatory properties, making them a promising tool in regenerative medicine and therapeutic strategies for various diseases, including autoimmune disorders and tissue injuries. It is important to note that the term "Mesenchymal Stem Cells" has been replaced by "Mesenchymal Stromal Cells" in the scientific community to better reflect their biological characteristics and potential functions.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Transforming Growth Factor beta (TGF-β) receptors are a group of cell surface receptors that bind to TGF-β ligands and transduce signals into the cell. These receptors play crucial roles in regulating various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix production.

There are two types of TGF-β receptors: type I and type II. Type I receptors, also known as activin receptor-like kinases (ALKs), have serine/threonine kinase activity and include ALK1, ALK2, ALK3, ALK4, ALK5, and ALK6. Type II receptors are constitutively active serine/threonine kinases and include TGF-β RII, ActRII, and ActRIIB.

When a TGF-β ligand binds to a type II receptor, it recruits and phosphorylates a type I receptor, which in turn phosphorylates downstream signaling molecules called Smads. Phosphorylated Smads form complexes with co-Smad proteins and translocate to the nucleus, where they regulate gene expression.

Abnormalities in TGF-β signaling have been implicated in various human diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and autoimmune disorders. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms of TGF-β receptor function is essential for developing therapeutic strategies to target these conditions.

A bone fracture is a medical condition in which there is a partial or complete break in the continuity of a bone due to external or internal forces. Fractures can occur in any bone in the body and can vary in severity from a small crack to a shattered bone. The symptoms of a bone fracture typically include pain, swelling, bruising, deformity, and difficulty moving the affected limb. Treatment for a bone fracture may involve immobilization with a cast or splint, surgery to realign and stabilize the bone, or medication to manage pain and prevent infection. The specific treatment approach will depend on the location, type, and severity of the fracture.

Metabolic bone diseases are a group of conditions that affect the bones and are caused by disorders in the body's metabolism. These disorders can result in changes to the bone structure, density, and strength, leading to an increased risk of fractures and other complications. Some common examples of metabolic bone diseases include:

1. Osteoporosis: a condition characterized by weak and brittle bones that are more likely to break, often as a result of age-related bone loss or hormonal changes.
2. Paget's disease of bone: a chronic disorder that causes abnormal bone growth and deformities, leading to fragile and enlarged bones.
3. Osteomalacia: a condition caused by a lack of vitamin D or problems with the body's ability to absorb it, resulting in weak and soft bones.
4. Hyperparathyroidism: a hormonal disorder that causes too much parathyroid hormone to be produced, leading to bone loss and other complications.
5. Hypoparathyroidism: a hormonal disorder that results in low levels of parathyroid hormone, causing weak and brittle bones.
6. Renal osteodystrophy: a group of bone disorders that occur as a result of chronic kidney disease, including osteomalacia, osteoporosis, and high turnover bone disease.

Treatment for metabolic bone diseases may include medications to improve bone density and strength, dietary changes, exercise, and lifestyle modifications. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to correct bone deformities or fractures.

A "knockout" mouse is a genetically engineered mouse in which one or more genes have been deleted or "knocked out" using molecular biology techniques. This allows researchers to study the function of specific genes and their role in various biological processes, as well as potential associations with human diseases. The mice are generated by introducing targeted DNA modifications into embryonic stem cells, which are then used to create a live animal. Knockout mice have been widely used in biomedical research to investigate gene function, disease mechanisms, and potential therapeutic targets.

A mammalian embryo is the developing offspring of a mammal, from the time of implantation of the fertilized egg (blastocyst) in the uterus until the end of the eighth week of gestation. During this period, the embryo undergoes rapid cell division and organ differentiation to form a complex structure with all the major organs and systems in place. This stage is followed by fetal development, which continues until birth. The study of mammalian embryos is important for understanding human development, evolution, and reproductive biology.

Wnt3 protein is a member of the Wnt family of signaling proteins, which are secreted signaling molecules that play crucial roles in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis in adults. Specifically, Wnt3 is involved in the regulation of cell fate decisions, proliferation, and differentiation during embryogenesis. It binds to receptors on the target cells and activates a signaling pathway known as the canonical Wnt pathway, leading to the stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin, which then interacts with transcription factors to regulate gene expression. Defects in Wnt3 have been implicated in various developmental disorders, including some forms of congenital scoliosis and spina bifida.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

A zebrafish is a freshwater fish species belonging to the family Cyprinidae and the genus Danio. Its name is derived from its distinctive striped pattern that resembles a zebra's. Zebrafish are often used as model organisms in scientific research, particularly in developmental biology, genetics, and toxicology studies. They have a high fecundity rate, transparent embryos, and a rapid development process, making them an ideal choice for researchers. However, it is important to note that providing a medical definition for zebrafish may not be entirely accurate or relevant since they are primarily used in biological research rather than clinical medicine.

Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is a technique used in pathology and laboratory medicine to identify specific proteins or antigens in tissue sections. It combines the principles of immunology and histology to detect the presence and location of these target molecules within cells and tissues. This technique utilizes antibodies that are specific to the protein or antigen of interest, which are then tagged with a detection system such as a chromogen or fluorophore. The stained tissue sections can be examined under a microscope, allowing for the visualization and analysis of the distribution and expression patterns of the target molecule in the context of the tissue architecture. Immunohistochemistry is widely used in diagnostic pathology to help identify various diseases, including cancer, infectious diseases, and immune-mediated disorders.

Transgenic mice are genetically modified rodents that have incorporated foreign DNA (exogenous DNA) into their own genome. This is typically done through the use of recombinant DNA technology, where a specific gene or genetic sequence of interest is isolated and then introduced into the mouse embryo. The resulting transgenic mice can then express the protein encoded by the foreign gene, allowing researchers to study its function in a living organism.

The process of creating transgenic mice usually involves microinjecting the exogenous DNA into the pronucleus of a fertilized egg, which is then implanted into a surrogate mother. The offspring that result from this procedure are screened for the presence of the foreign DNA, and those that carry the desired genetic modification are used to establish a transgenic mouse line.

Transgenic mice have been widely used in biomedical research to model human diseases, study gene function, and test new therapies. They provide a valuable tool for understanding complex biological processes and developing new treatments for a variety of medical conditions.

A phenotype is the physical or biochemical expression of an organism's genes, or the observable traits and characteristics resulting from the interaction of its genetic constitution (genotype) with environmental factors. These characteristics can include appearance, development, behavior, and resistance to disease, among others. Phenotypes can vary widely, even among individuals with identical genotypes, due to differences in environmental influences, gene expression, and genetic interactions.

Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is a medical procedure in which damaged or destroyed bone marrow is replaced with healthy bone marrow from a donor. Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside bones that produces blood cells. The main types of BMT are autologous, allogeneic, and umbilical cord blood transplantation.

In autologous BMT, the patient's own bone marrow is used for the transplant. This type of BMT is often used in patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma who have undergone high-dose chemotherapy or radiation therapy to destroy their cancerous bone marrow.

In allogeneic BMT, bone marrow from a genetically matched donor is used for the transplant. This type of BMT is often used in patients with leukemia, lymphoma, or other blood disorders who have failed other treatments.

Umbilical cord blood transplantation involves using stem cells from umbilical cord blood as a source of healthy bone marrow. This type of BMT is often used in children and adults who do not have a matched donor for allogeneic BMT.

The process of BMT typically involves several steps, including harvesting the bone marrow or stem cells from the donor, conditioning the patient's body to receive the new bone marrow or stem cells, transplanting the new bone marrow or stem cells into the patient's body, and monitoring the patient for signs of engraftment and complications.

BMT is a complex and potentially risky procedure that requires careful planning, preparation, and follow-up care. However, it can be a life-saving treatment for many patients with blood disorders or cancer.

Gene expression is the process by which the information encoded in a gene is used to synthesize a functional gene product, such as a protein or RNA molecule. This process involves several steps: transcription, RNA processing, and translation. During transcription, the genetic information in DNA is copied into a complementary RNA molecule, known as messenger RNA (mRNA). The mRNA then undergoes RNA processing, which includes adding a cap and tail to the mRNA and splicing out non-coding regions called introns. The resulting mature mRNA is then translated into a protein on ribosomes in the cytoplasm through the process of translation.

The regulation of gene expression is a complex and highly controlled process that allows cells to respond to changes in their environment, such as growth factors, hormones, and stress signals. This regulation can occur at various stages of gene expression, including transcriptional activation or repression, RNA processing, mRNA stability, and translation. Dysregulation of gene expression has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer, genetic disorders, and neurological conditions.

Smad2 protein is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in the TGF-β (transforming growth factor-beta) signaling pathway, which regulates various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Smad2 is primarily localized in the cytoplasm and becomes phosphorylated upon TGF-β receptor activation. Once phosphorylated, it forms a complex with Smad4 and translocates to the nucleus where it regulates the transcription of target genes. Mutations in the Smad2 gene have been associated with various human diseases, including cancer and fibrotic disorders.

A mutation is a permanent change in the DNA sequence of an organism's genome. Mutations can occur spontaneously or be caused by environmental factors such as exposure to radiation, chemicals, or viruses. They may have various effects on the organism, ranging from benign to harmful, depending on where they occur and whether they alter the function of essential proteins. In some cases, mutations can increase an individual's susceptibility to certain diseases or disorders, while in others, they may confer a survival advantage. Mutations are the driving force behind evolution, as they introduce new genetic variability into populations, which can then be acted upon by natural selection.

Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases (PSTKs) are a type of protein kinase that catalyzes the transfer of a phosphate group from ATP to the hydroxyl side chains of serine or threonine residues on target proteins. This phosphorylation process plays a crucial role in various cellular signaling pathways, including regulation of metabolism, gene expression, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. PSTKs are involved in many physiological and pathological processes, and their dysregulation has been implicated in several diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Fibroblast Growth Factors (FGFs) are a family of growth factors that play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. They bind to specific tyrosine kinase receptors (FGFRs) on the cell surface, leading to intracellular signaling cascades that regulate gene expression and downstream cellular responses. FGFs are involved in embryonic development, tissue repair, and angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). There are at least 22 distinct FGFs identified in humans, each with unique functions and patterns of expression. Some FGFs, like FGF1 and FGF2, have mitogenic effects on fibroblasts and other cell types, while others, such as FGF7 and FGF10, are essential for epithelial-mesenchymal interactions during organ development. Dysregulation of FGF signaling has been implicated in various pathological conditions, including cancer, fibrosis, and developmental disorders.

Fracture healing is the natural process by which a broken bone repairs itself. When a fracture occurs, the body responds by initiating a series of biological and cellular events aimed at restoring the structural integrity of the bone. This process involves the formation of a hematoma (a collection of blood) around the fracture site, followed by the activation of inflammatory cells that help to clean up debris and prepare the area for repair.

Over time, specialized cells called osteoblasts begin to lay down new bone matrix, or osteoid, along the edges of the broken bone ends. This osteoid eventually hardens into new bone tissue, forming a bridge between the fracture fragments. As this process continues, the callus (a mass of newly formed bone and connective tissue) gradually becomes stronger and more compact, eventually remodeling itself into a solid, unbroken bone.

The entire process of fracture healing can take several weeks to several months, depending on factors such as the severity of the injury, the patient's age and overall health, and the location of the fracture. In some cases, medical intervention may be necessary to help promote healing or ensure proper alignment of the bone fragments. This may include the use of casts, braces, or surgical implants such as plates, screws, or rods.

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

The periosteum is a highly vascularized and innervated tissue that surrounds the outer surface of bones, except at the articular surfaces. It consists of two layers: an outer fibrous layer containing blood vessels, nerves, and fibroblasts; and an inner cellular layer called the cambium or osteogenic layer, which contains progenitor cells capable of bone formation and repair.

The periosteum plays a crucial role in bone growth, remodeling, and healing by providing a source of osteoprogenitor cells and blood supply. It also contributes to the sensation of pain in response to injury or inflammation of the bone. Additionally, the periosteum can respond to mechanical stress by activating bone formation, making it an essential component in orthopedic treatments such as distraction osteogenesis.

The neural crest is a transient, multipotent embryonic cell population that originates from the ectoderm (outermost layer) of the developing neural tube (precursor to the central nervous system). These cells undergo an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and migrate throughout the embryo, giving rise to a diverse array of cell types and structures.

Neural crest cells differentiate into various tissues, including:

1. Peripheral nervous system (PNS) components: sensory neurons, sympathetic and parasympathetic ganglia, and glial cells (e.g., Schwann cells).
2. Facial bones and cartilage, as well as connective tissue of the skull.
3. Melanocytes, which are pigment-producing cells in the skin.
4. Smooth muscle cells in major blood vessels, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and other organs.
5. Secretory cells in endocrine glands (e.g., chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla).
6. Parts of the eye, such as the cornea and iris stroma.
7. Dental tissues, including dentin, cementum, and dental pulp.

Due to their wide-ranging contributions to various tissues and organs, neural crest cells play a crucial role in embryonic development and organogenesis. Abnormalities in neural crest cell migration or differentiation can lead to several congenital disorders, such as neurocristopathies.

A nodal protein, in the context of molecular biology and genetics, refers to a protein that plays a role in signal transmission within a cell at a node or junction point of a signaling pathway. These proteins are often involved in regulatory processes, such as activating or inhibiting downstream effectors in response to specific signals received by the cell. Nodal proteins can be activated or deactivated through various mechanisms, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and interactions with other signaling molecules.

In a more specific context, nodal proteins are also known as nodal factors, which are members of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily of signaling molecules that play critical roles in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis. Nodal is a secreted protein that acts as a morphogen, inducing different cellular responses depending on its concentration gradient. It is involved in establishing left-right asymmetry during embryonic development and regulates various processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis.

In summary, nodal proteins can refer to any protein that functions at a node or junction point of a signaling pathway, but they are also specifically known as nodal factors, which are TGF-β superfamily members involved in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis.

X-ray microtomography, often referred to as micro-CT, is a non-destructive imaging technique used to visualize and analyze the internal structure of objects with high spatial resolution. It is based on the principles of computed tomography (CT), where multiple X-ray images are acquired at different angles and then reconstructed into cross-sectional slices using specialized software. These slices can be further processed to create 3D visualizations, allowing researchers and clinicians to examine the internal structure and composition of samples in great detail. Micro-CT is widely used in materials science, biology, medicine, and engineering for various applications such as material characterization, bone analysis, and defect inspection.

The pulmonary artery is a large blood vessel that carries deoxygenated blood from the right ventricle of the heart to the lungs for oxygenation. It divides into two main branches, the right and left pulmonary arteries, which further divide into smaller vessels called arterioles, and then into a vast network of capillaries in the lungs where gas exchange occurs. The thin walls of these capillaries allow oxygen to diffuse into the blood and carbon dioxide to diffuse out, making the blood oxygen-rich before it is pumped back to the left side of the heart through the pulmonary veins. This process is crucial for maintaining proper oxygenation of the body's tissues and organs.

Protein binding, in the context of medical and biological sciences, refers to the interaction between a protein and another molecule (known as the ligand) that results in a stable complex. This process is often reversible and can be influenced by various factors such as pH, temperature, and concentration of the involved molecules.

In clinical chemistry, protein binding is particularly important when it comes to drugs, as many of them bind to proteins (especially albumin) in the bloodstream. The degree of protein binding can affect a drug's distribution, metabolism, and excretion, which in turn influence its therapeutic effectiveness and potential side effects.

Protein-bound drugs may be less available for interaction with their target tissues, as only the unbound or "free" fraction of the drug is active. Therefore, understanding protein binding can help optimize dosing regimens and minimize adverse reactions.

Growth substances, in the context of medical terminology, typically refer to natural hormones or chemically synthesized agents that play crucial roles in controlling and regulating cell growth, differentiation, and division. They are also known as "growth factors" or "mitogens." These substances include:

1. Proteins: Examples include insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and fibroblast growth factors (FGFs). They bind to specific receptors on the cell surface, activating intracellular signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

2. Steroids: Certain steroid hormones, such as androgens and estrogens, can also act as growth substances by binding to nuclear receptors and influencing gene expression related to cell growth and division.

3. Cytokines: Some cytokines, like interleukins (ILs) and hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs), contribute to the regulation of hematopoiesis, immune responses, and inflammation, thus indirectly affecting cell growth and differentiation.

These growth substances have essential roles in various physiological processes, such as embryonic development, tissue repair, and wound healing. However, abnormal or excessive production or response to these growth substances can lead to pathological conditions, including cancer, benign tumors, and other proliferative disorders.

Embryonic stem cells are a type of pluripotent stem cell that are derived from the inner cell mass of a blastocyst, which is a very early-stage embryo. These cells have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body, making them a promising area of research for regenerative medicine and the study of human development and disease. Embryonic stem cells are typically obtained from surplus embryos created during in vitro fertilization (IVF) procedures, with the consent of the donors. The use of embryonic stem cells is a controversial issue due to ethical concerns surrounding the destruction of human embryos.

Western blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and quantify specific proteins in a mixture of many different proteins. This technique is commonly used to confirm the expression of a protein of interest, determine its size, and investigate its post-translational modifications. The name "Western" blotting distinguishes this technique from Southern blotting (for DNA) and Northern blotting (for RNA).

The Western blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Protein extraction: The sample containing the proteins of interest is first extracted, often by breaking open cells or tissues and using a buffer to extract the proteins.
2. Separation of proteins by electrophoresis: The extracted proteins are then separated based on their size by loading them onto a polyacrylamide gel and running an electric current through the gel (a process called sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or SDS-PAGE). This separates the proteins according to their molecular weight, with smaller proteins migrating faster than larger ones.
3. Transfer of proteins to a membrane: After separation, the proteins are transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric current in a process called blotting. This creates a replica of the protein pattern on the gel but now immobilized on the membrane for further analysis.
4. Blocking: The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent, such as non-fat dry milk or bovine serum albumin (BSA), to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies in subsequent steps.
5. Primary antibody incubation: A primary antibody that specifically recognizes the protein of interest is added and allowed to bind to its target protein on the membrane. This step may be performed at room temperature or 4°C overnight, depending on the antibody's properties.
6. Washing: The membrane is washed with a buffer to remove unbound primary antibodies.
7. Secondary antibody incubation: A secondary antibody that recognizes the primary antibody (often coupled to an enzyme or fluorophore) is added and allowed to bind to the primary antibody. This step may involve using a horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-conjugated or alkaline phosphatase (AP)-conjugated secondary antibody, depending on the detection method used later.
8. Washing: The membrane is washed again to remove unbound secondary antibodies.
9. Detection: A detection reagent is added to visualize the protein of interest by detecting the signal generated from the enzyme-conjugated or fluorophore-conjugated secondary antibody. This can be done using chemiluminescent, colorimetric, or fluorescent methods.
10. Analysis: The resulting image is analyzed to determine the presence and quantity of the protein of interest in the sample.

Western blotting is a powerful technique for identifying and quantifying specific proteins within complex mixtures. It can be used to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and more. However, it requires careful optimization and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

A gastrula is a stage in the early development of many animals, including humans, that occurs following fertilization and cleavage of the zygote. During this stage, the embryo undergoes a process called gastrulation, which involves a series of cell movements that reorganize the embryo into three distinct layers: the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. These germ layers give rise to all the different tissues and organs in the developing organism.

The gastrula is characterized by the presence of a central cavity called the archenteron, which will eventually become the gut or gastrointestinal tract. The opening of the archenteron is called the blastopore, which will give rise to either the mouth or anus, depending on the animal group.

In summary, a gastrula is a developmental stage in which an embryo undergoes gastrulation to form three germ layers and a central cavity, which will eventually develop into various organs and tissues of the body.

The femur is the medical term for the thigh bone, which is the longest and strongest bone in the human body. It connects the hip bone to the knee joint and plays a crucial role in supporting the weight of the body and allowing movement during activities such as walking, running, and jumping. The femur is composed of a rounded head, a long shaft, and two condyles at the lower end that articulate with the tibia and patella to form the knee joint.

Embryonic induction is a process that occurs during the development of a multicellular organism, where one group of cells in the embryo signals and influences the developmental fate of another group of cells. This interaction leads to the formation of specific structures or organs in the developing embryo. The signaling cells that initiate the process are called organizers, and they release signaling molecules known as morphogens that bind to receptors on the target cells and trigger a cascade of intracellular signals that ultimately lead to changes in gene expression and cell fate. Embryonic induction is a crucial step in the development of complex organisms and plays a key role in establishing the body plan and organizing the different tissues and organs in the developing embryo.

"Xenopus" is not a medical term, but it is a genus of highly invasive aquatic frogs native to sub-Saharan Africa. They are often used in scientific research, particularly in developmental biology and genetics. The most commonly studied species is Xenopus laevis, also known as the African clawed frog.

In a medical context, Xenopus might be mentioned when discussing their use in research or as a model organism to study various biological processes or diseases.

Glycoproteins are complex proteins that contain oligosaccharide chains (glycans) covalently attached to their polypeptide backbone. These glycans are linked to the protein through asparagine residues (N-linked) or serine/threonine residues (O-linked). Glycoproteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell recognition, cell-cell interactions, cell adhesion, and signal transduction. They are widely distributed in nature and can be found on the outer surface of cell membranes, in extracellular fluids, and as components of the extracellular matrix. The structure and composition of glycoproteins can vary significantly depending on their function and location within an organism.

A base sequence in the context of molecular biology refers to the specific order of nucleotides in a DNA or RNA molecule. In DNA, these nucleotides are adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T). In RNA, uracil (U) takes the place of thymine. The base sequence contains genetic information that is transcribed into RNA and ultimately translated into proteins. It is the exact order of these bases that determines the genetic code and thus the function of the DNA or RNA molecule.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

An amino acid sequence is the specific order of amino acids in a protein or peptide molecule, formed by the linking of the amino group (-NH2) of one amino acid to the carboxyl group (-COOH) of another amino acid through a peptide bond. The sequence is determined by the genetic code and is unique to each type of protein or peptide. It plays a crucial role in determining the three-dimensional structure and function of proteins.

Congenital limb deformities refer to abnormalities in the structure, position, or function of the arms or legs that are present at birth. These deformities can vary greatly in severity and may affect any part of the limb, including the bones, muscles, joints, and nerves.

Congenital limb deformities can be caused by genetic factors, exposure to certain medications or chemicals during pregnancy, or other environmental factors. Some common types of congenital limb deformities include:

1. Clubfoot: A condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape, making it difficult to walk normally.
2. Polydactyly: A condition in which a person is born with extra fingers or toes.
3. Radial clubhand: A rare condition in which the radius bone in the forearm is missing or underdeveloped, causing the hand to turn inward and the wrist to bend.
4. Amniotic band syndrome: A condition in which strands of the amniotic sac wrap around a developing limb, restricting its growth and leading to deformities.
5. Agenesis: A condition in which a limb or part of a limb is missing at birth.

Treatment for congenital limb deformities may include surgery, bracing, physical therapy, or other interventions depending on the severity and nature of the deformity. In some cases, early intervention and treatment can help to improve function and reduce the impact of the deformity on a person's daily life.

Inhibins are a group of protein hormones that play a crucial role in regulating the function of the reproductive system, specifically by inhibiting the production of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) in the pituitary gland. They are produced and secreted primarily by the granulosa cells in the ovaries of females and Sertoli cells in the testes of males.

Inhibins consist of two subunits, an alpha subunit, and a beta subunit, which can be further divided into two types: inhibin A and inhibin B. Inhibin A is primarily produced by the granulosa cells of developing follicles in the ovary, while inhibin B is mainly produced by the Sertoli cells in the testes.

By regulating FSH production, inhibins help control the development and maturation of ovarian follicles in females and spermatogenesis in males. Abnormal levels of inhibins have been associated with various reproductive disorders, including polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and certain types of cancer.

Granulosa cells are specialized cells that surround and enclose the developing egg cells (oocytes) in the ovaries. They play a crucial role in the growth, development, and maturation of the follicles (the fluid-filled sacs containing the oocytes) by providing essential nutrients and hormones.

Granulosa cells are responsible for producing estrogen, which supports the development of the endometrium during the menstrual cycle in preparation for a potential pregnancy. They also produce inhibin and activin, two hormones that regulate the function of the pituitary gland and its secretion of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH).

These cells are critical for female reproductive health and fertility. Abnormalities in granulosa cell function can lead to various reproductive disorders, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), premature ovarian failure, and infertility.

Antimicrobial cationic peptides (ACPs) are a group of small, naturally occurring peptides that possess broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against various microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. They are called "cationic" because they contain positively charged amino acid residues (such as lysine and arginine), which allow them to interact with and disrupt the negatively charged membranes of microbial cells.

ACPs are produced by a wide range of organisms, including humans, animals, and plants, as part of their innate immune response to infection. They play an important role in protecting the host from invading pathogens by directly killing them or inhibiting their growth.

The antimicrobial activity of ACPs is thought to be mediated by their ability to disrupt the membranes of microbial cells, leading to leakage of cellular contents and death. Some ACPs may also have intracellular targets, such as DNA or protein synthesis, that contribute to their antimicrobial activity.

ACPs are being studied for their potential use as therapeutic agents to treat infectious diseases, particularly those caused by drug-resistant bacteria. However, their clinical application is still in the early stages of development due to concerns about their potential toxicity to host cells and the emergence of resistance mechanisms in microbial pathogens.

Cell surface receptors, also known as membrane receptors, are proteins located on the cell membrane that bind to specific molecules outside the cell, known as ligands. These receptors play a crucial role in signal transduction, which is the process of converting an extracellular signal into an intracellular response.

Cell surface receptors can be classified into several categories based on their structure and mechanism of action, including:

1. Ion channel receptors: These receptors contain a pore that opens to allow ions to flow across the cell membrane when they bind to their ligands. This ion flux can directly activate or inhibit various cellular processes.
2. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs): These receptors consist of seven transmembrane domains and are associated with heterotrimeric G proteins that modulate intracellular signaling pathways upon ligand binding.
3. Enzyme-linked receptors: These receptors possess an intrinsic enzymatic activity or are linked to an enzyme, which becomes activated when the receptor binds to its ligand. This activation can lead to the initiation of various signaling cascades within the cell.
4. Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs): These receptors contain intracellular tyrosine kinase domains that become activated upon ligand binding, leading to the phosphorylation and activation of downstream signaling molecules.
5. Integrins: These receptors are transmembrane proteins that mediate cell-cell or cell-matrix interactions by binding to extracellular matrix proteins or counter-receptors on adjacent cells. They play essential roles in cell adhesion, migration, and survival.

Cell surface receptors are involved in various physiological processes, including neurotransmission, hormone signaling, immune response, and cell growth and differentiation. Dysregulation of these receptors can contribute to the development of numerous diseases, such as cancer, diabetes, and neurological disorders.

Organogenesis is the process of formation and development of organs during embryonic growth. It involves the complex interactions of cells, tissues, and signaling molecules that lead to the creation of specialized structures in the body. This process begins in the early stages of embryonic development, around week 4-8, and continues until birth. During organogenesis, the three primary germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) differentiate into various cell types and organize themselves into specific structures that will eventually form the functional organs of the body. Abnormalities in organogenesis can result in congenital disorders or birth defects.

Osteoclasts are large, multinucleated cells that are primarily responsible for bone resorption, a process in which they break down and dissolve the mineralized matrix of bones. They are derived from monocyte-macrophage precursor cells of hematopoietic origin and play a crucial role in maintaining bone homeostasis by balancing bone formation and bone resorption.

Osteoclasts adhere to the bone surface and create an isolated microenvironment, called the "resorption lacuna," between their cell membrane and the bone surface. Here, they release hydrogen ions into the lacuna through a process called proton pumping, which lowers the pH and dissolves the mineral component of the bone matrix. Additionally, osteoclasts secrete proteolytic enzymes, such as cathepsin K, that degrade the organic components, like collagen, in the bone matrix.

An imbalance in osteoclast activity can lead to various bone diseases, including osteoporosis and Paget's disease, where excessive bone resorption results in weakened and fragile bones.

Phosphorylation is the process of adding a phosphate group (a molecule consisting of one phosphorus atom and four oxygen atoms) to a protein or other organic molecule, which is usually done by enzymes called kinases. This post-translational modification can change the function, localization, or activity of the target molecule, playing a crucial role in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, metabolism, and regulation of gene expression. Phosphorylation is reversible, and the removal of the phosphate group is facilitated by enzymes called phosphatases.

Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are a group of structural and functional molecules that provide support, organization, and regulation to the cells in tissues and organs. The ECM is composed of a complex network of proteins, glycoproteins, and carbohydrates that are secreted by the cells and deposited outside of them.

ECM proteins can be classified into several categories based on their structure and function, including:

1. Collagens: These are the most abundant ECM proteins and provide strength and stability to tissues. They form fibrils that can withstand high tensile forces.
2. Proteoglycans: These are complex molecules made up of a core protein and one or more glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains. The GAG chains attract water, making proteoglycans important for maintaining tissue hydration and resilience.
3. Elastin: This is an elastic protein that allows tissues to stretch and recoil, such as in the lungs and blood vessels.
4. Fibronectins: These are large glycoproteins that bind to cells and ECM components, providing adhesion, migration, and signaling functions.
5. Laminins: These are large proteins found in basement membranes, which provide structural support for epithelial and endothelial cells.
6. Tenascins: These are large glycoproteins that modulate cell adhesion and migration, and regulate ECM assembly and remodeling.

Together, these ECM proteins create a microenvironment that influences cell behavior, differentiation, and function. Dysregulation of ECM proteins has been implicated in various diseases, including fibrosis, cancer, and degenerative disorders.

The term "extremities" in a medical context refers to the most distant parts of the body, including the hands and feet (both fingers and toes), as well as the arms and legs. These are the farthest parts from the torso and head. Medical professionals may examine a patient's extremities for various reasons, such as checking circulation, assessing nerve function, or looking for injuries or abnormalities.

Inhibin-β subunits are proteins that combine to form inhibins, which are hormones that play a role in regulating the function of the reproductive system. Specifically, inhibins help to regulate the production of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) by the pituitary gland.

There are two main types of Inhibin-β subunits, Inhibin-β A and Inhibin-β B, which combine with a common α subunit to form the inhibins. Inhibin-β A is produced primarily in the granulosa cells of the ovaries, while Inhibin-beta B is produced primarily in the testicular Sertoli cells.

Abnormal levels of Inhibin-β subunits have been associated with various reproductive disorders, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and certain types of cancer. Measurement of Inhibin-β subunits can be used as a biomarker for ovarian function, ovarian reserve and ovarian cancer detection.

Transforming Growth Factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1) is a cytokine that belongs to the TGF-β superfamily. It is a multifunctional protein involved in various cellular processes, including cell growth, differentiation, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix production. TGF-β1 plays crucial roles in embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and repair, as well as in pathological conditions such as fibrosis and cancer. It signals through a heteromeric complex of type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors, leading to the activation of intracellular signaling pathways, primarily the Smad-dependent pathway. TGF-β1 has context-dependent functions, acting as a tumor suppressor in normal and early-stage cancer cells but promoting tumor progression and metastasis in advanced cancers.

Endoderm is the innermost of the three primary germ layers in a developing embryo, along with the ectoderm and mesoderm. The endoderm gives rise to several internal tissues and organs, most notably those found in the digestive system and respiratory system. Specifically, it forms the lining of the gut tube, which eventually becomes the epithelial lining of the gastrointestinal tract, liver, pancreas, lungs, and other associated structures.

During embryonic development, the endoderm arises from the inner cell mass of the blastocyst, following a series of cell divisions and migrations that help to establish the basic body plan of the organism. As the embryo grows and develops, the endoderm continues to differentiate into more specialized tissues and structures, playing a critical role in the formation of many essential bodily functions.

Up-regulation is a term used in molecular biology and medicine to describe an increase in the expression or activity of a gene, protein, or receptor in response to a stimulus. This can occur through various mechanisms such as increased transcription, translation, or reduced degradation of the molecule. Up-regulation can have important functional consequences, for example, enhancing the sensitivity or response of a cell to a hormone, neurotransmitter, or drug. It is a normal physiological process that can also be induced by disease or pharmacological interventions.

A "reporter gene" is a type of gene that is linked to a gene of interest in order to make the expression or activity of that gene detectable. The reporter gene encodes for a protein that can be easily measured and serves as an indicator of the presence and activity of the gene of interest. Commonly used reporter genes include those that encode for fluorescent proteins, enzymes that catalyze colorimetric reactions, or proteins that bind to specific molecules.

In the context of genetics and genomics research, a reporter gene is often used in studies involving gene expression, regulation, and function. By introducing the reporter gene into an organism or cell, researchers can monitor the activity of the gene of interest in real-time or after various experimental treatments. The information obtained from these studies can help elucidate the role of specific genes in biological processes and diseases, providing valuable insights for basic research and therapeutic development.

The tibia, also known as the shin bone, is the larger of the two bones in the lower leg and part of the knee joint. It supports most of the body's weight and is a major insertion point for muscles that flex the foot and bend the leg. The tibia articulates with the femur at the knee joint and with the fibula and talus bone at the ankle joint. Injuries to the tibia, such as fractures, are common in sports and other activities that put stress on the lower leg.

The ulna is one of the two long bones in the forearm, the other being the radius. It runs from the elbow to the wrist and is located on the medial side of the forearm, next to the bone called the humerus in the upper arm. The ulna plays a crucial role in the movement of the forearm and also serves as an attachment site for various muscles.

I'm not able to directly access real-time medical databases or search functions, but I can provide you with some information on the topic.

Bone demineralization is a process often associated with various medical and scientific techniques. It generally refers to the reduction of mineral content in bones, which can occur due to certain medical conditions, aging, or as part of laboratory procedures.

A bone demineralization technique in a laboratory setting typically involves the use of chemical solutions to remove minerals, mainly calcium and phosphate, from bone samples. This process is often used in research and scientific studies to isolate the organic matrix of bones, allowing for the study of its properties and components, such as collagen.

The demineralization process usually involves soaking bone specimens in a weak acid solution, like ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or acetic acid, for several days to weeks, depending on the size and density of the bones. The procedure must be carefully controlled to avoid damaging the organic matrix while ensuring complete demineralization.

Keep in mind that this is a simplified explanation, and specific techniques and protocols may vary based on the research question and bone type being studied.

Paracrine communication is a form of cell-to-cell communication in which a cell releases a signaling molecule, known as a paracrine factor, that acts on nearby cells within the local microenvironment. This type of communication allows for the coordination and regulation of various cellular processes, including growth, differentiation, and survival.

Paracrine factors can be released from a cell through various mechanisms, such as exocytosis or diffusion through the extracellular matrix. Once released, these factors bind to specific receptors on the surface of nearby cells, triggering intracellular signaling pathways that lead to changes in gene expression and cell behavior.

Paracrine communication is an important mechanism for maintaining tissue homeostasis and coordinating responses to injury or disease. For example, during wound healing, paracrine signals released by immune cells can recruit other cells to the site of injury and stimulate their proliferation and differentiation to promote tissue repair.

It's worth noting that paracrine communication should be distinguished from autocrine signaling, where a cell releases a signaling molecule that binds back to its own receptors, and endocrine signaling, where a hormone is released into the bloodstream and travels to distant target cells.

DNA primers are short single-stranded DNA molecules that serve as a starting point for DNA synthesis. They are typically used in laboratory techniques such as the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing. The primer binds to a complementary sequence on the DNA template through base pairing, providing a free 3'-hydroxyl group for the DNA polymerase enzyme to add nucleotides and synthesize a new strand of DNA. This allows for specific and targeted amplification or analysis of a particular region of interest within a larger DNA molecule.

Brachydactyly is a medical term that describes a condition where the digits (fingers or toes) are abnormally short in length. This condition can affect one or more digits and can be present at birth or develop later in life. Brachydactyly can occur as an isolated trait or as part of a genetic syndrome, such as Apert syndrome or Down syndrome.

The term "brachydactyly" comes from two Greek words: "brachys," which means short, and "daktylos," which means finger or toe. There are several types of brachydactyly, each classified based on the specific bones affected and the pattern of inheritance.

For example, Brachydactyly type A is characterized by shortening of the distal phalanges (the bone at the end of the finger or toe), while Brachydactyly type D involves shortening of the middle phalanges. In some cases, brachydactyly may also be associated with other symptoms such as joint stiffness, nail abnormalities, or curvature of the fingers or toes (clinodactyly).

It is important to note that while brachydactyly can be noticeable and affect the appearance of the hands or feet, it is generally a mild condition that does not typically cause significant functional impairment. However, if you have concerns about brachydactyly or any other medical condition, it is always best to consult with a healthcare professional for further evaluation and guidance.

Inhibitors of Differentiation (ID) proteins are a family of transcriptional regulators that play crucial roles in controlling cell growth, differentiation, and survival. They belong to the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein family and function as negative regulators of differentiation in various cell types.

ID proteins lack the DNA-binding domain required for specific interactions with DNA, but they contain a highly conserved HLH region that enables them to form heterodimers with other bHLH transcription factors. By doing so, ID proteins prevent these partner bHLH factors from binding to their target DNA sequences and thus inhibit the differentiation programs driven by those factors.

There are four members in the ID protein family: ID1, ID2, ID3, and ID4. These proteins exhibit distinct expression patterns during embryonic development and in adult tissues, reflecting their diverse roles in regulating cell fate decisions and homeostasis. Dysregulation of ID protein function has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including cancer and neurodevelopmental disorders.

'Drosophila proteins' refer to the proteins that are expressed in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. This organism is a widely used model system in genetics, developmental biology, and molecular biology research. The study of Drosophila proteins has contributed significantly to our understanding of various biological processes, including gene regulation, cell signaling, development, and aging.

Some examples of well-studied Drosophila proteins include:

1. HSP70 (Heat Shock Protein 70): A chaperone protein involved in protein folding and protection from stress conditions.
2. TUBULIN: A structural protein that forms microtubules, important for cell division and intracellular transport.
3. ACTIN: A cytoskeletal protein involved in muscle contraction, cell motility, and maintenance of cell shape.
4. BETA-GALACTOSIDASE (LACZ): A reporter protein often used to monitor gene expression patterns in transgenic flies.
5. ENDOGLIN: A protein involved in the development of blood vessels during embryogenesis.
6. P53: A tumor suppressor protein that plays a crucial role in preventing cancer by regulating cell growth and division.
7. JUN-KINASE (JNK): A signaling protein involved in stress response, apoptosis, and developmental processes.
8. DECAPENTAPLEGIC (DPP): A member of the TGF-β (Transforming Growth Factor Beta) superfamily, playing essential roles in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis.

These proteins are often studied using various techniques such as biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, and structural biology to understand their functions, interactions, and regulation within the cell.

Genetic transcription is the process by which the information in a strand of DNA is used to create a complementary RNA molecule. This process is the first step in gene expression, where the genetic code in DNA is converted into a form that can be used to produce proteins or functional RNAs.

During transcription, an enzyme called RNA polymerase binds to the DNA template strand and reads the sequence of nucleotide bases. As it moves along the template, it adds complementary RNA nucleotides to the growing RNA chain, creating a single-stranded RNA molecule that is complementary to the DNA template strand. Once transcription is complete, the RNA molecule may undergo further processing before it can be translated into protein or perform its functional role in the cell.

Transcription can be either "constitutive" or "regulated." Constitutive transcription occurs at a relatively constant rate and produces essential proteins that are required for basic cellular functions. Regulated transcription, on the other hand, is subject to control by various intracellular and extracellular signals, allowing cells to respond to changing environmental conditions or developmental cues.

Tissue engineering is a branch of biomedical engineering that combines the principles of engineering, materials science, and biological sciences to develop functional substitutes for damaged or diseased tissues and organs. It involves the creation of living, three-dimensional structures that can restore, maintain, or improve tissue function. This is typically accomplished through the use of cells, scaffolds (biodegradable matrices), and biologically active molecules. The goal of tissue engineering is to develop biological substitutes that can ultimately restore normal function and structure in damaged tissues or organs.

A hair follicle is a part of the human skin from which hair grows. It is a complex organ that consists of several layers, including an outer root sheath, inner root sheath, and matrix. The hair follicle is located in the dermis, the second layer of the skin, and is surrounded by sebaceous glands and erector pili muscles.

The hair growth cycle includes three phases: anagen (growth phase), catagen (transitional phase), and telogen (resting phase). During the anagen phase, cells in the matrix divide rapidly to produce new hair fibers that grow out of the follicle. The hair fiber is made up of a protein called keratin, which also makes up the outer layers of the skin and nails.

Hair follicles are important for various biological functions, including thermoregulation, sensory perception, and social communication. They also play a role in wound healing and can serve as a source of stem cells that can differentiate into other cell types.

Growth Differentiation Factor 10 (GDF10), also known as Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3b (BMP3b), is a member of the Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily. It is a secreted signaling protein that plays crucial roles in various biological processes, including embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, and repair. Specifically, GDF10 has been implicated in regulating skeletal growth, joint formation, and neural crest cell migration during embryogenesis. In addition, it is involved in the regulation of bone mass, as well as the maintenance and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Dysregulation of GDF10 has been associated with several pathological conditions, such as skeletal disorders and tumorigenesis.

Beta-catenin is a protein that plays a crucial role in gene transcription and cell-cell adhesion. It is a key component of the Wnt signaling pathway, which regulates various processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration during embryonic development and tissue homeostasis in adults.

In the absence of Wnt signals, beta-catenin forms a complex with other proteins, including adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and axin, which targets it for degradation by the proteasome. When Wnt ligands bind to their receptors, this complex is disrupted, allowing beta-catenin to accumulate in the cytoplasm and translocate to the nucleus. In the nucleus, beta-catenin interacts with T cell factor/lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (TCF/LEF) transcription factors to activate the transcription of target genes involved in cell fate determination, survival, and proliferation.

Mutations in the genes encoding components of the Wnt signaling pathway, including beta-catenin, have been implicated in various human diseases, such as cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative conditions.

Down-regulation is a process that occurs in response to various stimuli, where the number or sensitivity of cell surface receptors or the expression of specific genes is decreased. This process helps maintain homeostasis within cells and tissues by reducing the ability of cells to respond to certain signals or molecules.

In the context of cell surface receptors, down-regulation can occur through several mechanisms:

1. Receptor internalization: After binding to their ligands, receptors can be internalized into the cell through endocytosis. Once inside the cell, these receptors may be degraded or recycled back to the cell surface in smaller numbers.
2. Reduced receptor synthesis: Down-regulation can also occur at the transcriptional level, where the expression of genes encoding for specific receptors is decreased, leading to fewer receptors being produced.
3. Receptor desensitization: Prolonged exposure to a ligand can lead to a decrease in receptor sensitivity or affinity, making it more difficult for the cell to respond to the signal.

In the context of gene expression, down-regulation refers to the decreased transcription and/or stability of specific mRNAs, leading to reduced protein levels. This process can be induced by various factors, including microRNA (miRNA)-mediated regulation, histone modification, or DNA methylation.

Down-regulation is an essential mechanism in many physiological processes and can also contribute to the development of several diseases, such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders.

Animal disease models are specialized animals, typically rodents such as mice or rats, that have been genetically engineered or exposed to certain conditions to develop symptoms and physiological changes similar to those seen in human diseases. These models are used in medical research to study the pathophysiology of diseases, identify potential therapeutic targets, test drug efficacy and safety, and understand disease mechanisms.

The genetic modifications can include knockout or knock-in mutations, transgenic expression of specific genes, or RNA interference techniques. The animals may also be exposed to environmental factors such as chemicals, radiation, or infectious agents to induce the disease state.

Examples of animal disease models include:

1. Mouse models of cancer: Genetically engineered mice that develop various types of tumors, allowing researchers to study cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis.
2. Alzheimer's disease models: Transgenic mice expressing mutant human genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, which exhibit amyloid plaque formation and cognitive decline.
3. Diabetes models: Obese and diabetic mouse strains like the NOD (non-obese diabetic) or db/db mice, used to study the development of type 1 and type 2 diabetes, respectively.
4. Cardiovascular disease models: Atherosclerosis-prone mice, such as ApoE-deficient or LDLR-deficient mice, that develop plaque buildup in their arteries when fed a high-fat diet.
5. Inflammatory bowel disease models: Mice with genetic mutations affecting intestinal barrier function and immune response, such as IL-10 knockout or SAMP1/YitFc mice, which develop colitis.

Animal disease models are essential tools in preclinical research, but it is important to recognize their limitations. Differences between species can affect the translatability of results from animal studies to human patients. Therefore, researchers must carefully consider the choice of model and interpret findings cautiously when applying them to human diseases.

Embryonic development is the series of growth and developmental stages that occur during the formation and early growth of the embryo. In humans, this stage begins at fertilization (when the sperm and egg cell combine) and continues until the end of the 8th week of pregnancy. During this time, the fertilized egg (now called a zygote) divides and forms a blastocyst, which then implants into the uterus. The cells in the blastocyst begin to differentiate and form the three germ layers: the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. These germ layers will eventually give rise to all of the different tissues and organs in the body.

Embryonic development is a complex and highly regulated process that involves the coordinated interaction of genetic and environmental factors. It is characterized by rapid cell division, migration, and differentiation, as well as programmed cell death (apoptosis) and tissue remodeling. Abnormalities in embryonic development can lead to birth defects or other developmental disorders.

It's important to note that the term "embryo" is used to describe the developing organism from fertilization until the end of the 8th week of pregnancy in humans, after which it is called a fetus.

A cell line that is derived from tumor cells and has been adapted to grow in culture. These cell lines are often used in research to study the characteristics of cancer cells, including their growth patterns, genetic changes, and responses to various treatments. They can be established from many different types of tumors, such as carcinomas, sarcomas, and leukemias. Once established, these cell lines can be grown and maintained indefinitely in the laboratory, allowing researchers to conduct experiments and studies that would not be feasible using primary tumor cells. It is important to note that tumor cell lines may not always accurately represent the behavior of the original tumor, as they can undergo genetic changes during their time in culture.

A cartilage fracture is not a common injury because cartilage itself does not have bones, and it is difficult to fracture something that is not hard. However, there are situations where the term "cartilage fracture" can be used. One such situation is when the articular cartilage, which covers the ends of bones in joints, gets damaged or injured. This type of injury is also known as a chondral fracture or osteochondral fracture (if the bone beneath the cartilage is also involved). These injuries can occur due to trauma, such as a fall or a direct blow to the joint, and can cause pain, swelling, and limited mobility in the affected joint.

Osteocytes are the most abundant cell type in mature bone tissue. They are star-shaped cells that are located inside the mineralized matrix of bones, with their processes extending into small spaces called lacunae and canaliculi. Osteocytes are derived from osteoblasts, which are bone-forming cells that become trapped within the matrix they produce.

Osteocytes play a crucial role in maintaining bone homeostasis by regulating bone remodeling, sensing mechanical stress, and modulating mineralization. They communicate with each other and with osteoblasts and osteoclasts (bone-resorbing cells) through a network of interconnected processes and via the release of signaling molecules. Osteocytes can also respond to changes in their environment, such as hormonal signals or mechanical loading, by altering their gene expression and releasing factors that regulate bone metabolism.

Dysfunction of osteocytes has been implicated in various bone diseases, including osteoporosis, osteogenesis imperfecta, and Paget's disease of bone.

Transfection is a term used in molecular biology that refers to the process of deliberately introducing foreign genetic material (DNA, RNA or artificial gene constructs) into cells. This is typically done using chemical or physical methods, such as lipofection or electroporation. Transfection is widely used in research and medical settings for various purposes, including studying gene function, producing proteins, developing gene therapies, and creating genetically modified organisms. It's important to note that transfection is different from transduction, which is the process of introducing genetic material into cells using viruses as vectors.

COS cells are a type of cell line that are commonly used in molecular biology and genetic research. The name "COS" is an acronym for "CV-1 in Origin," as these cells were originally derived from the African green monkey kidney cell line CV-1. COS cells have been modified through genetic engineering to express high levels of a protein called SV40 large T antigen, which allows them to efficiently take up and replicate exogenous DNA.

There are several different types of COS cells that are commonly used in research, including COS-1, COS-3, and COS-7 cells. These cells are widely used for the production of recombinant proteins, as well as for studies of gene expression, protein localization, and signal transduction.

It is important to note that while COS cells have been a valuable tool in scientific research, they are not without their limitations. For example, because they are derived from monkey kidney cells, there may be differences in the way that human genes are expressed or regulated in these cells compared to human cells. Additionally, because COS cells express SV40 large T antigen, they may have altered cell cycle regulation and other phenotypic changes that could affect experimental results. Therefore, it is important to carefully consider the choice of cell line when designing experiments and interpreting results.

Cell division is the process by which a single eukaryotic cell (a cell with a true nucleus) divides into two identical daughter cells. This complex process involves several stages, including replication of DNA, separation of chromosomes, and division of the cytoplasm. There are two main types of cell division: mitosis and meiosis.

Mitosis is the type of cell division that results in two genetically identical daughter cells. It is a fundamental process for growth, development, and tissue repair in multicellular organisms. The stages of mitosis include prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase, followed by cytokinesis, which divides the cytoplasm.

Meiosis, on the other hand, is a type of cell division that occurs in the gonads (ovaries and testes) during the production of gametes (sex cells). Meiosis results in four genetically unique daughter cells, each with half the number of chromosomes as the parent cell. This process is essential for sexual reproduction and genetic diversity. The stages of meiosis include meiosis I and meiosis II, which are further divided into prophase, prometaphase, metaphase, anaphase, and telophase.

In summary, cell division is the process by which a single cell divides into two daughter cells, either through mitosis or meiosis. This process is critical for growth, development, tissue repair, and sexual reproduction in multicellular organisms.

I apologize for any confusion, but "dioxoles" is not a medical term or concept. It is a chemical term that refers to a specific type of organic compound containing a dioxole ring, which is a six-membered ring consisting of two oxygen atoms and two carbon atoms. Dioxoles can be found in various natural and synthetic substances, but they are not typically relevant to medical definitions or concepts.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help answer them for you.

Articular cartilage is the smooth, white tissue that covers the ends of bones where they come together to form joints. It provides a cushion between bones and allows for smooth movement by reducing friction. Articular cartilage also absorbs shock and distributes loads evenly across the joint, protecting the bones from damage. It is avascular, meaning it does not have its own blood supply, and relies on the surrounding synovial fluid for nutrients. Over time, articular cartilage can wear down or become damaged due to injury or disease, leading to conditions such as osteoarthritis.

SOX9 (SRY-related HMG-box gene 9) is a transcription factor that belongs to the SOX family of proteins, which are characterized by a high mobility group (HMG) box DNA-binding domain. SOX9 plays crucial roles in various developmental processes, including sex determination, chondrogenesis, and neurogenesis.

As a transcription factor, SOX9 binds to specific DNA sequences in the promoter or enhancer regions of its target genes and regulates their expression. In the context of sex determination, SOX9 is essential for the development of Sertoli cells in the male gonad, which are responsible for supporting sperm production. SOX9 also plays a role in maintaining the undifferentiated state of stem cells and promoting cell differentiation in various tissues.

Mutations in the SOX9 gene have been associated with several human genetic disorders, including campomelic dysplasia, a severe skeletal disorder characterized by bowed legs, and sex reversal in individuals with XY chromosomes.

An ovary is a part of the female reproductive system in which ova or eggs are produced through the process of oogenesis. They are a pair of solid, almond-shaped structures located one on each side of the uterus within the pelvic cavity. Each ovary measures about 3 to 5 centimeters in length and weighs around 14 grams.

The ovaries have two main functions: endocrine (hormonal) function and reproductive function. They produce and release eggs (ovulation) responsible for potential fertilization and development of an embryo/fetus during pregnancy. Additionally, they are essential in the production of female sex hormones, primarily estrogen and progesterone, which regulate menstrual cycles, sexual development, and reproduction.

During each menstrual cycle, a mature egg is released from one of the ovaries into the fallopian tube, where it may be fertilized by sperm. If not fertilized, the egg, along with the uterine lining, will be shed, leading to menstruation.

Collagen Type I is the most abundant form of collagen in the human body, found in various connective tissues such as tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones. It is a structural protein that provides strength and integrity to these tissues. Collagen Type I is composed of three alpha chains, two alpha-1(I) chains, and one alpha-2(I) chain, arranged in a triple helix structure. This type of collagen is often used in medical research and clinical applications, such as tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, due to its excellent mechanical properties and biocompatibility.

Odontogenesis is the process of tooth development that involves the formation and calcification of teeth. It is a complex process that requires the interaction of several types of cells, including epithelial cells, mesenchymal cells, and odontoblasts. The process begins during embryonic development with the formation of dental lamina, which gives rise to the tooth bud. As the tooth bud grows and differentiates, it forms the various structures of the tooth, including the enamel, dentin, cementum, and pulp. Odontogenesis is completed when the tooth erupts into the oral cavity. Abnormalities in odontogenesis can result in developmental dental anomalies such as tooth agenesis, microdontia, or odontomas.

Smooth muscle myocytes are specialized cells that make up the contractile portion of non-striated, or smooth, muscles. These muscles are found in various organs and structures throughout the body, including the walls of blood vessels, the digestive system, the respiratory system, and the reproductive system.

Smooth muscle myocytes are smaller than their striated counterparts (skeletal and cardiac muscle cells) and have a single nucleus. They lack the distinctive banding pattern seen in striated muscles and instead have a uniform appearance of actin and myosin filaments. Smooth muscle myocytes are controlled by the autonomic nervous system, which allows them to contract and relax involuntarily.

These cells play an essential role in many physiological processes, such as regulating blood flow, moving food through the digestive tract, and facilitating childbirth. They can also contribute to various pathological conditions, including hypertension, atherosclerosis, and gastrointestinal disorders.

Follistatin-related proteins (FRPs) are a group of glycoproteins that share structural similarity with follistatin, a well-known antagonist of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily. FRPs consist of four members: FSTL1, FSTL3, FSTL4, and FSTL5 (also known as Follistatin-like 1, 3, 4, and 5). These proteins are characterized by the presence of a follistatin-like domain, which is responsible for their ability to bind and inhibit TGF-β superfamily members.

FRPs play important roles in various biological processes, including muscle development, inflammation, and cancer progression. For example, FSTL1 has been shown to have both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects, depending on the context, while FSTL3 is involved in regulating muscle growth and differentiation.

It's worth noting that while FRPs share structural similarity with follistatin, their functions can be distinct and sometimes even opposite to those of follistatin. Therefore, it's important to consider each FRP individually when studying their roles in various biological processes.

Promoter regions in genetics refer to specific DNA sequences located near the transcription start site of a gene. They serve as binding sites for RNA polymerase and various transcription factors that regulate the initiation of gene transcription. These regulatory elements help control the rate of transcription and, therefore, the level of gene expression. Promoter regions can be composed of different types of sequences, such as the TATA box and CAAT box, and their organization and composition can vary between different genes and species.

Apoptosis is a programmed and controlled cell death process that occurs in multicellular organisms. It is a natural process that helps maintain tissue homeostasis by eliminating damaged, infected, or unwanted cells. During apoptosis, the cell undergoes a series of morphological changes, including cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation, and fragmentation into membrane-bound vesicles called apoptotic bodies. These bodies are then recognized and engulfed by neighboring cells or phagocytic cells, preventing an inflammatory response. Apoptosis is regulated by a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways that involve proteins such as caspases, Bcl-2 family members, and inhibitors of apoptosis (IAPs).

Osteoporosis is a systemic skeletal disease characterized by low bone mass, deterioration of bone tissue, and disruption of bone architecture, leading to increased risk of fractures, particularly in the spine, wrist, and hip. It mainly affects older people, especially postmenopausal women, due to hormonal changes that reduce bone density. Osteoporosis can also be caused by certain medications, medical conditions, or lifestyle factors such as smoking, alcohol abuse, and a lack of calcium and vitamin D in the diet. The diagnosis is often made using bone mineral density testing, and treatment may include medication to slow bone loss, promote bone formation, and prevent fractures.

Nerve tissue proteins are specialized proteins found in the nervous system that provide structural and functional support to nerve cells, also known as neurons. These proteins include:

1. Neurofilaments: These are type IV intermediate filaments that provide structural support to neurons and help maintain their shape and size. They are composed of three subunits - NFL (light), NFM (medium), and NFH (heavy).

2. Neuronal Cytoskeletal Proteins: These include tubulins, actins, and spectrins that provide structural support to the neuronal cytoskeleton and help maintain its integrity.

3. Neurotransmitter Receptors: These are specialized proteins located on the postsynaptic membrane of neurons that bind neurotransmitters released by presynaptic neurons, triggering a response in the target cell.

4. Ion Channels: These are transmembrane proteins that regulate the flow of ions across the neuronal membrane and play a crucial role in generating and transmitting electrical signals in neurons.

5. Signaling Proteins: These include enzymes, receptors, and adaptor proteins that mediate intracellular signaling pathways involved in neuronal development, differentiation, survival, and death.

6. Adhesion Proteins: These are cell surface proteins that mediate cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions, playing a crucial role in the formation and maintenance of neural circuits.

7. Extracellular Matrix Proteins: These include proteoglycans, laminins, and collagens that provide structural support to nerve tissue and regulate neuronal migration, differentiation, and survival.

Stromal cells, also known as stromal/stroma cells, are a type of cell found in various tissues and organs throughout the body. They are often referred to as the "connective tissue" or "supporting framework" of an organ because they play a crucial role in maintaining the structure and function of the tissue. Stromal cells include fibroblasts, adipocytes (fat cells), and various types of progenitor/stem cells. They produce and maintain the extracellular matrix, which is the non-cellular component of tissues that provides structural support and biochemical cues for other cells. Stromal cells also interact with immune cells and participate in the regulation of the immune response. In some contexts, "stromal cells" can also refer to cells found in the microenvironment of tumors, which can influence cancer growth and progression.

Tertiary protein structure refers to the three-dimensional arrangement of all the elements (polypeptide chains) of a single protein molecule. It is the highest level of structural organization and results from interactions between various side chains (R groups) of the amino acids that make up the protein. These interactions, which include hydrogen bonds, ionic bonds, van der Waals forces, and disulfide bridges, give the protein its unique shape and stability, which in turn determines its function. The tertiary structure of a protein can be stabilized by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of certain ions. Any changes in these factors can lead to denaturation, where the protein loses its tertiary structure and thus its function.

Fibroblast Growth Factor 8 (FGF-8) is a growth factor that belongs to the fibroblast growth factor family. It plays crucial roles in various biological processes, including embryonic development, tissue repair, and cancer progression. Specifically, FGF-8 has been implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival.

During embryonic development, FGF-8 is involved in the formation of the nervous system, limbs, and other organs. It acts as a signaling molecule that helps to establish patterns of gene expression and cell behavior during development. In tissue repair, FGF-8 can stimulate the proliferation and migration of cells involved in wound healing, such as fibroblasts and endothelial cells.

In cancer, FGF-8 has been shown to promote tumor growth, angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels), and metastasis. It can do this by activating signaling pathways that promote cell proliferation, survival, and migration. Overexpression of FGF-8 has been found in various types of cancer, including breast, lung, prostate, and ovarian cancer.

In summary, Fibroblast Growth Factor 8 (FGF-8) is a signaling molecule that plays important roles in embryonic development, tissue repair, and cancer progression by regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, migration, and survival.

Conditioned culture media refers to a type of growth medium that has been previously used to culture and maintain the cells of an organism. The conditioned media contains factors secreted by those cells, such as hormones, nutrients, and signaling molecules, which can affect the behavior and growth of other cells that are introduced into the media later on.

When the conditioned media is used for culturing a new set of cells, it can provide a more physiologically relevant environment than traditional culture media, as it contains factors that are specific to the original cell type. This can be particularly useful in studies that aim to understand cell-cell interactions and communication, or to mimic the natural microenvironment of cells in the body.

It's important to note that conditioned media should be handled carefully and used promptly after preparation, as the factors it contains can degrade over time and affect the quality of the results.

Synostosis is a medical term that refers to the abnormal or physiological fusion of adjacent bones. It's derived from two Greek words, "syn" meaning together and "osteon" meaning bone. In a normal physiological process, synostosis occurs during growth and development, where the growth of certain bones is stopped by the fusion of neighboring bones at specific sites known as sutures or fontanelles.

However, abnormal synostosis can occur due to various reasons such as injuries, infections, or genetic conditions. This can lead to restricted movement and growth disturbances in the affected area. Common examples include craniosynostosis, where the skull bones fuse prematurely, and syndactyly, where fingers or toes are fused together. Treatment for abnormal synostosis may involve surgery to correct the fusion and prevent further complications.

Calcinosis is a medical condition characterized by the abnormal deposit of calcium salts in various tissues of the body, commonly under the skin or in the muscles and tendons. These calcium deposits can form hard lumps or nodules that can cause pain, inflammation, and restricted mobility. Calcinosis can occur as a complication of other medical conditions, such as autoimmune disorders, kidney disease, and hypercalcemia (high levels of calcium in the blood). In some cases, the cause of calcinosis may be unknown. Treatment for calcinosis depends on the underlying cause and may include medications to manage calcium levels, physical therapy, and surgical removal of large deposits.

Transforming Growth Factor-beta 3 (TGF-β3) is a type of cytokine, specifically a growth factor that belongs to the TGF-β family. It plays crucial roles in regulating various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix production.

TGF-β3 has been identified to have significant functions during embryonic development and tissue repair. In particular, it is known to be involved in the regulation of wound healing and scar formation. TGF-β3 can influence the behavior of various cell types, including fibroblasts, epithelial cells, and immune cells.

In some cases, TGF-β3 has been investigated for its potential therapeutic use in reducing fibrosis and promoting tissue regeneration. However, more research is needed to fully understand its mechanisms and potential clinical applications.

RNA interference (RNAi) is a biological process in which RNA molecules inhibit the expression of specific genes. This process is mediated by small RNA molecules, including microRNAs (miRNAs) and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), that bind to complementary sequences on messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, leading to their degradation or translation inhibition.

RNAi plays a crucial role in regulating gene expression and defending against foreign genetic elements, such as viruses and transposons. It has also emerged as an important tool for studying gene function and developing therapeutic strategies for various diseases, including cancer and viral infections.

Gene expression profiling is a laboratory technique used to measure the activity (expression) of thousands of genes at once. This technique allows researchers and clinicians to identify which genes are turned on or off in a particular cell, tissue, or organism under specific conditions, such as during health, disease, development, or in response to various treatments.

The process typically involves isolating RNA from the cells or tissues of interest, converting it into complementary DNA (cDNA), and then using microarray or high-throughput sequencing technologies to determine which genes are expressed and at what levels. The resulting data can be used to identify patterns of gene expression that are associated with specific biological states or processes, providing valuable insights into the underlying molecular mechanisms of diseases and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

In recent years, gene expression profiling has become an essential tool in various fields, including cancer research, drug discovery, and personalized medicine, where it is used to identify biomarkers of disease, predict patient outcomes, and guide treatment decisions.

Osseointegration is a direct structural and functional connection between living bone and the surface of an implant. It's a process where the bone grows in and around the implant, which is typically made of titanium or another biocompatible material. This process provides a solid foundation for dental prosthetics, such as crowns, bridges, or dentures, or for orthopedic devices like artificial limbs. The success of osseointegration depends on various factors, including the patient's overall health, the quality and quantity of available bone, and the surgical technique used for implant placement.

Transforming Growth Factor beta2 (TGF-β2) is a type of cytokine, specifically a growth factor, that plays a role in cell growth, division, and apoptosis (programmed cell death). It belongs to the TGF-β family of proteins. TGF-β2 is involved in various biological processes such as embryonic development, tissue homeostasis, wound healing, and immune regulation. In particular, it has been implicated in the regulation of extracellular matrix production and fibrosis, making it an important factor in diseases that involve excessive scarring or fibrotic changes, such as glaucoma, Marfan syndrome, and systemic sclerosis.

The nervous system is a complex, highly organized network of specialized cells called neurons and glial cells that communicate with each other via electrical and chemical signals to coordinate various functions and activities in the body. It consists of two main parts: the central nervous system (CNS), including the brain and spinal cord, and the peripheral nervous system (PNS), which includes all the nerves and ganglia outside the CNS.

The primary function of the nervous system is to receive, process, and integrate information from both internal and external environments and then respond by generating appropriate motor outputs or behaviors. This involves sensing various stimuli through specialized receptors, transmitting this information through afferent neurons to the CNS for processing, integrating this information with other inputs and memories, making decisions based on this processed information, and finally executing responses through efferent neurons that control effector organs such as muscles and glands.

The nervous system can be further divided into subsystems based on their functions, including the somatic nervous system, which controls voluntary movements and reflexes; the autonomic nervous system, which regulates involuntary physiological processes like heart rate, digestion, and respiration; and the enteric nervous system, which is a specialized subset of the autonomic nervous system that controls gut functions. Overall, the nervous system plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis, regulating behavior, and enabling cognition and consciousness.

An ovarian follicle is a fluid-filled sac in the ovary that contains an immature egg or ovum (oocyte). It's a part of the female reproductive system and plays a crucial role in the process of ovulation.

Ovarian follicles start developing in the ovaries during fetal development, but only a small number of them will mature and release an egg during a woman's reproductive years. The maturation process is stimulated by hormones like follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and luteinizing hormone (LH).

There are different types of ovarian follicles, including primordial, primary, secondary, and tertiary or Graafian follicles. The Graafian follicle is the mature follicle that ruptures during ovulation to release the egg into the fallopian tube, where it may be fertilized by sperm.

It's important to note that abnormal growth or development of ovarian follicles can lead to conditions like polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and ovarian cancer.

Membrane proteins are a type of protein that are embedded in the lipid bilayer of biological membranes, such as the plasma membrane of cells or the inner membrane of mitochondria. These proteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including:

1. Cell-cell recognition and signaling
2. Transport of molecules across the membrane (selective permeability)
3. Enzymatic reactions at the membrane surface
4. Energy transduction and conversion
5. Mechanosensation and signal transduction

Membrane proteins can be classified into two main categories: integral membrane proteins, which are permanently associated with the lipid bilayer, and peripheral membrane proteins, which are temporarily or loosely attached to the membrane surface. Integral membrane proteins can further be divided into three subcategories based on their topology:

1. Transmembrane proteins, which span the entire width of the lipid bilayer with one or more alpha-helices or beta-barrels.
2. Lipid-anchored proteins, which are covalently attached to lipids in the membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor or other lipid modifications.
3. Monotopic proteins, which are partially embedded in the membrane and have one or more domains exposed to either side of the bilayer.

Membrane proteins are essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and are targets for various therapeutic interventions, including drug development and gene therapy. However, their structural complexity and hydrophobicity make them challenging to study using traditional biochemical methods, requiring specialized techniques such as X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM).

The temporal bone is a paired bone that is located on each side of the skull, forming part of the lateral and inferior walls of the cranial cavity. It is one of the most complex bones in the human body and has several important structures associated with it. The main functions of the temporal bone include protecting the middle and inner ear, providing attachment for various muscles of the head and neck, and forming part of the base of the skull.

The temporal bone is divided into several parts, including the squamous part, the petrous part, the tympanic part, and the styloid process. The squamous part forms the lateral portion of the temporal bone and articulates with the parietal bone. The petrous part is the most medial and superior portion of the temporal bone and contains the inner ear and the semicircular canals. The tympanic part forms the lower and anterior portions of the temporal bone and includes the external auditory meatus or ear canal. The styloid process is a long, slender projection that extends downward from the inferior aspect of the temporal bone and serves as an attachment site for various muscles and ligaments.

The temporal bone plays a crucial role in hearing and balance, as it contains the structures of the middle and inner ear, including the oval window, round window, cochlea, vestibule, and semicircular canals. The stapes bone, one of the three bones in the middle ear, is entirely encased within the petrous portion of the temporal bone. Additionally, the temporal bone contains important structures for facial expression and sensation, including the facial nerve, which exits the skull through the stylomastoid foramen, a small opening in the temporal bone.

Cumulus cells are a type of specialized cell that surround and support the egg (oocyte) in the ovary of female mammals, including humans. These cells are located in the cumulus oophorus, which is a cluster of cells that surrounds and protects the mature egg within the follicle.

Cumulus cells play an important role in the process of fertilization by providing nutrients to the developing egg and helping to regulate its growth and development. They also help to facilitate communication between the egg and the surrounding follicular cells, which is necessary for the release of the mature egg from the ovary during ovulation.

In addition to their role in reproduction, cumulus cells have been studied for their potential use in various medical applications, including as a source of stem cells for therapeutic purposes. However, more research is needed to fully understand the properties and potential uses of these cells.

Smad3 protein is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in the TGF-β (transforming growth factor-beta) signaling pathway. When TGF-β binds to its receptor, it activates Smad3 through phosphorylation. Activated Smad3 then forms a complex with other Smad proteins and translocates into the nucleus where it regulates the transcription of target genes involved in various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and migration.

Mutations in the SMAD3 gene or dysregulation of the TGF-β/Smad3 signaling pathway have been implicated in several human diseases, including fibrotic disorders, cancer, and Marfan syndrome. Therefore, Smad3 protein is an important target for therapeutic interventions in these conditions.

Odontoblasts are defined as columnar-shaped cells that are located in the pulp tissue of teeth, specifically within the predentin region. They are responsible for the formation of dentin, one of the main components of a tooth, by synthesizing and depositing collagenous and non-collagenous proteins, as well as the mineral hydroxyapatite.

Odontoblasts have a single process that extends into the dentinal tubules, which are microscopic channels within the dentin matrix. These cells play a crucial role in sensing external stimuli, such as heat, cold, or pressure, and transmitting signals to the nerves located in the pulp tissue, thereby contributing to the tooth's sensitivity.

In summary, odontoblasts are specialized dental cells that produce dentin, provide structural support for teeth, and contribute to their sensory functions.

A "mutant strain of mice" in a medical context refers to genetically engineered mice that have specific genetic mutations introduced into their DNA. These mutations can be designed to mimic certain human diseases or conditions, allowing researchers to study the underlying biological mechanisms and test potential therapies in a controlled laboratory setting.

Mutant strains of mice are created through various techniques, including embryonic stem cell manipulation, gene editing technologies such as CRISPR-Cas9, and radiation-induced mutagenesis. These methods allow scientists to introduce specific genetic changes into the mouse genome, resulting in mice that exhibit altered physiological or behavioral traits.

These strains of mice are widely used in biomedical research because their short lifespan, small size, and high reproductive rate make them an ideal model organism for studying human diseases. Additionally, the mouse genome has been well-characterized, and many genetic tools and resources are available to researchers working with these animals.

Examples of mutant strains of mice include those that carry mutations in genes associated with cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, metabolic diseases, and immunological conditions. These mice provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of human diseases and help advance our understanding of potential therapeutic interventions.

Neurulation is the process by which the neural tube, which eventually develops into the brain and spinal cord, forms in an embryo. This complex process occurs during early embryonic development and involves a series of coordinated steps, including the formation of the neuroectoderm (a layer of cells that will give rise to the nervous system), the folding of this layer to form the neural plate, and the subsequent closure of the neural plate to create the neural tube. Disruptions in neurulation can result in serious birth defects, such as spina bifida or anencephaly.

Tissue scaffolds, also known as bioactive scaffolds or synthetic extracellular matrices, refer to three-dimensional structures that serve as templates for the growth and organization of cells in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) found in biological tissues, providing a supportive environment for cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and migration.

Tissue scaffolds can be made from various materials, including naturally derived biopolymers (e.g., collagen, alginate, chitosan, hyaluronic acid), synthetic polymers (e.g., polycaprolactone, polylactic acid, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)), or a combination of both. The choice of material depends on the specific application and desired properties, such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, mechanical strength, and porosity.

The primary functions of tissue scaffolds include:

1. Cell attachment: Providing surfaces for cells to adhere, spread, and form stable focal adhesions.
2. Mechanical support: Offering a structural framework that maintains the desired shape and mechanical properties of the engineered tissue.
3. Nutrient diffusion: Ensuring adequate transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products throughout the scaffold to support cell survival and function.
4. Guided tissue growth: Directing the organization and differentiation of cells through spatial cues and biochemical signals.
5. Biodegradation: Gradually degrading at a rate that matches tissue regeneration, allowing for the replacement of the scaffold with native ECM produced by the cells.

Tissue scaffolds have been used in various applications, such as wound healing, bone and cartilage repair, cardiovascular tissue engineering, and neural tissue regeneration. The design and fabrication of tissue scaffolds are critical aspects of tissue engineering, aiming to create functional substitutes for damaged or diseased tissues and organs.

The neural plate is a structure formed during the embryonic development of vertebrates. It is a thickened plate of ectodermal cells located on the dorsal surface of the developing embryo. The neural plate gives rise to the central nervous system, including the brain and spinal cord.

The process of neural plate formation begins with the specification of ectodermal cells into neural fated cells, a process that is regulated by various signaling molecules. Once specified, these cells undergo morphological changes, resulting in the thickening of the ectoderm to form the neural plate.

The neural plate then undergoes a series of folding movements, leading to the formation of the neural tube, which eventually develops into the brain and spinal cord. The edges of the neural plate, known as the neural folds, come together and fuse, forming a closed tube. Failure of the neural folds to fuse properly can result in neural tube defects, such as spina bifida.

Overall, the neural plate is a critical structure in the development of the nervous system in vertebrates, and its formation and subsequent development are tightly regulated by various genetic and environmental factors.

Embryonic organizers are specialized cells or tissues in developing embryos that provide critical signals to guide the organization and development of surrounding cells and tissues. They play a crucial role in establishing the body plan and patterning of the organism during embryogenesis. A well-known example is the Spemann-Mangold organizer, first described in amphibians, which induces the formation of the neural tissue and organizes the surrounding tissues to form the body axis. Embryonic organizers have been identified in various animal models, including mammals, birds, and fish, and they are essential for normal embryonic development.

The alveolar process is the curved part of the jawbone (mandible or maxilla) that contains sockets or hollow spaces (alveoli) for the teeth to be embedded. These processes are covered with a specialized mucous membrane called the gingiva, which forms a tight seal around the teeth to help protect the periodontal tissues and maintain oral health.

The alveolar process is composed of both compact and spongy bone tissue. The compact bone forms the outer layer, while the spongy bone is found inside the alveoli and provides support for the teeth. When a tooth is lost or extracted, the alveolar process begins to resorb over time due to the lack of mechanical stimulation from the tooth's chewing forces. This can lead to changes in the shape and size of the jawbone, which may require bone grafting procedures before dental implant placement.

Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF-2), also known as basic fibroblast growth factor, is a protein involved in various biological processes such as cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. It plays a crucial role in wound healing, embryonic development, and angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels). FGF-2 is produced and secreted by various cells, including fibroblasts, and exerts its effects by binding to specific receptors on the cell surface, leading to activation of intracellular signaling pathways. It has been implicated in several diseases, including cancer, where it can contribute to tumor growth and progression.

The telencephalon is the most anterior (front) region of the embryonic brain, which eventually develops into the largest portion of the adult human brain, including the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and olfactory bulbs. It is derived from the prosencephalon (forebrain) during embryonic development and is responsible for higher cognitive functions such as thinking, perception, and language. The telencephalon can be further divided into two hemispheres, each containing regions associated with different functions.

Endothelial cells are the type of cells that line the inner surface of blood vessels, lymphatic vessels, and heart chambers. They play a crucial role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by controlling vasomotor tone, coagulation, platelet activation, and inflammation. Endothelial cells also regulate the transport of molecules between the blood and surrounding tissues, and contribute to the maintenance of the structural integrity of the vasculature. They are flat, elongated cells with a unique morphology that allows them to form a continuous, nonthrombogenic lining inside the vessels. Endothelial cells can be isolated from various tissues and cultured in vitro for research purposes.

A ligand, in the context of biochemistry and medicine, is a molecule that binds to a specific site on a protein or a larger biomolecule, such as an enzyme or a receptor. This binding interaction can modify the function or activity of the target protein, either activating it or inhibiting it. Ligands can be small molecules, like hormones or neurotransmitters, or larger structures, like antibodies. The study of ligand-protein interactions is crucial for understanding cellular processes and developing drugs, as many therapeutic compounds function by binding to specific targets within the body.

Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is a type of short, double-stranded RNA molecule that plays a role in the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The RNAi pathway is a natural cellular process that regulates gene expression by targeting and destroying specific messenger RNA (mRNA) molecules, thereby preventing the translation of those mRNAs into proteins.

SiRNAs are typically 20-25 base pairs in length and are generated from longer double-stranded RNA precursors called hairpin RNAs or dsRNAs by an enzyme called Dicer. Once generated, siRNAs associate with a protein complex called the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which uses one strand of the siRNA (the guide strand) to recognize and bind to complementary sequences in the target mRNA. The RISC then cleaves the target mRNA, leading to its degradation and the inhibition of protein synthesis.

SiRNAs have emerged as a powerful tool for studying gene function and have shown promise as therapeutic agents for a variety of diseases, including viral infections, cancer, and genetic disorders. However, their use as therapeutics is still in the early stages of development, and there are challenges associated with delivering siRNAs to specific cells and tissues in the body.

Sequence homology, amino acid, refers to the similarity in the order of amino acids in a protein or a portion of a protein between two or more species. This similarity can be used to infer evolutionary relationships and functional similarities between proteins. The higher the degree of sequence homology, the more likely it is that the proteins are related and have similar functions. Sequence homology can be determined through various methods such as pairwise alignment or multiple sequence alignment, which compare the sequences and calculate a score based on the number and type of matching amino acids.

Regeneration in a medical context refers to the process of renewal, restoration, and growth that replaces damaged or missing cells, tissues, organs, or even whole limbs in some organisms. This complex biological process involves various cellular and molecular mechanisms, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and migration, which work together to restore the structural and functional integrity of the affected area.

In human medicine, regeneration has attracted significant interest due to its potential therapeutic applications in treating various conditions, including degenerative diseases, trauma, and congenital disorders. Researchers are actively studying the underlying mechanisms of regeneration in various model organisms to develop novel strategies for promoting tissue repair and regeneration in humans.

Examples of regeneration in human medicine include liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy, where the remaining liver lobes can grow back to their original size within weeks, and skin wound healing, where keratinocytes migrate and proliferate to close the wound and restore the epidermal layer. However, the regenerative capacity of humans is limited compared to some other organisms, such as planarians and axolotls, which can regenerate entire body parts or even their central nervous system.

Sprague-Dawley rats are a strain of albino laboratory rats that are widely used in scientific research. They were first developed by researchers H.H. Sprague and R.C. Dawley in the early 20th century, and have since become one of the most commonly used rat strains in biomedical research due to their relatively large size, ease of handling, and consistent genetic background.

Sprague-Dawley rats are outbred, which means that they are genetically diverse and do not suffer from the same limitations as inbred strains, which can have reduced fertility and increased susceptibility to certain diseases. They are also characterized by their docile nature and low levels of aggression, making them easier to handle and study than some other rat strains.

These rats are used in a wide variety of research areas, including toxicology, pharmacology, nutrition, cancer, and behavioral studies. Because they are genetically diverse, Sprague-Dawley rats can be used to model a range of human diseases and conditions, making them an important tool in the development of new drugs and therapies.

Cell culture is a technique used in scientific research to grow and maintain cells from plants, animals, or humans in a controlled environment outside of their original organism. This environment typically consists of a sterile container called a cell culture flask or plate, and a nutrient-rich liquid medium that provides the necessary components for the cells' growth and survival, such as amino acids, vitamins, minerals, and hormones.

There are several different types of cell culture techniques used in research, including:

1. Adherent cell culture: In this technique, cells are grown on a flat surface, such as the bottom of a tissue culture dish or flask. The cells attach to the surface and spread out, forming a monolayer that can be observed and manipulated under a microscope.
2. Suspension cell culture: In suspension culture, cells are grown in liquid medium without any attachment to a solid surface. These cells remain suspended in the medium and can be agitated or mixed to ensure even distribution of nutrients.
3. Organoid culture: Organoids are three-dimensional structures that resemble miniature organs and are grown from stem cells or other progenitor cells. They can be used to study organ development, disease processes, and drug responses.
4. Co-culture: In co-culture, two or more different types of cells are grown together in the same culture dish or flask. This technique is used to study cell-cell interactions and communication.
5. Conditioned medium culture: In this technique, cells are grown in a medium that has been conditioned by previous cultures of other cells. The conditioned medium contains factors secreted by the previous cells that can influence the growth and behavior of the new cells.

Cell culture techniques are widely used in biomedical research to study cellular processes, develop drugs, test toxicity, and investigate disease mechanisms. However, it is important to note that cell cultures may not always accurately represent the behavior of cells in a living organism, and results from cell culture experiments should be validated using other methods.

"Xenopus laevis" is not a medical term itself, but it refers to a specific species of African clawed frog that is often used in scientific research, including biomedical and developmental studies. Therefore, its relevance to medicine comes from its role as a model organism in laboratories.

In a broader sense, Xenopus laevis has contributed significantly to various medical discoveries, such as the understanding of embryonic development, cell cycle regulation, and genetic research. For instance, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded in 1963 to John R. B. Gurdon and Sir Michael J. Bishop for their discoveries concerning the genetic mechanisms of organism development using Xenopus laevis as a model system.

REceptor Activator of NF-kB (RANK) Ligand is a type of protein that plays a crucial role in the immune system and bone metabolism. It belongs to the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily and is primarily produced by osteoblasts, which are cells responsible for bone formation.

RANK Ligand binds to its receptor RANK, which is found on the surface of osteoclasts, a type of cell involved in bone resorption or breakdown. The binding of RANK Ligand to RANK activates signaling pathways that promote the differentiation, activation, and survival of osteoclasts, thereby increasing bone resorption.

Abnormalities in the RANKL-RANK signaling pathway have been implicated in various bone diseases, such as osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and certain types of cancer that metastasize to bones. Therefore, targeting this pathway with therapeutic agents has emerged as a promising approach for the treatment of these conditions.

Neurons, also known as nerve cells or neurocytes, are specialized cells that constitute the basic unit of the nervous system. They are responsible for receiving, processing, and transmitting information and signals within the body. Neurons have three main parts: the dendrites, the cell body (soma), and the axon. The dendrites receive signals from other neurons or sensory receptors, while the axon transmits these signals to other neurons, muscles, or glands. The junction between two neurons is called a synapse, where neurotransmitters are released to transmit the signal across the gap (synaptic cleft) to the next neuron. Neurons vary in size, shape, and structure depending on their function and location within the nervous system.

Luciferases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of their substrates, leading to the emission of light. This bioluminescent process is often associated with certain species of bacteria, insects, and fish. The term "luciferase" comes from the Latin word "lucifer," which means "light bearer."

The most well-known example of luciferase is probably that found in fireflies, where the enzyme reacts with a compound called luciferin to produce light. This reaction requires the presence of oxygen and ATP (adenosine triphosphate), which provides the energy needed for the reaction to occur.

Luciferases have important applications in scientific research, particularly in the development of sensitive assays for detecting gene expression and protein-protein interactions. By labeling a protein or gene of interest with luciferase, researchers can measure its activity by detecting the light emitted during the enzymatic reaction. This allows for highly sensitive and specific measurements, making luciferases valuable tools in molecular biology and biochemistry.

The parietal bone is one of the four flat bones that form the skull's cranial vault, which protects the brain. There are two parietal bones in the skull, one on each side, located posterior to the frontal bone and temporal bone, and anterior to the occipital bone. Each parietal bone has a squamous part, which forms the roof and sides of the skull, and a smaller, wing-like portion called the mastoid process. The parietal bones contribute to the formation of the coronal and lambdoid sutures, which are fibrous joints that connect the bones in the skull.

Organ culture techniques refer to the methods used to maintain or grow intact organs or pieces of organs under controlled conditions in vitro, while preserving their structural and functional characteristics. These techniques are widely used in biomedical research to study organ physiology, pathophysiology, drug development, and toxicity testing.

Organ culture can be performed using a variety of methods, including:

1. Static organ culture: In this method, the organs or tissue pieces are placed on a porous support in a culture dish and maintained in a nutrient-rich medium. The medium is replaced periodically to ensure adequate nutrition and removal of waste products.
2. Perfusion organ culture: This method involves perfusing the organ with nutrient-rich media, allowing for better distribution of nutrients and oxygen throughout the tissue. This technique is particularly useful for studying larger organs such as the liver or kidney.
3. Microfluidic organ culture: In this approach, microfluidic devices are used to create a controlled microenvironment for organ cultures. These devices allow for precise control over the flow of nutrients and waste products, as well as the application of mechanical forces.

Organ culture techniques can be used to study various aspects of organ function, including metabolism, secretion, and response to drugs or toxins. Additionally, these methods can be used to generate three-dimensional tissue models that better recapitulate the structure and function of intact organs compared to traditional two-dimensional cell cultures.

Neuroepithelial cells are stem cells that line the developing central nervous system (CNS) in embryos. These cells have the ability to differentiate into various cell types, including neurons and glial cells, which make up the brain and spinal cord. Neuroepithelial cells form a pseudostratified epithelium, meaning that the nuclei of the cells are at varying heights within the cell layer, giving it a striped appearance. These cells play a crucial role in the development and growth of the CNS.

ICR (Institute of Cancer Research) is a strain of albino Swiss mice that are widely used in scientific research. They are an outbred strain, which means that they have been bred to maintain maximum genetic heterogeneity. However, it is also possible to find inbred strains of ICR mice, which are genetically identical individuals produced by many generations of brother-sister mating.

Inbred ICR mice are a specific type of ICR mouse that has been inbred for at least 20 generations. This means that they have a high degree of genetic uniformity and are essentially genetically identical to one another. Inbred strains of mice are often used in research because their genetic consistency makes them more reliable models for studying biological phenomena and testing new therapies or treatments.

It is important to note that while inbred ICR mice may be useful for certain types of research, they do not necessarily represent the genetic diversity found in human populations. Therefore, it is important to consider the limitations of using any animal model when interpreting research findings and applying them to human health.

Smad proteins are a group of intracellular signaling molecules that play a crucial role in the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway. They are involved in regulating various cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis.

Inhibitory Smad proteins, also known as I-Smads, include Smad6 and Smad7. These proteins function as negative regulators of the TGF-β signaling pathway by inhibiting the activation of receptor-regulated Smad proteins (R-Smads), which are necessary for signal transduction.

I-Smads prevent the phosphorylation and activation of R-Smads by binding to the TGF-β receptors, thereby blocking their interaction with R-Smads. I-Smads also promote the dephosphorylation and degradation of R-Smads, further inhibiting the TGF-β signaling pathway.

In addition to their role in TGF-β signaling, I-Smads have been shown to regulate other signaling pathways, including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Wnt signaling. Dysregulation of Smad proteins, including I-Smads, has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, fibrosis, and autoimmune disorders.

Genetically modified animals (GMAs) are those whose genetic makeup has been altered using biotechnological techniques. This is typically done by introducing one or more genes from another species into the animal's genome, resulting in a new trait or characteristic that does not naturally occur in that species. The introduced gene is often referred to as a transgene.

The process of creating GMAs involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The desired gene is isolated from the DNA of another organism.
2. Transfer: The isolated gene is transferred into the target animal's cells, usually using a vector such as a virus or bacterium.
3. Integration: The transgene integrates into the animal's chromosome, becoming a permanent part of its genetic makeup.
4. Selection: The modified cells are allowed to multiply, and those that contain the transgene are selected for further growth and development.
5. Breeding: The genetically modified individuals are bred to produce offspring that carry the desired trait.

GMAs have various applications in research, agriculture, and medicine. In research, they can serve as models for studying human diseases or testing new therapies. In agriculture, GMAs can be developed to exhibit enhanced growth rates, improved disease resistance, or increased nutritional value. In medicine, GMAs may be used to produce pharmaceuticals or other therapeutic agents within their bodies.

Examples of genetically modified animals include mice with added genes for specific proteins that make them useful models for studying human diseases, goats that produce a human protein in their milk to treat hemophilia, and pigs with enhanced resistance to certain viruses that could potentially be used as organ donors for humans.

It is important to note that the use of genetically modified animals raises ethical concerns related to animal welfare, environmental impact, and potential risks to human health. These issues must be carefully considered and addressed when developing and implementing GMA technologies.

Collagen Type II is a specific type of collagen that is a major component of the extracellular matrix in articular cartilage, which is the connective tissue that covers and protects the ends of bones in joints. It is also found in other tissues such as the vitreous humor of the eye and the inner ear.

Collagen Type II is a triple helix molecule composed of three polypeptide chains that contain a high proportion of the amino acids proline and hydroxyproline. This type of collagen provides structural support and elasticity to tissues, and it also plays a role in the regulation of cell behavior and signaling.

Collagen Type II is a target for autoimmune responses in conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, where the immune system mistakenly attacks the body's own collagen, leading to joint inflammation and damage. It is also a common component of various dietary supplements and therapies used to support joint health and treat osteoarthritis.

The Wnt signaling pathway is a complex cell communication system that plays a critical role in embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and cancer. It is named after the Wingless (Wg) gene in Drosophila melanogaster and the Int-1 gene in mice, both of which were found to be involved in this pathway.

In essence, the Wnt signaling pathway involves the binding of Wnt proteins to Frizzled receptors on the cell surface, leading to the activation of intracellular signaling cascades. There are three main branches of the Wnt signaling pathway: the canonical (or Wnt/β-catenin) pathway, the noncanonical planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, and the noncanonical Wnt/calcium pathway.

The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway is the most well-studied branch. In the absence of Wnt signaling, cytoplasmic β-catenin is constantly phosphorylated by a destruction complex consisting of Axin, APC, GSK3β, and CK1, leading to its ubiquitination and degradation in the proteasome. When Wnt ligands bind to Frizzled receptors and their coreceptor LRP5/6, Dishevelled is recruited and inhibits the destruction complex, allowing β-catenin to accumulate in the cytoplasm and translocate into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin interacts with TCF/LEF transcription factors to regulate the expression of target genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival.

Dysregulation of the Wnt signaling pathway has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer, developmental disorders, and degenerative conditions. For example, mutations in components of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway can lead to the accumulation of β-catenin and subsequent activation of oncogenic target genes, contributing to tumorigenesis in various types of cancer.

Epithelial cells are types of cells that cover the outer surfaces of the body, line the inner surfaces of organs and glands, and form the lining of blood vessels and body cavities. They provide a protective barrier against the external environment, regulate the movement of materials between the internal and external environments, and are involved in the sense of touch, temperature, and pain. Epithelial cells can be squamous (flat and thin), cuboidal (square-shaped and of equal height), or columnar (tall and narrow) in shape and are classified based on their location and function.

A biological marker, often referred to as a biomarker, is a measurable indicator that reflects the presence or severity of a disease state, or a response to a therapeutic intervention. Biomarkers can be found in various materials such as blood, tissues, or bodily fluids, and they can take many forms, including molecular, histologic, radiographic, or physiological measurements.

In the context of medical research and clinical practice, biomarkers are used for a variety of purposes, such as:

1. Diagnosis: Biomarkers can help diagnose a disease by indicating the presence or absence of a particular condition. For example, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a biomarker used to detect prostate cancer.
2. Monitoring: Biomarkers can be used to monitor the progression or regression of a disease over time. For instance, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels are monitored in diabetes patients to assess long-term blood glucose control.
3. Predicting: Biomarkers can help predict the likelihood of developing a particular disease or the risk of a negative outcome. For example, the presence of certain genetic mutations can indicate an increased risk for breast cancer.
4. Response to treatment: Biomarkers can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of a specific treatment by measuring changes in the biomarker levels before and after the intervention. This is particularly useful in personalized medicine, where treatments are tailored to individual patients based on their unique biomarker profiles.

It's important to note that for a biomarker to be considered clinically valid and useful, it must undergo rigorous validation through well-designed studies, including demonstrating sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility, and clinical relevance.

The radius is one of the two bones in the forearm in humans and other vertebrates. In humans, it runs from the lateral side of the elbow to the thumb side of the wrist. It is responsible for rotation of the forearm and articulates with the humerus at the elbow and the carpals at the wrist. Any medical condition or injury that affects the radius can impact the movement and function of the forearm and hand.

I'm not aware of a specific medical definition for "Avian Proteins." The term "avian" generally refers to birds or their characteristics. Therefore, "avian proteins" would likely refer to proteins that are found in birds or are produced by avian cells. These proteins could have various functions and roles, depending on the specific protein in question.

For example, avian proteins might be of interest in medical research if they have similarities to human proteins and can be used as models to study protein function, structure, or interaction with other molecules. Additionally, some avian proteins may have potential applications in therapeutic development, such as using chicken egg-derived proteins for wound healing or as vaccine components.

However, without a specific context or reference, it's difficult to provide a more precise definition of "avian proteins" in a medical context.

Proteoglycans are complex, highly negatively charged macromolecules that are composed of a core protein covalently linked to one or more glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains. They are a major component of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell signaling, regulation of growth factor activity, and maintenance of tissue structure and function.

The GAG chains, which can vary in length and composition, are long, unbranched polysaccharides that are composed of repeating disaccharide units containing a hexuronic acid (either glucuronic or iduronic acid) and a hexosamine (either N-acetylglucosamine or N-acetylgalactosamine). These GAG chains can be sulfated to varying degrees, which contributes to the negative charge of proteoglycans.

Proteoglycans are classified into four major groups based on their core protein structure and GAG composition: heparan sulfate/heparin proteoglycans, chondroitin/dermatan sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans, and hyaluronan-binding proteoglycans. Each group has distinct functions and is found in specific tissues and cell types.

In summary, proteoglycans are complex macromolecules composed of a core protein and one or more GAG chains that play important roles in the ECM and various biological processes, including cell signaling, growth factor regulation, and tissue structure maintenance.

Striated muscle, also known as skeletal or voluntary muscle, is a type of muscle tissue that is characterized by the presence of distinct light and dark bands, or striations, when viewed under a microscope. These striations correspond to the arrangement of sarcomeres, which are the functional units of muscle fibers.

Striated muscle is under voluntary control, meaning that it is consciously activated by signals from the nervous system. It is attached to bones via tendons and is responsible for producing movements of the body. Striated muscle fibers are multinucleated, meaning that they contain many nuclei, and are composed of numerous myofibrils, which are rope-like structures that run the length of the fiber.

The myofibrils are composed of thick and thin filaments that slide past each other to cause muscle contraction. The thick filaments are made up of the protein myosin, while the thin filaments are composed of actin, tropomyosin, and troponin. When a nerve impulse arrives at the muscle fiber, it triggers the release of calcium ions from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which bind to troponin and cause a conformational change that exposes the binding sites on actin for myosin. The myosin heads then bind to the actin filaments and pull them towards the center of the sarcomere, causing the muscle fiber to shorten and contract.

A semiconductor laser is a type of laser that uses a semiconductor material to produce coherent light. In a semiconductor laser, electrical current is passed through a p-n junction (a junction between p-type and n-type semiconductors) to create a population inversion, which is necessary for laser action. The active region of the laser, where stimulated emission occurs, is typically made up of multiple layers of semiconductor materials that are designed to confine the carriers (electrons and holes) and enhance the optical mode.

Semiconductor lasers are commonly used in a wide range of applications, including data storage, fiber optic communications, laser printers, and medical devices. They are compact, efficient, and can be easily modulated, making them ideal for use in high-speed optical communication systems. Additionally, semiconductor lasers can be made using various materials, such as gallium arsenide (GaAs), indium phosphide (InP), and aluminum gallium arsenide (AlGaAs), which allow for the emission of light at different wavelengths.

Semiconductor lasers are also known as diode lasers or laser diodes, and they can be further classified based on their structure, such as edge-emitting lasers, surface-emitting lasers, vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), and distributed feedback lasers (DFB).

Cell movement, also known as cell motility, refers to the ability of cells to move independently and change their location within tissue or inside the body. This process is essential for various biological functions, including embryonic development, wound healing, immune responses, and cancer metastasis.

There are several types of cell movement, including:

1. **Crawling or mesenchymal migration:** Cells move by extending and retracting protrusions called pseudopodia or filopodia, which contain actin filaments. This type of movement is common in fibroblasts, immune cells, and cancer cells during tissue invasion and metastasis.
2. **Amoeboid migration:** Cells move by changing their shape and squeezing through tight spaces without forming protrusions. This type of movement is often observed in white blood cells (leukocytes) as they migrate through the body to fight infections.
3. **Pseudopodial extension:** Cells extend pseudopodia, which are temporary cytoplasmic projections containing actin filaments. These protrusions help the cell explore its environment and move forward.
4. **Bacterial flagellar motion:** Bacteria use a whip-like structure called a flagellum to propel themselves through their environment. The rotation of the flagellum is driven by a molecular motor in the bacterial cell membrane.
5. **Ciliary and ependymal movement:** Ciliated cells, such as those lining the respiratory tract and fallopian tubes, have hair-like structures called cilia that beat in coordinated waves to move fluids or mucus across the cell surface.

Cell movement is regulated by a complex interplay of signaling pathways, cytoskeletal rearrangements, and adhesion molecules, which enable cells to respond to environmental cues and navigate through tissues.

Metalloendopeptidases are a type of enzymes that cleave peptide bonds in proteins, specifically at interior positions within the polypeptide chain. They require metal ions as cofactors for their catalytic activity, typically zinc (Zn2+) or cobalt (Co2+). These enzymes play important roles in various biological processes such as protein degradation, processing, and signaling. Examples of metalloendopeptidases include thermolysin, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and neutrophil elastase.

Embryonic and fetal development is the process of growth and development that occurs from fertilization of the egg (conception) to birth. The terms "embryo" and "fetus" are used to describe different stages of this development:

* Embryonic development: This stage begins at fertilization and continues until the end of the 8th week of pregnancy. During this time, the fertilized egg (zygote) divides and forms a blastocyst, which implants in the uterus and begins to develop into a complex structure called an embryo. The embryo consists of three layers of cells that will eventually form all of the organs and tissues of the body. During this stage, the basic structures of the body, including the nervous system, heart, and gastrointestinal tract, begin to form.
* Fetal development: This stage begins at the end of the 8th week of pregnancy and continues until birth. During this time, the embryo is called a fetus, and it grows and develops rapidly. The organs and tissues that were formed during the embryonic stage continue to mature and become more complex. The fetus also begins to move and kick, and it can hear and respond to sounds from outside the womb.

Overall, embryonic and fetal development is a complex and highly regulated process that involves the coordinated growth and differentiation of cells and tissues. It is a critical period of development that lays the foundation for the health and well-being of the individual throughout their life.

Phosphoproteins are proteins that have been post-translationally modified by the addition of a phosphate group (-PO3H2) onto specific amino acid residues, most commonly serine, threonine, or tyrosine. This process is known as phosphorylation and is mediated by enzymes called kinases. Phosphoproteins play crucial roles in various cellular processes such as signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, metabolism, and gene expression. The addition or removal of a phosphate group can activate or inhibit the function of a protein, thereby serving as a switch to control its activity. Phosphoproteins can be detected and quantified using techniques such as Western blotting, mass spectrometry, and immunofluorescence.

The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex network of biomolecules that provides structural and biochemical support to cells in tissues and organs. It is composed of various proteins, glycoproteins, and polysaccharides, such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, laminin, and proteoglycans. The ECM plays crucial roles in maintaining tissue architecture, regulating cell behavior, and facilitating communication between cells. It provides a scaffold for cell attachment, migration, and differentiation, and helps to maintain the structural integrity of tissues by resisting mechanical stresses. Additionally, the ECM contains various growth factors, cytokines, and chemokines that can influence cellular processes such as proliferation, survival, and differentiation. Overall, the extracellular matrix is essential for the normal functioning of tissues and organs, and its dysregulation can contribute to various pathological conditions, including fibrosis, cancer, and degenerative diseases.

Ovulation is the medical term for the release of a mature egg from an ovary during a woman's menstrual cycle. The released egg travels through the fallopian tube where it may be fertilized by sperm if sexual intercourse has occurred recently. If the egg is not fertilized, it will break down and leave the body along with the uterine lining during menstruation. Ovulation typically occurs around day 14 of a 28-day menstrual cycle, but the timing can vary widely from woman to woman and even from cycle to cycle in the same woman.

During ovulation, there are several physical changes that may occur in a woman's body, such as an increase in basal body temperature, changes in cervical mucus, and mild cramping or discomfort on one side of the lower abdomen (known as mittelschmerz). These symptoms can be used to help predict ovulation and improve the chances of conception.

It's worth noting that some medical conditions, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) or premature ovarian failure, may affect ovulation and make it difficult for a woman to become pregnant. In these cases, medical intervention may be necessary to help promote ovulation and increase the chances of conception.

Osteoblastoma is a rare, benign (non-cancerous) bone tumor that originates from osteoblasts, which are cells responsible for bone formation. It typically affects children and young adults, with around two-thirds of cases occurring in individuals under 30 years old.

Osteoblastomas usually develop in the long bones of the body, such as the femur (thigh bone) or tibia (shin bone), but they can also occur in the vertebrae of the spine. The tumor tends to grow slowly and may cause symptoms like pain, swelling, or tenderness in the affected area. In some cases, it can lead to pathological fractures (fractures caused by weakened bone structure).

While osteoblastomas are generally not life-threatening, they can be locally aggressive and cause significant morbidity if left untreated. Treatment typically involves surgical removal of the tumor, followed by curettage (scraping) and bone grafting to fill the void created by the tumor excision. In some cases, adjuvant therapies like cryosurgery or radiation therapy may be used to ensure complete tumor eradication.

The inner ear is the innermost part of the ear that contains the sensory organs for hearing and balance. It consists of a complex system of fluid-filled tubes and sacs called the vestibular system, which is responsible for maintaining balance and spatial orientation, and the cochlea, a spiral-shaped organ that converts sound vibrations into electrical signals that are sent to the brain.

The inner ear is located deep within the temporal bone of the skull and is protected by a bony labyrinth. The vestibular system includes the semicircular canals, which detect rotational movements of the head, and the otolith organs (the saccule and utricle), which detect linear acceleration and gravity.

Damage to the inner ear can result in hearing loss, tinnitus (ringing in the ears), vertigo (a spinning sensation), and balance problems.

Pyrazoles are heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds that contain a six-membered ring with two nitrogen atoms at positions 1 and 2. The chemical structure of pyrazoles consists of a pair of nitrogen atoms adjacent to each other in the ring, which makes them unique from other azole heterocycles such as imidazoles or triazoles.

Pyrazoles have significant biological activities and are found in various pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and natural products. Some pyrazole derivatives exhibit anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antipyretic, antimicrobial, antiviral, antifungal, and anticancer properties.

In the medical field, pyrazoles are used in various drugs to treat different conditions. For example, celecoxib (Celebrex) is a selective COX-2 inhibitor used for pain relief and inflammation reduction in arthritis patients. It contains a pyrazole ring as its core structure. Similarly, febuxostat (Uloric) is a medication used to treat gout, which also has a pyrazole moiety.

Overall, pyrazoles are essential compounds with significant medical applications and potential for further development in drug discovery and design.

Fibroblasts are specialized cells that play a critical role in the body's immune response and wound healing process. They are responsible for producing and maintaining the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is the non-cellular component present within all tissues and organs, providing structural support and biochemical signals for surrounding cells.

Fibroblasts produce various ECM proteins such as collagens, elastin, fibronectin, and laminins, forming a complex network of fibers that give tissues their strength and flexibility. They also help in the regulation of tissue homeostasis by controlling the turnover of ECM components through the process of remodeling.

In response to injury or infection, fibroblasts become activated and start to proliferate rapidly, migrating towards the site of damage. Here, they participate in the inflammatory response, releasing cytokines and chemokines that attract immune cells to the area. Additionally, they deposit new ECM components to help repair the damaged tissue and restore its functionality.

Dysregulation of fibroblast activity has been implicated in several pathological conditions, including fibrosis (excessive scarring), cancer (where they can contribute to tumor growth and progression), and autoimmune diseases (such as rheumatoid arthritis).

Complementary DNA (cDNA) is a type of DNA that is synthesized from a single-stranded RNA molecule through the process of reverse transcription. In this process, the enzyme reverse transcriptase uses an RNA molecule as a template to synthesize a complementary DNA strand. The resulting cDNA is therefore complementary to the original RNA molecule and is a copy of its coding sequence, but it does not contain non-coding regions such as introns that are present in genomic DNA.

Complementary DNA is often used in molecular biology research to study gene expression, protein function, and other genetic phenomena. For example, cDNA can be used to create cDNA libraries, which are collections of cloned cDNA fragments that represent the expressed genes in a particular cell type or tissue. These libraries can then be screened for specific genes or gene products of interest. Additionally, cDNA can be used to produce recombinant proteins in heterologous expression systems, allowing researchers to study the structure and function of proteins that may be difficult to express or purify from their native sources.

Adipogenesis is the process by which precursor cells differentiate into mature adipocytes, or fat cells. This complex biological process involves a series of molecular and cellular events that are regulated by various genetic and epigenetic factors.

During adipogenesis, preadipocytes undergo a series of changes that include cell cycle arrest, morphological alterations, and the expression of specific genes that are involved in lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. These changes ultimately result in the formation of mature adipocytes that are capable of storing energy in the form of lipids.

Abnormalities in adipogenesis have been linked to various health conditions, including obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate adipogenesis is an active area of research, as it may lead to the development of new therapies for these and other related diseases.

"Cattle" is a term used in the agricultural and veterinary fields to refer to domesticated animals of the genus *Bos*, primarily *Bos taurus* (European cattle) and *Bos indicus* (Zebu). These animals are often raised for meat, milk, leather, and labor. They are also known as bovines or cows (for females), bulls (intact males), and steers/bullocks (castrated males). However, in a strict medical definition, "cattle" does not apply to humans or other animals.

Myoblasts are types of cells that are responsible for the development and growth of muscle tissue in the body. They are undifferentiated cells, meaning they have not yet developed into their final form or function. Myoblasts fuse together to form myotubes, which then develop into muscle fibers, also known as myofibers. This process is called myogenesis and it plays a crucial role in the growth, repair, and maintenance of skeletal muscle tissue throughout an individual's life.

Myoblasts can be derived from various sources, including embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, or satellite cells, which are adult stem cells found within mature muscle tissue. Satellite cells are typically quiescent but can be activated in response to muscle damage or injury, proliferate and differentiate into myoblasts, and fuse together to repair and replace damaged muscle fibers.

Dysregulation of myogenesis and impaired myoblast function have been implicated in various muscle-related disorders, including muscular dystrophies, sarcopenia, and cachexia. Therefore, understanding the biology of myoblasts and their role in muscle development and regeneration is an important area of research with potential therapeutic implications for muscle-related diseases.

Collagen is the most abundant protein in the human body, and it is a major component of connective tissues such as tendons, ligaments, skin, and bones. Collagen provides structure and strength to these tissues and helps them to withstand stretching and tension. It is made up of long chains of amino acids, primarily glycine, proline, and hydroxyproline, which are arranged in a triple helix structure. There are at least 16 different types of collagen found in the body, each with slightly different structures and functions. Collagen is important for maintaining the integrity and health of tissues throughout the body, and it has been studied for its potential therapeutic uses in various medical conditions.

Monocrotaline is not a medical condition but a toxic compound that is found in certain plants, including the Crotalaria species (also known as "rattlebox" or "crowtoe"). It has been used in research to create laboratory models of pulmonary hypertension. Ingestion or inhalation of monocrotaline can lead to serious health effects, including lung damage and death.

Therefore, there is no medical definition for 'Monocrotaline' as it is not a disease or condition.

Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a soluble decoy receptor for the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). It is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor superfamily and plays a crucial role in regulating bone metabolism. By binding to RANKL, OPG prevents it from interacting with its signaling receptor RANK on the surface of osteoclast precursor cells, thereby inhibiting osteoclast differentiation, activation, and survival. This results in reduced bone resorption and increased bone mass.

In addition to its role in bone homeostasis, OPG has also been implicated in various physiological and pathological processes, including immune regulation, cancer progression, and cardiovascular disease.

Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to amplify and detect specific DNA sequences in real-time. It is a sensitive and specific method that allows for the quantification of target nucleic acids, such as DNA or RNA, through the use of fluorescent reporter molecules.

The RT-PCR process involves several steps: first, the template DNA is denatured to separate the double-stranded DNA into single strands. Then, primers (short sequences of DNA) specific to the target sequence are added and allowed to anneal to the template DNA. Next, a heat-stable enzyme called Taq polymerase adds nucleotides to the annealed primers, extending them along the template DNA until a new double-stranded DNA molecule is formed.

During each amplification cycle, fluorescent reporter molecules are added that bind specifically to the newly synthesized DNA. As more and more copies of the target sequence are generated, the amount of fluorescence increases in proportion to the number of copies present. This allows for real-time monitoring of the PCR reaction and quantification of the target nucleic acid.

RT-PCR is commonly used in medical diagnostics, research, and forensics to detect and quantify specific DNA or RNA sequences. It has been widely used in the diagnosis of infectious diseases, genetic disorders, and cancer, as well as in the identification of microbial pathogens and the detection of gene expression.

Wnt4 protein is a member of the Wnt family of signaling proteins, which are involved in various developmental processes, including cell fate determination, tissue homeostasis, and embryonic development. Specifically, Wnt4 plays crucial roles in female reproductive system development, such as promoting nephrogenesis (kidney development) and regulating Müllerian duct formation during sex differentiation. It exerts its functions by binding to Frizzled receptors and activating the canonical or non-canonical Wnt signaling pathways. Genetic mutations in WNT4 have been associated with certain genetic disorders, such as Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome, which is characterized by congenital absence of the uterus and vagina.

Goosecoid protein is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, it is a biological term related to the field of developmental biology and genetics.

Goosecoid protein is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in embryonic development, particularly during gastrulation - an early stage of embryogenesis where the three germ layers (ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm) are formed. The goosecoid gene encodes this protein, and it is primarily expressed in the Spemann-Mangold organizer, a structure located in the dorsal blastopore lip of amphibian embryos. This organizer region is essential for establishing the body axis and inducing the formation of the central nervous system.

In humans, goosecoid protein homologs have been identified, and they are involved in various developmental processes, including limb development and craniofacial morphogenesis. Dysregulation of goosecoid protein expression or function has been implicated in several congenital disorders and cancer types. However, a direct medical definition focusing on 'Goosecoid Protein' is not available due to its broader biological context.

HEK293 cells, also known as human embryonic kidney 293 cells, are a line of cells used in scientific research. They were originally derived from human embryonic kidney cells and have been adapted to grow in a lab setting. HEK293 cells are widely used in molecular biology and biochemistry because they can be easily transfected (a process by which DNA is introduced into cells) and highly express foreign genes. As a result, they are often used to produce proteins for structural and functional studies. It's important to note that while HEK293 cells are derived from human tissue, they have been grown in the lab for many generations and do not retain the characteristics of the original embryonic kidney cells.

An animal model in medicine refers to the use of non-human animals in experiments to understand, predict, and test responses and effects of various biological and chemical interactions that may also occur in humans. These models are used when studying complex systems or processes that cannot be easily replicated or studied in human subjects, such as genetic manipulation or exposure to harmful substances. The choice of animal model depends on the specific research question being asked and the similarities between the animal's and human's biological and physiological responses. Examples of commonly used animal models include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, and non-human primates.

Tissue culture techniques refer to the methods used to maintain and grow cells, tissues or organs from multicellular organisms in an artificial environment outside of the living body, called an in vitro culture. These techniques are widely used in various fields such as biology, medicine, and agriculture for research, diagnostics, and therapeutic purposes.

The basic components of tissue culture include a sterile growth medium that contains nutrients, growth factors, and other essential components to support the growth of cells or tissues. The growth medium is often supplemented with antibiotics to prevent contamination by microorganisms. The cells or tissues are cultured in specialized containers called culture vessels, which can be plates, flasks, or dishes, depending on the type and scale of the culture.

There are several types of tissue culture techniques, including:

1. Monolayer Culture: In this technique, cells are grown as a single layer on a flat surface, allowing for easy observation and manipulation of individual cells.
2. Organoid Culture: This method involves growing three-dimensional structures that resemble the organization and function of an organ in vivo.
3. Co-culture: In co-culture, two or more cell types are grown together to study their interactions and communication.
4. Explant Culture: In this technique, small pieces of tissue are cultured to maintain the original structure and organization of the cells within the tissue.
5. Primary Culture: This refers to the initial culture of cells directly isolated from a living organism. These cells can be further subcultured to generate immortalized cell lines.

Tissue culture techniques have numerous applications, such as studying cell behavior, drug development and testing, gene therapy, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine.

Wound healing is a complex and dynamic process that occurs after tissue injury, aiming to restore the integrity and functionality of the damaged tissue. It involves a series of overlapping phases: hemostasis, inflammation, proliferation, and remodeling.

1. Hemostasis: This initial phase begins immediately after injury and involves the activation of the coagulation cascade to form a clot, which stabilizes the wound and prevents excessive blood loss.
2. Inflammation: Activated inflammatory cells, such as neutrophils and monocytes/macrophages, infiltrate the wound site to eliminate pathogens, remove debris, and release growth factors that promote healing. This phase typically lasts for 2-5 days post-injury.
3. Proliferation: In this phase, various cell types, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells, and keratinocytes, proliferate and migrate to the wound site to synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) components, form new blood vessels (angiogenesis), and re-epithelialize the wounded area. This phase can last up to several weeks depending on the size and severity of the wound.
4. Remodeling: The final phase of wound healing involves the maturation and realignment of collagen fibers, leading to the restoration of tensile strength in the healed tissue. This process can continue for months to years after injury, although the tissue may never fully regain its original structure and function.

It is important to note that wound healing can be compromised by several factors, including age, nutrition, comorbidities (e.g., diabetes, vascular disease), and infection, which can result in delayed healing or non-healing chronic wounds.

Basic Helix-Loop-Helix (bHLH) transcription factors are a type of proteins that regulate gene expression through binding to specific DNA sequences. They play crucial roles in various biological processes, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. The bHLH domain is composed of two amphipathic α-helices separated by a loop region. This structure allows the formation of homodimers or heterodimers, which then bind to the E-box DNA motif (5'-CANNTG-3') to regulate transcription.

The bHLH family can be further divided into several subfamilies based on their sequence similarities and functional characteristics. Some members of this family are involved in the development and function of the nervous system, while others play critical roles in the development of muscle and bone. Dysregulation of bHLH transcription factors has been implicated in various human diseases, including cancer and neurodevelopmental disorders.

Guided Tissue Regeneration (GTR) in periodontics is a surgical procedure that aims to regenerate lost periodontal tissues, including the alveolar bone, cementum, and periodontal ligament, which have been destroyed due to periodontal disease. The goal of GTR is to restore the architectural relationship between these supporting structures and the tooth, thereby improving its prognosis and function.

The procedure involves placing a barrier membrane between the tooth root and the surrounding soft tissues, creating a protected space that allows for the selective growth of periodontal cells. The membrane acts as a physical barrier to prevent the ingrowth of epithelial cells and fibroblasts from the oral mucosa, which can interfere with the regeneration process.

The membrane can be either resorbable or non-resorbable, depending on the clinical situation and surgeon's preference. Resorbable membranes are made of materials that degrade over time, while non-resorbable membranes require a second surgical procedure for removal. The choice of membrane material and configuration depends on various factors such as the size and location of the defect, patient's medical history, and surgeon's experience.

GTR has been shown to be effective in treating intrabony defects, furcation involvements, and class II function defects, among others. However, its success depends on various factors such as patient selection, surgical technique, membrane type and placement, and postoperative care.

GPI-linked proteins are a type of cell surface protein that are attached to the plasma membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor. The GPI anchor is a complex glycolipid molecule that acts as a molecular tether, connecting the protein to the outer leaflet of the lipid bilayer of the cell membrane.

The GPI anchor is synthesized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and added to proteins in the ER or Golgi apparatus during protein trafficking. The addition of the GPI anchor to a protein occurs in a post-translational modification process called GPI anchoring, which involves the transfer of the GPI moiety from a lipid carrier to the carboxyl terminus of the protein.

GPI-linked proteins are found on the surface of many different types of cells, including red blood cells, immune cells, and nerve cells. They play important roles in various cellular processes, such as cell signaling, cell adhesion, and enzyme function. Some GPI-linked proteins also serve as receptors for bacterial toxins and viruses, making them potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

A transgene is a segment of DNA that has been artificially transferred from one organism to another, typically between different species, to introduce a new trait or characteristic. The term "transgene" specifically refers to the genetic material that has been transferred and has become integrated into the host organism's genome. This technology is often used in genetic engineering and biomedical research, including the development of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) for agricultural purposes or the creation of animal models for studying human diseases.

Transgenes can be created using various techniques, such as molecular cloning, where a desired gene is isolated, manipulated, and then inserted into a vector (a small DNA molecule, such as a plasmid) that can efficiently enter the host organism's cells. Once inside the cell, the transgene can integrate into the host genome, allowing for the expression of the new trait in the resulting transgenic organism.

It is important to note that while transgenes can provide valuable insights and benefits in research and agriculture, their use and release into the environment are subjects of ongoing debate due to concerns about potential ecological impacts and human health risks.

Tacrolimus Binding Protein 1A, also known as FKBP12 or FK506 binding protein 12, is a intracellular protein that binds to the immunosuppressive drug tacrolimus (FK506) and forms a complex. This complex inhibits the calcium-dependent serine/threonine phosphatase calcineurin, which plays a crucial role in T-cell activation. By inhibiting calcineurin, tacrolimus suppresses the immune response, particularly the activation of T-lymphocytes, and is used to prevent rejection in organ transplantation. FKBP12 is a member of the immunophilin family and has peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase activity.

Alveolar bone loss refers to the breakdown and resorption of the alveolar process of the jawbone, which is the part of the jaw that contains the sockets of the teeth. This type of bone loss is often caused by periodontal disease, a chronic inflammation of the gums and surrounding tissues that can lead to the destruction of the structures that support the teeth.

In advanced stages of periodontal disease, the alveolar bone can become severely damaged or destroyed, leading to tooth loss. Alveolar bone loss can also occur as a result of other conditions, such as osteoporosis, trauma, or tumors. Dental X-rays and other imaging techniques are often used to diagnose and monitor alveolar bone loss. Treatment may include deep cleaning of the teeth and gums, medications, surgery, or tooth extraction in severe cases.

Bone cements are medical-grade materials used in orthopedic and trauma surgery to fill gaps between bone surfaces and implants, such as artificial joints or screws. They serve to mechanically stabilize the implant and provide a smooth, load-bearing surface. The two most common types of bone cement are:

1. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement: This is a two-component system consisting of powdered PMMA and liquid methyl methacrylate monomer. When mixed together, they form a dough-like consistency that hardens upon exposure to air. PMMA cement has been widely used for decades in joint replacement surgeries, such as hip or knee replacements.
2. Calcium phosphate (CP) cement: This is a two-component system consisting of a powdered CP compound and an aqueous solution. When mixed together, they form a paste that hardens through a chemical reaction at body temperature. CP cement has lower mechanical strength compared to PMMA but demonstrates better biocompatibility, bioactivity, and the ability to resorb over time.

Both types of bone cements have advantages and disadvantages, and their use depends on the specific surgical indication and patient factors.

'C3H' is the name of an inbred strain of laboratory mice that was developed at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine. The mice are characterized by their uniform genetic background and have been widely used in biomedical research for many decades.

The C3H strain is particularly notable for its susceptibility to certain types of cancer, including mammary tumors and lymphomas. It also has a high incidence of age-related macular degeneration and other eye diseases. The strain is often used in studies of immunology, genetics, and carcinogenesis.

Like all inbred strains, the C3H mice are the result of many generations of brother-sister matings, which leads to a high degree of genetic uniformity within the strain. This makes them useful for studying the effects of specific genes or environmental factors on disease susceptibility and other traits. However, it also means that they may not always be representative of the genetic diversity found in outbred populations, including humans.

Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis is a type of microarray analysis that allows for the simultaneous measurement of the expression levels of thousands of genes in a single sample. In this technique, oligonucleotides (short DNA sequences) are attached to a solid support, such as a glass slide, in a specific pattern. These oligonucleotides are designed to be complementary to specific target mRNA sequences from the sample being analyzed.

During the analysis, labeled RNA or cDNA from the sample is hybridized to the oligonucleotide array. The level of hybridization is then measured and used to determine the relative abundance of each target sequence in the sample. This information can be used to identify differences in gene expression between samples, which can help researchers understand the underlying biological processes involved in various diseases or developmental stages.

It's important to note that this technique requires specialized equipment and bioinformatics tools for data analysis, as well as careful experimental design and validation to ensure accurate and reproducible results.

Biocompatible materials are non-toxic and non-reacting substances that can be used in medical devices, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems without causing harm or adverse reactions to living tissues or organs. These materials are designed to mimic the properties of natural tissues and are able to integrate with biological systems without being rejected by the body's immune system.

Biocompatible materials can be made from a variety of substances, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. The specific properties of these materials, such as their mechanical strength, flexibility, and biodegradability, are carefully selected to meet the requirements of their intended medical application.

Examples of biocompatible materials include titanium used in dental implants and joint replacements, polyethylene used in artificial hips, and hydrogels used in contact lenses and drug delivery systems. The use of biocompatible materials has revolutionized modern medicine by enabling the development of advanced medical technologies that can improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

The Neural Tube is a structure that forms during the development of an embryo and eventually becomes the brain, spinal cord, and other parts of the nervous system. It is a narrow channel that runs along the back of the embryo, forming from the ectoderm (one of the three germ layers) and closing around the 23rd or 26th day after conception. Defects in the closure of the neural tube can lead to conditions such as spina bifida and anencephaly.

Metalloproteases are a group of enzymes that require a metal ion as a cofactor for their enzymatic activity. They are also known as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) or extracellular proteinases, and they play important roles in various biological processes such as tissue remodeling, wound healing, and cell migration. These enzymes are capable of degrading various types of extracellular matrix proteins, including collagens, gelatins, and proteoglycans. The metal ion cofactor is usually zinc, although other ions such as calcium or cobalt can also be involved. Metalloproteases are implicated in several diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. Inhibitors of metalloproteases have been developed for therapeutic purposes.

Ligaments are bands of dense, fibrous connective tissue that surround joints and provide support, stability, and limits the range of motion. They are made up primarily of collagen fibers arranged in a parallel pattern to withstand tension and stress. Ligaments attach bone to bone, and their function is to prevent excessive movement that could cause injury or dislocation.

There are two main types of ligaments: extracapsular and intracapsular. Extracapsular ligaments are located outside the joint capsule and provide stability to the joint by limiting its range of motion. Intracapsular ligaments, on the other hand, are found inside the joint capsule and help maintain the alignment of the joint surfaces.

Examples of common ligaments in the body include the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) in the knee, the medial collateral ligament (MCL) and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) in the elbow, and the coracoacromial ligament in the shoulder.

Injuries to ligaments can occur due to sudden trauma or overuse, leading to sprains, strains, or tears. These injuries can cause pain, swelling, bruising, and limited mobility, and may require medical treatment such as immobilization, physical therapy, or surgery.

Autocrine communication is a type of cell signaling in which a cell produces and releases a chemical messenger (such as a hormone or growth factor) that binds to receptors on the same cell, thereby affecting its own behavior or function. This process allows the cell to regulate its own activities in response to internal or external stimuli. Autocrine communication plays important roles in various physiological and pathological processes, including tissue repair, immune responses, and cancer progression.

A bone cyst is a fluid-filled sac that develops within a bone. It can be classified as either simple (unicameral) or aneurysmal. Simple bone cysts are more common in children and adolescents, and they typically affect the long bones of the arms or legs. These cysts are usually asymptomatic unless they become large enough to weaken the bone and cause a fracture. Aneurysmal bone cysts, on the other hand, can occur at any age and can affect any bone, but they are most common in the leg bones and spine. They are characterized by rapidly growing blood-filled sacs that can cause pain, swelling, and fractures.

Both types of bone cysts may be treated with observation, medication, or surgery depending on their size, location, and symptoms. It is important to note that while these cysts can be benign, they should still be evaluated and monitored by a healthcare professional to ensure proper treatment and prevention of complications.

In medical terms, "wing" is not a term that is used as a standalone definition. However, it can be found in the context of certain anatomical structures or medical conditions. For instance, the "wings" of the lungs refer to the upper and lower portions of the lungs that extend from the main body of the organ. Similarly, in dermatology, "winging" is used to describe the spreading out or flaring of the wings of the nose, which can be a characteristic feature of certain skin conditions like lupus.

It's important to note that medical terminology can be highly specific and context-dependent, so it's always best to consult with a healthcare professional for accurate information related to medical definitions or diagnoses.

Hematopoiesis is the process of forming and developing blood cells. It occurs in the bone marrow and includes the production of red blood cells (erythropoiesis), white blood cells (leukopoiesis), and platelets (thrombopoiesis). This process is regulated by various growth factors, hormones, and cytokines. Hematopoiesis begins early in fetal development and continues throughout a person's life. Disorders of hematopoiesis can result in conditions such as anemia, leukopenia, leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, or thrombocytosis.

Osteopontin (OPN) is a phosphorylated glycoprotein that is widely distributed in many tissues, including bone, teeth, and mineralized tissues. It plays important roles in various biological processes such as bone remodeling, immune response, wound healing, and tissue repair. In the skeletal system, osteopontin is involved in the regulation of bone formation and resorption by modulating the activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. It also plays a role in the development of chronic inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and cancer metastasis to bones. Osteopontin is considered a potential biomarker for various disease states, including bone turnover, cardiovascular disease, and cancer progression.

The mandible, also known as the lower jaw, is the largest and strongest bone in the human face. It forms the lower portion of the oral cavity and plays a crucial role in various functions such as mastication (chewing), speaking, and swallowing. The mandible is a U-shaped bone that consists of a horizontal part called the body and two vertical parts called rami.

The mandible articulates with the skull at the temporomandibular joints (TMJs) located in front of each ear, allowing for movements like opening and closing the mouth, protrusion, retraction, and side-to-side movement. The mandible contains the lower teeth sockets called alveolar processes, which hold the lower teeth in place.

In medical terminology, the term "mandible" refers specifically to this bone and its associated structures.

SOXD (SRY-related HMG box gene D) transcription factors are a subgroup of the SOX family of proteins that regulate gene expression during development and differentiation. The SOXD group includes two closely related members, SOX5 and SOX6, which contain a highly conserved HMG (high mobility group) DNA-binding domain. These transcription factors play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as chondrogenesis, neurogenesis, and spermatogenesis, by binding to specific DNA sequences and regulating the transcription of target genes. SOX5 and SOX6 can form heterodimers or homodimers and interact with other transcription factors and cofactors to modulate their activities, contributing to the precise control of gene expression during development.

Integrin-binding sialoprotein (IBSP) is a non-collagenous protein found in bones and teeth. It is also known as bone sialoprotein II or acidic glycoprotein 34. IBSP plays a role in the regulation of biomineralization, which is the process by which minerals are deposited in biological tissues.

IBSP contains several functional domains that allow it to interact with other proteins and molecules. One such domain is an arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif, which can bind to integrin receptors on the surface of cells. This interaction helps regulate the attachment and behavior of cells in bone tissue.

IBSP also contains a large number of sialic acid residues, which give it its name and contribute to its negative charge. These residues may play a role in protecting the protein from degradation and helping it interact with other molecules in the extracellular matrix.

Overall, IBSP is an important component of bone tissue and plays a key role in regulating the formation and maintenance of bones and teeth.

Oligodendroglia are a type of neuroglial cell found in the central nervous system (CNS) of vertebrates, including humans. These cells play a crucial role in providing support and insulation to nerve fibers (axons) in the CNS, which includes the brain and spinal cord.

More specifically, oligodendroglia produce a fatty substance called myelin that wraps around axons, forming myelin sheaths. This myelination process helps to increase the speed of electrical impulse transmission (nerve impulses) along the axons, allowing for efficient communication between different neurons.

In addition to their role in myelination, oligodendroglia also contribute to the overall health and maintenance of the CNS by providing essential nutrients and supporting factors to neurons. Dysfunction or damage to oligodendroglia has been implicated in various neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis (MS), where demyelination of axons leads to impaired nerve function and neurodegeneration.

"Newborn animals" refers to the very young offspring of animals that have recently been born. In medical terminology, newborns are often referred to as "neonates," and they are classified as such from birth until about 28 days of age. During this time period, newborn animals are particularly vulnerable and require close monitoring and care to ensure their survival and healthy development.

The specific needs of newborn animals can vary widely depending on the species, but generally, they require warmth, nutrition, hydration, and protection from harm. In many cases, newborns are unable to regulate their own body temperature or feed themselves, so they rely heavily on their mothers for care and support.

In medical settings, newborn animals may be examined and treated by veterinarians to ensure that they are healthy and receiving the care they need. This can include providing medical interventions such as feeding tubes, antibiotics, or other treatments as needed to address any health issues that arise. Overall, the care and support of newborn animals is an important aspect of animal medicine and conservation efforts.

I apologize, but "sheep" is not a term that has a medical definition. It is a common animal with the scientific name Ovis aries. If you have any medical or health-related questions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Gene knockdown techniques are methods used to reduce the expression or function of specific genes in order to study their role in biological processes. These techniques typically involve the use of small RNA molecules, such as siRNAs (small interfering RNAs) or shRNAs (short hairpin RNAs), which bind to and promote the degradation of complementary mRNA transcripts. This results in a decrease in the production of the protein encoded by the targeted gene.

Gene knockdown techniques are often used as an alternative to traditional gene knockout methods, which involve completely removing or disrupting the function of a gene. Knockdown techniques allow for more subtle and reversible manipulation of gene expression, making them useful for studying genes that are essential for cell survival or have redundant functions.

These techniques are widely used in molecular biology research to investigate gene function, genetic interactions, and disease mechanisms. However, it is important to note that gene knockdown can have off-target effects and may not completely eliminate the expression of the targeted gene, so results should be interpreted with caution.

Repressor proteins are a type of regulatory protein in molecular biology that suppress the transcription of specific genes into messenger RNA (mRNA) by binding to DNA. They function as part of gene regulation processes, often working in conjunction with an operator region and a promoter region within the DNA molecule. Repressor proteins can be activated or deactivated by various signals, allowing for precise control over gene expression in response to changing cellular conditions.

There are two main types of repressor proteins:

1. DNA-binding repressors: These directly bind to specific DNA sequences (operator regions) near the target gene and prevent RNA polymerase from transcribing the gene into mRNA.
2. Allosteric repressors: These bind to effector molecules, which then cause a conformational change in the repressor protein, enabling it to bind to DNA and inhibit transcription.

Repressor proteins play crucial roles in various biological processes, such as development, metabolism, and stress response, by controlling gene expression patterns in cells.

A chondroma is a benign, slow-growing tumor that develops in the cartilage. Cartilage is a type of connective tissue found in various parts of the body, including the joints, ribcage, and nose. Chondromas are most commonly found in the hands and feet.

Chondromas are typically small, measuring less than 2 centimeters in diameter, and they usually do not cause any symptoms. However, if a chondroma grows large enough to press on nearby nerves or blood vessels, it may cause pain, numbness, or weakness in the affected area.

Chondromas are usually diagnosed through imaging tests such as X-rays, CT scans, or MRI scans. If a chondroma is suspected based on these tests, a biopsy may be performed to confirm the diagnosis and rule out other types of tumors.

Treatment for chondromas typically involves surgical removal of the tumor. In most cases, this can be done using minimally invasive techniques that allow for quicker recovery times. After surgery, patients will need to follow up with their healthcare provider to ensure that the tumor has been completely removed and to monitor for any signs of recurrence.

Feathers are not a medical term, but they are a feature found in birds and some extinct theropod dinosaurs. Feathers are keratinous structures that grow from the skin and are used for various functions such as insulation, flight, waterproofing, and display. They have a complex structure consisting of a central shaft with barbs branching off on either side, which further divide into smaller barbules. The arrangement and modification of these feather structures vary widely among bird species to serve different purposes.

Limb buds are embryological structures that develop in the early stages of fetal growth and give rise to future limbs. In humans, they appear around the 4th week of gestation as thickenings on the sides of the body trunk. These buds consist of a core of mesenchymal tissue surrounded by ectoderm. The mesenchyme will later differentiate into bones, muscles, tendons, ligaments, and cartilages, while the ectoderm will form the skin and nervous tissues, including sensory organs in the limbs.

The development of limb buds is regulated by a complex interplay of genetic and molecular factors that control their outgrowth, patterning, and differentiation into specific limb components. Abnormalities during this process can lead to various congenital limb defects or deformations.

A heterozygote is an individual who has inherited two different alleles (versions) of a particular gene, one from each parent. This means that the individual's genotype for that gene contains both a dominant and a recessive allele. The dominant allele will be expressed phenotypically (outwardly visible), while the recessive allele may or may not have any effect on the individual's observable traits, depending on the specific gene and its function. Heterozygotes are often represented as 'Aa', where 'A' is the dominant allele and 'a' is the recessive allele.

IDP-2, or Inhibitor of Differentiation Protein 2, is also known as Zinc Finger and BTB Domain Containing 16 (ZBTB16). It is a transcriptional repressor protein that belongs to the POK (POZ and KRAB zinc finger) family. IDP-2 contains several functional domains, including a BTB/POZ domain for protein-protein interactions, a C2H2-type zinc finger domain for DNA binding, and a Krüppel-associated box (KRAB) domain that can recruit histone deacetylases to repress transcription.

IDP-2 plays important roles in various biological processes, including cell differentiation, development, and tumor suppression. It has been shown to inhibit the differentiation of several types of cells, such as myeloid progenitor cells, adipocytes, and osteoblasts, by repressing the expression of genes that promote differentiation. IDP-2 also functions as a tumor suppressor by regulating cell cycle progression and apoptosis.

Mutations in the IDP-2 gene have been associated with several human diseases, including myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). These mutations can lead to aberrant expression or function of IDP-2, which can contribute to the development and progression of these diseases.

Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a group of enzymes responsible for degrading and remodeling the extracellular matrix (ECM), the non-cellular component of tissues. They play crucial roles in various physiological processes, such as tissue repair, wound healing, and embryonic development, as well as pathological conditions like tumor invasion and metastasis.

Secreted Matrix Metalloproteinases (sMMPs) are a subclass of MMPs that are synthesized and secreted by cells into the extracellular space. These enzymes exist in an inactive form called zymogens or pro-MMPs and require activation to become functional. Once activated, they can cleave and degrade various ECM components, including collagens, elastin, fibronectin, and laminins.

Examples of secreted MMPs include:

1. MMP-1 (Collagenase-1): Primarily involved in the degradation of fibrillar collagens (types I, II, III) found in skin, tendons, and ligaments.
2. MMP-3 (Stromelysin-1): Capable of degrading various ECM components, such as proteoglycans, laminin, fibronectin, and collagens (types III, IV, V, IX, X).
3. MMP-7 (Matrilysin): A small MMP that can degrade several ECM proteins, including elastin, fibronectin, laminin, entactin, casein, and various types of collagens.
4. MMP-9 (Gelatinase B): Specifically cleaves denatured collagens (gelatins) and contributes to the breakdown of basement membranes by degrading type IV collagen.
5. MMP-13 (Collagenase-3): Highly efficient in degrading fibrillar collagens, especially types II and III, found in articular cartilage.

Tight regulation of sMMPs is essential to maintain ECM homeostasis and prevent excessive tissue breakdown. Dysregulation of these enzymes has been implicated in various pathological conditions, such as arthritis, cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders.

Heart valves are specialized structures in the heart that ensure unidirectional flow of blood through its chambers during the cardiac cycle. There are four heart valves: the tricuspid valve and the mitral (bicuspid) valve, located between the atria and ventricles, and the pulmonic (pulmonary) valve and aortic valve, located between the ventricles and the major blood vessels leaving the heart.

The heart valves are composed of thin flaps of tissue called leaflets or cusps, which are supported by a fibrous ring. The aortic and pulmonic valves have three cusps each, while the tricuspid and mitral valves have three and two cusps, respectively.

The heart valves open and close in response to pressure differences across them, allowing blood to flow forward into the ventricles during diastole (filling phase) and preventing backflow of blood into the atria during systole (contraction phase). A properly functioning heart valve ensures efficient pumping of blood by the heart and maintains normal blood circulation throughout the body.

Coculture techniques refer to a type of experimental setup in which two or more different types of cells or organisms are grown and studied together in a shared culture medium. This method allows researchers to examine the interactions between different cell types or species under controlled conditions, and to study how these interactions may influence various biological processes such as growth, gene expression, metabolism, and signal transduction.

Coculture techniques can be used to investigate a wide range of biological phenomena, including the effects of host-microbe interactions on human health and disease, the impact of different cell types on tissue development and homeostasis, and the role of microbial communities in shaping ecosystems. These techniques can also be used to test the efficacy and safety of new drugs or therapies by examining their effects on cells grown in coculture with other relevant cell types.

There are several different ways to establish cocultures, depending on the specific research question and experimental goals. Some common methods include:

1. Mixed cultures: In this approach, two or more cell types are simply mixed together in a culture dish or flask and allowed to grow and interact freely.
2. Cell-layer cultures: Here, one cell type is grown on a porous membrane or other support structure, while the second cell type is grown on top of it, forming a layered coculture.
3. Conditioned media cultures: In this case, one cell type is grown to confluence and its culture medium is collected and then used to grow a second cell type. This allows the second cell type to be exposed to any factors secreted by the first cell type into the medium.
4. Microfluidic cocultures: These involve growing cells in microfabricated channels or chambers, which allow for precise control over the spatial arrangement and flow of nutrients, waste products, and signaling molecules between different cell types.

Overall, coculture techniques provide a powerful tool for studying complex biological systems and gaining insights into the mechanisms that underlie various physiological and pathological processes.

A tibial fracture is a medical term that refers to a break in the shin bone, which is called the tibia. The tibia is the larger of the two bones in the lower leg and is responsible for supporting much of your body weight. Tibial fractures can occur in various ways, such as from high-energy trauma like car accidents or falls, or from low-energy trauma in individuals with weakened bones due to osteoporosis or other medical conditions.

Tibial fractures can be classified into different types based on the location, pattern, and severity of the break. Some common types of tibial fractures include:

1. Transverse fracture: A straight break that goes across the bone.
2. Oblique fracture: A diagonal break that slopes across the bone.
3. Spiral fracture: A break that spirals around the bone, often caused by twisting or rotational forces.
4. Comminuted fracture: A break where the bone is shattered into multiple pieces.
5. Open fracture: A break in which the bone pierces through the skin, increasing the risk of infection.
6. Closed fracture: A break in which the bone does not pierce through the skin.

Tibial fractures can cause symptoms such as pain, swelling, bruising, deformity, and difficulty walking or bearing weight on the affected leg. Treatment for tibial fractures may include immobilization with a cast or brace, surgery to realign and stabilize the bone with plates, screws, or rods, and rehabilitation to restore strength, mobility, and function to the injured limb.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mink" is not a medical term. It refers to a species of small, semiaquatic carnivorous mammals that are known for their sleek fur. They belong to the family Mustelidae, which also includes otters, weasels, and ferrets. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help!

The term "septum" in the context of the brain refers to the septal nuclei, which are a collection of neurons located in the basal forebrain. Specifically, they make up the septal area, which is part of the limbic system and plays a role in reward, reinforcement, and positive motivational states.

There isn't a structure called the "septum of brain" in medical terminology. However, there are several structures in the brain that contain a septum or have a partitioning septum within them, such as:

1. Septal nuclei (as mentioned above)
2. The nasal septum, which is a thin wall of bone and cartilage that separates the two nostrils in the nose
3. The interventricular septum, which is a thin muscular wall that separates the left and right lateral ventricles within the brain
4. The membranous septum, a part of the heart's structure that separates the left and right ventricles

Confusion might arise due to the term "septum" being used in different contexts. In this case, there is no specific medical definition for 'Septum of Brain'.

A dose-response relationship in the context of drugs refers to the changes in the effects or symptoms that occur as the dose of a drug is increased or decreased. Generally, as the dose of a drug is increased, the severity or intensity of its effects also increases. Conversely, as the dose is decreased, the effects of the drug become less severe or may disappear altogether.

The dose-response relationship is an important concept in pharmacology and toxicology because it helps to establish the safe and effective dosage range for a drug. By understanding how changes in the dose of a drug affect its therapeutic and adverse effects, healthcare providers can optimize treatment plans for their patients while minimizing the risk of harm.

The dose-response relationship is typically depicted as a curve that shows the relationship between the dose of a drug and its effect. The shape of the curve may vary depending on the drug and the specific effect being measured. Some drugs may have a steep dose-response curve, meaning that small changes in the dose can result in large differences in the effect. Other drugs may have a more gradual dose-response curve, where larger changes in the dose are needed to produce significant effects.

In addition to helping establish safe and effective dosages, the dose-response relationship is also used to evaluate the potential therapeutic benefits and risks of new drugs during clinical trials. By systematically testing different doses of a drug in controlled studies, researchers can identify the optimal dosage range for the drug and assess its safety and efficacy.

Malunited fractures refer to a type of fracture where the bones do not heal in their proper alignment or position. This can occur due to various reasons such as inadequate reduction of the fracture fragments during initial treatment, improper casting or immobilization, or failure of the patient to follow proper immobilization instructions. Malunited fractures can result in deformity, limited range of motion, and decreased functionality of the affected limb. Additional treatments such as surgery may be required to correct the malunion and restore normal function.

Preprosthetic oral surgical procedures are dental surgeries performed to prepare the mouth for the placement of dental prostheses such as dentures. These procedures aim to create a smooth, stable, and suitable foundation in the mouth to support the prosthesis and ensure its proper functioning, retention, and comfort.

Common preprosthetic oral surgical procedures include:

1. Alveoloplasty: This procedure involves reshaping the alveolar ridge (the bony ridge that supports the teeth) to create a more uniform and even surface. It helps to eliminate any sharp or irregular bony edges that may interfere with the fit or comfort of the denture.

2. Gingivectomy/Gingivoplasty: These procedures involve removing or reshaping excess gum tissue to improve the fit and appearance of the dental prosthesis. A gingivectomy removes a portion of the gum tissue, while a gingivoplasty sculpts and reshapes the existing gum tissue.

3. Frenectomy: This procedure involves removing or repositioning the frenum, a small fold of tissue that connects the lips, cheeks, or tongue to the jawbone. A lingual frenectomy may be necessary when the frenum restricts tongue movement and interferes with proper denture placement or speech.

4. Maxillary tori reduction: This procedure involves removing or reducing the size of tori, which are bony growths found on the roof of the mouth (maxilla). Large tori can make it difficult to wear a denture, so their removal or reduction can improve the fit and comfort of the prosthesis.

5. Ridge augmentation: This procedure involves adding bone grafting material to the jaw ridge to increase its height, width, or volume. This is often done when there is significant bone loss due to tooth extraction, periodontal disease, or other factors, making it difficult to achieve a secure and comfortable denture fit.

6. Exostectomy: This procedure involves removing small, benign bony growths (exostoses) that may develop on the hard palate or along the jaw ridge. These growths can interfere with the fit and comfort of a denture, so their removal can improve the prosthesis' functionality.

These procedures are typically performed by oral surgeons, periodontists, or prosthodontists who specialize in dental implants, oral surgery, and complex restorative treatments. The specific treatment plan will depend on each patient's individual needs and preferences.

Holoprosencephaly is a congenital brain malformation that occurs due to the failure of the prosencephalon (the forebrain) to properly divide into the two hemispheres during embryonic development. This condition can vary in severity, from mild anomalies to severe neurological defects and facial abnormalities.

There are four primary types of holoprosencephaly: alobar, semilobar, lobar, and middle interhemispheric variant (MIV). Alobar holoprosencephaly is the most severe form, where the forebrain fails to divide into separate hemispheres, and there is a single ventricle instead of two. Semilobar holoprosencephaly has some separation of the hemispheres but not completely. Lobar holoprosencephaly shows more separation of the hemispheres, with a more typical appearance of the cerebral cortex. MIV is the mildest form and involves an abnormal development of the corpus callosum and third ventricle.

Facial anomalies often accompany holoprosencephaly, such as a single central eye (cyclopia), closely spaced eyes (hypotelorism), a proboscis above the nose, or a flat nasal bridge with a median cleft lip and palate. The severity of these facial abnormalities can correlate with the degree of brain malformation.

Holoprosencephaly is caused by genetic mutations, chromosomal abnormalities, or environmental factors that disrupt normal embryonic development. It affects approximately 1 in 250 conceptuses but has a lower prevalence at birth due to early pregnancy loss. The condition can be diagnosed through prenatal ultrasound, fetal MRI, or postnatal imaging techniques such as CT or MRI scans. Management of holoprosencephaly involves multidisciplinary care, addressing neurological, developmental, and medical needs.

p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (p38 MAPKs) are a family of conserved serine-threonine protein kinases that play crucial roles in various cellular processes, including inflammation, immune response, differentiation, apoptosis, and stress responses. They are activated by diverse stimuli such as cytokines, ultraviolet radiation, heat shock, osmotic stress, and lipopolysaccharides (LPS).

Once activated, p38 MAPKs phosphorylate and regulate several downstream targets, including transcription factors and other protein kinases. This regulation leads to the expression of genes involved in inflammation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Dysregulation of p38 MAPK signaling has been implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and autoimmune diseases. Therefore, p38 MAPKs are considered promising targets for developing new therapeutic strategies to treat these conditions.

Adult stem cells, also known as somatic stem cells, are undifferentiated cells found in specialized tissues or organs throughout the body of a developed organism. Unlike embryonic stem cells, which are derived from blastocysts and have the ability to differentiate into any cell type in the body (pluripotency), adult stem cells are typically more limited in their differentiation potential, meaning they can only give rise to specific types of cells within the tissue or organ where they reside.

Adult stem cells serve to maintain and repair tissues by replenishing dying or damaged cells. They can divide and self-renew over time, producing one daughter cell that remains a stem cell and another that differentiates into a mature, functional cell type. The most well-known adult stem cells are hematopoietic stem cells, which give rise to all types of blood cells, and mesenchymal stem cells, which can differentiate into various connective tissue cells such as bone, cartilage, fat, and muscle.

The potential therapeutic use of adult stem cells has been explored in various medical fields, including regenerative medicine and cancer therapy. However, their limited differentiation capacity and the challenges associated with isolating and expanding them in culture have hindered their widespread application. Recent advances in stem cell research, such as the development of techniques to reprogram adult cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), have opened new avenues for studying and harnessing the therapeutic potential of these cells.

A two-hybrid system technique is a type of genetic screening method used in molecular biology to identify protein-protein interactions within an organism, most commonly baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) or Escherichia coli. The name "two-hybrid" refers to the fact that two separate proteins are being examined for their ability to interact with each other.

The technique is based on the modular nature of transcription factors, which typically consist of two distinct domains: a DNA-binding domain (DBD) and an activation domain (AD). In a two-hybrid system, one protein of interest is fused to the DBD, while the second protein of interest is fused to the AD. If the two proteins interact, the DBD and AD are brought in close proximity, allowing for transcriptional activation of a reporter gene that is linked to a specific promoter sequence recognized by the DBD.

The main components of a two-hybrid system include:

1. Bait protein (fused to the DNA-binding domain)
2. Prey protein (fused to the activation domain)
3. Reporter gene (transcribed upon interaction between bait and prey proteins)
4. Promoter sequence (recognized by the DBD when brought in proximity due to interaction)

The two-hybrid system technique has several advantages, including:

1. Ability to screen large libraries of potential interacting partners
2. High sensitivity for detecting weak or transient interactions
3. Applicability to various organisms and protein types
4. Potential for high-throughput analysis

However, there are also limitations to the technique, such as false positives (interactions that do not occur in vivo) and false negatives (lack of detection of true interactions). Additionally, the fusion proteins may not always fold or localize correctly, leading to potential artifacts. Despite these limitations, two-hybrid system techniques remain a valuable tool for studying protein-protein interactions and have contributed significantly to our understanding of various cellular processes.

A neoplasm is a tumor or growth that is formed by an abnormal and excessive proliferation of cells, which can be benign or malignant. Neoplasm proteins are therefore any proteins that are expressed or produced in these neoplastic cells. These proteins can play various roles in the development, progression, and maintenance of neoplasms.

Some neoplasm proteins may contribute to the uncontrolled cell growth and division seen in cancer, such as oncogenic proteins that promote cell cycle progression or inhibit apoptosis (programmed cell death). Others may help the neoplastic cells evade the immune system, allowing them to proliferate undetected. Still others may be involved in angiogenesis, the formation of new blood vessels that supply the tumor with nutrients and oxygen.

Neoplasm proteins can also serve as biomarkers for cancer diagnosis, prognosis, or treatment response. For example, the presence or level of certain neoplasm proteins in biological samples such as blood or tissue may indicate the presence of a specific type of cancer, help predict the likelihood of cancer recurrence, or suggest whether a particular therapy will be effective.

Overall, understanding the roles and behaviors of neoplasm proteins can provide valuable insights into the biology of cancer and inform the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

A tooth is a hard, calcified structure found in the jaws (upper and lower) of many vertebrates and used for biting and chewing food. In humans, a typical tooth has a crown, one or more roots, and three layers: the enamel (the outermost layer, hardest substance in the body), the dentin (the layer beneath the enamel), and the pulp (the innermost layer, containing nerves and blood vessels). Teeth are essential for proper nutrition, speech, and aesthetics. There are different types of teeth, including incisors, canines, premolars, and molars, each designed for specific functions in the mouth.

Eye abnormalities refer to any structural or functional anomalies that affect the eye or its surrounding tissues. These abnormalities can be present at birth (congenital) or acquired later in life due to various factors such as injury, disease, or aging. Some examples of eye abnormalities include:

1. Strabismus: Also known as crossed eyes, strabismus is a condition where the eyes are misaligned and point in different directions.
2. Nystagmus: This is an involuntary movement of the eyes that can be horizontal, vertical, or rotatory.
3. Cataracts: A cataract is a clouding of the lens inside the eye that can cause vision loss.
4. Glaucoma: This is a group of eye conditions that damage the optic nerve and can lead to vision loss.
5. Retinal disorders: These include conditions such as retinal detachment, macular degeneration, and diabetic retinopathy.
6. Corneal abnormalities: These include conditions such as keratoconus, corneal ulcers, and Fuchs' dystrophy.
7. Orbital abnormalities: These include conditions such as orbital tumors, thyroid eye disease, and Graves' ophthalmopathy.
8. Ptosis: This is a condition where the upper eyelid droops over the eye.
9. Color blindness: A condition where a person has difficulty distinguishing between certain colors.
10. Microphthalmia: A condition where one or both eyes are abnormally small.

These are just a few examples of eye abnormalities, and there are many others that can affect the eye and its functioning. If you suspect that you have an eye abnormality, it is important to consult with an ophthalmologist for proper diagnosis and treatment.

Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) is a rare genetic disorder that affects the blood vessels. It is also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu syndrome. This condition is characterized by the formation of abnormal blood vessels called telangiectases, which are small red spots or tiny bulges that can be found in the skin, mucous membranes (like those inside the nose, mouth, and GI tract), and sometimes in vital organs like the lungs and brain.

These telangiectases have a tendency to bleed easily, leading to potentially serious complications such as anemia due to chronic blood loss, and in some cases, strokes or brain abscesses if the telangiectases in the brain rupture. HHT is typically inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern, meaning that a child has a 50% chance of inheriting the gene from an affected parent. There are several genes associated with HHT, the most common being ACVRL1, ENG, and SMAD4.

Immunoprecipitation (IP) is a research technique used in molecular biology and immunology to isolate specific antigens or antibodies from a mixture. It involves the use of an antibody that recognizes and binds to a specific antigen, which is then precipitated out of solution using various methods, such as centrifugation or chemical cross-linking.

In this technique, an antibody is first incubated with a sample containing the antigen of interest. The antibody specifically binds to the antigen, forming an immune complex. This complex can then be captured by adding protein A or G agarose beads, which bind to the constant region of the antibody. The beads are then washed to remove any unbound proteins, leaving behind the precipitated antigen-antibody complex.

Immunoprecipitation is a powerful tool for studying protein-protein interactions, post-translational modifications, and signal transduction pathways. It can also be used to detect and quantify specific proteins in biological samples, such as cells or tissues, and to identify potential biomarkers of disease.

Anti-Mullerian Hormone (AMH) is a glycoprotein hormone that belongs to the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) family. It is primarily produced by the granulosa cells of developing follicles in the ovaries of females. AMH plays an essential role in female reproductive physiology, as it inhibits the recruitment and further development of primordial follicles, thereby regulating the size of the primordial follicle pool and the onset of puberty.

AMH levels are often used as a biomarker for ovarian reserve assessment in women. High AMH levels indicate a larger ovarian reserve, while low levels suggest a decreased reserve, which may be associated with reduced fertility or an earlier onset of menopause. Additionally, measuring AMH levels can help predict the response to ovarian stimulation during assisted reproductive technologies (ART) such as in vitro fertilization (IVF).

Tretinoin is a form of vitamin A that is used in the treatment of acne vulgaris, fine wrinkles, and dark spots caused by aging or sun damage. It works by increasing the turnover of skin cells, helping to unclog pores and promote the growth of new skin cells. Tretinoin is available as a cream, gel, or liquid, and is usually applied to the affected area once a day in the evening. Common side effects include redness, dryness, and peeling of the skin. It is important to avoid sunlight and use sunscreen while using tretinoin, as it can make the skin more sensitive to the sun.

Physiologic neovascularization is the natural and controlled formation of new blood vessels in the body, which occurs as a part of normal growth and development, as well as in response to tissue repair and wound healing. This process involves the activation of endothelial cells, which line the interior surface of blood vessels, and their migration, proliferation, and tube formation to create new capillaries. Physiologic neovascularization is tightly regulated by a balance of pro-angiogenic and anti-angiogenic factors, ensuring that it occurs only when and where it is needed. It plays crucial roles in various physiological processes, such as embryonic development, tissue regeneration, and wound healing.

'Rats, Nude' is not a standard medical term or condition. The term 'nude' in the context of laboratory animals like rats usually refers to a strain of rats that are hairless due to a genetic mutation. This can make them useful for studies involving skin disorders, wound healing, and other conditions where fur might interfere with observations or procedures. However, 'Rats, Nude' is not a recognized or established term in medical literature or taxonomy.

Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is a laboratory technique used to amplify specific regions of DNA. It enables the production of thousands to millions of copies of a particular DNA sequence in a rapid and efficient manner, making it an essential tool in various fields such as molecular biology, medical diagnostics, forensic science, and research.

The PCR process involves repeated cycles of heating and cooling to separate the DNA strands, allow primers (short sequences of single-stranded DNA) to attach to the target regions, and extend these primers using an enzyme called Taq polymerase, resulting in the exponential amplification of the desired DNA segment.

In a medical context, PCR is often used for detecting and quantifying specific pathogens (viruses, bacteria, fungi, or parasites) in clinical samples, identifying genetic mutations or polymorphisms associated with diseases, monitoring disease progression, and evaluating treatment effectiveness.

"Cell count" is a medical term that refers to the process of determining the number of cells present in a given volume or sample of fluid or tissue. This can be done through various laboratory methods, such as counting individual cells under a microscope using a specialized grid called a hemocytometer, or using automated cell counters that use light scattering and electrical impedance techniques to count and classify different types of cells.

Cell counts are used in a variety of medical contexts, including hematology (the study of blood and blood-forming tissues), microbiology (the study of microscopic organisms), and pathology (the study of diseases and their causes). For example, a complete blood count (CBC) is a routine laboratory test that includes a white blood cell (WBC) count, red blood cell (RBC) count, hemoglobin level, hematocrit value, and platelet count. Abnormal cell counts can indicate the presence of various medical conditions, such as infections, anemia, or leukemia.

Homeostasis is a fundamental concept in the field of medicine and physiology, referring to the body's ability to maintain a stable internal environment, despite changes in external conditions. It is the process by which biological systems regulate their internal environment to remain in a state of dynamic equilibrium. This is achieved through various feedback mechanisms that involve sensors, control centers, and effectors, working together to detect, interpret, and respond to disturbances in the system.

For example, the body maintains homeostasis through mechanisms such as temperature regulation (through sweating or shivering), fluid balance (through kidney function and thirst), and blood glucose levels (through insulin and glucagon secretion). When homeostasis is disrupted, it can lead to disease or dysfunction in the body.

In summary, homeostasis is the maintenance of a stable internal environment within biological systems, through various regulatory mechanisms that respond to changes in external conditions.

Osteoarthritis (OA) is a type of joint disease that is characterized by the breakdown and eventual loss of cartilage - the tissue that cushions the ends of bones where they meet in the joints. This breakdown can cause the bones to rub against each other, causing pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility. OA can occur in any joint, but it most commonly affects the hands, knees, hips, and spine. It is often associated with aging and can be caused or worsened by obesity, injury, or overuse.

The medical definition of osteoarthritis is: "a degenerative, non-inflammatory joint disease characterized by the loss of articular cartilage, bone remodeling, and the formation of osteophytes (bone spurs). It is often associated with pain, stiffness, and decreased range of motion in the affected joint."

Growth Differentiation Factor 3 (GDF3) is a member of the transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) superfamily, which are signaling proteins involved in cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. GDF3 plays crucial roles during embryonic development, including mesoderm formation, endoderm differentiation, and left-right patterning. It is also expressed in adult tissues, such as the heart, brain, and reproductive organs, although its functions in these contexts are less well understood. GDF3 is secreted as a dimeric protein and signals through a heteromeric complex of type I and type II serine/threonine kinase receptors, leading to the activation of intracellular SMAD proteins and downstream transcriptional responses.

"Drosophila" is a genus of small flies, also known as fruit flies. The most common species used in scientific research is "Drosophila melanogaster," which has been a valuable model organism for many areas of biological and medical research, including genetics, developmental biology, neurobiology, and aging.

The use of Drosophila as a model organism has led to numerous important discoveries in genetics and molecular biology, such as the identification of genes that are associated with human diseases like cancer, Parkinson's disease, and obesity. The short reproductive cycle, large number of offspring, and ease of genetic manipulation make Drosophila a powerful tool for studying complex biological processes.

The Primitive Streak is a transient structure that forms in the epiblast (the outermost layer of cells) of a developing embryo during gastrulation, which is a critical phase of embryonic development in many animals, including humans. In human embryos, this process starts around 14-16 days after fertilization.

The Primitive Streak is the site of important events that establish the three primary germ layers of the developing embryo: the ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. These germ layers give rise to all the different cell types and tissues in the body. The Primitive Streak itself is formed by a narrow band of cells that migrate inward from the epiblast, creating a linear groove on the surface of the embryo.

As gastrulation proceeds, cells continue to move through the Primitive Streak, undergoing an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and differentiating into various cell types that will form the mesoderm and endoderm. The ectoderm remains on the exterior of the embryo and eventually forms the skin and nervous system.

The Primitive Streak is a crucial structure in early human development, as its formation and subsequent events set the stage for proper body plan establishment and organogenesis. Any abnormalities during this process can lead to severe birth defects or developmental disorders.

Germ cells are the reproductive cells, also known as sex cells, that combine to form offspring in sexual reproduction. In females, germ cells are called ova or egg cells, and in males, they are called spermatozoa or sperm cells. These cells are unique because they carry half the genetic material necessary for creating new life. They are produced through a process called meiosis, which reduces their chromosome number by half, ensuring that when two germ cells combine during fertilization, the normal diploid number of chromosomes is restored.

Spinal fusion is a surgical procedure where two or more vertebrae in the spine are fused together to create a solid bone. The purpose of this procedure is to restrict movement between the fused vertebrae, which can help reduce pain and stabilize the spine. This is typically done using bone grafts or bone graft substitutes, along with hardware such as rods, screws, or cages to hold the vertebrae in place while they heal together. The procedure may be recommended for various spinal conditions, including degenerative disc disease, spinal stenosis, spondylolisthesis, scoliosis, or fractures.

Aggrecan is a large, complex proteoglycan molecule found in the extracellular matrix of articular cartilage and other connective tissues. It is a key component of the structural framework of these tissues, helping to provide resiliency, cushioning, and protection to the cells within. Aggrecan contains numerous glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains, which are negatively charged molecules that attract water and ions, creating a swelling pressure that contributes to the tissue's load-bearing capacity.

The medical definition of 'Aggrecans' can be described as:

1. A large proteoglycan molecule found in articular cartilage and other connective tissues.
2. Composed of a core protein with attached glycosaminoglycan (GAG) chains, primarily chondroitin sulfate and keratan sulfate.
3. Plays a crucial role in the biomechanical properties of articular cartilage by attracting water and ions, creating a swelling pressure that contributes to the tissue's load-bearing capacity.
4. Aggrecan degradation or loss is associated with various joint diseases, such as osteoarthritis, due to reduced structural integrity and shock-absorbing capabilities of articular cartilage.

Osteosarcoma is defined as a type of cancerous tumor that arises from the cells that form bones (osteoblasts). It's the most common primary bone cancer, and it typically develops in the long bones of the body, such as the arms or legs, near the growth plates. Osteosarcoma can metastasize (spread) to other parts of the body, including the lungs, making it a highly malignant form of cancer. Symptoms may include bone pain, swelling, and fractures. Treatment usually involves a combination of surgery, chemotherapy, and/or radiation therapy.

Pluripotent stem cells are a type of undifferentiated stem cell that have the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the three germ layers (endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm) of a developing embryo. These cells can give rise to all the cell types that make up the human body, with the exception of those that form the extra-embryonic tissues such as the placenta.

Pluripotent stem cells are characterized by their ability to self-renew, which means they can divide and produce more pluripotent stem cells, and differentiate, which means they can give rise to specialized cell types with specific functions. Pluripotent stem cells can be derived from embryos at the blastocyst stage of development or generated in the lab through a process called induced pluripotency, where adult cells are reprogrammed to have the properties of embryonic stem cells.

Pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering because they can be used to generate large numbers of specific cell types that can potentially replace or repair damaged or diseased tissues in the body. However, their use is still a subject of ethical debate due to concerns about the source of embryonic stem cells and the potential risks associated with their use in clinical applications.

The amnion is the innermost fetal membrane in mammals, forming a sac that contains and protects the developing embryo and later the fetus within the uterus. It is one of the extraembryonic membranes that are derived from the outer cell mass of the blastocyst during early embryonic development. The amnion is filled with fluid (amniotic fluid) that allows for the freedom of movement and protection of the developing fetus.

The primary function of the amnion is to provide a protective environment for the growing fetus, allowing for expansion and preventing physical damage from outside forces. Additionally, the amniotic fluid serves as a medium for the exchange of waste products and nutrients between the fetal membranes and the placenta. The amnion also contributes to the formation of the umbilical cord and plays a role in the initiation of labor during childbirth.

Cell survival refers to the ability of a cell to continue living and functioning normally, despite being exposed to potentially harmful conditions or treatments. This can include exposure to toxins, radiation, chemotherapeutic drugs, or other stressors that can damage cells or interfere with their normal processes.

In scientific research, measures of cell survival are often used to evaluate the effectiveness of various therapies or treatments. For example, researchers may expose cells to a particular drug or treatment and then measure the percentage of cells that survive to assess its potential therapeutic value. Similarly, in toxicology studies, measures of cell survival can help to determine the safety of various chemicals or substances.

It's important to note that cell survival is not the same as cell proliferation, which refers to the ability of cells to divide and multiply. While some treatments may promote cell survival, they may also inhibit cell proliferation, making them useful for treating diseases such as cancer. Conversely, other treatments may be designed to specifically target and kill cancer cells, even if it means sacrificing some healthy cells in the process.

Dominant genes refer to the alleles (versions of a gene) that are fully expressed in an individual's phenotype, even if only one copy of the gene is present. In dominant inheritance patterns, an individual needs only to receive one dominant allele from either parent to express the associated trait. This is in contrast to recessive genes, where both copies of the gene must be the recessive allele for the trait to be expressed. Dominant genes are represented by uppercase letters (e.g., 'A') and recessive genes by lowercase letters (e.g., 'a'). If an individual inherits one dominant allele (A) from either parent, they will express the dominant trait (A).

Kruppel-like transcription factors (KLFs) are a family of transcription factors that are characterized by their highly conserved DNA-binding domain, known as the Kruppel-like zinc finger domain. This domain consists of approximately 30 amino acids and is responsible for binding to specific DNA sequences, thereby regulating gene expression.

KLFs play important roles in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and inflammation. They are involved in the development and function of many tissues and organs, such as the hematopoietic system, cardiovascular system, nervous system, and gastrointestinal tract.

There are 17 known members of the KLF family in humans, each with distinct functions and expression patterns. Some KLFs act as transcriptional activators, while others function as repressors. Dysregulation of KLFs has been implicated in various diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes.

Overall, Kruppel-like transcription factors are crucial regulators of gene expression that play important roles in normal development and physiology, as well as in the pathogenesis of various diseases.

Adenoviridae is a family of viruses that includes many species that can cause various types of illnesses in humans and animals. These viruses are non-enveloped, meaning they do not have a lipid membrane, and have an icosahedral symmetry with a diameter of approximately 70-90 nanometers.

The genome of Adenoviridae is composed of double-stranded DNA, which contains linear chromosomes ranging from 26 to 45 kilobases in length. The family is divided into five genera: Mastadenovirus, Aviadenovirus, Atadenovirus, Siadenovirus, and Ichtadenovirus.

Human adenoviruses are classified under the genus Mastadenovirus and can cause a wide range of illnesses, including respiratory infections, conjunctivitis, gastroenteritis, and upper respiratory tract infections. Some serotypes have also been associated with more severe diseases such as hemorrhagic cystitis, hepatitis, and meningoencephalitis.

Adenoviruses are highly contagious and can be transmitted through respiratory droplets, fecal-oral route, or by contact with contaminated surfaces. They can also be spread through contaminated water sources. Infections caused by adenoviruses are usually self-limiting, but severe cases may require hospitalization and supportive care.

Northern blotting is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to detect and analyze specific RNA molecules (such as mRNA) in a mixture of total RNA extracted from cells or tissues. This technique is called "Northern" blotting because it is analogous to the Southern blotting method, which is used for DNA detection.

The Northern blotting procedure involves several steps:

1. Electrophoresis: The total RNA mixture is first separated based on size by running it through an agarose gel using electrical current. This separates the RNA molecules according to their length, with smaller RNA fragments migrating faster than larger ones.

2. Transfer: After electrophoresis, the RNA bands are denatured (made single-stranded) and transferred from the gel onto a nitrocellulose or nylon membrane using a technique called capillary transfer or vacuum blotting. This step ensures that the order and relative positions of the RNA fragments are preserved on the membrane, similar to how they appear in the gel.

3. Cross-linking: The RNA is then chemically cross-linked to the membrane using UV light or heat treatment, which helps to immobilize the RNA onto the membrane and prevent it from washing off during subsequent steps.

4. Prehybridization: Before adding the labeled probe, the membrane is prehybridized in a solution containing blocking agents (such as salmon sperm DNA or yeast tRNA) to minimize non-specific binding of the probe to the membrane.

5. Hybridization: A labeled nucleic acid probe, specific to the RNA of interest, is added to the prehybridization solution and allowed to hybridize (form base pairs) with its complementary RNA sequence on the membrane. The probe can be either a DNA or an RNA molecule, and it is typically labeled with a radioactive isotope (such as ³²P) or a non-radioactive label (such as digoxigenin).

6. Washing: After hybridization, the membrane is washed to remove unbound probe and reduce background noise. The washing conditions (temperature, salt concentration, and detergent concentration) are optimized based on the stringency required for specific hybridization.

7. Detection: The presence of the labeled probe is then detected using an appropriate method, depending on the type of label used. For radioactive probes, this typically involves exposing the membrane to X-ray film or a phosphorimager screen and analyzing the resulting image. For non-radioactive probes, detection can be performed using colorimetric, chemiluminescent, or fluorescent methods.

8. Data analysis: The intensity of the signal is quantified and compared to controls (such as housekeeping genes) to determine the relative expression level of the RNA of interest. This information can be used for various purposes, such as identifying differentially expressed genes in response to a specific treatment or comparing gene expression levels across different samples or conditions.

GATA5 transcription factor is a protein that binds to specific DNA sequences, called GATA sites, in the regulatory regions of target genes and regulates their expression. The GATA5 protein contains two conserved domains, called zinc fingers, which mediate its binding to the GATA sites. GATA5 is mainly expressed in tissues derived from the endoderm, such as the gut, liver, and pancreas, where it plays critical roles in developmental processes, including cell fate determination, proliferation, and differentiation.

Mutations in the gene encoding GATA5 have been associated with congenital heart defects, suggesting that GATA5 is essential for normal cardiac development. In addition to its role in development, GATA5 has also been implicated in the pathogenesis of various diseases, including cancer, where it can act as a tumor suppressor or oncogene depending on the context.

Immunoblotting, also known as western blotting, is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology and immunogenetics to detect and quantify specific proteins in a complex mixture. This technique combines the electrophoretic separation of proteins by gel electrophoresis with their detection using antibodies that recognize specific epitopes (protein fragments) on the target protein.

The process involves several steps: first, the protein sample is separated based on size through sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Next, the separated proteins are transferred onto a nitrocellulose or polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane using an electric field. The membrane is then blocked with a blocking agent to prevent non-specific binding of antibodies.

After blocking, the membrane is incubated with a primary antibody that specifically recognizes the target protein. Following this, the membrane is washed to remove unbound primary antibodies and then incubated with a secondary antibody conjugated to an enzyme such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or alkaline phosphatase (AP). The enzyme catalyzes a colorimetric or chemiluminescent reaction that allows for the detection of the target protein.

Immunoblotting is widely used in research and clinical settings to study protein expression, post-translational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and disease biomarkers. It provides high specificity and sensitivity, making it a valuable tool for identifying and quantifying proteins in various biological samples.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Mice, 129 Strain" is not a medical definition. Instead, it refers to a specific strain of laboratory mice used in biomedical research. The 129 strain is one of the most commonly used inbred mouse strains and has been extensively characterized genetically and phenotypically. These mice are often used as models for various human diseases due to their well-defined genetic background, which facilitates reproducible experimental results.

The 129 strain is maintained through brother-sister mating for many generations, resulting in a high degree of genetic homogeneity within the strain. There are several substrains of the 129 strain, including 129S1/SvImJ, 129X1/SvJ, 129S6/SvEvTac, and 129P3/J, among others. Each substrain may have distinct genetic differences that can influence experimental outcomes. Therefore, it is essential to specify the exact substrain when reporting research findings involving 129 mice.

Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) is a glycoprotein hormone produced and released by the anterior pituitary gland. It plays crucial roles in the reproductive system, primarily by promoting the growth and development of follicles in the ovaries or sperm production in the testes.

The FSH molecule consists of two subunits: α (alpha) and β (beta). The α-subunit is common to several glycoprotein hormones, including thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). In contrast, the β-subunit is unique to each hormone and determines its specific biological activity.

A medical definition of 'Follicle Stimulating Hormone, beta Subunit' refers to the distinct portion of the FSH molecule that is responsible for its particular functions in the body. The β-subunit of FSH enables the hormone to bind to its specific receptors in the gonads and initiate downstream signaling pathways leading to follicular development and spermatogenesis. Any alterations or mutations in the FSH beta subunit can lead to disruptions in reproductive processes, potentially causing infertility or other related disorders.

Hyaline cartilage is a type of cartilaginous tissue that is primarily found in the articulating surfaces of bones, ribcage, nose, ears, and trachea. It has a smooth, glassy appearance (hence the name "hyaline," derived from the Greek word "hyalos" meaning glass) due to the presence of type II collagen fibers that are arranged in a precise pattern and embedded in a proteoglycan-rich matrix.

The high concentration of proteoglycans, which are complex molecules made up of a protein core and glycosaminoglycan side chains, gives hyaline cartilage its firm yet flexible properties. This type of cartilage is avascular, meaning it does not contain blood vessels, and receives nutrients through diffusion from the surrounding synovial fluid in joints or adjacent tissues.

Hyaline cartilage plays a crucial role in providing structural support, reducing friction between articulating bones, and facilitating smooth movement in joints. It also serves as a template for endochondral ossification, a process by which long bones grow in length during development.

Molecular cloning is a laboratory technique used to create multiple copies of a specific DNA sequence. This process involves several steps:

1. Isolation: The first step in molecular cloning is to isolate the DNA sequence of interest from the rest of the genomic DNA. This can be done using various methods such as PCR (polymerase chain reaction), restriction enzymes, or hybridization.
2. Vector construction: Once the DNA sequence of interest has been isolated, it must be inserted into a vector, which is a small circular DNA molecule that can replicate independently in a host cell. Common vectors used in molecular cloning include plasmids and phages.
3. Transformation: The constructed vector is then introduced into a host cell, usually a bacterial or yeast cell, through a process called transformation. This can be done using various methods such as electroporation or chemical transformation.
4. Selection: After transformation, the host cells are grown in selective media that allow only those cells containing the vector to grow. This ensures that the DNA sequence of interest has been successfully cloned into the vector.
5. Amplification: Once the host cells have been selected, they can be grown in large quantities to amplify the number of copies of the cloned DNA sequence.

Molecular cloning is a powerful tool in molecular biology and has numerous applications, including the production of recombinant proteins, gene therapy, functional analysis of genes, and genetic engineering.

Hypertrophy, in the context of physiology and pathology, refers to an increase in the size of an organ or tissue due to an enlargement of its constituent cells. It is often used to describe the growth of muscle cells (myocytes) in response to increased workload or hormonal stimulation, resulting in an increase in muscle mass. However, hypertrophy can also occur in other organs such as the heart (cardiac hypertrophy) in response to high blood pressure or valvular heart disease.

It is important to note that while hypertrophy involves an increase in cell size, hyperplasia refers to an increase in cell number. In some cases, both hypertrophy and hyperplasia can occur together, leading to a significant increase in the overall size and function of the organ or tissue.

Astrocytes are a type of star-shaped glial cell found in the central nervous system (CNS), including the brain and spinal cord. They play crucial roles in supporting and maintaining the health and function of neurons, which are the primary cells responsible for transmitting information in the CNS.

Some of the essential functions of astrocytes include:

1. Supporting neuronal structure and function: Astrocytes provide structural support to neurons by ensheathing them and maintaining the integrity of the blood-brain barrier, which helps regulate the entry and exit of substances into the CNS.
2. Regulating neurotransmitter levels: Astrocytes help control the levels of neurotransmitters in the synaptic cleft (the space between two neurons) by taking up excess neurotransmitters and breaking them down, thus preventing excessive or prolonged activation of neuronal receptors.
3. Providing nutrients to neurons: Astrocytes help supply energy metabolites, such as lactate, to neurons, which are essential for their survival and function.
4. Modulating synaptic activity: Through the release of various signaling molecules, astrocytes can modulate synaptic strength and plasticity, contributing to learning and memory processes.
5. Participating in immune responses: Astrocytes can respond to CNS injuries or infections by releasing pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which help recruit immune cells to the site of injury or infection.
6. Promoting neuronal survival and repair: In response to injury or disease, astrocytes can become reactive and undergo morphological changes that aid in forming a glial scar, which helps contain damage and promote tissue repair. Additionally, they release growth factors and other molecules that support the survival and regeneration of injured neurons.

Dysfunction or damage to astrocytes has been implicated in several neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and multiple sclerosis (MS).

The endocardial cushions are a part of the embryonic heart that contributes to the formation of the atrioventricular septum and the valves between the chambers of the heart. They are composed of mesenchymal tissue, which is a type of connective tissue that contains cells called mesenchymal stem cells. During fetal development, these cushions grow and fuse together to form the atrioventricular septum, which separates the upper chambers (atria) from the lower chambers (ventricles) of the heart. The endocardial cushions also give rise to the valves that regulate blood flow between the chambers of the heart. Defects in the development of the endocardial cushions can lead to congenital heart defects, such as atrial septal defect and ventricular septal defect.

Somites are transient, segmentally repeated embryonic structures that form along the anterior-posterior body axis during vertebrate development. They are derived from the paraxial mesoderm and give rise to various tissues, including the sclerotome (which forms the vertebrae and ribs), myotome (which forms the skeletal muscles of the back and limbs), and dermatome (which forms the dermis of the skin).

Each somite is a block-like structure that is arranged in a repeating pattern along the notochord, which is a flexible rod-like structure that provides mechanical support to the developing embryo. The formation of somites is a critical step in the development of the vertebrate body plan, as they help to establish the segmental organization of the musculoskeletal system and contribute to the formation of other important structures such as the dermis and the circulatory system.

The process of somitogenesis, or the formation of somites, is a highly regulated and coordinated event that involves the interaction of various signaling molecules and genetic pathways. Defects in somite formation can lead to a range of developmental abnormalities, including spinal deformities, muscle weakness, and skin defects.

In medical terms, the heart is a muscular organ located in the thoracic cavity that functions as a pump to circulate blood throughout the body. It's responsible for delivering oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and removing carbon dioxide and other wastes. The human heart is divided into four chambers: two atria on the top and two ventricles on the bottom. The right side of the heart receives deoxygenated blood from the body and pumps it to the lungs, while the left side receives oxygenated blood from the lungs and pumps it out to the rest of the body. The heart's rhythmic contractions and relaxations are regulated by a complex electrical conduction system.

Developmental genes and proteins, Bone morphogenetic protein, TGFβ domain). ... Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP-15) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the BMP15 gene. It is involved in ... Bragdon B, Moseychuk O, Saldanha S, King D, Julian J, Nohe A (April 2011). "Bone morphogenetic proteins: a critical review". ... Persani L, Rossetti R, Di Pasquale E, Cacciatore C, Fabre S (2014-11-01). "The fundamental role of bone morphogenetic protein ...
... or BMP7 (also known as osteogenic protein-1 or OP-1) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ... The protein encoded by this gene is a member of the TGF-β superfamily. Like other members of the bone morphogenetic protein ... Reddi AH (July 2000). "Bone morphogenetic proteins and skeletal development: the kidney-bone connection". Pediatric Nephrology ... bone morphogenetic protein 7 (BMP-7) versus autologous bone grafting for tibial fractures]". Der Unfallchirurg (in German). 110 ...
... , also known as BMP1, is a protein which in humans is encoded by the BMP1 gene. There are seven ... Although other bone morphogenetic proteins are members of the TGF-beta superfamily, BMP1 encodes a protein that is not closely ... 1993). "Mapping of the bone morphogenetic protein 1 gene (BMP1) to 8p21: removal of BMP1 from candidacy for the bone disorder ... BMP1 belongs to the peptidase M12A family of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). It induces bone and cartilage development. ...
"Entrez Gene: BMP4 bone morphogenetic protein 4". Miyazono K, Kamiya Y, Morikawa M (January 2010). "Bone morphogenetic protein ... type II receptor for bone morphogenetic protein-4 that forms differential heteromeric complexes with bone morphogenetic protein ... Bone morphogenetic protein 4 is a protein that in humans is encoded by BMP4 gene. BMP4 is found on chromosome 14q22-q23. BMP4 ... Bone morphogenetic proteins are known to stimulate bone formation in adult animals. This is thought that inducing osteoblastic ...
2000). "Bone morphogenetic protein receptor complexes on the surface of live cells: a new oligomerization mode for serine/ ... Vitt U, Mazerbourg S, Klein C, Hsueh A (2002). "Bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II is a receptor for growth ... Vitt UA, Mazerbourg S, Klein C, Hsueh AJ (2003). "Bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II is a receptor for growth ... The cell surface receptor through which GDF9 generates a signal is the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR2). ...
1 April 2001). "Highly prolific Booroola sheep have a mutation in the intracellular kinase domain of bone morphogenetic protein ... 1 December 2002). "Growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 are essential for ovarian follicular ... Jennifer Juengel; McNatty KP (10 February 2005). "The role of proteins of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily in ...
... bone morphogenetic protein 15 heterodimers are potent regulators of ovarian functions". Proceedings of the National Academy of ... ROS also interacts with ERK pathway that leads to activation of Ras, MEK and MEK-like proteins. These proteins activate protein ... Bone morphogenetic proteins/ Mothers against decapentaplegic/ Inhibitor of differentiation), mediated by transcription factors ... In TGF-β (Transforming Growth Factor β) pathway, BMP (Bone Morphogenic Protein), Activin and Nodal ligands bind to their ...
Dudley, A. T.; Robertson, E. J. (1997). "Overlapping expression domains of bone morphogenetic protein family members ... "A requirement for bone morphogenetic protein-7 during development of the mammalian kidney and eye". Genes & Development. 9 (22 ... Brennan, Jane; Norris, Dominic P.; Robertson, Elizabeth J. (15 September 2002). "Nodal activity in the node governs left-right ... cite book}}: ,journal= ignored (help) Dudley, A. T.; Lyons, K. M.; Robertson, E. J. (15 November 1995). " ...
It acts as a regulator of TGFβ family (such as bone morphogenetic proteins) activity by competing with SMAD4 and preventing the ... Itoh F, Asao H, Sugamura K, Heldin CH, ten Dijke P, Itoh S (2001). "Promoting bone morphogenetic protein signaling through ... The SMAD proteins are homologs of both the drosophila protein, mothers against decapentaplegic (MAD) and the C. elegans protein ... SMAD family member 6, also known as SMAD6, is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SMAD6 gene. SMAD6 is a protein that, ...
By occupying type I receptors for Activin and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), it also plays a role in negative feedback of ... Itoh F, Asao H, Sugamura K, Heldin CH, ten Dijke P, Itoh S (August 2001). "Promoting bone morphogenetic protein signaling ... "Differential inhibition of Smad6 and Smad7 on bone morphogenetic protein- and activin-mediated growth arrest and apoptosis in B ... Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 7 or SMAD7 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SMAD7 gene. SMAD7 is a protein ...
Bone morphogenetic protein, Developmental genes and proteins, TS domain, S/T kinase, Receptors, EC 2.7.11). ... Bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II or BMPR2 is a serine/threonine receptor kinase encoded by the BMPR2 gene. It binds ... BMPR2 is expressed on both human and animal granulosa cells, and is a crucial receptor for bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15 ... Gilboa L, Nohe A, Geissendörfer T, Sebald W, Henis YI, Knaus P (March 2000). "Bone morphogenetic protein receptor complexes on ...
The BMPs bind to the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type-2 (BMPR2). They are involved in a multitude of cellular functions ... Bone morphogenetic proteins cause the transcription of mRNAs involved in osteogenesis, neurogenesis, and ventral mesoderm ... The TGF beta superfamily of ligands includes: Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), Growth and differentiation factors (GDFs), ... "Promoting bone morphogenetic protein signaling through negative regulation of inhibitory Smads". The EMBO Journal. 20 (15): ...
Itoh F, Asao H, Sugamura K, Heldin CH, ten Dijke P, Itoh S (August 2001). "Promoting bone morphogenetic protein signaling ... STAM-binding protein is a protein that in humans is encoded by the STAMBP gene. Cytokine-mediated signal transduction in the ... "Towards a proteome-scale map of the human protein-protein interaction network". Nature. 437 (7062): 1173-8. Bibcode:2005Natur. ... "Towards a proteome-scale map of the human protein-protein interaction network". Nature. 437 (7062): 1173-8. Bibcode:2005Natur. ...
Itoh F, Asao H, Sugamura K, Heldin CH, ten Dijke P, Itoh S (August 2001). "Promoting bone morphogenetic protein signaling ... "Physical and functional interaction of murine and Xenopus Smad7 with bone morphogenetic protein receptors and transforming ... potency of cell proliferation and differentiation responses to transforming growth factor beta and bone morphogenetic protein ... Thus, the two proteins could be caught in a "vicious cycle" of regulation. Pin1 causes both itself and Smad2 to be associated ...
The BMPs bind to the bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPR2). Some of the proteins of the BMP family are BMP4 and ... Then active Smoothened protein is able to inhibit PKA and Slimb, so that the Ci protein is not cleaved. This intact Ci protein ... The binding of Wnt to a Frizzled protein activates the Dishevelled protein. In its active state the Dishevelled protein ... "Promoting bone morphogenetic protein signaling through negative regulation of inhibitory Smads". The EMBO Journal. 20 (15): ...
"A novel link between the proteasome pathway and the signal transduction pathway of the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs)". BMC ... Smad nuclear-interacting protein 1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SNIP1 gene. SNIP1 has been shown to interact ... "Towards a proteome-scale map of the human protein-protein interaction network". Nature. 437 (7062): 1173-1178. Bibcode: ... Roche KC, Wiechens N, Owen-Hughes T, Perkins ND (2004). "The FHA domain protein SNIP1 is a regulator of the cell cycle and ...
"A novel link between the proteasome pathway and the signal transduction pathway of the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs)". BMC ... The eukaryotic proteasome recognized degradable proteins, including damaged proteins for protein quality control purpose or key ... "A novel link between the proteasome pathway and the signal transduction pathway of the bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs)". BMC ... "Microsequences of 145 proteins recorded in the two-dimensional gel protein database of normal human epidermal keratinocytes". ...
... bone morphogenetic protein‐6 (BMP‐6) vector. She found BMP‐6 to be osteo-inductive in vivo resulting in acceleration of bone ... Her research indicated that transduction of BMDMSC with bone morphogenetic proteins‐2 or ‐6 can accelerate osteogenic ... "Mesenchymal Stem Cell-mediated Gene Delivery of Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in an Articular Fracture Model". Molecular Therapy ... "Gene-mediated osteogenic differentiation of stem cells by bone morphogenetic proteins-2 or -6". Journal of Orthopaedic Research ...
... is a chemical compound used in the study of bone morphogenetic protein signalling through the ALK2, ALK3 and ALK6 ... Structure-activity relationship study of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling inhibitors. Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 2008 Aug ... Bone. 2018 Apr;109:251-258. doi:10.1016/j.bone.2017.09.004 PMID 28918311 (Articles without InChI source, Chemical pages without ... Bone morphogenetic protein, Quinolines, Phenylpiperazines, Pyrazolopyrimidines). ...
1998). "Cartilage-derived morphogenetic proteins and osteogenic protein-1 differentially regulate osteogenesis". J. Bone Miner ... GDF6 interacts with bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) to form heterodimers that may work to regulate neural induction and ... Reddi AH (1995). "Cartilage morphogenesis: role of bone and cartilage morphogenetic proteins, homeobox genes and extracellular ... 2005). "Identification of receptors and signaling pathways for orphan bone morphogenetic protein/growth differentiation factor ...
... a bone morphogenetic protein. Matrix 1992; 12:369-80. Ripamonti U, Heliotis M, van den Heever B, Reddi AH. Bone morphogenetic ... isolation and purification of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) that are involved in bone formation and repair. The molecular ... Osteogenin (bone morphogenetic protein-3) stimulates cartilage formation by chick limb bud cells in vitro. Dev Biol 1991; 146: ... Osteogenin and recombinant bone morphogenetic protein 2B are chemotactic for human monocytes and stimulate transforming growth ...
Dpp is the Drosophila homolog of the vertebrate bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), which are members of the TGF-β superfamily ... It is known to be necessary for the correct patterning and development of the early Drosophila embryo and the fifteen imaginal ... In Drosophila, the receptor for Dpp is formed by two proteins, Thickveins (Tkv) and Punt. Like Dpp itself, Tkv and Punt are ... When a cell receives a Dpp signal, the receptors are able to activate an intracellular protein called mothers against Dpp (mad ...
... and bone morphogenetic proteins. Evidence suggests that bone cells produce growth factors for extracellular storage in the bone ... Most of the bones of the skull are flat bones, as is the sternum. Sesamoid bones are bones embedded in tendons. Since they act ... Cancellous bone, or spongy bone, also known as trabecular bone, is the internal tissue of the skeletal bone and is an open cell ... Bone tissue is mineralized tissue of two types, cortical bone and cancellous bone. Other types of tissue found in bones include ...
... bone morphogenetic protein-7) to initiate rapid bone formation". J Bone Miner Res. 12 (10): 1584-95. doi:10.1359/jbmr.1997.12. ... bone morphogenetic protein-7) to initiate rapid bone formation. (October 1997) Transforming growth factor-beta 1: induction of ... induction of bone morphogenetic protein genes expression during endochondral bone formation in the baboon, and synergistic ... "Enhanced activity of demineralised bone matrix augmented with xenogeneic bone morphogenetic protein complex in rats". South ...
Shim S, Bae N, Han JK (July 2002). "Bone morphogenetic protein-4-induced activation of Xretpos is mediated by Smads and Olf-1/ ... Zinc finger protein 423 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the ZNF423 gene. The protein encoded by this gene is a ... "ZFP423 coordinates Notch and bone morphogenetic protein signaling, selectively up-regulating Hes5 gene expression". The Journal ... OAZ+protein,+human at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) This article incorporates text from ...
... of the co-repressor homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 for ski-mediated inhibition of bone morphogenetic protein-induced ... The SMAD proteins are homologs of both the drosophila protein, mothers against decapentaplegic (MAD) and the C. elegans protein ... protein. In response to TGF-beta signal, this protein is phosphorylated by the TGF-beta receptors. The phosphorylation induces ... Developmental genes and proteins, MH1 domain, MH2 domain, R-SMAD, Transcription factors, Human proteins). ...
"Entrez Gene: NOG noggin". Blázquez-Medela AM, Jumabay M, Boström KI (May 2019). "Beyond the bone: Bone morphogenetic protein ... superfamily signaling proteins, such as bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4). By diffusing through extracellular matrices more ... BMPedia - the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Wiki[permanent dead link] Noggin publications, gene expression data, sequences and ... Hall AK, Burke RM, Anand M, Dinsio KJ (July 2002). "Activin and bone morphogenetic proteins are present in perinatal sensory ...
Core AB, Canali S, Babitt JL (2014). "Hemojuvelin and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling in iron homeostasis". ... In response to large iron stores, production of Bone Morphogenic Protein (BMP) is induced, which binds to receptors on ... Hepcidin is a protein that in humans is encoded by the HAMP gene. Hepcidin is a key regulator of the entry of iron into the ... NMR studies showed a new model for hepcidin: at ambient temperatures, the protein interconverts between two conformations, ...
Type XIII - OI caused by a mutation in the bone morphogenetic protein 1 (BMP1) gene on chromosome 8p21.3. This mutation causes ... Type XV - OI caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in the WNT1 gene on chromosome 12q13.12. It is autosomal ... Defects in these proteins lead to defective bone mineralization which causes the characteristic brittle bones of osteogenesis ... Defects in the proteins pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and bone-restricted interferon-induced transmembrane protein ( ...
"Treatment of osteonecrosis of the femoral head with core decompression and human bone morphogenetic protein". Clinical ... Normally, bone continuously breaks down and rebuilds-old bone is resorbed and replaced with new bone. The process keeps the ... The necrotic bone itself does not show increased radiographic opacity, as dead bone cannot undergo bone resorption which is ... The most commonly affected bone is the femur (thigh bone). Other relatively common sites include the upper arm bone, knee, ...
Developmental genes and proteins, Bone morphogenetic protein, TGFβ domain). ... Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP-15) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the BMP15 gene. It is involved in ... Bragdon B, Moseychuk O, Saldanha S, King D, Julian J, Nohe A (April 2011). "Bone morphogenetic proteins: a critical review". ... Persani L, Rossetti R, Di Pasquale E, Cacciatore C, Fabre S (2014-11-01). "The fundamental role of bone morphogenetic protein ...
Both mutations have occurred in the prodomain region of protein. Despite prodomain cleavage through dimerization, it is ... Novel bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) gene variants implicated in premature ovarian insufficiency Fatemeh Afkhami 1 , ... Novel bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) gene variants implicated in premature ovarian insufficiency Fatemeh Afkhami et al. ... Background: Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) is expressed in oocytes and plays a crucial role in the reproduction of mono- ...
SMAD specific E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2 (SMURF2); BMP4; bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1B (BMPR1B); and BMP ... SMAD specific E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 2 (SMURF2); BMP4; bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 1B (BMPR1B); and BMP ... Whereas, others such as, bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and MMPs were selected due to the piling evidence describing the ... Nilsson, E. E. & Skinner, M. K. Bone morphogenetic protein-4 acts as an ovarian follicle survival factor and promotes ...
Bone morphogenetic protein 15. Xp11·2. DIAPH2. Diaphanous. Xq22. FMR1 premutation. Fragile X mental retardation protein 1. Xq27 ... Management should be directed at symptom resolution and bone protection, but most importantly should include psychosocial ...
Bone morphogenetic proteins.. Chen D; Zhao M; Mundy GR. Growth Factors; 2004 Dec; 22(4):233-41. PubMed ID: 15621726. [TBL] ... Bone morphogenetic protein signaling in articular chondrocyte differentiation.. Nishihara A; Fujii M; Sampath TK; Miyazono K; ... J Bone Miner Res; 2003 Sep; 18(9):1593-604. PubMed ID: 12968668. [TBL] ... J Bone Miner Res; 1999 Jul; 14(7):1145-52. PubMed ID: 10404014. [TBL] ...
Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/pharmacology; Cell Survival/drug effects; Cell Survival/genetics; ... MeSH Terms: Animals; Apoptosis/drug effects; Apoptosis/genetics; Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15; ... whereas there were decreases in mRNA encoding bone morphogenic protein receptor 1a (Bmpr1a) and Kit. To confirm findings from ... Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit/genetics; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit/physiology*; Rats; Rats, Inbred F344; Signal Transduction ...
Growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 are essential for ovarian follicular development in sheep. JL ...
Enhancement of bone morphogenetic protein-2 expression and bone formation by coumarin derivatives via p38 and ERK-dependent ... Runx2 is a common target of transforming growth factor-β1 and bone morphogenetic protein 2, and cooperation between Runx2 and ... Thymoquinone accelerates osteoblast differentiation and activates bone morphogenetic protein-2 and ERK pathway.Int ... bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), and core-binding factor a1 (Celil and Campbell 2005; Wu et al. 2012). However, the effect ...
Utilization of bone morphogenetic protein receptors during chondrocyte maturation. J Bone Miner Res 15: 1630-9, 2000. ... J Bone Joint Surg [Am] 83-A Suppl 1 (Pt1): 15-22, 2001. ... impaired bone healing and osteoporosis. Our study showing that ... modulating bone formation during development and fracture repair. These studies have important implications for the development ... Adams SL.Type III collagen regulates osteoblastogenesis and the quantity of trabecular bone. Calcif Tiss Intl, 94(6): 621-31, ...
Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease caused by an inherited mutation in bone morphogenetic protein receptor II. Am J Respir Crit ... Pulmonary veno-occlusive disease in an adult following bone marrow transplantation. Case report and review of the literature. ... Procoagulant vitamin K-dependent proteins are responsible for a transient hypercoagulable state when warfarin is first started ... Pulmonary Veno-occlusive Disease Following Reduced-intensity Allogeneic Bone Marrow Transplantation for Acute Myeloid Leukemia ...
Mutation of the bone morphogenetic protein GDF3 causes ocular and skeletal anomalies. Hum Mol Genet. 2010 Jan 15;19(2):287-98. ... Am J Med Genet A. 2004 Aug 15;129A(1):92-4. doi: 10.1002/ajmg.a.30126. No abstract available. Citation on PubMed ... 2009 Mar 15;18(6):1110-21. doi: 10.1093/hmg/ddp008. Epub 2009 Jan 6. Citation on PubMed ...
Hong, J.H.; Lee, G.T.; Lee, J.H.; Kwon, S.J.; Park, S.H.; Kim, S.J.; Kim, I.Y. Effect of bone morphogenetic protein-6 on ... bone morphogenetic proteins; rheumatoid arthritis; interleukin-17; tumor necrosis factor-alpha; hippocampus; adult neurogenesis ... Lee, G.T.; Jung, Y.S.; Lee, J.H.; Kim, W.J.; Kim, I.Y. Bone morphogenetic protein 6-induced interleukin-1β expression in ... Lories, R.J.; Luyten, F.P. Bone morphogenetic proteins in destructive and remodeling arthritis. Arthritis Res. Ther. 2007, 9, ...
... analysis of serum concentrations of oocyte biomarkers growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 in ...
13), placental bone morphogenetic protein (PLAB; ref. 14), prostate-derived factor (PDF; ref. 15), nonsteroidal anti- ... The transforming growth factor-β family members bone morphogenetic protein-2 and macrophage inhibitory cytokine-1 as mediators ... Cloning and characterization of a novel member of the transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenetic protein family ... is a divergent member of the TGF-β superfamily that displays similarity with both bone morphogenetic proteins (31-35% homology ...
Sulfated glycosaminoglycans exploit the conformational plasticity of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) and alter the ... Protein and receptor structure modeling. The complete structure of the PDGF-BB protein is not available in its unbound form in ... Molecular modeling of protein and receptor. The structure of the PDGF-BB/PDGFR-β complex was obtained from the Protein Data ... Analysis of the protein-receptor interface. The protein-receptor interaction interface of the full PDGF/PDGFR-β complex ...
TGF-beta Superfamily Proteins [D23.529.942] * Bone Morphogenetic Proteins [D23.529.942.200] * Bone Morphogenetic Protein 1 [ ... TGF-beta Superfamily Proteins [D12.644.276.954] * Bone Morphogenetic Proteins [D12.644.276.954.200] * Bone Morphogenetic ... TGF-beta Superfamily Proteins [D12.776.467.942] * Bone Morphogenetic Proteins [D12.776.467.942.200] * Bone Morphogenetic ... TGF-beta Superfamily Proteins [D23.529.942] * Growth Differentiation Factors [D23.529.942.300] * Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 ...
TGF-beta Superfamily Proteins [D23.529.942] * Bone Morphogenetic Proteins [D23.529.942.200] * Bone Morphogenetic Protein 1 [ ... TGF-beta Superfamily Proteins [D12.644.276.954] * Bone Morphogenetic Proteins [D12.644.276.954.200] * Bone Morphogenetic ... TGF-beta Superfamily Proteins [D12.776.467.942] * Bone Morphogenetic Proteins [D12.776.467.942.200] * Bone Morphogenetic ... TGF-beta Superfamily Proteins [D23.529.942] * Growth Differentiation Factors [D23.529.942.300] * Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 ...
... which is a group of proteins that help control the growth and development of tissues throughout the body. Learn about this gene ... The GDF3 gene provides instructions for making a protein that is part of the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) superfamily ... Within the TGFβ superfamily, the GDF3 protein belongs to the bone morphogenetic protein family, which is involved in regulating ... Mutation of the bone morphogenetic protein GDF3 causes ocular and skeletal anomalies. Hum Mol Genet. 2010 Jan 15;19(2):287-98. ...
Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) alleles predict over-response to recombinant follicle stimulation hormone and iatrogenic ...
Bone morphogenetic protein 15. Xp11.22. 300247. 1068. GC0XP050910. Primary ovarian insufficiency ... Links: Germinal vesicle oocyte protein expression , MII oocyte protein expression , Zygote Protein Expression , Mouse ... and proteins. In the human fetal ovary oocyte development, the RNA binding protein VASA protein is expressed in primordial ... In G0/G1 cells express a red fluorescent protein and S/G2/M cells express a green fluorescent protein. (More? Tooth Development ...
BMP2 Bone morphogenetic protein 2. BMP3 Bone morphogenetic protein 3. BMP4 Bone morphogenetic protein 4. BMP5 Bone ... BMP1 Bone morphogenetic protein 1. BMP10 Bone morphogenetic protein 10. BMP15 Bone morphogenetic protein 15. ... BMP6 Bone morphogenetic protein 6. BMP7 Bone morphogenetic protein 7. BMPER BMP binding endothelial regulator. BMPR1B Bone ... morphogenetic protein receptor, type IB. BMPR2 Bone morphogenetic protein receptor, type II (serine/threonine kinase). CDH1 ...
Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 - Preferred Concept UI. M0355426. Scope note. A protein that plays a role in GRANULOSA CELLS ... Bone Morphogenetic Protein 15 Entry term(s). BMP-15 GDF 9 Related Factor GDF 9 Related Protein GDF-9 Related Factor GDF-9- ... 2009; BONE MORPHOGENETIC PROTEIN 15 was indexed under INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS 2003-2008, & under GROWTH ... Mutations in the gene for bone morphogenetic protein 15 are linked to reproductive abnormalities such as PREMATURE OVARIAN ...
bone morphogenetic protein 15 [Source:HG.... C17orf81. 23587. ELP5. elongator acetyltransferase complex subu.... ...
PCR-RFLP of bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15/FecX) gene as a candidate for prolificacy in sheep. H Nagdy, KGM Mahmoud, MMM ... 15. 2016. Secretion of inhibin in male Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) from one week of age to sexual maturity. M Sedqyar, Q ... 15. 2008. Accuracy of subjective evaluation of luteal blood flow by color Doppler ultrasonography for early diagnosis of ...
CLIA Kit for Human Bone morphogenetic protein 15. U1469h. 人. 96T. 人乳腺癌易感蛋白2(BRCA-2)CLIA试剂盒 CLIA Kit for Human Breast cancer ... 人蛋白BTG3(Protein BTG3)CLIA试剂盒 CLIA Kit for Human Protein BTG3 ... 人Bassoon蛋白(Protein bassoon)CLIA试剂盒 CLIA Kit for Human Protein bassoon ... CLIA Kit for Human B-cell CLL/lymphoma 6 member B protein ... CLIA Kit for Human Bone morphogenetic protein 1.
Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2 N0000178599 Bone Morphogenetic Protein 3 N0000178660 Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4 N0000178663 Bone ... Morphogenetic Protein 5 N0000178664 Bone Morphogenetic Protein 6 N0000178610 Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7 N0000168833 Bone ... Morphogenetic Protein Receptors N0000168835 Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type I N0000168834 Bone Morphogenetic Protein ... N0000011368 Bone Cements N0000007457 bone meal N0000178645 Bone Morphogenetic Protein 1 N0000178698 Bone Morphogenetic Protein ...
MA5-15739 was used in Western Blotting to examine the potential link between bone morphogenetic proteins and inflammation in ... actin and actin related protein actin or actin-binding cytoskeletal protein cytoskeletal protein ... protein binding ATP binding kinesin binding Tat protein binding nucleosomal DNA binding identical protein binding nitric-oxide ... Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research ...
... placement of dental implants in the presence of platelet-rich plasma or recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7. Clin ...
Bone Morphogenetic Protein15 as a candidate gene for prolificacy of Jining Grey goat. Chin J Vet Sci 40:468-475, 2009. ... Association between PCR-SSCP of bone morphogenetic protein 15 gene and prolificacy in Jining Grey goats. Anim Biotechnol 18:263 ...
  • Bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP-15) is a protein that in humans is encoded by the BMP15 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • Polymorphisms in the gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) have been associated with multiple ovulations in sheep. (inrae.fr)
  • Two related members of the TGFB superfamily are involved in the function and development of the ovary: Growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 (BMP15) (7). (balkanmedicaljournal.org)
  • In vivo and in vitro studies have suggested that GDF9 and BMP15 contribute to the formation of the pathogenesis of PCOS (13-15). (balkanmedicaljournal.org)
  • However, studies investigating the roles of GDF9 and BMP15 proteins through the stages of folliculogenesis in the pathogenesis of PCOS do not currently exist. (balkanmedicaljournal.org)
  • The objective of this study was to identify polymorphisms and their genotypes in the growth differentiation factor 9 ( GDF9 ) and bone morphogenetic protein 15 ( BMP15 ) genes in Pelibuey sheep using the tetra-primer amplification-refractory mutation system through polymerase chain reaction (T-ARMS-PCR). (ajvs.cl)
  • Sinus floor augmentation with simultaneous placement of dental implants in the presence of platelet-rich plasma or recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-7. (bvsalud.org)
  • Meta-analysis of the Impact of Patient Characteristics on Estimates of Effectiveness and Harms of Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 in Lumbar Spinal Fusion. (medscape.com)
  • An odontogenic medium modified by the addition of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 was used in the experimental groups to induce differentiation. (scielo.br)
  • BMP-15 and GDF9 interact with each other and work synergistically to have similar interactions with the target cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • Methods of inducing differentiation in stem cells and muscle cells produced therefrom may be used for the study of cellular and molecular biology of tissue development, for the discovery of genes and proteins such as differentiation factors that play a role in tissue development and regeneration. (justia.com)
  • To systematically discover ovarian fertility genes en masse, we employed a mouse model (Foxo3) in which follicles are assembled normally but then undergo synchronous activation. (appliedbioinfo.com)
  • mice with null mutations in the gdf-9 gene or ewes with inactivating mutations in gdf-9 or bmp-15 genes are infertile with follicle development arrested at the primary stage. (reading.ac.uk)
  • Oocytes prevent cumulus cell apoptosis by maintaining a morphogenic paracrine gradient of bone morphogenetic proteins. (wikigenes.org)
  • Findings suggest that fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva maps to band 4q27-31, a region that contains at least 1 gene involved in the bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signaling pathway. (medscape.com)
  • However, in the BMP-15 the homodimers form as a non-covalent bond is present between two BMP-15 subunits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Freeze thaw will destroy a percentage in every cycle and should be avoided.Antibody for research use.Aplha, transcription related growth factors and stimulating factors or repressing nuclear factors are complex subunits of proteins involved in cell differentiation. (tgf-a.com)
  • This protein is a member of the Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) superfamily and is a paracrine signalling molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • Growth/differentiation factors (GDF-1 to GDF-15) are members of the BMP family of TGF-beta superfamily proteins. (rndsystems.com)
  • Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. (childrensmercy.org)
  • Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are progress components that belong to the remodeling progress factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily, and until date 15 BMPs have been described. (eb2009.org)
  • [ 5 ] BMPs are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily and play a role in the development of bone and other tissues. (medscape.com)
  • Positive selection in bone morphogenetic protein 15 targets a natural mutation associated with primary ovarian insufficiency in human. (inra.fr)
  • 15. Characterization and expression of bone morphogenetic protein 4 gene in postnatal pigs. (dxtang.com)
  • Identification, characterization and structure analysis of a type I ribosome-inactivating protein from Sapium sebiferum (Euphorbiaceae). (shengsci.com)
  • Two breeds of sheep, Inverdale and Hanna, are naturally heterozygous carriers of point mutations in the BMP-15 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • These point mutations result in higher ovulation rates and larger litter sizes than sheep strains with a wildtype BMP-15 genotype. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sheep carrying homozygous alleles for the Inverdale and Hanna BMP-15 mutations are infertile, as they have streak ovaries and the primary stage of folliculogenesis is inhibited. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studies published 15 years ago determined that heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding the bone morphogenetic protein type II receptor (BMPR-II) are the most common genetic cause of the disease. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Mutations of this gene introduce a premature stop codon and result in truncated protein versions. (medscape.com)
  • Functions of BMP-15 include Promotion of growth and maturation of ovarian follicles, starting from the primary gonadotrophin-independent phases of folliculogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • BMP-15 main functions are crucial for the beginning of folliculogenesis as seen in Image 1. (wikipedia.org)
  • As BMP-15 acts directly on granulosa cells it has an important influence on granulosa function including steroidogenesis inhibition of luteinization and differentiation of cumulus, without which would lead to infertility and lack of folliculogenesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • These studies suggest that BMP-15 plays a vital role in the normal regulation of folliculogenesis and ovulation in sheep. (wikipedia.org)
  • To investigate the efficiency of growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 during folliculogenesis in a dehydroepiandrosterone-induced mouse Polycystic ovary syndrome model. (balkanmedicaljournal.org)
  • A variety of growth factors (GFs)-including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP), platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and peptides of the parathyroid hormone (PTH)-have been tested for local bone regeneration. (allenpress.com)
  • It may be feasible in the near future for BMPs to replace autologous and allogenic bone grafts. (allenpress.com)
  • BMPs comprise the largest subfamily of TGF-beta and belong to a group of noncollagen proteins. (allenpress.com)
  • BMPs, first described for his or her function in bone and cartilage formation, additionally play a task in renal fibrosis in persistent kidney illness (CKD). (eb2009.org)
  • Simple Plex assay for the detection of mouse Growth Differentiation Factor 15 (GDF-15) in cell culture supernatant (CCS), serum, plasma (EDTA/Heparin), and urine. (rndsystems.com)
  • The application of specific growth factors for osteoinduction without using a bone graft constitutes a real impact on bone regeneration. (allenpress.com)
  • 13 , 15 , 19 , 25 The use of BMP-2 and BMP-7 osteogenic proteins has been widely studied due to their marketing factors. (allenpress.com)
  • Two such factors, bone morphogenetic proteins, RMP-4 and BMP-7, are expressed by ovarian stromal cells and/or theca cells and have recently been implicated as positive regulators of the primordial-to-primary follicle transition. (reading.ac.uk)
  • Description: This is Double-antibody Sandwich Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 1 (BMP1) in serum, plasma, tissue homogenates and other biological fluids. (srbiosystem.com)
  • Description: Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay based on the Double-antibody Sandwich method for detection of Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein 1 (BMP1) in samples from serum, plasma, tissue homogenates and other biological fluids with no significant corss-reactivity with analogues from other species. (srbiosystem.com)
  • 14. Polymorphisms of the bone morphogenetic protein 7 gene(BMP7) and association analysis with sow productive traits. (dxtang.com)
  • Faulty bone morphogenetic protein signaling in esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula. (childrensmercy.org)
  • Bone morphogenetic protein expression patterns in human esophageal atresia with tracheoesophageal fistula. (childrensmercy.org)
  • BMP-15 prevents this transition by inhibiting the production of FSH receptor mRNA in granulosa cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptor ( BMPR ) family includes transmembrane receptors that play vital roles in tissue development and cellular signaling. (news-medical.net)
  • BMPR family of proteins is a valuable tool for studying ligand-receptor interactions, downstream signaling events, and determining therapeutic targets. (news-medical.net)
  • Now, Professor Nick Morrell and colleagues (Medicine) have determined that a particular circulating bone morphogenetic protein (BMP9) is the preferred ligand for the BMPR-II receptor complex on endothelial cells. (cam.ac.uk)
  • A cardiomelic developmental field has also been postulated to relate the genetic heterogeneity of HOS (and other similar syndromes) to a cascade of molecules, including the brachyury, sonic hedgehog, bone morphogenetic protein, retinoic acid receptor, and transforming growth factor beta families. (medscape.com)
  • Bone Morphogenetic Proteins" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (childrensmercy.org)
  • Bone morphogenetic protein 15 and growth differentiation factor 9 co-operate to regulate granulosa cell function in ruminants. (wikigenes.org)
  • Ovarian tissues were examined for growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 using immunofluorescent labelling and electron microscopic examinations. (balkanmedicaljournal.org)
  • These results suggest that the decrease in the growth differentiation factor 9 and bone morphogenetic protein 15 expression initiated at the primary follicle stage effect the follicle development and zona pellucida structure and may cause subfertility or infertility in Polycystic ovary syndrome. (balkanmedicaljournal.org)
  • Wu S, Flint JK, Rezvani G, De Luca F. Nuclear factor-kappaB p65 facilitates longitudinal bone growth by inducing growth plate chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation and by preventing apoptosis. (childrensmercy.org)
  • Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP), known as active components of odontogenic differentiation and tooth development, have been used as a growth factor in an appropriate medium. (scielo.br)
  • This super-fertility was mimicked later through immunization of wildtype ewes against BMP-15 using various immunisation techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • BMP-15 prevents differentiation into preovulatory follicle by inhibiting FSH action in granulosa. (wikipedia.org)
  • We investigated whether impaired regulation of bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) via epigenetic pathways is associated with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis. (oncotarget.com)
  • Regulation of apoAI processing by procollagen C-proteinase enhancer-2 and bone morphogenetic protein-1. (nih.gov)
  • Sarkar MR, Augat P, Shefelbine SJ, et al: Bone formation in a long bone defect model using a platelet-rich plasma-loaded collagen scaffold. (medigraphic.com)
  • Grafting with autogenous bone, guided bone regeneration (GBR), distraction osteogenesis, and tissue engineering have been developed to perform intraoral bone augmentation in dentistry. (allenpress.com)
  • Bone scans also can help to differentiate osteoarthritis from osteomyelitis and bone metastases. (medscape.com)
  • Description: A sandwich ELISA kit for detection of Bone Morphogenetic Protein 1 from Human in samples from blood, serum, plasma, cell culture fluid and other biological fluids. (srbiosystem.com)
  • Recombinant human protein Gal-3, EGFR, BMPR1A, and BMPR2 were obtained from Sino Biological. (news-medical.net)
  • Assignment of the mouse Pcolce2 gene, which encodes procollagen C-proteinase enhancer protein 2, to chromosome 9 and localization of PCOLCE2 to human chromosome 3q23. (nih.gov)
  • They have become a likely treatment option, given their action on regeneration and remodeling of bone lesions and increasing the bone response around alloplastic materials. (allenpress.com)
  • In this review, we will highlight the role of the BMP in bone, periodontal and dental regeneration. (allenpress.com)
  • Nakashima M. Bone morphogenetic proteins in dentin regeneration for potential use in endodontic therapy. (scielo.br)
  • 13. Cloning and Spatio-Temporal Expression of Bone Morphogenetic Proteins-2,-4Gene During Ovarian Development in New Zealand White Rabbit. (dxtang.com)
  • Morone MA, Boden SD, Hair G: Gene expression during autograft lumbar spine fusion and the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 2. (medigraphic.com)
  • However, GBR has different clinical limitations, including increased treatment time, 1 limited predictability for vertical bone augmentation, 1 risk of infection subsequent to membrane exposure, 2 and technique sensitivity. (allenpress.com)
  • Schmitt JM, Hwang K, Winn SR, Hollinger JO: Bone morphogenetic proteins: an update on basic biology and clinical relevance. (medigraphic.com)
  • Carriers for bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) used in clinical practice still suffer from limitations such as insufficient protein retention. (unige.ch)
  • BMP-15 is an exception to this as the molecule does not contain the seventh cysteine. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the late 1980s, the active factor responsible for the induction of bone was identified: BMP. (allenpress.com)
  • In the United States, these proteins are commercially available INFUSE Bone Graft since its approval by the Food and Drug Administration in July 2002 for its use in anterior lumbar interbody fusion. (allenpress.com)
  • Ladd AL, Pliam NB: The role of bone graft and alternatives in unstable distal radius fracture treatment. (medigraphic.com)
  • The BMP-15 gene is located on the X-chromosome and using Northern blot analysis BMP-15 mRNA is locally expressed within the ovaries in oocytes only after they have started to undergo the primary stages of development. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast, bone scans are often negative in the early stages of multiple myeloma, a cause of bone pain in older adults that can be confused with osteoarthritis. (medscape.com)
  • 3 To overcome some of these difficulties, research has been driven toward the use of bioactive molecules to induce local bone formation. (allenpress.com)
  • Description: A sandwich quantitative ELISA assay kit for detection of Rat Bone Morphogenetic Protein 1 (BMP1) in samples from serum, plasma, tissue homogenates or other biological fluids. (srbiosystem.com)
  • Simple Plex Mouse GDF-15 assay kit for use on Ella instrument. (rndsystems.com)
  • Samples containing high concentrations of mouse GDF-15 were serially diluted with Sample Diluent to produce samples within the dynamic range of the assay. (rndsystems.com)
  • Bioinformatics and biology insights 15, 11779322211043297. (edu.pk)
  • GDF proteins are important during embryonic development, particularly in the skeletal, nervous, and muscular systems. (rndsystems.com)
  • Previous studies showed that bone morphogenetic protein 9 (BMP-9) induces the expression of choline acetyltransferase and the vesicular acetylcholine (ACh) transporter, and upregulates ACh synthesis in cultured primary neurons from embryonic mouse septum [I. López-Coviella, B. Berse, R. Krauss, R.S. Thies, J.K. Blusztajn, Induction and maintenance of the neuronal cholinergic phenotype in the central nervous system by BMP-9. (rti.org)
  • BMP-15 is released from the oocyte into the surrounding granulosa tissue where it binds to two membrane bound receptors on granulosa cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • HNP (seen in the image below) is defined as localized displacement of nucleus, cartilage, fragmented apophyseal bone, or fragmented anular tissue beyond the intervertebral disc space. (medscape.com)
  • Hard tissue formation in a porous HA/TCP ceramic scaffold loaded with stromal cells derived from dental pulp and bone marrow. (scielo.br)
  • Odontogenic capability: bone marrow stromal stem cells versus dental pulp stem cells. (scielo.br)
  • BMP-15 promotes the change of primordial to primary and secondary follicles which are surrounded by several granulosa cell layers but doesn't promote transition into preovulatory follicles. (wikipedia.org)
  • This encoded protein can induce G1 arrest in the cell cycle. (appliedbioinfo.com)
  • Cytokinesis in animal cells relies on a centralspindlin complex consisting of male germ cell RacGap (MgcRacGAP) and mitotic kinesin-like protein 1 (MKLP1). (shengsci.com)
  • Computational screening of phytochemicals against survivin protein: A potent target for cancer. (edu.pk)
  • Effects of chemotherapy and hormonal therapy for early breast cancer on recurrence and 15-year survival: an overview of the randomised trials. (nature.com)