Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Graft vs Host Disease: The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Whole-Body Irradiation: Irradiation of the whole body with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. It is applicable to humans or animals but not to microorganisms.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Anemia, Aplastic: A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.Transplantation Conditioning: Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Liver Transplantation: The transference of a part of or an entire liver from one human or animal to another.Transplantation Chimera: An organism that, as a result of transplantation of donor tissue or cells, consists of two or more cell lines descended from at least two zygotes. This state may result in the induction of donor-specific TRANSPLANTATION TOLERANCE.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Busulfan: An alkylating agent having a selective immunosuppressive effect on BONE MARROW. It has been used in the palliative treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (MYELOID LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC), but although symptomatic relief is provided, no permanent remission is brought about. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), busulfan is listed as a known carcinogen.Bone Marrow Purging: Techniques for the removal of subpopulations of cells (usually residual tumor cells) from the bone marrow ex vivo before it is infused. The purging is achieved by a variety of agents including pharmacologic agents, biophysical agents (laser photoirradiation or radioisotopes) and immunologic agents. Bone marrow purging is used in both autologous and allogeneic BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION.Histocompatibility Testing: Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Histocompatibility: The degree of antigenic similarity between the tissues of different individuals, which determines the acceptance or rejection of allografts.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Transplantation, Isogeneic: Transplantation between genetically identical individuals, i.e., members of the same species with identical histocompatibility antigens, such as monozygotic twins, members of the same inbred strain, or members of a hybrid population produced by crossing certain inbred strains.Bone Marrow DiseasesKidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Hematopoiesis: The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Radiation Chimera: An organism whose body contains cell populations of different genotypes as a result of the TRANSPLANTATION of donor cells after sufficient ionizing radiation to destroy the mature recipient's cells which would otherwise reject the donor cells.Mice, Inbred C57BLLeukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive: Clonal hematopoetic disorder caused by an acquired genetic defect in PLURIPOTENT STEM CELLS. It starts in MYELOID CELLS of the bone marrow, invades the blood and then other organs. The condition progresses from a stable, more indolent, chronic phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, CHRONIC PHASE) lasting up to 7 years, to an advanced phase composed of an accelerated phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, ACCELERATED PHASE) and BLAST CRISIS.Bone Marrow Examination: Removal of bone marrow and evaluation of its histologic picture.Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute: Clonal expansion of myeloid blasts in bone marrow, blood, and other tissue. Myeloid leukemias develop from changes in cells that normally produce NEUTROPHILS; BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Graft Rejection: An immune response with both cellular and humoral components, directed against an allogeneic transplant, whose tissue antigens are not compatible with those of the recipient.Hepatic Veno-Occlusive Disease: Liver disease that is caused by injuries to the ENDOTHELIAL CELLS of the vessels and subendothelial EDEMA, but not by THROMBOSIS. Extracellular matrix, rich in FIBRONECTINS, is usually deposited around the HEPATIC VEINS leading to venous outflow occlusion and sinusoidal obstruction.Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma: A neoplasm characterized by abnormalities of the lymphoid cell precursors leading to excessive lymphoblasts in the marrow and other organs. It is the most common cancer in children and accounts for the vast majority of all childhood leukemias.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bone Marrow Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the bone marrow. They are differentiated from neoplasms composed of bone marrow cells, such as MULTIPLE MYELOMA. Most bone marrow neoplasms are metastatic.Transplantation Immunology: A general term for the complex phenomena involved in allo- and xenograft rejection by a host and graft vs host reaction. Although the reactions involved in transplantation immunology are primarily thymus-dependent phenomena of cellular immunity, humoral factors also play a part in late rejection.Graft vs Host Reaction: An immunological attack mounted by a graft against the host because of tissue incompatibility when immunologically competent cells are transplanted to an immunologically incompetent host; the resulting clinical picture is that of GRAFT VS HOST DISEASE.Leukemia, Myeloid: Form of leukemia characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of the myeloid lineage and their precursors (MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS) in the bone marrow and other sites.Immunosuppression: Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs.Lymphocyte Depletion: Immunosuppression by reduction of circulating lymphocytes or by T-cell depletion of bone marrow. The former may be accomplished in vivo by thoracic duct drainage or administration of antilymphocyte serum. The latter is performed ex vivo on bone marrow before its transplantation.Stem Cell Transplantation: The transfer of STEM CELLS from one individual to another within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or between species (XENOTRANSPLANTATION), or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). The source and location of the stem cells determines their potency or pluripotency to differentiate into various cell types.Leukocyte Transfusion: The transfer of leukocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin: Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.Heart Transplantation: The transference of a heart from one human or animal to another.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Severe Combined Immunodeficiency: Group of rare congenital disorders characterized by impairment of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, leukopenia, and low or absent antibody levels. It is inherited as an X-linked or autosomal recessive defect. Mutations occurring in many different genes cause human Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID).Chimera: An individual that contains cell populations derived from different zygotes.Colony-Forming Units Assay: A cytologic technique for measuring the functional capacity of stem cells by assaying their activity.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.HLA Antigens: Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplasia in one or more hematopoietic cell lineages. They predominantly affect patients over 60, are considered preleukemic conditions, and have high probability of transformation into ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Lung Transplantation: The transference of either one or both of the lungs from one human or animal to another.Cyclosporine: A cyclic undecapeptide from an extract of soil fungi. It is a powerful immunosupressant with a specific action on T-lymphocytes. It is used for the prophylaxis of graft rejection in organ and tissue transplantation. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed).Actuarial Analysis: The application of probability and statistical methods to calculate the risk of occurrence of any event, such as onset of illness, recurrent disease, hospitalization, disability, or death. It may include calculation of the anticipated money costs of such events and of the premiums necessary to provide for payment of such costs.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Hematologic Diseases: Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.Lymphocyte Transfusion: The transfer of lymphocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Nuclear Family: A family composed of spouses and their children.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Carmustine: A cell-cycle phase nonspecific alkylating antineoplastic agent. It is used in the treatment of brain tumors and various other malignant neoplasms. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p462) This substance may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen according to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985). (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Organ Transplantation: Transference of an organ between individuals of the same species or between individuals of different species.Pancytopenia: Deficiency of all three cell elements of the blood, erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets.Graft vs Tumor Effect: Immunological rejection of tumor tissue/cells following bone marrow transplantation.Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Graft vs Leukemia Effect: Immunological rejection of leukemia cells following bone marrow transplantation.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Cytarabine: A pyrimidine nucleoside analog that is used mainly in the treatment of leukemia, especially acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytarabine is an antimetabolite antineoplastic agent that inhibits the synthesis of DNA. Its actions are specific for the S phase of the cell cycle. It also has antiviral and immunosuppressant properties. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p472)Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Survival Rate: The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.Cytomegalovirus Infections: Infection with CYTOMEGALOVIRUS, characterized by enlarged cells bearing intranuclear inclusions. Infection may be in almost any organ, but the salivary glands are the most common site in children, as are the lungs in adults.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor: A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.Melphalan: An alkylating nitrogen mustard that is used as an antineoplastic in the form of the levo isomer - MELPHALAN, the racemic mixture - MERPHALAN, and the dextro isomer - MEDPHALAN; toxic to bone marrow, but little vesicant action; potential carcinogen.Mice, Inbred BALB CDisease-Free Survival: Period after successful treatment in which there is no appearance of the symptoms or effects of the disease.Etoposide: A semisynthetic derivative of PODOPHYLLOTOXIN that exhibits antitumor activity. Etoposide inhibits DNA synthesis by forming a complex with topoisomerase II and DNA. This complex induces breaks in double stranded DNA and prevents repair by topoisomerase II binding. Accumulated breaks in DNA prevent entry into the mitotic phase of cell division, and lead to cell death. Etoposide acts primarily in the G2 and S phases of the cell cycle.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Multiple Myeloma: A malignancy of mature PLASMA CELLS engaging in monoclonal immunoglobulin production. It is characterized by hyperglobulinemia, excess Bence-Jones proteins (free monoclonal IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) in the urine, skeletal destruction, bone pain, and fractures. Other features include ANEMIA; HYPERCALCEMIA; and RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Antigens, CD34: Glycoproteins found on immature hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. They are the only molecules to date whose expression within the blood system is restricted to a small number of progenitor cells in the bone marrow.Hodgkin Disease: A malignant disease characterized by progressive enlargement of the lymph nodes, spleen, and general lymphoid tissue. In the classical variant, giant usually multinucleate Hodgkin's and REED-STERNBERG CELLS are present; in the nodular lymphocyte predominant variant, lymphocytic and histiocytic cells are seen.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Infection: Invasion of the host organism by microorganisms that can cause pathological conditions or diseases.Cell Transplantation: Transference of cells within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Granulocytes: Leukocytes with abundant granules in the cytoplasm. They are divided into three groups according to the staining properties of the granules: neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and basophilic. Mature granulocytes are the NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and BASOPHILS.Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of STEM CELLS collected from the fetal blood remaining in the UMBILICAL CORD and the PLACENTA after delivery. Included are the HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS.Antilymphocyte Serum: Serum containing GAMMA-GLOBULINS which are antibodies for lymphocyte ANTIGENS. It is used both as a test for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY and therapeutically in TRANSPLANTATION.Immunophenotyping: Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.Pancreas Transplantation: The transference of a pancreas from one human or animal to another.Chimerism: The occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations of different chromosomal constitutions, derived from different individuals. This contrasts with MOSAICISM in which the different cell populations are derived from a single individual.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Islets of Langerhans Transplantation: The transference of pancreatic islets within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Thymus Gland: A single, unpaired primary lymphoid organ situated in the MEDIASTINUM, extending superiorly into the neck to the lower edge of the THYROID GLAND and inferiorly to the fourth costal cartilage. It is necessary for normal development of immunologic function early in life. By puberty, it begins to involute and much of the tissue is replaced by fat.Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation: Transplantation of stem cells collected from the peripheral blood. It is a less invasive alternative to direct marrow harvesting of hematopoietic stem cells. Enrichment of stem cells in peripheral blood can be achieved by inducing mobilization of stem cells from the BONE MARROW.Immunologic Deficiency Syndromes: Syndromes in which there is a deficiency or defect in the mechanisms of immunity, either cellular or humoral.Transplantation Tolerance: An induced state of non-reactivity to grafted tissue from a donor organism that would ordinarily trigger a cell-mediated or humoral immune response.Opportunistic Infections: An infection caused by an organism which becomes pathogenic under certain conditions, e.g., during immunosuppression.Skin Transplantation: The grafting of skin in humans or animals from one site to another to replace a lost portion of the body surface skin.Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Transplantation: Transference of a tissue or organ from either an alive or deceased donor, within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Cell SeparationBlood Cells: The cells found in the body fluid circulating throughout the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Methotrexate: An antineoplastic antimetabolite with immunosuppressant properties. It is an inhibitor of TETRAHYDROFOLATE DEHYDROGENASE and prevents the formation of tetrahydrofolate, necessary for synthesis of thymidylate, an essential component of DNA.Living Donors: Non-cadaveric providers of organs for transplant to related or non-related recipients.Cyclosporins: A group of closely related cyclic undecapeptides from the fungi Trichoderma polysporum and Cylindocarpon lucidum. They have some antineoplastic and antifungal action and significant immunosuppressive effects. Cyclosporins have been proposed as adjuvants in tissue and organ transplantation to suppress graft rejection.Bone Development: The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.Blood Group Incompatibility: An antigenic mismatch between donor and recipient blood. Antibodies present in the recipient's serum may be directed against antigens in the donor product. Such a mismatch may result in a transfusion reaction in which, for example, donor blood is hemolyzed. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984).Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Neoplasm, Residual: Remnant of a tumor or cancer after primary, potentially curative therapy. (Dr. Daniel Masys, written communication)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization: The release of stem cells from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood circulation for the purpose of leukapheresis, prior to stem cell transplantation. Hematopoietic growth factors or chemotherapeutic agents often are used to stimulate the mobilization.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Stromal Cells: Connective tissue cells of an organ found in the loose connective tissue. These are most often associated with the uterine mucosa and the ovary as well as the hematopoietic system and elsewhere.Blood Cell Count: The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Immunocompromised Host: A human or animal whose immunologic mechanism is deficient because of an immunodeficiency disorder or other disease or as the result of the administration of immunosuppressive drugs or radiation.Salvage Therapy: A therapeutic approach, involving chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or surgery, after initial regimens have failed to lead to improvement in a patient's condition. Salvage therapy is most often used for neoplastic diseases.Life Tables: Summarizing techniques used to describe the pattern of mortality and survival in populations. These methods can be applied to the study not only of death, but also of any defined endpoint such as the onset of disease or the occurrence of disease complications.beta-Thalassemia: A disorder characterized by reduced synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin. There is retardation of hemoglobin A synthesis in the heterozygous form (thalassemia minor), which is asymptomatic, while in the homozygous form (thalassemia major, Cooley's anemia, Mediterranean anemia, erythroblastic anemia), which can result in severe complications and even death, hemoglobin A synthesis is absent.Lymphoproliferative Disorders: Disorders characterized by proliferation of lymphoid tissue, general or unspecified.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Osteopetrosis: Excessive formation of dense trabecular bone leading to pathological fractures; OSTEITIS; SPLENOMEGALY with infarct; ANEMIA; and extramedullary hemopoiesis (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Leukemia, Lymphoid: Leukemia associated with HYPERPLASIA of the lymphoid tissues and increased numbers of circulating malignant LYMPHOCYTES and lymphoblasts.Mice, Inbred C3HCell Count: The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.Blood Transfusion: The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)Hemibody Irradiation: Irradiation of one half or both halves of the body in the treatment of disseminated cancer or widespread metastases. It is used to treat diffuse metastases in one session as opposed to multiple fields over an extended period. The more frequent treatment modalities are upper hemibody irradiation (UHBI) or lower hemibody irradiation (LHBI). Less common is mid-body irradiation (MBI). In the treatment of both halves of the body sequentially, hemibody irradiation permits radiotherapy of the whole body with larger doses of radiation than could be accomplished with WHOLE-BODY IRRADIATION. It is sometimes called "systemic" hemibody irradiation with reference to its use in widespread cancer or metastases. (P. Rubin et al. Cancer, Vol 55, p2210, 1985)Leukemia, Myelomonocytic, Acute: A pediatric acute myeloid leukemia involving both myeloid and monocytoid precursors. At least 20% of non-erythroid cells are of monocytic origin.Cell Lineage: The developmental history of specific differentiated cell types as traced back to the original STEM CELLS in the embryo.Minor Histocompatibility Antigens: Allelic alloantigens often responsible for weak graft rejection in cases when (major) histocompatibility has been established by standard tests. In the mouse they are coded by more than 500 genes at up to 30 minor histocompatibility loci. The most well-known minor histocompatibility antigen in mammals is the H-Y antigen.Vincristine: An antitumor alkaloid isolated from VINCA ROSEA. (Merck, 11th ed.)Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Anemia, Refractory, with Excess of Blasts: Chronic refractory anemia with granulocytopenia, and/or thrombocytopenia. Myeloblasts and progranulocytes constitute 5 to 40 percent of the nucleated marrow cells.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS).Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor: An acidic glycoprotein of MW 23 kDa with internal disulfide bonds. The protein is produced in response to a number of inflammatory mediators by mesenchymal cells present in the hemopoietic environment and at peripheral sites of inflammation. GM-CSF is able to stimulate the production of neutrophilic granulocytes, macrophages, and mixed granulocyte-macrophage colonies from bone marrow cells and can stimulate the formation of eosinophil colonies from fetal liver progenitor cells. GM-CSF can also stimulate some functional activities in mature granulocytes and macrophages.Mice, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.Bone Regeneration: Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.Prednisone: A synthetic anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid derived from CORTISONE. It is biologically inert and converted to PREDNISOLONE in the liver.Podophyllotoxin: A lignan (LIGNANS) found in PODOPHYLLIN resin from the roots of PODOPHYLLUM plants. It is a potent spindle poison, toxic if taken internally, and has been used as a cathartic. It is very irritating to skin and mucous membranes, has keratolytic actions, has been used to treat warts and keratoses, and may have antineoplastic properties, as do some of its congeners and derivatives.Host vs Graft Reaction: The immune responses of a host to a graft. A specific response is GRAFT REJECTION.Immune Tolerance: The specific failure of a normally responsive individual to make an immune response to a known antigen. It results from previous contact with the antigen by an immunologically immature individual (fetus or neonate) or by an adult exposed to extreme high-dose or low-dose antigen, or by exposure to radiation, antimetabolites, antilymphocytic serum, etc.Tacrolimus: A macrolide isolated from the culture broth of a strain of Streptomyces tsukubaensis that has strong immunosuppressive activity in vivo and prevents the activation of T-lymphocytes in response to antigenic or mitogenic stimulation in vitro.Fanconi Anemia: Congenital disorder affecting all bone marrow elements, resulting in ANEMIA; LEUKOPENIA; and THROMBOPENIA, and associated with cardiac, renal, and limb malformations as well as dermal pigmentary changes. Spontaneous CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE is a feature of this disease along with predisposition to LEUKEMIA. There are at least 7 complementation groups in Fanconi anemia: FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCD1, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, and FANCL. (from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/dispomim.cgi?id=227650, August 20, 2004)Histiocytosis, Non-Langerhans-Cell: Group of disorders which feature accumulations of active HISTIOCYTES and LYMPHOCYTES, but where the histiocytes are not LANGERHANS CELLS. The group includes HEMOPHAGOCYTIC LYMPHOHISTIOCYTOSIS; SINUS HISTIOCYTOSIS; xanthogranuloma; reticulohistiocytoma; JUVENILE XANTHOGRANULOMA; xanthoma disseminatum; as well as the lipid storage diseases (SEA-BLUE HISTIOCYTE SYNDROME; and NIEMANN-PICK DISEASES).Graft Enhancement, Immunologic: The induction of prolonged survival and growth of allografts of either tumors or normal tissues which would ordinarily be rejected. It may be induced passively by introducing graft-specific antibodies from previously immunized donors, which bind to the graft's surface antigens, masking them from recognition by T-cells; or actively by prior immunization of the recipient with graft antigens which evoke specific antibodies and form antigen-antibody complexes which bind to the antigen receptor sites of the T-cells and block their cytotoxic activity.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Primary Myelofibrosis: A de novo myeloproliferation arising from an abnormal stem cell. It is characterized by the replacement of bone marrow by fibrous tissue, a process that is mediated by CYTOKINES arising from the abnormal clone.Cystitis: Inflammation of the URINARY BLADDER, either from bacterial or non-bacterial causes. Cystitis is usually associated with painful urination (dysuria), increased frequency, urgency, and suprapubic pain.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Liver Failure: Severe inability of the LIVER to perform its normal metabolic functions, as evidenced by severe JAUNDICE and abnormal serum levels of AMMONIA; BILIRUBIN; ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE; ASPARTATE AMINOTRANSFERASE; LACTATE DEHYDROGENASES; and albumin/globulin ratio. (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed)Antigens, CD45: High-molecular weight glycoproteins uniquely expressed on the surface of LEUKOCYTES and their hemopoietic progenitors. They contain a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase activity which plays a role in intracellular signaling from the CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. The CD45 antigens occur as multiple isoforms that result from alternative mRNA splicing and differential usage of three exons.ABO Blood-Group System: The major human blood type system which depends on the presence or absence of two antigens A and B. Type O occurs when neither A nor B is present and AB when both are present. A and B are genetic factors that determine the presence of enzymes for the synthesis of certain glycoproteins mainly in the red cell membrane.Lymphocyte Activation: Morphologic alteration of small B LYMPHOCYTES or T LYMPHOCYTES in culture into large blast-like cells able to synthesize DNA and RNA and to divide mitotically. It is induced by INTERLEUKINS; MITOGENS such as PHYTOHEMAGGLUTININS, and by specific ANTIGENS. It may also occur in vivo as in GRAFT REJECTION.Pneumonia, Viral: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by a viral infection.Megakaryocytes: Very large BONE MARROW CELLS which release mature BLOOD PLATELETS.Platelet Transfusion: The transfer of blood platelets from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.Transplantation, Heterotopic: Transplantation of tissue typical of one area to a different recipient site. The tissue may be autologous, heterologous, or homologous.Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Philadelphia Chromosome: An aberrant form of human CHROMOSOME 22 characterized by translocation of the distal end of chromosome 9 from 9q34, to the long arm of chromosome 22 at 22q11. It is present in the bone marrow cells of 80 to 90 per cent of patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (LEUKEMIA, MYELOGENOUS, CHRONIC, BCR-ABL POSITIVE).Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Drug Evaluation: Any process by which toxicity, metabolism, absorption, elimination, preferred route of administration, safe dosage range, etc., for a drug or group of drugs is determined through clinical assessment in humans or veterinary animals.Mice, Mutant Strains: Mice bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.Clone Cells: A group of genetically identical cells all descended from a single common ancestral cell by mitosis in eukaryotes or by binary fission in prokaryotes. Clone cells also include populations of recombinant DNA molecules all carrying the same inserted sequence. (From King & Stansfield, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Osteogenesis: The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.Ganciclovir: An ACYCLOVIR analog that is a potent inhibitor of the Herpesvirus family including cytomegalovirus. Ganciclovir is used to treat complications from AIDS-associated cytomegalovirus infections.Lymphocyte Count: The number of LYMPHOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD.Gonadal Disorders: Pathological processes of the OVARIES or the TESTES.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Neutropenia: A decrease in the number of NEUTROPHILS found in the blood.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Liver Diseases: Pathological processes of the LIVER.Tissue and Organ Procurement: The administrative procedures involved with acquiring TISSUES or organs for TRANSPLANTATION through various programs, systems, or organizations. These procedures include obtaining consent from TISSUE DONORS and arranging for transportation of donated tissues and organs, after TISSUE HARVESTING, to HOSPITALS for processing and transplantation.Isoantigens: Antigens that exist in alternative (allelic) forms in a single species. When an isoantigen is encountered by species members who lack it, an immune response is induced. Typical isoantigens are the BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS.Mice, Inbred AKRBronchiolitis Obliterans: Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES leading to an obstructive lung disease. Bronchioles are characterized by fibrous granulation tissue with bronchial exudates in the lumens. Clinical features include a nonproductive cough and DYSPNEA.Mucopolysaccharidosis I: Systemic lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficiency of alpha-L-iduronidase (IDURONIDASE) and characterized by progressive physical deterioration with urinary excretion of DERMATAN SULFATE and HEPARAN SULFATE. There are three recognized phenotypes representing a spectrum of clinical severity from severe to mild: Hurler syndrome, Hurler-Scheie syndrome and Scheie syndrome (formerly mucopolysaccharidosis V). Symptoms may include DWARFISM; hepatosplenomegaly; thick, coarse facial features with low nasal bridge; corneal clouding; cardiac complications; and noisy breathing.Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Heart-Lung Transplantation: The simultaneous, or near simultaneous, transference of heart and lungs from one human or animal to another.Thiotepa: A very toxic alkylating antineoplastic agent also used as an insect sterilant. It causes skin, gastrointestinal, CNS, and bone marrow damage. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), thiotepa may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen (Merck Index, 11th ed).

Bone marrow transplantation in pediatric patients with therapy-related myelodysplasia and leukemia. (1/8007)

Eleven children underwent BMT for therapy-related MDS or leukemia, four from HLA-identical siblings and seven from unrelated donors. Ten of the 11 were conditioned with busulfan and cyclophosphamide as the majority had received prior irradiation to the chest and/or abdomen. All patients engrafted. Regimen-related toxicity was more common when compared to historical controls. Eight patients developed acute GVHD and four of eight who survived 100 days post transplant developed extensive chronic GVHD. Non-relapse related mortality occurred in three patients. Five patients developed recurrent malignancy: one died from recurrence of osteosarcoma, three died of recurrent leukemia or MDS and another developed two subsequent malignancies (duodenal carcinoma and anaplastic astrocytoma). Three survive disease-free at 14+, 22+ and 43+ months for a 2 year actuarial cancer-free survival of 24% (95% confidence interval = 5-53%). Although allogeneic BMT can be curative, regimen-related toxicity is frequent and recurrent malignancy remains the major obstacle.  (+info)

Risk factors for severe hemorrhagic cystitis following BMT. (2/8007)

Hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) is a common toxicity of preparative regimens for bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Severe HC often requires prolonged and expensive hospitalization, and occasionally can result in death. To investigate the risk factors for severe HC, we conducted a retrospective study among 1908 patients who received BMTs at the University of Minnesota during 1974 to 1993. A previous report from our institution reported on 977 of these patients. We identified all patients with genitourinary complication within 100 days post-BMT from the BMT database. Medical charts for these patients were reviewed to determine whether the patient had HC and also the grade of HC. A total of 208 HC cases were identified during the study period. Of them, 92 patients had severe HC, an incidence of 5% (95% CI = 4-6%). We found that grade II-IV graft-versus-host disease (RR = 2.56; 95% CI = 1.43-4.56), use of busulfan (RR = 2.69; 95% CI = 1.35-5.35), and age at transplant (RR = 2.20; 95% CI = 1.27-3.81, for age of 10-30 compared to age of 0-9) were related to an increased risk of HC. In contrast, transplant year was inversely associated with the risk of HC (trend test, P < 0.01). We did not find any significant difference in HC with the use of prophylactic Mesna.  (+info)

Central venous catheter exchange by guidewire for treatment of catheter-related bacteraemia in patients undergoing BMT or intensive chemotherapy. (3/8007)

Current guidelines for the treatment of catheter-related bacteraemia (CRB) advise against central venous catheter (CVC) exchange because of the potential risk of prolonging infection. However, there are no consistent data proving this recommendation. We evaluated prospectively the usefulness of CVC exchange by guidewire for the treatment of CRB in patients undergoing BMT or intensive chemotherapy. CVC exchange was considered when fever and positive blood cultures persisted after 2 days of adequate antimicrobial therapy and no potential source of bacteraemia other than CVC could be identified. The guidewire exchange was preceded and followed by a slow infusion of adequate antimicrobial therapy. Bacteraemia was confirmed as catheter-related by demonstrating concordance between isolates from the tip and blood cultures by pulsed-field electrophoresis of genomic DNA. This procedure was performed in 19 episodes of bacteraemia during a 1-year period. Fourteen episodes (74%) were catheter-related and 71% of these were due to coagulase-negative staphylococci. Guidewire replacement was accomplished uneventfully 4 days after development of sepsis (range 3-6). In all cases, clinical signs of sepsis disappeared in less than 24 h after replacement. Definitive catheter withdrawal was carried out a median of 16 days (range 3-42) after guidewire exchange; in all cases, the tip culture was negative. We conclude that CVC replacement by guidewire under adequate antimicrobial therapy may be a reasonable option for the treatment of CRB when antimicrobial therapy alone has been unsuccessful.  (+info)

The clinical utility of CMV surveillance cultures and antigenemia following bone marrow transplantation. (4/8007)

At our institution, the cytomegalovirus (CMV) prophylaxis protocol for allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) recipients who are CMV-seropositive or receive marrow from a CMV-seropositive donor consists of a surveillance bronchoscopy approximately 35 days posttransplant. Patients with a positive surveillance bronchoscopy for CMV receive pre-emptive ganciclovir. In order to determine the utility of other screening methods for CMV, we prospectively performed weekly CMV antigenemia, and blood, urine and throat cultures from time of engraftment to day 120 post-BMT in 126 consecutive patients. Pre-emptive ganciclovir was given to 11/81 patients (13.6%) because of a positive surveillance bronchoscopy for CMV. Results of CMV blood, urine and throat cultures and the antigenemia assay done prior to or at the time of the surveillance bronchoscopy were analyzed for their ability to predict the bronchoscopy result. The antigenemia test had the highest positive and negative predictive values (72% and 96%, respectively). The ability of these tests to predict CMV disease was evaluated in the 70 patients with a negative surveillance bronchoscopy who did not receive pre-emptive ganciclovir. Of 19 cases of active CMV disease, CMV antigenemia was positive in 15 patients (79%) a mean of 34 days preceding symptoms. Blood cultures were positive in 14/19 patients (74%) a mean of 31 days before onset of disease. CMV antigenemia is useful for predicting the surveillance bronchoscopy result, and also predicts the development of CMV disease in the majority of patients missed by the surveillance bronchoscopy.  (+info)

Disappearance of lupus anticoagulant after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. (5/8007)

Lupus anticoagulant antibodies have never been reported to disappear after either allogeneic or autologous bone marrow transplantation in humans. We report the first case of disappearance of lupus anticoagulant antibodies in a patient without systemic lupus erythematosus or clinical evidence of other autoimmune disorders, who received an allogeneic bone marrow transplant as treatment for chronic myeloid leukemia. Although marrow transplantation is not a recognized therapy for antiphospholipid syndrome, our observation should be considered another example of the capability of intensive chemo-radiotherapy followed by stem cell transplantation to ablate a pathologic marrow clone resulting in an autoimmune disorder and improve, or even cure, some severe autoimmune diseases.  (+info)

Rapid autologous marrow recovery and eradication of infectious mononucleosis despite severe immunosuppression following second transplantation for aplastic anemia. (6/8007)

A patient with aplastic anemia failed to respond to immunosuppressive therapy and first marrow transplantation (BMT). Recovery of autologous hematopoiesis was rapid following a second stem cell transplant with a non-myeloablative preparatory regimen. The autologous immune response to infectious mononucleosis (IM) 4 weeks post-transplant was normal despite recent and ongoing severe immunosuppression.  (+info)

Nephrotic syndrome as a clinical manifestation of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in a marrow transplant recipient after cyclosporine withdrawal. (7/8007)

GVHD is one of the most frequent complications of BMT and recently nephrotic syndrome (NS) has been described as a manifestation of chronic GVHD. Here, we present an AA patient who developed NS 1 year after BMT when cyclosporine was stopped. Renal biopsy showed focal sclerosis associated with membranous deposits. He also had other clinical manifestations of chronic GVHD: sicca-like syndrome and colestasis. After 15 days of CsA therapy, he experienced a remarkable improvement in the NS and GVHD as a whole. We comment on immunological mechanisms that could be involved in the pathogenesis of this manifestation.  (+info)

Gonadotropin-releasing hormone analogue conjugates with strong selective antitumor activity. (8/8007)

Conjugation of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogues GnRH-III, MI-1544, and MI-1892 through lysyl side chains and a tetrapeptide spacer, Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly (X) to a copolymer, poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone-co-maleic acid) (P) caused increased antiproliferative activity toward MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 breast, PC3 and LNCaP prostate, and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines in culture and against tumor development by xenografts of the breast cancer cells in immunodeficient mice. MCF-7 cells treated with P-X-1544 and P-X-1892 displayed characteristic signs of apoptosis, including vacuoles in the cytoplasm, rounding up, apoptotic bodies, bleb formation, and DNA fragmentation. Conjugates, but not free peptides, inhibited cdc25 phosphatase and caused accumulation of Ishikawa and PC3 cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle after 24 h at lower doses and in the G1 and G2 phases after 48 h. Since P-X-peptides appear to be internalized, the increased cytotoxicity of the conjugates is attributed to protection of peptides from proteolysis, enhanced interaction of the peptides with the GnRH receptors, and/or internalization of P-X-peptide receptor complexes so that P can exert toxic effects inside, possibly by inhibiting enzymes involved in the cell cycle. The additional specificity of P-X-peptides compared with free peptides for direct antiproliferative effects on the cancer cells but not for interactions in the pituitary indicates the therapeutic potential of the conjugates.  (+info)

TY - JOUR. T1 - Epstein-barr-virus-related malignant b cell lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for aplastic anemia. AU - Forman, Stephen J.. AU - Sullivan, John L.. AU - Wright, Christine. AU - Ratech, Howard. AU - Racklin, Barbara. AU - Blume, Karl G.. PY - 1987. Y1 - 1987. N2 - The development of B cell lymphoma has been reported to occur in recipients of a variety of organ transplants, including some patients who have received an allogeneic bone marrow graft. In this report, we describe a patient with severe aplastic anemia who developed a malignant B cell lymphoplasmacytoid proliferation 48 days after undergoing allogeneic marrow transplantation from her HLA-matched MLC-nonreactive brother. Immunologic studies showed this malignancy to be a mixed polyclonal and monoclonal proliferation in donor ceils. Virologie studies documented Epstein Bare infection of the cells. A review of the literature suggests that graft-versus-host disease and treatment of ...
View the Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplantation Program statistics for St. Louis Childrens Hospital including number of procedures, statistics for both autologous and allogeneic patients and survivor ratings. For more information on the Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Program, call 314-454-KIDS (5437).
TY - JOUR. T1 - Chemotherapy vs HLA-identical sibling bone marrow transplants for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in first remission. AU - Oh, H.. AU - Gale, R. P.. AU - Zhang, M. J.. AU - Passweg, J. R.. AU - Ino, T.. AU - Murakami, H.. AU - Ohno, R.. AU - Rowlings, P. A.. AU - Sobocinski, K. A.. AU - Tanimoto, M.. AU - Tomonaga, M.. AU - Weisdorf, D. J.. AU - Horowitz, M. M.. PY - 1998. Y1 - 1998. N2 - There is controversy about whether chemotherapy or an HLA-identical sibling bone marrow transplant is better treatment for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in first remission. A previous study of patients treated in 1980-1987 showed similar leukemia-free survivals with these approaches. We re-examined this issue in more recently treated patients receiving different chemotherapy. Chemotherapy subjects (n = 76) participated in trial ALL-87 of the Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group (JALSG). Transplant subjects (n = 214) were reported to the International Bone Marrow Transplant ...
Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous bone marrow transplantation: report of two cases. Hauke, R.J.; Greiner, T.C.; Smir, B.N.; Vose, J.M.; Tarantolo, S.R.; Bashir, R.M.; Bierman, P.J. // Bone Marrow Transplantation;6/15/98, Vol. 21 Issue 12, p1271 Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphoproliferative disorders have been frequently reported as a complication of solid organ and allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. Their occurrence is rare after autologous bone marrow transplantation (BMT) with only five published reports in the literature.... ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in bone marrow transplant patients after transfusions from anti-HCV-positive blood donors. AU - Shuhart, M. C.. AU - Myerson, D.. AU - Spurgeon, C. L.. AU - Bevan, C. A.. AU - Sayers, M. H.. AU - McDonald, G. B.. PY - 1996/4/1. Y1 - 1996/4/1. N2 - In March 1992, 12 bone marrow transplant patients at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center received blood components from donors who were anti-HCV-nonreactive by first generation ELISA but whose serum later tested anti-HCV-reactive to a second generation ELISA. All these blood components were further tested for anti-HCV using a second-generation RIBA and for HCV RNA by polymerase chain reaction. Recipient sera were tested for HCV RNA prior to and following blood component infusion. Blood components from four donors were positive for HCV RNA. All recipients of HCV RNA-positive blood components became viremic on the first day tested post-infusion. In addition, two recipients of HCV RNA-negative blood ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Effect of centre on outcome of bone-marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia. AU - Frassoni, Francesco. AU - Labopin, Myriam. AU - Powles, Ray. AU - Mary, Jean Yves. AU - Arcese, William. AU - Bacigalupo, Andrea. AU - Bunjes, Donald. AU - Gluckman, Eliane. AU - Ruutu, Tapani. AU - Schaefer, Ulrich W.. AU - Sierra, Jorge. AU - Vernant, Jean Paul. AU - Willemze, Roel. AU - De Witte, Theo. AU - Gorin, Norbert Claude. PY - 2000/4/22. Y1 - 2000/4/22. N2 - Background: There is increasing pressure for the recognition and replication of good clinical practice. We undertook a study to assess the variability in outcome of allogeneic bone-marrow transplantation among major European centres. Methods: We studied 13 centres, including 522 patients (aged 16-55 years), which had undertaken more than 30 bone-marrow transplantations between Jan 1, 1987, and Dec 31, 1995, for acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission. We undertook a (global) multivariate analysis of all factors ...
Gonadal function after allogenic bone marrow transplantation for thalassaemia. Social integration of the older thalassaemic patient
We discuss clinical strategies for the prophylaxis and treatment of both acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) with particular attention to children. Grades II to IV acute GVHD occur in 10 to 50% of patients given an allogeneic transplantation of haemopoietic stem cells (HSCT) from a genotypically HLA-identical donor. A significantly higher incidence and severity of the disease is reported in patients receiving transplants from partially matched family donors or unrelated volunteers. Younger individuals or patients receiving HSCT from younger donors develop GVHD less frequently than do older recipients. Severe acute GVHD is characterised by a significant decrease in survival probability, even though the graft-versus-leukaemia activity associated with both acute and chronic GVHD may reduce the risk of leukaemia relapse. Prophylaxis of acute GVHD usually consists of in vivo post-grafting immunosuppression with cyclosporin alone or in combination with methotrexate; methotrexate alone ...
RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor bone marrow transplant or peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer and abnormal cells and helps stop the patients immune system from rejecting the donors stem cells. When certain stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patients bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the bodys normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.. PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is studying donor bone marrow that is treated in the laboratory using two different devices to compare how well they work in treating patients who are undergoing a donor bone marrow transplant for hematologic cancer. ...
Intensive, myelosuppressive therapy is necessary to maximize outcomes for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). A comparison was made of 3 aggressive postremission approaches for children and adolescents with AML in a randomized trial, CCG-2891. A total of 652 children and adolescents with AML who achieved remission on 2 induction regimens using identical drugs and doses (standard and intensive timing) were eligible for allocation to allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) based on matched related donor status (n = 181) or randomization to autologous BMT (n = 177) or to aggressive high-dose cytarabine-based chemotherapy (n = 179). Only 115 patients (18%) refused to participate in the postremission phase of this study. Overall compliance with the 3 allocated regimens was 90%. At 8 years actuarial, 54% +/- 4% (95% confidence interval) of all remission patients remain alive. Survival by assigned regimen (intent to treat) is as follows: allogeneic BMT, 60% +/- 9%; autologous BMT, 48% ...
different allogeneic graft accelerates white cell and platelet engraftment after T-cell-depleted bone marrow transplantation. Addition of a seconds profile, publications, research topics, and co-authors
TY - JOUR. T1 - A phase I clinical and pharmacological profile of dacarbazine with autologous bone marrow transplantation in patients with solid tumors. AU - Adkins, Douglas R.. AU - Irvin, Rebecca. AU - Kuhn, John. AU - Boldt, David H.. AU - Roodman, G. David. AU - Salzman, Donna. AU - Freytes, Cesar. AU - Von Hoff, D. D.. AU - LeMaistre, C. F.. PY - 1993/6. Y1 - 1993/6. N2 - Dacarbazine (DTIC) is a chemotherapy drug which has antitumor activity at standard doses, exhibits a steep dose-response effect in vitro, and is associated with relatively few non-hematologic toxicities. These characteristics suggest a potential role for this drug in bone marrow transplant preparative regimens. To pursue this hypothesis, 16 patients with refractory solid tumors were enrolled in a phase I study of single agent DTIC to determine the dose of DTIC requiring bone marrow reinfusion and to define the dose-limiting toxicity and maximum tolerated dose when given with autologous bone marrow rescue. Pharmacokinetics ...
Invasive mold infections (IMIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients who are undergoing bone marrow transplantation (BMT). To examine the epidemiology, risk factors, and outcome of IMIs in allogeneic BMT recipients, all cases of mold infection among 94 adult patients who underwent allogeneic BMT at this institution from 1 January 1997 through 31 December 1998 were reviewed retrospectively. Fifteen cases of IMI were identified; infection occurred a median of 102 days after BMT. Aspergillus species was the most common cause of disease, and species other than Aspergillus fumigatus were present in 53% of patients. By multivariate analysis, the variable associated with infection risk was systemic glucocorticosteroid use. Prophylactic antifungal therapy that was targeted to high-risk patients had little effect on disease incidence. These observations suggest that early identification of high-risk patients and better approaches to prevention should be explored, to reduce ...
Competitive bone marrow transplantation assay measures multi-lineage reconstitution of hematopoiesis in irradiated transplant recipient mice. Thus this assay is routinely used to determine haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) functionality in vivo. The principle of the method is to transplant bone marrow donor cells (derived from transgenic mice of choice) on C57BL6 background together with normal competitor bone marrow. In order to distinguish donor from competitor cells upon transplantation, usually competitor mice are congenic and carry the differential B cell antigen originally designated Ly5.1 and CD45.1.A typical competitive bone marrow transplantation experiment will contain two transplantation groups, donor (transgenic mice of choice and their controls) are transplanted in competition with normal competitors and engraftment efficiency is evaluated in both blood and bone marrow.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Blood and bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia. AU - Villela, Luis M.. AU - Bolanos Meade, F Javier. PY - 2009. Y1 - 2009. N2 - Bone marrow transplantation is the treatment of choice for some patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients with high-risk disease, such as those with MDS, in second (or subsequent) complete remission or those with poor-risk cytogenetics will benefit the most from this approach. With current transplantation techniques, outcomes have improved over recent years. Although relapse and graft-versus-host disease still are important problems faced by these patients, novel approaches have been developed to decrease the risk of complications, with excellent results.. AB - Bone marrow transplantation is the treatment of choice for some patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients with high-risk disease, such as those with MDS, in second (or subsequent) complete remission ...
A healthy immune system produces T cells that can recognize and react against foreign molecules (antigens) to protect against infection, while leaving normal host cells with "self antigens" undamaged. All T cells are produced in the thymus from blood stem cells that originate in the bone marrow and migrate through the blood circulation to the thymus. During aging, the thymus shrinks in size (involutes) and T cell production is limited, causing a poorly functioning immune system. T cell production and immune recovery is also slow and incomplete after bone marrow transplantation in older patients. In previous studies we showed that the thymus grows rapidly and T production is very robust in new-born mice. We also showed that during the new-born period, a growth factor called Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) is made at high levels in the thymus. When VEGF is inhibited in new-borns, T cell production falls, suggesting that this molecule plays an important role in thymic growth during this ...
And after more than 50 years of tireless investigations, this procedure has become standard treatment of hematologic malignancies. Despite major advances, bone marrow transplantation is still a difficult and evolving field. A newly published clinical resource called Clinical Manual of Blood and Bone Marrow Transplantation is a valuable addition to the literature on transplantation. Well-Organized Format EDITED BY Drs. Syed A. Abutalib and Parameswaran Hari, the book provides a concise practical expert review in a well-organized format of 42 chapters, each annotated with numerous practical headings to enhance focused learning. Stem cell transplantation is highly specialized, and this book is targeted for teachers and clinicians in the field. Each of the 42 chapters focuses on a particular topic and provides numerous reference tables and figures. The structure provides a neat and handy compendium for daily work caring for bone marrow transplant patients. It also offers a complete set of ...
OBJECTIVES: I. Compare the disease free survival of patients with leukemia, myelodysplasia, or lymphoblastic lymphoma after treatment with conventional (non-T cell depleted) or T cell depleted unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation. II. Compare the incidence of primary and secondary graft failure, acute and chronic graft-vs-host disease, complications (infection, veno-occlusive disease, interstitial pneumonitis), and relapse in these patients after these treatments. III. Compare the incidence of other malignancies, lymphoproliferative disorders, and post-transplant myelodysplasia in these patients after these treatments.. OUTLINE: This is a randomized, multicenter study. Patients will be stratified according to institution. Patients are assigned to one of two treatment arms, one with conventional bone marrow transplantation (arm I) and one with T cell depletion of the bone marrow (arm II). Arm I: Patients receive cyclophosphamide on days -6 and -5. Total body irradiation (TBI) is ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Leukocyte low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) does not contribute to LDL clearance in vivo. T2 - Bone marrow transplantation studies in the mouse. AU - Fazio, Sergio. AU - Hasty, Alyssa H.. AU - Carter, Kathy J.. AU - Murray, Alisa B.. AU - Price, James O.. AU - Linton, MacRae R.F.. PY - 1997/2/1. Y1 - 1997/2/1. N2 - The targeted disruption of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene in mice results in accumulation of plasma LDL cholesterol and in predisposition to diet-induced aortic atherosclerosis. Although the liver is the central organ for receptor mediated clearance of LDL, the in vivo role of other organs and tissues in LDL catabolism has not been directly studied. Since bone marrow-derived cells such as blood leukocytes and tissue macrophages express LDL receptors and contribute a large cell mass to the body, we designed bone marrow transplantation (BMT) experiments to reconstitute LDL receptor null mice [LDL-R(-/-)] with marrow obtained from LDL-R wild-type ...
The results in 34 adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who have undergone autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) using busulfan and cyclophosphamide (Bu/Cy) in 12 United Kingdom (UK) centers have been analyzed. There were 19 females and 15 males; median age was 40 years (range, 21 to 62 years). Nine patients were in first relapse; 25 were in second remission. The median time of first remission for the whole group was 11.5 months (range, 1 to 56 months). All the patients in first relapse and six patients in second remission received first remission marrow. The leukemia-free survival (LFS) for the patients in first relapse was 33%, with a median follow-up of 20 months. The LFS for the patients in second remission was 48% with a median follow-up of 26 months. The length of second remission exceeds the length of first remission in 14 patients. Considerable toxicity with hemorrhagic cystitis (four patients; none fatal), venoocclusive disease (four patients; one fatal), pneumonitis ...
Intravenous literature: Wiersma, P., Schillie, S., Keyserling, H., Watson, J.R., De, A., Banerjee, S.N., Drenzek, C.L., Arnold, K.E., Shivers, C., Kendrick, L., Ryan, L.G., Jensen, B., Noble-Wang, J. and Srinivasan, A. (2010) Catheter-Related Polymicrobial Bloodstream Infections among Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Outpatients, Atlanta, Georgia, 2007. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology. 31, [ePub ahead of print]. Abstract:. Objective: To identify risk factors for polymicrobial bloodstream infections (BSIs) in pediatric bone marrow transplant (BMT) outpatients attending a newly constructed clinic affiliated with a children’s hospital.. Methods: All 30 outpatients treated at a new BMT clinic during September 10â€"21, 2007, were enrolled in a cohort study. The investigation included interviews, medical records review, observations, and bacterial culture and molecular typing of patient and environmental isolates. Data were analyzed using exact conditional logistic ...
Pediatr Dent. 1989 Mar;11(1):37-42. Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Research Support, Non-U.S. Govt; Research Support, U.S. Govt, P.H.S.
We analyzed the clinical course and risk factors of 18 patients with poor engraftment after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), defined as absolute neutrophil count below 0.1×10 9/1 28 days post-BMT. Significant risks associated with non-engraftment included HLA one antigen mismatch, BMT from matched unrelated donor, and a low dose of colony-forming units-granulocyte-macrophage (,10 4/kg). Examined by a semi-quantitative analysis of polymorphic microsatellite markers, donor DNA chimerism on day 28 was found to be predictive of treatment outcome. Seven patients had detectable donor DNA, varying from 43 to 100%. Five of them responded to granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and achieved engraftment. Two were given further infusions of peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells (PBSC) from the same donors, resulting in engraftment in one of them. Eleven patients had no detectable donor DNA, and none responded to G-CSF. Autologous regeneration occurred in six of these patients, ...
Fludarabine is a nucleoside analog with potent antitumor and immunosuppressive properties used in conditioning regimens of pediatric allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) to promote stem cell engraftment.. This is a single-center, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) study investigating the clinical pharmacology of fludarabine in 45 children undergoing alloHCT at UCSF Benioff Childrens Hospital.. Patients would receive fludarabine regardless of whether or not they decide to consent to PK sampling.. Fludarabine doses will not be adjusted based on PK data.. We will apply the combination of a D-optimality-based limited sampling strategy and population PK methodologies to determine specific factors influencing fludarabine exposure in pediatric alloHCT recipients and identify exposure-response relationships.. Subjects will undergo PK sampling of plasma (f-ara-a) and intracellular (f-ara-ATP) drug concentrations over the duration of fludarabine therapy (3 to 5 days).. To evaluate ...
Question - Successful bone marrow transplant for AML. Now have back pain, cough, loss of appetite. Why?. Ask a Doctor about Bone marrow transplant, Ask an Oncologist
Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (stem cell transplant) in aplastic anemia (costs for program #80341) ✔ Andreasklinik Cham Zug ✔ Department of Oncology and Hematology ✔ BookingHealth.com
Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (stem cell transplant) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) (costs for program #260823) ✔ University Hospital Münster ✔ Department of Hematology, Hemostaseology, Oncology and Pneumology (Medical Department A) ✔ BookingHealth.com
To determine whether graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) reactions are important in preventing leukemia recurrence after bone marrow transplantation, we studied 2,254 persons receiving HLA-identical sibling bone marrow transplants for acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) in first remission, acute lymphoblastic …
Intensive chemoradiotherapy, with or without additional local radiotherapy, and unpurged autologous marrow transplantation was given to 68 patients with progressive non-Hodgkins lymphoma. Responses were attained in 44 patients (65%, 95% confidence intervals [CI], 52% to 76%), including 37 who achieved complete responses. Fifteen patients (22%, 95% C.I. 13% to 34%) remain free of disease (including 11 continuously) at a median of 5.3 (range 3.1 to 9.1) years later. Higher Karnofsky scores (P less than .01, Mann-Whitney U test) and the absence of a history of prior radiotherapy (P = .02, chi 2 test) were associated with achievement of complete plus partial responses. Higher Karnofsky scores (P less than .01, Mann-Whitney U test) and less resistant disease status at transplantation (P = .04, chi 2 test) were significant when calculations were limited to complete responses. Karnofsky scores were also associated with the probability of freedom from progression (P = .02, log-rank) for responding ...
New research provides preclinical proof-of-concept for the ability of PRO 140, a humanized anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody under development by CytoDyn Inc., to effectively block the development of graft-versus-host disease, a potentially lethal complication of bone marrow stem cell transplantation. CytoDyn is currently enrolling patients in a Phase 2 clinical trial with PRO 140 for the prevention of GvHD in leukemia patients undergoing BMSC transplantation.
Transplantation of 8 x 10(6) C57BL/6-Nu+/Nu+ (nude) bone marrow cells into C3H/HeJ recipients after conditioning with 8 Gy of total body irradiation has resulted in a markedly higher rate of graft rejection or graft failure compared to that found in recipients of normal C57BL/6 or C57BL/6-Bg+/Bg+ (beige) T-cell-depleted bone marrow. Mixing experiments using different numbers of nude bone marrow cells with or without mature thymocytes (unagglutinated by peanut agglutinin) revealed that engraftment of allogeneic T-cell-depleted bone marrow is T-cell dependent. To ensure engraftment, a large inoculum of nude bone marrow must be supplemented with a trace number of donor T cells, whereas a small bone marrow dose from nude donors requires a much larger number of T cells for engraftment. Marked enhancement of donor type chimerism was also found when F1 thymocytes were added to nude bone marrow cells, indicating that the enhancement of bone marrow engraftment by T cells is not only mediated by ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Is there a place for autologous bone marrow transplantation in chronic myeloid leukemia?. AU - Frassoni, F.. AU - Carella, A. M.. PY - 1993. Y1 - 1993. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027525235&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0027525235&partnerID=8YFLogxK. M3 - Article. C2 - 8298470. AN - SCOPUS:0027525235. VL - 11. SP - 1. EP - 3. JO - Stem Cells. JF - Stem Cells. SN - 1066-5099. IS - SUPPL. 3. ER - ...
Stem Cell Transplantation. Stem cell transplantation, also referred as bone marrow transplantation, is currently being performed in the treatment of leukemia, lymphoma, multiple myeloma, various cancers, poorly functioning bone marrow, hereditary anemia, immunodeficiencies and hereditary metabolic diseases.. Stem cells can be obtained from bone marrow, peripheral blood or cord blood. Although bone marrow has been used historically as a stem cell source in the first transplantations, peripheral blood stem cell transplantation is currently performed in 75% of cases. Stem cell from the cord blood is collected as soon as the baby is born. Collected stem cells are stored in sterile conditions.. Stem cell transplants are defined as autologous or allogeneic transplantation.. Autologous transplantation is the process by which the patients own stem cells are collected and stored frozen, then given back to the patient. The most common uses for autologous stem cell transplantation are solid tumors such as ...
Published in Bone Marrow Transplantation, Volume 21, Issue 5, 1998, pages 461-471. Lamb, Jr., L. S., Gee, A. P., Henslee-Downey, P. J., Geier, S. S., Hazlett, L., Pati, A. R., Godder, K., Abhyankar, S. A., Turner, M. W., Lee, C., Harris, W. G., & Parrish, R. S. (1998). Phenotypic and functional reconstitution of peripheral blood lymphocytes following T cell-depleted bone marrow transplantation from partially mismatched related donors. Bone Marrow Transplantation, 21(5), 461-471.. © Bone Marrow Transplantation, 1998, Nature Publishing Group. ...
Autologous bone marrow or stem cell transplantation has had an important role in the treatment of aggressive lymphoma for several decades. The important results of the PARMA study1 demonstrated that patients in first relapse who remained chemosensitive had improved progression-free and overall survival compared to patients who continued to receive standard-dose salvage therapy. Based on that trial, salvage autologous bone marrow transplantation became the standard of care for these patients and resulted in a long-term progression-free survival rate of approximately 50%.. Consolidation Strategy. If salvage bone marrow transplantation is effective, would consolidation bone marrow transplantation immediately after initial chemotherapy further improve the survival of advanced-stage, aggressive lymphomas? Over the past 2 decades, numerous randomized studies demonstrated no improvement in overall survival when all patients received consolidative autologous bone marrow transplantation or stem cell ...
Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, 2nd ed. Blackwell Science, London, 1999, pp. 823-834. 3. Forman SJ, Krance RA, ODonnell MR, et al. Bone marrow transplantation for acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia during first complete remission. An analysis of prognostic factors. Transplantation 1987;43:650-653. 4. Mehta J, Powles R, Treleaven J, et al. Long-term follow-up of patients undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission after cyclophosphamide-total body irradiation and cyclosporine. International scoring system for evaluating prognosis in myelodysplastic syndromes. Blood 1997;89:2079-2088. 59. Appelbaum FR, Anderson J. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for myelodysplastic syndrome: outcomes analysis according to IPSS score. Leukemia 1998;12 (suppl. 1):S25-S29. Chapter 2 / Allogeneic BMT for AML 27 60. Fefer A. Graft-versus-tumor responses. In: Thomas ED, Blume KG, Forman SJ, eds. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation, 2nd ed. Blackwell ...
The Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant program at Childrens Hospital Colorado offers the regions only dedicated bone marrow transplant program for kids.
The Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant program at Childrens Hospital Colorado offers the regions only dedicated bone marrow transplant program for kids.
Health, ...LEXINGTON Ky. (Aug. 23 2011) Bone marrow transplantation with genet...Bone marrow a spongy tissue inside bones contains stem cells that pr...Par-4 (also known as PAWR) is a tumor suppressor protein that selectiv...After transplantation the researchers discovered the expression of ca...,Bone,marrow,transplantation,may,increase,cancer,resistance,in,patients,medicine,medical news today,latest medical news,medical newsletters,current medical news,latest medicine news
In two situations, transfer of normal unsensitized bone marrow cells into heavily irradiated H-2-identical allogeneic mice caused a high incidence of lethal chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), i.e. mortality occuring between days of 20 and 80 postirradiation. Minor histocompatibility determinants appeared to be the main target for eliciting GVHD. Removing mature T cells from the marrow with anti-Thy 1.2 serum and complement before injection prevented GVHD. On the basis of adding purified T cells to T-cell-depleted marrow cells, it was concluded that contamination of the marrow with as few as 0.3% T cells was sufficient to cause a high incidence of lethal GVHD in certain situations. No GVHD was found with the injection of non-T cells (Thy 1.2-negative cells) or with tolerant T cells. Irradiated recipients of T-cell-depleted marrow cells remained in good health for prolonged periods. These mice showed extensive chimerism with respect to the donor marrow, normal numbers of T and B cells and ...
P220 To determine the degree and extent of changes in cellular metabolic demand after stroke and bone marrow cell transplantation, a histochemistry assay of cytochrome oxidase (COx) which correlates with neuronal activity was employed,. Adult Wistar rats (n=9) were subjected to transient (2 h) middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). At 1 d after ischemia, bone marrow stromal cells (MSCs, 4x105 in 10 :l) were transplanted intracerebrally into the ischemic boundary zone in the striatum and the cortex. The ischemia rats with (n=4) or without (n=5) MSC transplantation were sacrificed at 14 d after MCAo. Bone marrow cells were harvested from normal donor adult rats and cultured in Iscove s Modified Dulbecco s medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum. MSCs were isolated by their adherence to the plastic dishes from the whole bone marrow cells at 72 h of incubation. Subsequently, the MSCs were cultured for 2 weeks and bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU, as a tracer to identify cells derived from bone ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Predictors of PTSD in mothers of children undergoing bone marrow transplantation. T2 - The role of cognitive and social processes. AU - Manne, Sharon. AU - DuHamel, Katherine. AU - Nereo, Nancy. AU - Ostroff, Jamie. AU - Parsons, Susan. AU - Martini, Richard. AU - Williams, Sharon. AU - Mee, Laura. AU - Sexson, Sandra Griffin Bishop. AU - Wu, Lisa. AU - Difede, Joanne. AU - Redd, William H.. PY - 2002/10/1. Y1 - 2002/10/1. N2 - Objective: To investigate the role of cognitive and social processing in posttraumatic stress symptoms and disorder (PTSD) among mothers of children undergoing bone marrow and hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (BMT/SCT). Method: Questionnaires assessing emotional distress, BMT-related fears, and negative responses of family and friends were completed by 90 mothers at the time of the BMT infusion and 3 and 6 months post-BMT. PTSD symptoms were measured 6 months post-BMT by both paper-and-pencil and structured interview methods. Results: Emotional ...
At the University of Chicago Medicine, we offer the full range of blood and bone marrow stem cell transplantation options. We are recognized for our expertise in alternative donor transplantation; relapse prevention and treatment; transplantation for older adults; and focused, disease-specific care.
Bone marrow transplantation is a treatment method used to treat diseases like cancer and thalassemia. This article provides an incite of the techniques and procedures followed for bone marrow transplantation, benefits and risks accompanied by this ...
View details of top bone marrow transplantation hospitals in Westend Heights, Gurgaon, Gurgaon. Get guidance from medical experts to select best bone marrow transplantation hospital in Westend Heights, Gurgaon
View details of top bone marrow transplantation hospitals in Alipore, Kolkata. Get guidance from medical experts to select best bone marrow transplantation hospital in Alipore
Hello everybody, I have been called out to this study next month and I am very excited it is finally here. I am looking to get any input from the knowledgeable people on this site as to anything that will ...
A bone marrow transplant is a treatment option for some people who have life-threatening blood or immune system diseases, such as leukaemia, multiple myeloma and lymphoma. The procedure replaces blood stem cells in people whose bone marrow has been destroyed by large doses of chemotherapy or radiotherapy.. A bone marrow transplant is a generic term that covers all types of transplants that use stem cells: a blood stem cell transplant, an umbilical cord blood transplant and a bone marrow transplant.. There are different types of bone marrow transplants:. ...
QIMR Berghofer Senior Scientist, Professor Geoff Hill, said the Phase I/II trials resulted in a significant drop in cases of acute graft versus host disease (GVHD), a potentially fatal complication from stem cell transplants. "The incidence of acute GVHD was reduced from the usual 50%, to 12% of transplant patients in the trial," Professor Hill said. "Severe cases - which often result in death - were reduced from 21% to 4%." The trials were conducted at the RBWH Transplant Unit. Professor Hill said irradiation followed by bone marrow transplant was now the standard treatment for blood cancers such as leukaemia, and was generally successful. "The treatment does result in a ramped up response in the patients immune system, and unfortunately in acute GVHD this is directed towards normal tissues in the skin, gut and liver," Professor Hill said. "To try to prevent this from happening, we administered the drug Tocilizumab (TCZ) to inhibit the immune systems production of the protein IL-6, which ...
The studys lead author, John Levine, M.D., of the University of Michigans Blood and Marrow Transplant Program and his colleagues studied almost 800 patients from the US and Germany to develop and validate a new scoring system. The Ann Arbor GVHD score uses the levels of three proteins in the blood (TNFR1, ST2, and REG3a) to determine whether the patient should be treated right away or not and how intense the treatment should be. Patients with Ann Arbor 1 GVHD usually dont need treatment while patients with Ann Arbor 3 GVHD often dont respond to standard treatment and should be considered for clinical trials. "We often have to treat all patients with GVHD alike with very high-dose steroids, because the severity of symptoms at the diseases onset dont help us predict how sick the patient will get. But this new scoring system will help identify patients that need a different approach, says Levine, who also is clinical director of the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplantation program at C.S. ...
Bone Marrow Transplantation. For bone marrow transplantation, not only native stem cells of the patient are used, but also stem cells of another person can be transplanted, if particular criteria are met. Transplantations are categorized according to the source of stem cell.. How bone marrow is obtained for transplantation and how peripheral stem cells are collected for transplantation?. Stem cells to be used in transplantation can be collected from bone marrow, peripheral blood and umbilical cord blood of mothers who deliver recently. Although stem cells collected from peripheral blood are usually primarily preferred, stem cells collected from bone marrow will be preferred in benign diseases, such as aplastic anemia, thalassemia and immune deficiency syndromes.. Peripheral stem cell is harvested with apheresis device after cytokines, which help stem cells in bone marrow migrate to peripheral blood and are referred as granulocyte colony stimulant factor (G-CSF), are used.. For patients in need ...
Pulmonary complications have emerged as one of the major problem of allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (ITT). Interstitial pneumonitis is the most well-]mown complication; however, there is also...
About Stem Cell Transplantations (SCT). In the bone marrow, there is approximately one stem cell in every 100,000 blood cells. The bone marrow in the breast bone, skull, hips, ribs, and spine contains the stem cells.. In the blood stream, the number of stem cells is about 1/100 of that in the bone marrow. Transplantation of these stem cells from the blood stream is sometimes used in addition to, or instead of, traditional bone marrow transplantation.. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation differs from traditional bone marrow transplantation only in the method by which the stem cells are harvested for infusion into the patient.. Harvesting stem cells from bone marrow requires a surgical procedure.. Harvesting stem cells from the blood stream is accomplished by a process called apheresis.. The patient is connected to a cell separation machine via a needle in each arm. Blood is taken from one arm, circulated through the machine to remove the stem cells, and the remaining blood cells are ...
About Stem Cell Transplantations (SCT). In the bone marrow, there is approximately one stem cell in every 100,000 blood cells. The bone marrow in the breast bone, skull, hips, ribs, and spine contains the stem cells.. In the blood stream, the number of stem cells is about 1/100 of that in the bone marrow. Transplantation of these stem cells from the blood stream is sometimes used in addition to, or instead of, traditional bone marrow transplantation.. Peripheral blood stem cell transplantation differs from traditional bone marrow transplantation only in the method by which the stem cells are harvested for infusion into the patient.. Harvesting stem cells from bone marrow requires a surgical procedure.. Harvesting stem cells from the blood stream is accomplished by a process called apheresis.. The patient is connected to a cell separation machine via a needle in each arm. Blood is taken from one arm, circulated through the machine to remove the stem cells, and the remaining blood cells are ...
Recommended screening and preventive practices for long-term survivors after hematopoietic cell transplantation. (Majhail NS, Rizzo JD, Lee SJ, Aljurf M, Atsuta Y, Bonfim C, Burns LJ, Chaudhri N, Davies S, Okamoto S, Seber A, Socie G, Szer J, Van Lint MT, Wingard JR, Tichelli A, Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR), American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (ASBMT), European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (EBMT), Asia-Pacific Blood and Marrow Transplantation Group (APBMT), Bone Marrow Transplant Society of Australia and New Zealand (BMTSANZ), East Mediterranean Blood and Marrow Transplantation Group (EMBMT), Sociedade Brasileira de Transplante de Medula Ossea (SBTMO)) Hematol Oncol Stem Cell Ther 2012;5(1):1-30 PMID: 22446607 PMCID: PMC3393086 03/27/ ...
Bone Marrow Transplant https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IH6zRK7BivA A bone marrow transplant is a procedure that infuses healthy blood stem cells into your body to replace your damaged or diseased bone marrow. A bone marrow transplant is also called a stem cell transplant. A bone marrow transplant may be necessary if your bone marrow stops working and doesnt produce enough healthy blood cells. Bone marrow transplants may use cells from your own body (autologous transplant) or from a donor (allogeneic transplant). The Bone Marrow Transplant Group at Mayo Clinic evaluates and treats patients who are candidates for bone marrow transplant or stem cell transplant, including those diagnosed with: Acute lymphocytic leukemia Acute myelogenous leukemia Amyloidosis Blood and marrow transplantation Blood and marrow transplant for non-malignant diseases Chronic lymphocytic leukemia Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia Hodgkins lymphoma Leukemia Multiple myeloma and other
Purpose: : Cigarette smoke is the single greatest environmental risk factor for age-related macular degeneration, and the effects of smoking are partially retained years after cessation. We have shown that cigarette smoke causes more severe CNV in mice. One proposed mechanism for the long lasting effect of smoke is toxic damage to vascular cells or extracellular matrix in blood vessels, which would persist long after smoke cessation. Another possibility is smoke-related alterations in myeloid or vascular progenitors in the marrow. In this case, the long term consequences of smoke would be retained in the bone marrow, but not in the peripheral tissue. We performed an experiment to test this distinction. Methods: : We performed bone marrow transplantation (BMT) by isolating bone marrow from mice exposed to full stream cigarette smoke two hrs daily for four weeks transferred into normal, non-exposed recipients; or vice versa, marrow from non-exposed mice into smoke-exposed recipients. Then, ...
Dr. Andolina is the director of pediatric bone marrow transplantation and has experience in treating both leukemias as well as non-malignant conditions such as aplastic anemia. He has a particular interest in bone marrow transplant for patients with sickle cell anemia. In addition, Dr. Andolina has an interest in the adolescent and young adult population, and also cares for young adults undergoing bone marrow transplantation ...
Lotzova, E; Dicke, K A.; Trentin, J J.; and Gallagher, M T., "Genetic control of bone marrow transplantation in irradiated mice. Classification of mouse strains according to their responsiveness to bone marrow allografts and xenografts." (1977). Subject Strain Bibliography 1977. 2100 ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Density-gradient separation for 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide purging of autologous bone marrow grafts.. AU - Rowley, S.. AU - Davis, J.. AU - Braine, H.. AU - Jones, R.. AU - Yeager, A.. AU - Saral, R.. AU - Santos, G.. PY - 1990. Y1 - 1990. N2 - We studied density-gradient separation of autologous bone marrow grafts in preparation for ex vivo 4-hydroperoxy-cyclophosphamide (4-HC) purging. A two-step procedure of buffy coat isolation followed by Ficoll-diatrizoate separation was used. Buffy-coat cells were isolated primarily either using the COBE 2991 Blood Cell Processor or Haemonetics 30 Cell Separator. All density-gradient separations were performed using the COBE 2991. The nucleated cell recoveries after buffy-coat isolation were 44.3 +/- 10.4% and 85.1 +/- 10.5% (+/- standard deviation, P less than 0.001) for the Haemonetics 30 and COBE 2991 isolated grafts, respectively. The final nucleated cell recoveries after density-gradient separation for these two buffy-coat ...
A research team from Massachusetts General Hospital has shown that patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) - more commonly known as bone marrow transplantation - benefit from palliative care. The two-year study, the first of its kind, followed 160 patients who underwent HCT for a variety of hematologic malignancies at Mass General.. Areej El-Jawahri, MD, director of the Bone Marrow Transplant Survivorship Program at the Mass General Cancer Center, led the study and was a corresponding author of the JAMA report. "There is a common misconception that equates palliative care with end-of-life care," she said. "While end-of-life care is a component of what palliative care does, it is really a specialty that can help patients across their illness continuum.". The Mass General palliative care team of physicians, clinicians, nurses, social workers and psychologists has expertise in symptom management. Many patients who are receiving intensive curative therapy, such as bone ...
Nurses pricked his finger to get an extra drop of blood to test his compatibility with people who needed bone marrow transplants. Six months later, because antigens in their blood matched, he was asked to donate bone marrow to a Utah teen near death from leukemia. In 2003, he began recruiting bone marrow donors at Houston post offices for the National Marrow Donor Program. The donor registry allows patients and their physicians access to 10 million potential bone marrow donors worldwide. [...] donations are crucial to help those with blood and immune system diseases, such as leukemia and lymphoma.
We analyzed the incidence of posttransplant chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) relapse in 283 consecutive related-donor (n = 177) and unrelated-donor (n = 106) allogeneic transplant recipients. Twenty-two of 165 related-donor recipients with stable or advanced disease at the time of transplant had hematologic relapse of CML following transplant (5-year Kaplan-Meier estimate of relapse, 20%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 11 to 30%). One of 12 patients transplanted in second stable phase following blast crisis also relapsed. Fifteen related-donor transplant recipients relapsed within 5 years of transplant; however, seven relapsed between 5 and 9 years after transplant. Factors independently associated with an increased risk of posttransplant relapse for related-donor recipients included prolonged interval between diagnosis and transplant (relative risk, [RR], 3.81; P = .009) and bone marrow basophilia (RR, 5.62; P = .01). Related-donor recipients with posttransplant chronic graft-versus-host ...
CAMPATH-1 (CDw52) antibodies recognize a very small lipid-anchored glycoprotein that is expressed on the surface of human lymphocytes. They are remarkably lytic with human complement. In addition, CAMPATH-1G (rat IgG2b) and CAMPATH-1H (human IgG1) bind to human Fc receptors and are very effective for cell lysis in vivo. CAMPATH-1M (rat IgM) and CAMPATH-1G have been used to control GVHD and graft rejection in bone marrow transplantation by depletion of the T cells of the donor and recipient. Depletion of donor T cells alone gave excellent control of GVHD but up to 20% of the patients transplanted from HLA-matched siblings, and 51% of those transplanted from nonsibling donors, experienced graft failure caused by immunological rejection. Graft rejection could be partly overcome by additional immunosuppression either with CsA or total lymphoid irradiation (TLI). More effective was the use of CAMPATH-1G in vivo to deplete residual host lymphocytes. Preliminary results from current protocols of antibody
Pulmonary function was measured before and at intervals after treatment in 44 patients who received a bone marrow transplant for chronic myeloid leukaemia in the chronic phase. All patients were treated with cytotoxic drugs, total body irradiation, and post-graft immunosuppression. Thirty four patients surviving for 12 months were followed at three monthly intervals and 16 patients for 24 months. Fifteen patients received unmanipulated donor marrow cells and 29 patients received donor marrow cells depleted of lymphocytes ex vivo with the monoclonal antibody Campath-1. The 21 patients treated early in this study received 10 Gy of total body irradiation whereas the 23 patients treated more recently, who were all T lymphocyte depleted, received 12 Gy. Pretransplant lung function for the group was normal and was similar in survivors (n = 34) and nonsurvivors (n = 10), and in smokers (n = 8) and non-smokers (n = 36). (Carbon monoxide transfer factor--TLCO) was under 75% of predicted normal in nine ...
There are many different types of blood cell, but they all develop from stem cells. Most of these stem cells are found in the bone marrow (the soft inside part of the bone), although some are found in the blood (peripheral blood stem cells). Chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy damages normal cells as well as cancer cells. At high doses the bone marrow may be damaged or destroyed, and the patient may not be able to produce the necessary blood cells. In a Bone marrow transplant (BMT), marrow containing healthy stem cells is infused to replace those damaged by the high dose therapy, so that the patient can produce blood cells again. If it is not possible to use marrow, a peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) may be given. There are 3 types of transplant: (1) Allogenic transplants are where marrow is donated by another person; (2) Autologous transplants involve cells being taken from the patient, stored, and then reinfused following high-dose therapy; and (3) Syngenic transplants are where the ...
Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of Selective depletion of CD8,sup,+,/sup, cells for prevention of graft-versus-host disease after bone marrow transplantation: A randomized controlled trial. Together they form a unique fingerprint. ...
At St. Louis Childrens Hospital, Dr. Shalini Shenoy, director of the bone marrow transplant program, has developed a reduced-intensity regimen that has made it possible to use bone marrow transplant to more successfully treat childhood illness. Formerly considered a treatment just for cancer, Shenoy has successfully cured non-malignant disorders like hemaglobinopathies, immune deficiencies, bone marrow failure and metabolic disorders with bone marrow transplantation.. ...
What is bone marrow transplant?. A Bone Marrow Transplant is a medical procedure that is performed for replacing the infected or damaged bone marrow. Bone marrow can be destroyed by complex chemotherapy or infected by a disease. Blood stem cells are transplanted in this process that produces healthy blood cells in the bone marrow and encourage growth in new marrow. Transplants are of two types; autologous transplant (usage of own stem cells) and allogeneic transplant (usage of stem cells from the donor) ...
This year marks the 60th anniversary of one of the seminal publications that triggered the introduction of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in medical practices worldwide. This landmark paper by Thomas et al. entitled, Intravenous infusion of bone marrow in patients receiving radiation and chemotherapy was published in the New England Journal on the 12th September 1957. The same year, this group also published other landmark papers in Blood. From the mid-1950s, Thomas developed methods for providing people with new bone marrow cells through transplants. Using radiation, chemotherapy, and nowadays immunosuppressive drugs, the bodys own bone marrow cells are killed and the immune systems rejection mechanism is subdued. Bone marrow cells from a donor are then provided through a blood transfusion. In 1958, a year after Thomas paper, Georges Mathé performed the first ever successful allogeneic bone marrow transplant on unrelated human beings. Since then, major developments in the ...
Patient tailored immunity transplant for the prevention of viral infections post haemopoietic stem cell transplantation University of Sydney | 2011 | Project Grant | $567,968 Team Members: Dr Emily Blyth, Dr Kenneth Micklethwaite and Dr Leighton Clancy
The Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplant Center at the UNM Comprehensive Cancer Center offers treatment choices for people with lymphoma and myeloma.Almost 1,000 New Mexicans receive a blood cancer diagnosis each year, according to American Cancer Society estimates.. The UNM Comprehensive Cancer Center program is the states only bone marrow transplant program.It includes a nurse manager, nurse coordinator, a social worker, a pharmacist, infusion nurses, and an inpatient team. Bone marrow transplantation needs a multidisciplinary team because of the complexity in coordinating care, says Fero. The teams Nurse Manager, Maria Limanovich, says the team follows each person from the beginning of bone marrow transplant treatment through completion.. Bone marrow, the soft reddish material that fills the inside of our bones, produces millions of new blood cells each second. These millions of cells come from a tiny number of bone marrow stem cells. These stem cells are special because they can mature into ...
Thank you for your interest in spreading the word about Haematologica.. NOTE: We only request your email address so that the person you are recommending the page to knows that you wanted them to see it, and that it is not junk mail. We do not capture any email address.. ...
Several functions have been proposed for the role of macrophage apoE synthesis in cholesterol homeostasis and its relation to atherosclerosis, including either proatherosclerotic or antiatherosclerotic functions.18-31 The present study confirms that hypercholesterolemia in apoE-deficient mice can be markedly reduced by transplantation with wild-type bone marrow, while heterozygous apoE-deficient bone marrow appeared to be nearly equally effective. We demonstrate that this reduction in cholesterol levels is accompanied by an increased recognition and uptake of (β)VLDL by parenchymal liver cells.. Following total body irradiation, aplasia of bone marrow develops within 2 to 3 days. BMT will lead to recovery of hematopoietic tissues after two distinct phases of engraftment. In the first, unsustained phase, monocytes and macrophages are derived from committed progenitors. In the second, sustained phase, these cells are derived from pluripotent stem cells in the bone marrow.44 Recently, it was ...
Bone Marrow Transplantation is a high quality, peer-reviewed journal covering all aspects of clinical and basic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation.
WEDNESDAY, March 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The chances of finding an unrelated bone marrow donor are higher for U.S. patients of European descent than for those of non-European descent, a new study finds.. A bone marrow transplant can sometimes help people with life-threatening blood cancers by replacing the patients cells with healthy ones from a donor. A brother or sister with the same genetic markers as the recipient is the ideal donor.. For patients without a suitable sibling donor, a transplant from a matched unrelated donor is typically the next best option.. In the new study, researchers looked at just over 1,300 blood cancer patients at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, in New York City, who sought a fully matched bone marrow donor between 2005 and 2017.. While 67 percent of patients with European ancestry received a matched transplant from an unrelated donor, the rate was only 33 percent for non-Europeans, including Asians, white Hispanics and Africans. Those of African ...
WEDNESDAY, March 27, 2019 (HealthDay News) -- The chances of finding an unrelated bone marrow donor are higher for U.S. patients of European descent than for those of non-European descent, a new study finds.. A bone marrow transplant can sometimes help people with life-threatening blood cancers by replacing the patients cells with healthy ones from a donor. A brother or sister with the same genetic markers as the recipient is the ideal donor.. For patients without a suitable sibling donor, a transplant from a matched unrelated donor is typically the next best option.. In the new study, researchers looked at just over 1,300 blood cancer patients at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, in New York City, who sought a fully matched bone marrow donor between 2005 and 2017.. While 67 percent of patients with European ancestry received a matched transplant from an unrelated donor, the rate was only 33 percent for non-Europeans, including Asians, white Hispanics and Africans. Those of African ...
A cancer survivor who received a lifesaving bone marrow donation from someone she has never met has written a heartfelt poem to say thank you to the man who saved her life on World Bone Marrow Donor Day (15th September).. Kelly Coombes, a 28 year-old mother from Caerphilly, was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukaemia, a cancer of the white blood cells. After two rounds of chemotherapy to help moderate the illness, Kelly was told her best chance of survival was finding a suitable bone marrow donor for a lifesaving stem cell transplant.. After months of treatment, Kelly received the news that a bone marrow match had been found: "All of a sudden when everything is really horrible, you get a little bit of hope and you feel empowered. It gives you an extra reason to fight.". Kelly received a bone marrow transplant which cured her illness. Since receiving the lifesaving donation, Kelly has been able to marry her long term partner and was present to take her young daughter to her first day of school - ...
Gabriel, Sarah Sharon. Apoptosis modulation in lymphocytes as novel concept for tolerance induction and bone marrow transplantation to alleviate a renal tubulopathy. 2016, University of Zurich, Faculty of Science. ...
Возможности и перспективы использования конфокальной микроскопии для оценки результатов перекрестного типирования HLA у пациентов с трансплантацией костного мозгаPotentials and prospects of using a confocal microscopy for the HLA-Crossmatch result evaluation in bone marrow transplantation patients
Soderberg et al. demonstrated anti-CD13 antibodies in 15/33 bone marrow transplant patients, all of whom developed antibodies at the time of CMV reactivation or disease. CD13 is the known receptor for CMV entry into host cells. When the virus reactivates, it incorporates CD13 into the virion envelope, becoming immunogenic and resulting in antibody production [101, 102]. More recently, soluble CD13 has been shown to be a robust marker for cGVHD in children [88]. Recently, a strong association with a recipient NOD2/CARD15 variant associated with decreased TLR2/4 signaling polymorphisms has strongly correlated with bronchiolitis obliterans secondary to cGVHD [103]. Predictors of acute graft-versus-host disease in bone marrow transplantation between HLA-identical siblings. N Engl J Med. 1992;327:1613-1617. Schwarer AP, Jiang YZ, Brookes PA, et al. Frequency of antirecipient alloreactive helper T-cell precursors in donor blood and graft-versus-host disease after HLA-identical sibling bonemarrow ...
An Exploratory Study of Recipients Perceptions of Bone Marrow Transplantation| Professionally written academic essays, report and term papers for nursing and medical students - order 24/7/365.
The patients described here developed acute to subacute focal neurological deficits, encephalopathy, or neuropsychological impairment approximately 2 years after allogeneic BMT. MRI in all cases showed multifocal or confluent white matter signal changes; in addition, 2 patients had lacunar ischemic lesions (cortical-subcortical, basal ganglia, thalamic, or brain stem), 2 patients had territorial infarctions, and 2 patients developed parenchymal hemorrhages. As a result of the clinical course and the radiological findings, a cerebral angiitis-like syndrome must be discussed.11 12 Since biopsy was not performed because of higher complication rates in BMT patients (thrombocytopenia, immunosuppression), histological confirmation of cerebral vasculitis was available only for the 1 autopsied patient. This patient had severe chronic GVH disease and developed progressive neurological symptoms because of subacute gray and white matter ischemias as well as cerebral hemorrhages. After treatment, he ...
A fundamental mission of the Hematological Malignancies and Bone Marrow Transplantation program is to enhance our understanding of the basic biology of blood cancers and to translate this knowledge towards the development of effective therapies. The program conducts a broad array of research studies directed towards enhancing and refining existing therapies, as well as examining the efficacy of new treatment approaches. These include the development of clinical protocols that are conducted through the Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (DF/HCC), the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG), and the Clinical Trials Network. These efforts are supported by a large infrastructure of research staff required for patient monitoring, data collection, and research analysis of studies.
This category provides information about bone marrow transplantation: when it is used, how it may help, and the problems associated with it.
Semantic Scholar extracted view of [Psychosocial aspects and the quality of life of patients treated with bone marrow transplantation]. by J Z Krisković
- The report provides a snapshot of the global therapeutic landscape of Bone Marrow Transplantation - The report reviews key pipeline products under drug profile section which includes, product description, MoA and R&D brief, licensing and collaboration details & other developmental activities
TY - JOUR. T1 - Tense blisters after bone marrow transplantation. AU - Kikuchi, A.. AU - Kawahara, Y.. AU - Okamoto, Shinichiro. AU - Ikeda, Y.. AU - Nishikawa, T.. PY - 1999. Y1 - 1999. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0032911991&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0032911991&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1001/archderm.135.1.81. DO - 10.1001/archderm.135.1.81. M3 - Article. C2 - 9935388. AN - SCOPUS:0032911991. VL - 135. SP - 81. EP - 86. JO - JAMA Dermatology. JF - JAMA Dermatology. SN - 2168-6068. IS - 1. ER - ...
... : The Effect of Patient Lymphocytes on the Response of Donor Lymphocytes to Mitogens and Allogeneic Cells ...
Are Bone Marrow Transplants Successful ? Read the blog to know the Success Rate of BMT and Why is there a need for a bone marrow transplant. Also read: What are the new options available in bone marrow transplants?
Bone marrow transplants are used to treat patients with leukemia, multiple myeloma, immune deficiency disorders, aplastic anemia, lymphomas and some cases of breast or ovarian cancer. During a bone marrow transplant the patients existing bone marrow is destroyed and the new healthy bone marrow is infused into the patients blood stream. If the transplant is successful the new bone marrow will begin to produce healthy blood cells ...
To satisfy the requirements of care from the point of view Surgical Clinic to the child population of the territory, ensuring an adequate level of care in correspondence with the resources available to the institution, as well as compliance with the assigned activities such as: • Care for patients HIV AIDS. • Care for patients, children of prisoners in the western prison. • Comprehensive care for polytraumatized patients. • Care for burned patients from the Province of Havana, Ciudad Habana, Pinar del Río, Matanzas, Isla de la Juventud and the rest of the provinces. • Care for patients with Cystic Fibrosis in the country. • International Medical Care Service for pediatric patients. • Surgical care of highly complex intracranial tumors. • Diagnosis and treatment of neurological and metabolic diseases of difficult solution. • Care for cancer patients of high complexity. • Pediatric Bone Marrow Transplant Service, attached to the Oncohematology Service. • Development of a Service of
Find information on the bone marrow harvest procedure when preparing for transplant from the Cleveland Clinic, including how its done and more.
9. Bokemeyer C, Franzke A, Hartman JT, et al: A phase I/II study of sequential, dose-escalated, high dose ifosfamide plus doxorubicin 25. Dupuis-Girod S, Hartman O, Benhamou E, et al: Will high dose with peripheral blood stem cell support for the treatment of patients chemotherapy followed by autologous bone marrow transplantation with advanced soft tissue sarcomas. Cancer 80:1221-1227, 1997 supplant cranio-spinal irradiation in young children treated for medul- 10. Matthay KK, Villablanca JG, Seeger RC, et al: Treatment of high-risk neuroblastoma with intensive chemotherapy, radiotherapy, 26. Mason WP, Grovas A, Halpern S, et al: Intensive chemotherapy autologous bone marrow transplantation, and 13-cis-retinoic acid: and bone marrow rescue for young children with newly diagnosed Childrens Cancer Group. N Engl J Med 341:1165-1173, 1999 malignant brain tumors. J Clin Oncol 16:210-221, 1998 11. Grupp SA, Stern JW, Bunin N, et al: Tandem high-dose therapy 27. Gajjar A, Kuhl J, Epelman S, et al: ...
Looking for the list of best Bone Marrow Transplant Hospital in India. Bone Marrow Transplant treatment in India. within your budget. Contact Us at Vaidam for the right guidance
BACKGROUND/AIMS: Cardiac MRI has evolved as a sensitive imaging technique for detecting cardiac amyloidosis as well as left ventricular (LV) function. We assessed LV systolic function in patients with multiple myeloma and cardiac amyloidosis undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Further, we examined if plasma levels of certain immune markers would correlate with change in EF following bone marrow transplant.. METHODS: LV function was assessed before and after (within 6-12 months of) autologous bone marrow transplantation in 17 patients with multiple myeloma and cardiac amyloidosis using Cardiac MRI . Normal LV function was categorized as EF ,55%. Patients who had post-transplant change in LV systolic function were further studied for association with the level of immune prognostic markers CD-4, CD-19, CRP and IL-6.. RESULTS: Ten of 17 patients (59%) had normal LV EF before transplant . In eight of these patients the EF remained normal while in two patients EF slightly decreased ...
QUESTION: A married woman under my care underwent successful bone marrow transplantation as part of treatment for a malignancy. She wishes to start a family. What are her chances? Are there risks? ANSWER: Success in becoming pregnant after stem cell transplantation depends on such factors as cumulative doses of chemotherapy and radiation and mothers age at time of transplant. There is increased risk of prematurity, low birth weight, and spontaneous abortion. Pregnancy should be managed as high risk.. ...
Following a bone marrow transplant, patients are monitored closely for evidence of graft rejection or recurrence of the original disease. Bone marrow transplantation creates a donor-recipient cellular chimerism in the patient, which can be quantitively measured through short tandem repeat (STR) analysis of peripheral whole blood to determine the percent chimerism of the sample. Increasing recipient chimerism is an indication of graft rejection or relapse. Software programs designed to analyze forensic mixture samples have the potential to be useful in analyzing post-transplant mixed chimeric samples. Post-transplant samples were analyzed using three mixture deconvolution software programs. The programs were fast, accurate and consistent in determining the mixing proportions of the samples and the three programs gave concordant results.
Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality following bone marrow transplantation. The in vitro removal of the GVHD-causing T-lymphocytes from donor marrow is one approach which could control this complication. Treatment of the donor bone marrow with lectins and erythrocyte-forming rosette depletion, anti-T-cell antisera or monoclonal antibodies are methods currently being tested to accomplish this.. CT-2 is an immunoglobulin monoclonal antibody specific for the T-cell erythrocyte-forming rosette receptor. Bone marrow from 23 consecutive donors was treated in vitro with CT-2 and complement, prior to infusion, as a potential means of controlling GVHD. Surface marker analysis using erythrocyte-forming rosetting, and OKT-3 and OKT-11 monoclonal antibodies on paired samples of treated and untreated marrow demonstrated a mean depletion to 1% of the original number of T-cells. Proliferative responses to alloantigens and mitogens as well as cytotoxic and natural ...
Bierer, Barbara E., et al. "Regulation of Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte-Mediated Graft Rejection Following Bone Marrow." Transplantation 46.6 (1988): 835-839.. ...
Bone marrow transplantation. *Gene therapy. Career paths and training[edit]. The examples and perspective in this article deal ...
bone marrow transplantation. *angiogenesis for cardiovascular diseases. See also[edit]. *Angiogenesis. *Bone growth factor ... For the circulatory system and bone marrow in which cells can occur in a liquid suspension and not bound up in solid tissue, it ...
"Bone Marrow Transplantation. 41 (2): 159-65. doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1705929. PMC 2892221. PMID 18037943.. ... or bone marrow (less than 10 percent of nucleated bone marrow cells are tumors). ... Stage 4: Dissemination of tumor to distant lymph nodes, bone marrow, bone, liver, or other organs except as defined by Stage 4S ... Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation, and 13-cis-Retinoic Acid". New England Journal of Medicine. 341 (16): 1165-73. doi: ...
"Bone Marrow Transplantation. 31 (12): 1704105. doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1704105.. *^ Fine, Jo-David; Manes, Becky; Frangoul, Haydar ( ... at least four patients have died in the course of either preparation for or institution of bone marrow transplantation for ... the severe immunosuppression that bone marrow transplantation requires causes a significant risk of serious infections in ... As of 2008 clinical research at the University of Minnesota has included a bone marrow transplant to a 2-year-old child who is ...
June 2008). "Stem cell transplantation for primary immunodeficiencies". Bone Marrow Transplant. 41 Suppl 2: S83-6. doi:10.1038/ ... Bone marrow transplant may be possible for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency and other severe immunodeficiences. Virus-specific ... T-Lymphocytes (VST) therapy is used for patients who have received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation that has proven to ...
It can also involve bone marrow transplantation. Information on prognosis is limited by the rarity of the condition. Prognosis ... Acute erythroid leukemias can be classified as follows: 50% or more of all nucleated bone marrow cells are erythroblasts, ... Orazi, Attilio; O'Malley, Dennis P.; Arber, Daniel A. (2006-07-20). Illustrated Pathology of the Bone Marrow. Cambridge ... These cells may constitute 90% or more of the marrow elements. Despite this lack of myeloblasts, these cases should be ...
Association of Community Cancer Centers, National Bone Marrow Transplantation Research Network, National Gene Vector Laboratory ... In 2017, City of Hope was planning a Bone Marrow Transplant Reunion Day and Survivors Day.[10] The hospital also participates ... "City of Hope Reaches Historic Treatment Milestone with 10,000th Bone Marrow Transplant". BusinessWire. 2011-01-13. Archived ... which includes transplants of bone marrow, peripheral blood stem cells collected by apheresis, and umbilical cord stem cells.[9 ...
"False Hope : Bone Marrow Transplantation for Breast Cancer". Oxford University Press. Retrieved 7 May 2014. Eddy DM (1992). " ... "High-Dose Chemotherapy with Autologous Bone Marrow Transplantation for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer". 10. Journal ... under Eddy's guidance were tested and vindicated during the national controversy over high dose chemotherapy and bone marrow ...
In 2016, it inaugurated a bone marrow transplantation unit. It is the second-largest hospital in East Jerusalem, as well as ...
"Bordetella bronchiseptica pneumonia and bacteremia following bone marrow transplantation". J Clin Microbiol. 30 (9): 2474-5. ...
"Bone Marrow Transplantation. 31: 411-412. doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1703857.. Pemeliharaan CS1: Banyak nama: authors list (link) ...
1987). "Bone marrow transplantation in the treatment of alpha-mannosidosis". Disease in Childhood. 62 (10): 1044-1049. doi: ... 2004).Effective treatment of alpha-mannosidosis by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. J Pediatr, 144:569-573. ... Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) can be a treatment option for some patients, however the risk-benefit profile is ... The long-term forecast for the condition is poor.[2] There is generally a slow progression of neuromuscular and bone changes ...
Signs of progressive marrow failure may warrant bone marrow transplantation (BMT). This has been used successfully to treat ... Bone marrow is typically hypocellular, with maturation arrest in the myeloid lineages that give rise to neutrophils, ... Shwachman H, Diamond LK, Oski FA, Khaw KT (1964). "The syndrome of pancreatic insufficiency and bone marrow dysfunction". J ... bone marrow dysfunction, skeletal abnormalities and short stature. After cystic fibrosis (CF), it is the second most common ...
Bone Marrow Transplantation. 24 (12): 1367-8. doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1702097. PMID 10627651.. ... Lohrmann HP (1984). "The problem of permanent bone marrow damage after cytotoxic drug treatment". Oncology. 41 (3): 180-4. doi: ... bone marrow suppression,[14] stomach ache, hemorrhagic cystitis, diarrhea, darkening of the skin/nails, alopecia (hair loss) or ... avoid drug-induced bladder complications and screen for bone marrow toxicity.. It is used in medicine for treating certain ...
"G-CSF-primed bone marrow as a source of stem cells for allografting: revisiting the concept". Bone Marrow Transplantation. 50 ( ... and transplantation". Biology of Blood and Marrow Transplantation. 12 (6): 672-82. doi:10.1016/j.bbmt.2006.02.006. PMID ... The G-CSF-receptor is present on precursor cells in the bone marrow, and, in response to stimulation by G-CSF, initiates ... G-CSF is also a potent inducer of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization from the bone marrow into the bloodstream, ...
... and neuropsychological outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Wolman disease". Bone Marrow Transplantation. 43 (1): ... also known as bone marrow transplant, to try to prevent the disease from getting worse. Data are sparse but there is a known ... Some children with LAL-D have had an experimental therapy called hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), ... liver transplantation was necessary in most patients.[3] ...
The 2016 European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplant activity survey report". Bone Marrow Transplantation. 53 (9): 1139- ... There is little evidence for the use of preventative platelet transfusions in people with chronic bone marrow failure, such as ... International guidelines recommend that platelets transfusions are given to people with reversible bone marrow failure to ... Multiple guidelines recommend prophylactic platelet transfusions are not used routinely in people with chronic bone marrow ...
1996) 4. Established the Laminar Air Flow Room and the Bone Marrow Transplantation Center. (1995) The hospital is accessible ...
Bone Marrow Transplantation and Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation In National Cancer Institute Fact Sheet web site. ... Bone marrow transplantation is a widely used form of stem cell therapy.[28] No other forms of stem cell therapy are in clinical ... This type of medicine would allow for autologous transplantation, thus removing the risk of organ transplant rejection by the ... bone, blood, urogenital), or ectoderm (epidermal tissues and nervous tissue).[21] A specific set of genes, often called " ...
KK Ballen, F Verter and J Kurtzberg Umbilical cord blood donation: public or private? Bone Marrow Transplantation (2015), 1-8 ... Increased migration of cord blood-derived CD34+ cells, as compared to bone marrow and mobilized peripheral blood CD34+ cells ...
"Gianotti-Crosti syndrome associated with cytomegalovirus antigenemia after bone marrow transplantation". Bone Marrow ... Transplantation. 20 (8): 691-3. doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1700945. PMID 9383234. Chandrasekaran M, Mukherjee S (September 2007). " ...
HLA non-identical bone marrow transplants in a series of 10 patients". Bone Marrow Transplantation. 29 (9): 759-762. doi: ... Aggressive treatment with antibiotics is required and bone marrow transplant is common. Patients undergoing bone marrow ... Transplantation is a simple process. Bone marrow product is infused through a central vein over a period of several hours. The ... Transplantation of stem cells are taken from the bone marrow, peripheral blood or umbilical cord of healthy, matched donors. ...
"Unexpected complications after bone marrow transplantation in transfusion-dependent children". Bone marrow transplantation. 12 ... Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can cure hematological aspects of DBA. This option may be considered when patients become ... Typically, a diagnosis of DBA is made through a blood count and a bone marrow biopsy. A diagnosis of DBA is made on the basis ... This is in contrast to Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome, in which the bone marrow defect results primarily in neutropenia, and ...
March 1997). "Factors predicting morbidity following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation". Bone Marrow Transplantation. 19 ... Bone Marrow Transplantation. 37 (5): 499-502. doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1705262. PMID 16415895. Suzuki A, Nakauchi H, Taniguchi H ( ... Perry SS, Wang H, Pierce LJ, Yang AM, Tsai S, Spangrude GJ (April 2004). "L-selectin defines a bone marrow analog to the thymic ... 1984). "Bone marrow monosomy 7: hematologic and clinical manifestations in childhood and adolescence". Hematological Oncology. ...
Bone Marrow Transplantation. 24 (12): 1367-8. doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1702097. PMID 10627651. Vigouroux D, Voltaire L (1995). " ... Lohrmann HP (1984). "The problem of permanent bone marrow damage after cytotoxic drug treatment". Oncology. 41 (3): 180-4. doi: ... bone marrow suppression, stomach ache, hemorrhagic cystitis, diarrhea, darkening of the skin/nails, alopecia (hair loss) or ... avoid drug-induced bladder complications and screen for bone marrow toxicity. The main use of cyclophosphamide is with other ...
... bone marrow transplantation, and HIV-1 infection. Annual Review of Immunology. 2000, 18: 529-560. ISSN 0732-0582. PMID 10837068 ... American Journal of Transplantation. September 2015, 15 (9): 2431-42. PMID 25943855. doi:10.1111/ajt.13288.. ... The role of peripheral T-cell deletion in transplantation tolerance. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London ... IL-10 Induces T Cell Exhaustion During Transplantation of Virus Infected Hearts. Cellular Physiology and Biochemistry. 2016, 38 ...
... peer-reviewed journal covering all aspects of clinical and basic haemopoietic stem cell transplantation. ... Long-term follow-up of secondary malignancies in adults after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation FREE. W Hasegawa, G R Pond ... Life-threatening neurological complications after bone marrow transplantation in children FREE. D Uckan, M Cetin, Yigitkanli, ... Bone Marrow Transplant 35: 1-16; advance online publication, October 18, 2004; doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1704716 ...
Bone marrow transplantation. Definition. Bone marrow transplantation is the transference of bone marrow from one human or ... Taking the good without the bad in transplantation Targeting GM-CSF in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation could prevent ... Bone marrow transplantation can be used to treat certain blood disorders such as leukemia or immunodeficiency, but can also ... Increased bone marrow CD56bright natural killer cells at 30 days after allogeneic stem cell transplantation associated with ...
Bone marrow transplantation replaces faulty bone marrow with healthy bone marrow from a donor. Learn about the possible risks, ... Bone marrow (stem cell) donation (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish * Bone marrow transplant (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in ... Find a Donor (National Marrow Donor Program) * Learn About Bone Marrow Transplantation as a Treatment Option (Health Resources ... Bone marrow transplant - children - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish * Bone marrow transplant - discharge ( ...
Bone marrow transplantation.. -- Features peer-reviewed articles covering all aspects of clinical and basic hemopoietic stem ... Bone marrow transplantation. Bone Marrow Transplant. Abstract:. Features peer-reviewed articles covering all aspects of ... Bone marrow transplantation.. a schema:MediaObject, schema:Periodical, schema:CreativeWork ;. library:oclcnum "958631636" ;. ... Transplantation. schema:alternateName "Bone Marrow Transplant" ;. schema:datePublished "uuuu/9999" ;. schema:description " ...
... is a medical procedure to replenish bone marrow - the soft tissue within bones that produces new ... bone marrow transplantation. Bone marrow transplantation is a medical procedure to replenish bone marrow - the soft tissue ... Bone marrow transplants are necessary when marrow has been destroyed by drug or radiation therapy for cancer, often leukemia. A ... bone marrow donor is usually a close relative of the patient. ...
... and bone marrow (BM)-derived sorted CD4+ and CD8+ T cells of donor mice to T cell depleted bone marrow injected into lethally ... Regulatory Immunotherapy in Bone Marrow Transplantation. Vanessa Morales-Tirado, Wioleta Luszczek, Marié van der Merwe, and ... Department of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cellular Therapy, St. Jude Childrens Research Hospital, 262 Danny Thomas Place, ... H. E. Kohrt, A. B. Pillai, R. Lowsky, and S. Strober, "NKT cells, Treg, and their interactions in bone marrow transplantation ...
Bone Marrow Transplantation volume 49, pages539-544(2014)Cite this article ... cytotoxic T-lymphocyte clones from a patient with severe graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation ... interferon-gamma production in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. ... Bone Marrow Transplant 49, 539-544 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1038/bmt.2013.215 ...
Bone Marrow Transplantation volume 53, pages1048-1050(2018)Cite this article ... Histochemical and ultrastructural study of diffuse melanoderma after bone marrow transplantation. Br J Dermatol. 1996;134:325- ... Bone Marrow Transplant 53, 1048-1050 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1038/s41409-018-0110-z ... is a frequent and severe complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT). According to the National ...
A fundamental mission of the Hematological Malignancies and Bone Marrow Transplantation program is to enhance our understanding ... The program in Bone Marrow Transplantation (Drs. David E. Avigan, Jon Arnason, Vassiliki Boussiotis, Robin M. Joyce, James D. ... Bone marrow transplantation is uniquely curative for many patients with hematological malignancies due to the targeting of ... Bone marrow transplantation is potentially effective in eliminating blood cancer stem cells through their replacement by normal ...
Do you know which doctor should you consult if you have Bone Marrow Transplantation. This and other commonly asked questions ... Bone Marrow Transplantation - Animation. Animation and slides providing graphic explanation of Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT ... 1. Which doctors do bone marrow transplantation?. Bone marrow transplantation is performed by physicians including oncologists ... 5. What is the cost of bone marrow transplantation?. The cost for bone marrow transplant may vary for each patient depending on ...
Background Info? Bone marrow transplantation restores stem cells that were destroyed by high doses of ch... ... Read this full essay on Bone Marrow Transplantation. ... and into the bone marrow to draw the marrow out of the bone. ... Bone Marrow Transplantation Essay. 1229 words - 5 pages Background Info? Bone marrow transplantation restores stem cells that ... After the successful bone marrow transplantation, the MHC molecules on cells derived from the donor bone marrow will match the ...
The Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency at Cincinnati Childrens is a leader in care for hard-to- ... Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency The Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency at ... Our Bone Marrow Transplantation Program. Learn more about our different clinics, the diseases we treat, research efforts, ... Learn more about the conditions we treat, including malignancies, immune deficiencies, bone marrow failure syndromes, ...
View scientific achievements from the Division of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency in our 2018 Research Annual ... Bone Marrow Transplantation and Immune Deficiency Featured Research. Critical Link Discovered for Dangerous Complication of ... poorly recognized complication that can occur in about 30 percent of people receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation ( ...
... transplantation is for patients with relapsed or high risk cancers of the blood, eg leukaemia, lymphoma, myeloma. ... Bone marrow transplantation (or stem cell transplantation) is a well-established procedure for patients with relapsed or high- ... Bone marrow transplantation may also be an option for the treatment of certain non-haematological disorders. ... Home Our services Haematology Specialities list Bone marrow (stem cell) transplantation services ...
Autologous bone marrow transplantation for non-transformed low-grade non-Hodgkins lymphoma Bone Marrow Transplant 1995 16: 387 ... Bone marrow and PBPC processing and supportive care. Before 1991, patients received autologous bone marrow alone without the ... Bone Marrow Transplantation volume 29, pages673-679(2002)Cite this article ... Armitage J . Editorial: myelodysplasia and acute leukemia after autologous bone marrow transplantation J Clin Oncol 2000 18: ...
... life-threatening complications in immunocompromised patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. ... Bone Marrow Transplantation volume 49, pages934-941(2014)Cite this article ... Treatment of relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with chemotherapy followed by G ... Sellar RS, Peggs KS . The role of virus-specific adoptive T-cell therapy in hematopoietic transplantation. Cytotherapy 2012; 14 ...
We are recognized for our expertise in alternative donor transplantation; relapse prevention and treatment; transplantation for ... we offer the full range of blood and bone marrow stem cell transplantation options. ... Blood and Bone Marrow Stem Cell Transplantation. Wendy Stock, MD, is an expert in leukemia and stem cell transplantation. ... Birthplace of Bone Marrow Transplantation. In the late 1940s, University of Chicago researcher Dr. Leon Jacobson discovered ...
Bone Marrow Transplantation - Animation. Animation and slides providing graphic explanation of Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT ... Complications of Bone Marrow Transplantation. Complications of Bone Marrow or Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation include ... Complications of Bone Marrow or Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Complications of Bone Marrow or Hematopoietic Stem Cell ... Complications of bone marrow transplantation/ hematopoietic stem cell transplantation include:. Complications due to ...
E. Donnall Thomas - Nobel Lecture: Bone Marrow Transplantation Past, Present and Future ...
... following bone marrow transplantation (BMT)?) and What is the mortality rate for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) following bone ... What is the mortality rate for myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) following bone marrow transplantation (BMT)?. Updated: Jul 24, ... This bone marrow film (400× magnification) demonstrates an almost complete replacement of normal hematopoiesis by blasts in a ... Bone marrow film (1000× magnification) demonstrating ring sideroblasts in Prussian blue staining in a refractory anemia with ...
Procedure: Bone marrow transplantation Day 0 - Transplantation of hematopoietic cells derived from bone marrow of a donor to a ... Non-Myeloablative Conditioning and Bone Marrow Transplantation. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ... MedlinePlus related topics: Bone Marrow Transplantation Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center resources: Sickle Cell ... Experimental: Non-Myeloablative Conditioning and Bone Marrow Transplantation Drug: Thymoglobulin Day 9 - 0.5 mg/kg IV before ...
The month, day, and year a content piece was published electronically (as opposed to in print). Depending on the webpage, it may or may not be shown ...
Busulfan disposition: the role of therapeutic monitoring in bone marrow transplantation induction regimens.. Grochow LB1. ... High-dose busulfan is an important component of many bone marrow transplantation (BMT) preparative regimens. The dose-limiting ... Transplantation - Genetic Alliance. *Bone Marrow Transplantation - MedlinePlus Health Information. Miscellaneous. *BUSULFAN - ...
Use of a lower intensity bone marrow transplantation method showed promising results among 30 patients (16-65 years of age) ... Bone marrow transplantation shows potential for treating adults with sickle cell disease. The JAMA Network Journals ... Bone marrow transplantation shows potential for treating adults with sickle cell disease ... Use of a lower intensity bone marrow transplantation method showed promising results among 30 patients (16-65 years of age) ...
... a potentially lethal complication of bone marrow stem cell transplantation. CytoDyn is currently enrolling patients in a Phase ... 2 clinical trial with PRO 140 for the prevention of GvHD in leukemia patients undergoing BMSC transplantation. ... Monoclonal antibody prevents graft-vs-host disease in bone marrow transplantation model PRO 140 currently in phase 2 clinical ... Monoclonal antibody prevents graft-vs-host disease in bone marrow transplantation model. Bioscribe ...
  • Many of the roots of chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, gene therapy, and bone marrow transplantation can be traced to UChicago. (uchicago.edu)
  • Staff of the Children's Cancer Centre are family focused in their care and provide both inpatient and outpatient diagnostic and treatment services for a full range of paediatric cancers including brain tumours and diseases requiring bone marrow transplantation. (rch.org.au)
  • While stem cell therapy, such as bone marrow transplantation, may be used to treat a limited number of diseases and conditions, there are currently no clinically tested or government-approved cell therapies available for the treatment or prevention of COVID-19, says Ikonomou. (wnypapers.com)
  • Our objective was to characterize the most important clinical, social and economic features of candidates for transplantation and their potential donors as well as the influence of these factors on overall survival in a retrospective and exploratory analysis at a university hospital. (embrapa.br)
  • His clinical and research interests include bone marrow transplantation and chemotherapeutic agents. (uwmedicine.org)
  • The NHS Wales Shared Services Partnership, hosted by Velindre NHS Trust are acting on behalf of Cardiff and Vale University Local Health Board who are seeking to establish a contract for the purchase of a bone marrow transplantation database for the management of procurement, collection, processing and storage of cellular therapy products and collation of clinical data with associated maintenance costs for use in their Haematology department. (gov.wales)
  • But Robert Gale, a physician and specialist in bone marrow transplantation who treated Chernobyl victims for two years after the accident, recently wrote in a critique of the series that the first responders from Chernobyl would not have been contagious once their clothing was removed and they were washed-because their exposure was external. (slate.com)
  • Be The Match is a global leader in bone marrow transplantation and connects patients with their donor match for a life-saving marrow or blood stem cell. (lesnuggle.com)
  • He is editor of Bone Marrow Transplantation, a former editor of The Haematology Journal, and an associate editor of the European Journal of Haematology. (cml-foundation.org)
  • Bone marrow transplantation remains the only cure for PNH but should be reserved for patients with suboptimal response to eculizumab. (aamds.org)
  • TKE is now taking their support to an all-new level, committing to raise $10 million dollars in 10 years to name the Bone Marrow Transplantation & Cellular Therapy Research Floor. (stjude.org)
  • Additionally, many members of our team complete special training and focus primarily on bone marrow transplantation and cellular therapy . (childrenscolorado.org)
  • Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoblobinuria (PNH) is a rare bone marrow failure disorder that manifests with hemolytic anemia , thrombosis and peripheral blood cytopenias. (aamds.org)
  • Is the ABO incompatibility a risk factor in bone marrow transplantation? (google.se)
  • Be The Match® is a global leader in bone marrow transplantation. (bethematch.org)