Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Bone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Bone Marrow DiseasesBone Marrow Examination: Removal of bone marrow and evaluation of its histologic picture.Bone Marrow Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the bone marrow. They are differentiated from neoplasms composed of bone marrow cells, such as MULTIPLE MYELOMA. Most bone marrow neoplasms are metastatic.Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Bone Marrow Purging: Techniques for the removal of subpopulations of cells (usually residual tumor cells) from the bone marrow ex vivo before it is infused. The purging is achieved by a variety of agents including pharmacologic agents, biophysical agents (laser photoirradiation or radioisotopes) and immunologic agents. Bone marrow purging is used in both autologous and allogeneic BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION.Hematopoiesis: The development and formation of various types of BLOOD CELLS. Hematopoiesis can take place in the BONE MARROW (medullary) or outside the bone marrow (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Transplantation, Homologous: Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.Bone Development: The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.Mumps virus: The type species of RUBULAVIRUS that causes an acute infectious disease in humans, affecting mainly children. Transmission occurs by droplet infection.Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.Colony-Forming Units Assay: A cytologic technique for measuring the functional capacity of stem cells by assaying their activity.Cerebral Arterial Diseases: Pathological conditions of intracranial ARTERIES supplying the CEREBRUM. These diseases often are due to abnormalities or pathological processes in the ANTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY; MIDDLE CEREBRAL ARTERY; and POSTERIOR CEREBRAL ARTERY.Bone Regeneration: Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Whole-Body Irradiation: Irradiation of the whole body with ionizing or non-ionizing radiation. It is applicable to humans or animals but not to microorganisms.Transplantation, Autologous: Transplantation of an individual's own tissue from one site to another site.Radiation Chimera: An organism whose body contains cell populations of different genotypes as a result of the TRANSPLANTATION of donor cells after sufficient ionizing radiation to destroy the mature recipient's cells which would otherwise reject the donor cells.Stromal Cells: Connective tissue cells of an organ found in the loose connective tissue. These are most often associated with the uterine mucosa and the ovary as well as the hematopoietic system and elsewhere.Graft vs Host Disease: The clinical entity characterized by anorexia, diarrhea, loss of hair, leukopenia, thrombocytopenia, growth retardation, and eventual death brought about by the GRAFT VS HOST REACTION.Anemia, Aplastic: A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.Osteogenesis: The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.Flow Cytometry: Technique using an instrument system for making, processing, and displaying one or more measurements on individual cells obtained from a cell suspension. Cells are usually stained with one or more fluorescent dyes specific to cell components of interest, e.g., DNA, and fluorescence of each cell is measured as it rapidly transverses the excitation beam (laser or mercury arc lamp). Fluorescence provides a quantitative measure of various biochemical and biophysical properties of the cell, as well as a basis for cell sorting. Other measurable optical parameters include light absorption and light scattering, the latter being applicable to the measurement of cell size, shape, density, granularity, and stain uptake.Leukemia: A progressive, malignant disease of the blood-forming organs, characterized by distorted proliferation and development of leukocytes and their precursors in the blood and bone marrow. Leukemias were originally termed acute or chronic based on life expectancy but now are classified according to cellular maturity. Acute leukemias consist of predominately immature cells; chronic leukemias are composed of more mature cells. (From The Merck Manual, 2006)Bone Matrix: Extracellular substance of bone tissue consisting of COLLAGEN fibers, ground substance, and inorganic crystalline minerals and salts.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Antigens, CD34: Glycoproteins found on immature hematopoietic cells and endothelial cells. They are the only molecules to date whose expression within the blood system is restricted to a small number of progenitor cells in the bone marrow.Granulocytes: Leukocytes with abundant granules in the cytoplasm. They are divided into three groups according to the staining properties of the granules: neutrophilic, eosinophilic, and basophilic. Mature granulocytes are the NEUTROPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and BASOPHILS.Spleen: An encapsulated lymphatic organ through which venous blood filters.Osteoblasts: Bone-forming cells which secrete an EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. HYDROXYAPATITE crystals are then deposited into the matrix to form bone.Osteoclasts: A large multinuclear cell associated with the BONE RESORPTION. An odontoclast, also called cementoclast, is cytomorphologically the same as an osteoclast and is involved in CEMENTUM resorption.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS from BONE MARROW or BLOOD between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used as an alternative to BONE MARROW TRANSPLANTATION in the treatment of a variety of neoplasms.Transplantation Chimera: An organism that, as a result of transplantation of donor tissue or cells, consists of two or more cell lines descended from at least two zygotes. This state may result in the induction of donor-specific TRANSPLANTATION TOLERANCE.Multiple Myeloma: A malignancy of mature PLASMA CELLS engaging in monoclonal immunoglobulin production. It is characterized by hyperglobulinemia, excess Bence-Jones proteins (free monoclonal IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) in the urine, skeletal destruction, bone pain, and fractures. Other features include ANEMIA; HYPERCALCEMIA; and RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Pancytopenia: Deficiency of all three cell elements of the blood, erythrocytes, leukocytes and platelets.Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute: Clonal expansion of myeloid blasts in bone marrow, blood, and other tissue. Myeloid leukemias develop from changes in cells that normally produce NEUTROPHILS; BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and MONOCYTES.Cell SeparationTime Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Bone Substitutes: Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.Bone Diseases, MetabolicMegakaryocytes: Very large BONE MARROW CELLS which release mature BLOOD PLATELETS.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Stem Cells: Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.Mice, Inbred BALB CCell Lineage: The developmental history of specific differentiated cell types as traced back to the original STEM CELLS in the embryo.Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplasia in one or more hematopoietic cell lineages. They predominantly affect patients over 60, are considered preleukemic conditions, and have high probability of transformation into ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Immunophenotyping: Process of classifying cells of the immune system based on structural and functional differences. The process is commonly used to analyze and sort T-lymphocytes into subsets based on CD antigens by the technique of flow cytometry.Granulocyte Colony-Stimulating Factor: A glycoprotein of MW 25 kDa containing internal disulfide bonds. It induces the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of neutrophilic granulocyte precursor cells and functionally activates mature blood neutrophils. Among the family of colony-stimulating factors, G-CSF is the most potent inducer of terminal differentiation to granulocytes and macrophages of leukemic myeloid cell lines.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.T-Lymphocytes: Lymphocytes responsible for cell-mediated immunity. Two types have been identified - cytotoxic (T-LYMPHOCYTES, CYTOTOXIC) and helper T-lymphocytes (T-LYMPHOCYTES, HELPER-INDUCER). They are formed when lymphocytes circulate through the THYMUS GLAND and differentiate to thymocytes. When exposed to an antigen, they divide rapidly and produce large numbers of new T cells sensitized to that antigen.Leukemia, Myeloid: Form of leukemia characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation of the myeloid lineage and their precursors (MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS) in the bone marrow and other sites.Graft Survival: The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.Cyclophosphamide: Precursor of an alkylating nitrogen mustard antineoplastic and immunosuppressive agent that must be activated in the LIVER to form the active aldophosphamide. It has been used in the treatment of LYMPHOMA and LEUKEMIA. Its side effect, ALOPECIA, has been used for defleecing sheep. Cyclophosphamide may also cause sterility, birth defects, mutations, and cancer.Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2: A potent osteoinductive protein that plays a critical role in the differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells into OSTEOBLASTS.Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.Blood Cells: The cells found in the body fluid circulating throughout the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Antigens, CD: Differentiation antigens residing on mammalian leukocytes. CD stands for cluster of differentiation, which refers to groups of monoclonal antibodies that show similar reactivity with certain subpopulations of antigens of a particular lineage or differentiation stage. The subpopulations of antigens are also known by the same CD designation.Leukocyte Count: The number of WHITE BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in venous BLOOD. A differential leukocyte count measures the relative numbers of the different types of white cells.Cell Count: The number of CELLS of a specific kind, usually measured per unit volume or area of sample.Erythropoiesis: The production of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES). In humans, erythrocytes are produced by the YOLK SAC in the first trimester; by the liver in the second trimester; by the BONE MARROW in the third trimester and after birth. In normal individuals, the erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood remains relatively constant implying a balance between the rate of erythrocyte production and rate of destruction.Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Blood Cell Count: The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.Thymus Gland: A single, unpaired primary lymphoid organ situated in the MEDIASTINUM, extending superiorly into the neck to the lower edge of the THYROID GLAND and inferiorly to the fourth costal cartilage. It is necessary for normal development of immunologic function early in life. By puberty, it begins to involute and much of the tissue is replaced by fat.Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma: A neoplasm characterized by abnormalities of the lymphoid cell precursors leading to excessive lymphoblasts in the marrow and other organs. It is the most common cancer in children and accounts for the vast majority of all childhood leukemias.Primary Myelofibrosis: A de novo myeloproliferation arising from an abnormal stem cell. It is characterized by the replacement of bone marrow by fibrous tissue, a process that is mediated by CYTOKINES arising from the abnormal clone.Leukemia, Myelogenous, Chronic, BCR-ABL Positive: Clonal hematopoetic disorder caused by an acquired genetic defect in PLURIPOTENT STEM CELLS. It starts in MYELOID CELLS of the bone marrow, invades the blood and then other organs. The condition progresses from a stable, more indolent, chronic phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, CHRONIC PHASE) lasting up to 7 years, to an advanced phase composed of an accelerated phase (LEUKEMIA, MYELOID, ACCELERATED PHASE) and BLAST CRISIS.Busulfan: An alkylating agent having a selective immunosuppressive effect on BONE MARROW. It has been used in the palliative treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia (MYELOID LEUKEMIA, CHRONIC), but although symptomatic relief is provided, no permanent remission is brought about. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), busulfan is listed as a known carcinogen.Chimera: An individual that contains cell populations derived from different zygotes.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Tissue Donors: Individuals supplying living tissue, organs, cells, blood or blood components for transfer or transplantation to histocompatible recipients.Transplantation Conditioning: Preparative treatment of transplant recipient with various conditioning regimens including radiation, immune sera, chemotherapy, and/or immunosuppressive agents, prior to transplantation. Transplantation conditioning is very common before bone marrow transplantation.Macrophages: The relatively long-lived phagocytic cell of mammalian tissues that are derived from blood MONOCYTES. Main types are PERITONEAL MACROPHAGES; ALVEOLAR MACROPHAGES; HISTIOCYTES; KUPFFER CELLS of the liver; and OSTEOCLASTS. They may further differentiate within chronic inflammatory lesions to EPITHELIOID CELLS or may fuse to form FOREIGN BODY GIANT CELLS or LANGHANS GIANT CELLS. (from The Dictionary of Cell Biology, Lackie and Dow, 3rd ed.)Antibodies, Monoclonal: Antibodies produced by a single clone of cells.Bone Cysts: Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.Plasma Cells: Specialized forms of antibody-producing B-LYMPHOCYTES. They synthesize and secrete immunoglobulin. They are found only in lymphoid organs and at sites of immune responses and normally do not circulate in the blood or lymph. (Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989, p169 & Abbas et al., Cellular and Molecular Immunology, 2d ed, p20)Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor: An acidic glycoprotein of MW 23 kDa with internal disulfide bonds. The protein is produced in response to a number of inflammatory mediators by mesenchymal cells present in the hemopoietic environment and at peripheral sites of inflammation. GM-CSF is able to stimulate the production of neutrophilic granulocytes, macrophages, and mixed granulocyte-macrophage colonies from bone marrow cells and can stimulate the formation of eosinophil colonies from fetal liver progenitor cells. GM-CSF can also stimulate some functional activities in mature granulocytes and macrophages.Mice, Inbred Strains: Genetically identical individuals developed from brother and sister matings which have been carried out for twenty or more generations, or by parent x offspring matings carried out with certain restrictions. All animals within an inbred strain trace back to a common ancestor in the twentieth generation.Colony-Stimulating Factors: Glycoproteins found in a subfraction of normal mammalian plasma and urine. They stimulate the proliferation of bone marrow cells in agar cultures and the formation of colonies of granulocytes and/or macrophages. The factors include INTERLEUKIN-3; (IL-3); GRANULOCYTE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR; (G-CSF); MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR; (M-CSF); and GRANULOCYTE-MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR; (GM-CSF).Histocompatibility Testing: Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation: Transfer of MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS).Transplantation, Isogeneic: Transplantation between genetically identical individuals, i.e., members of the same species with identical histocompatibility antigens, such as monozygotic twins, members of the same inbred strain, or members of a hybrid population produced by crossing certain inbred strains.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Chemokine CXCL12: A CXC chemokine that is chemotactic for T-LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES. It has specificity for CXCR4 RECEPTORS. Two isoforms of CXCL12 are produced by alternative mRNA splicing.Hematologic Diseases: Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Histocompatibility: The degree of antigenic similarity between the tissues of different individuals, which determines the acceptance or rejection of allografts.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Melatonin: A biogenic amine that is found in animals and plants. In mammals, melatonin is produced by the PINEAL GLAND. Its secretion increases in darkness and decreases during exposure to light. Melatonin is implicated in the regulation of SLEEP, mood, and REPRODUCTION. Melatonin is also an effective antioxidant.Alkaline Phosphatase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of an orthophosphoric monoester and water to an alcohol and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.1.Mummies: Bodies preserved either by the ancient Egyptian technique or due to chance under favorable climatic conditions.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Combined Modality Therapy: The treatment of a disease or condition by several different means simultaneously or sequentially. Chemoimmunotherapy, RADIOIMMUNOTHERAPY, chemoradiotherapy, cryochemotherapy, and SALVAGE THERAPY are seen most frequently, but their combinations with each other and surgery are also used.Clone Cells: A group of genetically identical cells all descended from a single common ancestral cell by mitosis in eukaryotes or by binary fission in prokaryotes. Clone cells also include populations of recombinant DNA molecules all carrying the same inserted sequence. (From King & Stansfield, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)B-Lymphocytes: Lymphoid cells concerned with humoral immunity. They are short-lived cells resembling bursa-derived lymphocytes of birds in their production of immunoglobulin upon appropriate stimulation.Remission Induction: Therapeutic act or process that initiates a response to a complete or partial remission level.Calcification, Physiologic: Process by which organic tissue becomes hardened by the physiologic deposit of calcium salts.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Hematopoietic Stem Cell Mobilization: The release of stem cells from the bone marrow into the peripheral blood circulation for the purpose of leukapheresis, prior to stem cell transplantation. Hematopoietic growth factors or chemotherapeutic agents often are used to stimulate the mobilization.Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Coculture Techniques: A technique of culturing mixed cell types in vitro to allow their synergistic or antagonistic interactions, such as on CELL DIFFERENTIATION or APOPTOSIS. Coculture can be of different types of cells, tissues, or organs from normal or disease states.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Parietal Bone: One of a pair of irregularly shaped quadrilateral bones situated between the FRONTAL BONE and OCCIPITAL BONE, which together form the sides of the CRANIUM.Lymphocytes: White blood cells formed in the body's lymphoid tissue. The nucleus is round or ovoid with coarse, irregularly clumped chromatin while the cytoplasm is typically pale blue with azurophilic (if any) granules. Most lymphocytes can be classified as either T or B (with subpopulations of each), or NATURAL KILLER CELLS.Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin: Any of a group of malignant tumors of lymphoid tissue that differ from HODGKIN DISEASE, being more heterogeneous with respect to malignant cell lineage, clinical course, prognosis, and therapy. The only common feature among these tumors is the absence of giant REED-STERNBERG CELLS, a characteristic of Hodgkin's disease.Sickle Cell Trait: The condition of being heterozygous for hemoglobin S.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Erythroid Precursor Cells: The cells in the erythroid series derived from MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS or from the bi-potential MEGAKARYOCYTE-ERYTHROID PROGENITOR CELLS which eventually give rise to mature RED BLOOD CELLS. The erythroid progenitor cells develop in two phases: erythroid burst-forming units (BFU-E) followed by erythroid colony-forming units (CFU-E); BFU-E differentiate into CFU-E on stimulation by ERYTHROPOIETIN, and then further differentiate into ERYTHROBLASTS when stimulated by other factors.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Stem Cell Factor: A hematopoietic growth factor and the ligand of the cell surface c-kit protein (PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEINS C-KIT). It is expressed during embryogenesis and is a growth factor for a number of cell types including the MAST CELLS and the MELANOCYTES in addition to the HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Cell Survival: The span of viability of a cell characterized by the capacity to perform certain functions such as metabolism, growth, reproduction, some form of responsiveness, and adaptability.RANK Ligand: A transmembrane protein belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that specifically binds RECEPTOR ACTIVATOR OF NUCLEAR FACTOR-KAPPA B and OSTEOPROTEGERIN. It plays an important role in regulating OSTEOCLAST differentiation and activation.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Medicine, Ayurvedic: The traditional Hindu system of medicine which is based on customs, beliefs, and practices of the Hindu culture. Ayurveda means "the science of Life": veda - science, ayur - life.Antigens, CD45: High-molecular weight glycoproteins uniquely expressed on the surface of LEUKOCYTES and their hemopoietic progenitors. They contain a cytoplasmic protein tyrosine phosphatase activity which plays a role in intracellular signaling from the CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS. The CD45 antigens occur as multiple isoforms that result from alternative mRNA splicing and differential usage of three exons.Osteocalcin: Vitamin K-dependent calcium-binding protein synthesized by OSTEOBLASTS and found primarily in BONES. Serum osteocalcin measurements provide a noninvasive specific marker of bone metabolism. The protein contains three residues of the amino acid gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla), which, in the presence of CALCIUM, promotes binding to HYDROXYAPATITE and subsequent accumulation in BONE MATRIX.Antigens, Ly: A group of lymphocyte surface antigens located on mouse LYMPHOCYTES. Specific Ly antigens are useful markers for distinguishing subpopulations of lymphocytes.Hematologic Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the blood and blood-forming tissue (the bone marrow and lymphatic tissue). The commonest forms are the various types of LEUKEMIA, of LYMPHOMA, and of the progressive, life-threatening forms of the MYELODYSPLASTIC SYNDROMES.Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-kit: A protein-tyrosine kinase receptor that is specific for STEM CELL FACTOR. This interaction is crucial for the development of hematopoietic, gonadal, and pigment stem cells. Genetic mutations that disrupt the expression of PROTO-ONCOGENE PROTEINS C-KIT are associated with PIEBALDISM, while overexpression or constitutive activation of the c-kit protein-tyrosine kinase is associated with tumorigenesis.Mice, SCID: Mice homozygous for the mutant autosomal recessive gene "scid" which is located on the centromeric end of chromosome 16. These mice lack mature, functional lymphocytes and are thus highly susceptible to lethal opportunistic infections if not chronically treated with antibiotics. The lack of B- and T-cell immunity resembles severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndrome in human infants. SCID mice are useful as animal models since they are receptive to implantation of a human immune system producing SCID-human (SCID-hu) hematochimeric mice.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Myeloid Progenitor Cells: Stem cells derived from HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS. Derived from these myeloid progenitor cells are the MEGAKARYOCYTES; ERYTHROID CELLS; MYELOID CELLS; and some DENDRITIC CELLS.Hematopoiesis, Extramedullary: The formation and development of blood cells outside the BONE MARROW, as in the SPLEEN; LIVER; or LYMPH NODES.Osteocytes: Mature osteoblasts that have become embedded in the BONE MATRIX. They occupy a small cavity, called lacuna, in the matrix and are connected to adjacent osteocytes via protoplasmic projections called canaliculi.Leukemia, Lymphoid: Leukemia associated with HYPERPLASIA of the lymphoid tissues and increased numbers of circulating malignant LYMPHOCYTES and lymphoblasts.X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Stem Cell Transplantation: The transfer of STEM CELLS from one individual to another within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or between species (XENOTRANSPLANTATION), or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS). The source and location of the stem cells determines their potency or pluripotency to differentiate into various cell types.Myelopoiesis: Formation of MYELOID CELLS from the pluripotent HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS in the BONE MARROW via MYELOID STEM CELLS. Myelopoiesis generally refers to the production of leukocytes in blood, such as MONOCYTES and GRANULOCYTES. This process also produces precursor cells for MACROPHAGE and DENDRITIC CELLS found in the lymphoid tissue.Erythropoietin: Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the KIDNEY in the adult and the LIVER in the FETUS, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the BONE MARROW to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.Immunosuppression: Deliberate prevention or diminution of the host's immune response. It may be nonspecific as in the administration of immunosuppressive agents (drugs or radiation) or by lymphocyte depletion or may be specific as in desensitization or the simultaneous administration of antigen and immunosuppressive drugs.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Cell Culture Techniques: Methods for maintaining or growing CELLS in vitro.Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially in the drug therapy of neoplasms. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Alveolar Bone Loss: Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.Platelet Count: The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.Retroviridae: Family of RNA viruses that infects birds and mammals and encodes the enzyme reverse transcriptase. The family contains seven genera: DELTARETROVIRUS; LENTIVIRUS; RETROVIRUSES TYPE B, MAMMALIAN; ALPHARETROVIRUS; GAMMARETROVIRUS; RETROVIRUSES TYPE D; and SPUMAVIRUS. A key feature of retrovirus biology is the synthesis of a DNA copy of the genome which is integrated into cellular DNA. After integration it is sometimes not expressed but maintained in a latent state (PROVIRUSES).Thrombocytopenia: A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.Neoplasm, Residual: Remnant of a tumor or cancer after primary, potentially curative therapy. (Dr. Daniel Masys, written communication)Graft vs Host Reaction: An immunological attack mounted by a graft against the host because of tissue incompatibility when immunologically competent cells are transplanted to an immunologically incompetent host; the resulting clinical picture is that of GRAFT VS HOST DISEASE.Fetal Blood: Blood of the fetus. Exchange of nutrients and waste between the fetal and maternal blood occurs via the PLACENTA. The cord blood is blood contained in the umbilical vessels (UMBILICAL CORD) at the time of delivery.Leukocytes: White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Erythroblasts: Immature, nucleated ERYTHROCYTES occupying the stage of ERYTHROPOIESIS that follows formation of ERYTHROID PRECURSOR CELLS and precedes formation of RETICULOCYTES. The normal series is called normoblasts. Cells called MEGALOBLASTS are a pathologic series of erythroblasts.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Mice, Mutant Strains: Mice bearing mutant genes which are phenotypically expressed in the animals.Leukopoiesis: The process of generating white blood cells (LEUKOCYTES) from the pluripotent HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELLS of the BONE MARROW. There are two significant pathways to generate various types of leukocytes: MYELOPOIESIS, in which leukocytes in the blood are derived from MYELOID STEM CELLS, and LYMPHOPOIESIS, in which leukocytes of the lymphatic system (LYMPHOCYTES) are generated from lymphoid stem cells.Cytokines: Non-antibody proteins secreted by inflammatory leukocytes and some non-leukocytic cells, that act as intercellular mediators. They differ from classical hormones in that they are produced by a number of tissue or cell types rather than by specialized glands. They generally act locally in a paracrine or autocrine rather than endocrine manner.Hematopoietic Cell Growth Factors: These growth factors comprise a family of hematopoietic regulators with biological specificities defined by their ability to support proliferation and differentiation of blood cells of different lineages. ERYTHROPOIETIN and the COLONY-STIMULATING FACTORS belong to this family. Some of these factors have been studied and used in the treatment of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia, myelodysplastic syndromes, and bone marrow failure syndromes.Myeloproliferative Disorders: Conditions which cause proliferation of hemopoietically active tissue or of tissue which has embryonic hemopoietic potential. They all involve dysregulation of multipotent MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS, most often caused by a mutation in the JAK2 PROTEIN TYROSINE KINASE.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Cell Adhesion: Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.Thrombopoietin: A humoral factor that stimulates the production of thrombocytes (BLOOD PLATELETS). Thrombopoietin stimulates the proliferation of bone marrow MEGAKARYOCYTES and their release of blood platelets. The process is called THROMBOPOIESIS.Cytarabine: A pyrimidine nucleoside analog that is used mainly in the treatment of leukemia, especially acute non-lymphoblastic leukemia. Cytarabine is an antimetabolite antineoplastic agent that inhibits the synthesis of DNA. Its actions are specific for the S phase of the cell cycle. It also has antiviral and immunosuppressant properties. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p472)Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Aortic Bodies: Small clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the ARCH OF THE AORTA; the PULMONARY ARTERIES; and the CORONARY ARTERIES. The aortic bodies sense PH; CARBON DIOXIDE; and OXYGEN concentrations in the BLOOD and participate in the control of RESPIRATION. The aortic bodies should not be confused with the PARA-AORTIC BODIES in the abdomen (which are sometimes also called aortic bodies).Severe Combined Immunodeficiency: Group of rare congenital disorders characterized by impairment of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity, leukopenia, and low or absent antibody levels. It is inherited as an X-linked or autosomal recessive defect. Mutations occurring in many different genes cause human Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID).Gene Expression Regulation: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control (induction or repression) of gene action at the level of transcription or translation.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Precursor Cells, B-Lymphoid: Lymphocyte progenitor cells that are restricted in their differentiation potential to the B lymphocyte lineage. The pro-B cell stage of B lymphocyte development precedes the pre-B cell stage.Antigens, Thy-1: A group of differentiation surface antigens, among the first to be discovered on thymocytes and T-lymphocytes. Originally identified in the mouse, they are also found in other species including humans, and are expressed on brain neurons and other cells.Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Neutrophils: Granular leukocytes having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by slender threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing fine inconspicuous granules and stainable by neutral dyes.Antigens, Differentiation: Antigens expressed primarily on the membranes of living cells during sequential stages of maturation and differentiation. As immunologic markers they have high organ and tissue specificity and are useful as probes in studies of normal cell development as well as neoplastic transformation.Myeloid Cells: The classes of BONE MARROW-derived blood cells in the monocytic series (MONOCYTES and their precursors) and granulocytic series (GRANULOCYTES and their precursors).Apoptosis: One of the mechanisms by which CELL DEATH occurs (compare with NECROSIS and AUTOPHAGOCYTOSIS). Apoptosis is the mechanism responsible for the physiological deletion of cells and appears to be intrinsically programmed. It is characterized by distinctive morphologic changes in the nucleus and cytoplasm, chromatin cleavage at regularly spaced sites, and the endonucleolytic cleavage of genomic DNA; (DNA FRAGMENTATION); at internucleosomal sites. This mode of cell death serves as a balance to mitosis in regulating the size of animal tissues and in mediating pathologic processes associated with tumor growth.Monocytes: Large, phagocytic mononuclear leukocytes produced in the vertebrate BONE MARROW and released into the BLOOD; contain a large, oval or somewhat indented nucleus surrounded by voluminous cytoplasm and numerous organelles.Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7: A bone morphogenetic protein that is widely expressed during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT. It is both a potent osteogenic factor and a specific regulator of nephrogenesis.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Regeneration: The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.Multipotent Stem Cells: Specialized stem cells that are committed to give rise to cells that have a particular function; examples are MYOBLASTS; MYELOID PROGENITOR CELLS; and skin stem cells. (Stem Cells: A Primer [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Institutes of Health (US); 2000 May [cited 2002 Apr 5]. Available from: http://www.nih.gov/news/stemcell/primer.htm)Karyotyping: Mapping of the KARYOTYPE of a cell.Fanconi Anemia: Congenital disorder affecting all bone marrow elements, resulting in ANEMIA; LEUKOPENIA; and THROMBOPENIA, and associated with cardiac, renal, and limb malformations as well as dermal pigmentary changes. Spontaneous CHROMOSOME BREAKAGE is a feature of this disease along with predisposition to LEUKEMIA. There are at least 7 complementation groups in Fanconi anemia: FANCA, FANCB, FANCC, FANCD1, FANCD2, FANCE, FANCF, FANCG, and FANCL. (from Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/dispomim.cgi?id=227650, August 20, 2004)Liver: A large lobed glandular organ in the abdomen of vertebrates that is responsible for detoxification, metabolism, synthesis and storage of various substances.Mice, Inbred CBADose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Osteopetrosis: Excessive formation of dense trabecular bone leading to pathological fractures; OSTEITIS; SPLENOMEGALY with infarct; ANEMIA; and extramedullary hemopoiesis (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor: A mononuclear phagocyte colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) synthesized by mesenchymal cells. The compound stimulates the survival, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic cells of the monocyte-macrophage series. M-CSF is a disulfide-bonded glycoprotein dimer with a MW of 70 kDa. It binds to a specific high affinity receptor (RECEPTOR, MACROPHAGE COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR).Medical Office Buildings: Office and laboratory facilities constructed for the use of physicians and other health personnel.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Mice, Inbred DBAB-Lymphocyte Subsets: A classification of B-lymphocytes based on structurally or functionally different populations of cells.Preleukemia: Conditions in which the abnormalities in the peripheral blood or bone marrow represent the early manifestations of acute leukemia, but in which the changes are not of sufficient magnitude or specificity to permit a diagnosis of acute leukemia by the usual clinical criteria.Green Fluorescent Proteins: Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.

Bone marrow angiogenesis and mast cell density increase simultaneously with progression of human multiple myeloma. (1/9035)

Immunohistochemical, cytochemical and ultrastructural data showing vivid angiogenesis and numerous mast cells (MCs) in the bone marrow of 24 patients with active multiple myeloma (MM) compared with 34 patients with non-active MM and 22 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) led us to hypothesize that angiogenesis parallels progression of MM, and that MCs participate in its induction via angiogenic factors in their secretory granules.  (+info)

Granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-3 correct osteopetrosis in mice with osteopetrosis mutation. (2/9035)

Although young mice homozygous for the osteopetrosis (op) mutation usually developed prominent osteopetrosis, its severity was markedly reduced in aged op/op mice. This age-associated reversal of osteopetrosis was accompanied by the expansion of bone marrow cavities and increased numbers of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive cells and of macrophages in the bone marrow. The TRAP-positive cells were mononuclear and developed ruffled borders and numerous vesicles, vacuoles, and granules. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated a significant elevation of serum granulocyte/ macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-3 levels in the aged op/op mice. To examine whether GM-CSF and/or IL-3 could correct osteopetrosis in young op/op mice, 5 ng of recombinant murine (rm)GM-CSF and/or 100 ng of rmIL-3 were injected daily into young op/op mice. In these treated young op/op mice, the bone marrow cavities were expanded significantly at 2 weeks after administration, associated with significantly increased numbers of TRAP-positive cells and bone marrow macrophages. TRAP-positive cells increased in number with days after injection. These results suggest that GM-CSF and IL-3 induce the development of osteoclasts to correct osteopetrosis in the op/op mice with aging.  (+info)

Organ-selective homing defines engraftment kinetics of murine hematopoietic stem cells and is compromised by Ex vivo expansion. (3/9035)

Hematopoietic reconstitution of ablated recipients requires that intravenously (IV) transplanted stem and progenitor cells "home" to organs that support their proliferation and differentiation. To examine the possible relationship between homing properties and subsequent engraftment potential, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were labeled with fluorescent PKH26 dye and injected into lethally irradiated hosts. PKH26(+) cells homing to marrow or spleen were then isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and assayed for in vitro colony-forming cells (CFCs). Progenitors accumulated rapidly in the spleen, but declined to only 6% of input numbers after 24 hours. Although egress from this organ was accompanied by a simultaneous accumulation of CFCs in the BM (plateauing at 6% to 8% of input after 3 hours), spleen cells remained enriched in donor CFCs compared with marrow during this time. To determine whether this differential homing of clonogenic cells to the marrow and spleen influenced their contribution to short-term or long-term hematopoiesis in vivo, PKH26(+) cells were sorted from each organ 3 hours after transplantation and injected into lethally irradiated Ly-5 congenic mice. Cells that had homed initially to the spleen regenerated circulating leukocytes (20% of normal counts) approximately 2 weeks faster than cells that had homed to the marrow, or PKH26-labeled cells that had not been selected by a prior homing step. Both primary (17 weeks) and secondary (10 weeks) recipients of "spleen-homed" cells also contained approximately 50% higher numbers of CFCs per femur than recipients of "BM-homed" cells. To examine whether progenitor homing was altered upon ex vivo expansion, highly enriched Sca-1(+)c-kit+Lin- cells were cultured for 9 days in serum-free medium containing interleukin (IL)-6, IL-11, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, stem cell factor, flk-2/flt3 ligand, and thrombopoietin. Expanded cells were then stained with PKH26 and assayed as above. Strikingly, CFCs generated in vitro exhibited a 10-fold reduction in homing capacity compared with fresh progenitors. These studies demonstrate that clonogenic cells with differential homing properties contribute variably to early and late hematopoiesis in vivo. The dramatic decline in the homing capacity of progenitors generated in vitro underscores critical qualitative changes that may compromise their biologic function and potential clinical utility, despite their efficient numerical expansion.  (+info)

Bone marrow ribonucleic acid polymerase. Effect of testosterone on nucleotide incorporation into nuclear RNA. (4/9035)

The incorporation of 3H-UTP into RNA by isolated rat bone marrow nuclei is stimulated by testosterone. This effect is hormone and tissue specific. Using alpha-amanitine and different ionic strength conditions it was found that testosterone enhances preferentially RNA polymerase I activity. The sedimentation pattern of RNA isolated from bone marrow nuclei shows that the synthesis of RNA species within the 14-30 S range is mainly stimulated by the hormone.  (+info)

In irradiation chimeras, K or D regions of the chimeric host, not of the donor lymphocytes, determine immune responsiveness of antiviral cytotoxic T cells. (5/9035)

The H-2 haplotype of the chimeric host determines the responder phenotype of maturing T cells. Spleen cells of chimeric mice formed when (K(k) nonresponder to D(b) x K(b) responder to D(b) plus vaccinia)F(1) bone marrow cells were used to reconstitute K(b)D(b) (C57BL/6 D(b) responder) irradiated recipients generated high levels of D(b) plus vaccinia virus-specific cytotoxic T cells. The same stem cells used to reconstitute K(k)D(b) (B10.A (2R) D(b) nonresponder) irradiated recipients resulted in spleen cells that responded well to K plus vaccinia, but responsiveness to D(b) was low. A generally low response to D(k) plus vaccinia, which seems to be regulated by D(k), was confirmed in chimeras. Thus, K(d)D(d) (D(d) plus vaccinia responder) stem cells differentiating in a K(d)D(k) chimeric host failed to generate a measurable response to D(k) plus vaccinia. In contrast, stem cells from K(d)D(k) (D(k) plus vaccinia low responders) differentiating in a K(d)D(d) (K(d) and D(d) high responders to vaccinia) host do generate responsiveness to D(d) plus vaccinia. These results indicate that in chimeras, the Ir phenotype is independent of the donor T cell's Ir genotype, and that thymic selection of a T cell's restriction specificity for a particular H-2 allele of the chimeric host also defines that T cell's/r phenotype.  (+info)

Hydroxyapatite-coated femoral stems. Histology and histomorphometry around five components retrieved at post mortem. (6/9035)

We performed a histological and histomorphometric examination in five cadaver specimens of the femoral and acetabular components and the associated tissue which had been recovered between 3.3 and 6.2 years after primary total hip arthroplasty (THA) using a proximal hydroxyapatite (HA)-coated titanium alloy implant. All had functioned well during the patients' life. All the stems were fixed in the femur and showed osseointegration of both the proximal and distal parts. The amount of residual HA was greatest in the distal metaphyseal sections, indicating that the rate of bone remodelling may be the main factor causing loss of HA. The level of activity of the patient was the only clinical factor which correlated with loss of coating. The percentage of bone-implant osseointegration was almost constant, regardless of the amount of HA residue, periprosthetic bone density or the time of implantation. HA debris was seldom observed and if present did not cause any adverse or inflammatory reaction. Partial debonding did occur in one case as a result of a polyethylene-induced inflammatory reaction.  (+info)

Mutant N-ras induces myeloproliferative disorders and apoptosis in bone marrow repopulated mice. (7/9035)

Mutations that activate the N-ras oncogene are among the most frequently detected genetic alterations in human acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs), Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative disorders (MPDs), and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs). However, because N-ras has not been shown to induce these disorders in an in vivo model, the role of N-ras in the evolution of myeloid leukemia is unclear. To investigate the potential of N-ras to induce myeloid leukemia, lethally irradiated mice were reconstituted with bone marrow (BM) cells infected with a retroviral vector carrying activated N-ras. Approximately 60% of these mice developed hematopoietic disorders, including severe MPDs resembling human chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) or AML with differentiation (French-American-British [FAB] classification M2). Other reconstituted mice succumbed to hematopoietic defects that were pathologically similar to human MDSs. The latter disorders appeared to be due to a myeloid impairment that was demonstrated by enumeration of day-12 colony-forming units-spleen (CFU-S) and by in vitro colony assays. A high level of apoptosis associated with thymic atrophy and peripheral blood (PB) lymphopenia was also evident in N-ras reconstituted mice. Our results are consistent with a model in which antiproliferative effects are a primary consequence of N-ras mutations and secondary transforming events are necessary for the development of myeloid leukemia. This is the first report of an in vivo model for N-ras induced MPD and leukemia.  (+info)

Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for the detection of micrometastases in patients with breast cancer. (8/9035)

PURPOSE: Previous reports have indicated that reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for cytokeratin 19 (CK-19) may be useful in the management of patients with breast cancer. However, the specificity of this technique is low, principally because of a high rate of false-positive results. To improve the specificity of this assay, we developed a quantitative RT-PCR methodology that enables an estimate to be made of the number of CK-19 transcripts in blood and bone marrow samples. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We examined 45 peripheral-blood samples and 30 bone marrow samples from patients with a variety of nonneoplastic conditions using nested RT-PCR for CK-19. We also examined bone marrow and peripheral-blood samples from 23 patients with primary breast cancer and peripheral-blood samples from 37 patients with metastatic breast cancer. The number of CK-19 transcripts was estimated in positive specimens by competitive PCR and normalized to the number of ABL transcripts as an internal control for the quality and quantity of cDNA. RT-PCR results were compared with the numbers of CK-19-positive cells detected by immunocytochemistry. RESULTS: Analysis of samples from patients without cancer enabled us to define an upper limit for the background ratio of CK-19 to ABL transcripts (1:1,000 for blood samples and 1:1,600 for bone marrow samples). Using these figures as cut-off points, elevated CK-19: ABL ratios were detected in peripheral-blood samples of 20 of 37 (54%) patients with metastatic breast cancer and in bone marrow samples of 14 of 23 (61%) patients with primary breast cancer. Only three of 23 (13%) primary breast cancer peripheral-blood samples and none of the control samples were positive by these criteria. Only two of 23 patients (9%) with primary breast cancer showed immunocytochemically detectable cells in the blood; 10 of 23 (43%) showed immunocytochemically detectable cells in the bone marrow. Of 36 patients with metastatic breast cancer, eight (22%) showed positive events. CONCLUSION: Quantitative RT-PCR for CK-19 detects a percentage of patients with breast cancer and may enable the progression or regression of the disease to be monitored.  (+info)

*Bone marrow (food)

... or marrow spoon), often of silver and with a long, thin bowl, as a table implement for removing marrow from a bone. Bone marrow ... The bone marrow of animals is widely used by humans as food. It consists of yellow marrow contained in long bones. There is ... It may be found in bone-in cuts of meat purchased from a butcher or supermarket. Many cultures have used bone marrow as food ... Upon serving the soup, the marrow is usually spread on toast.[citation needed] Beef bone marrow is also the main ingredient in ...

*Bone marrow failure

Bone marrow also contains platelets, which trigger clotting, and thus help stop the blood flow when a wound occurs. Bone marrow ... Bone marrow failure in both children and adults can be either inherited or acquired. Inherited bone marrow failure is often the ... A maturation defect in genes is a common cause of inherited bone marrow failure. The most common cause of acquired bone marrow ... Leguit, Roos J; Jan G. van den Tweel (2010). "The Pathology Of Bone Marrow Failure". The Pathology Of Bone Marrow Failure: 655- ...

*Bone marrow examination

... refers to the pathologic analysis of samples of bone marrow obtained by bone marrow biopsy (often ... An Illustrated Guide to Performing the Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy MedlinePlus: Bone marrow biopsy eMedicine: Bone Marrow ... Sometimes, a bone marrow examination will include both an aspirate and a biopsy. The aspirate yields semi-liquid bone marrow, ... Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy Article Last Updated: April 7, 2008 What to Expect During a Bone Marrow Aspirate and Biopsy, ...

*Bone marrow suppression

Because the bone marrow is the manufacturing center of blood cells, the suppression of bone marrow activity causes a deficiency ... leading to chronic anemia with B19 viremia due to chronic marrow suppression. Bone marrow suppression due to azathioprine can ... Bone marrow suppression due to anti-cancer chemotherapy is much harder to treat and often involves hospital admission, strict ... Bone marrow suppression also known as myelotoxicity or myelosuppression, is the decrease in production of cells responsible for ...

*Bone Marrow Transplantation (journal)

Bone Marrow Transplantation is a peer-reviewed medical journal covering transplantation of bone marrow in humans. It is ... Bone Marrow Transplantation is abstracted and indexed in BIOBASE/Current Awareness in Biological Sciences, BIOSIS, Current ...

*Osteoporotic bone marrow defect

... is a condition which may be found in the body of the mandible. It is usually painless and found ... It is a localized increase of hematopoietic bone marrow that creates a radiolucent radiographic defect. They occur more ...

*Bone marrow-derived macrophage

... refers to macrophage cells that are generated in a research laboratory from mammalian bone marrow cells. Undifferentiated bone ... Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Porse, Bo (2008-12-01). "Bone Marrow-Derived Macrophages (BMM): Isolation and Applications". Cold ... marrow cells are cultured in the presence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF; CSF1). M-CSF is a cytokine that ...

*Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide

3, e91-e100". Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide (BMDW) World Marrow Donor Association (WMDA) World Marrow Donor Day (WMDD). ... Bone Marrow Donors Worldwide (BMDW) is an organization based in Leiden, Netherlands, that coordinates the collection of the HLA ... Consideration of noninherited maternal Ags as permissible HLA mismatches in cord blood donor selection "Bone Marrow ... used to perform what used to be called bone marrow transplants, but now referred as hematopoietic cell transplants) and cord ...

*High-dose chemotherapy and bone marrow transplant

In HDC, the bone marrow transplantation was used to maximise chemotherapeutic dosage. By harvesting and freezing bone marrow, ... High-dose chemotherapy and bone marrow transplant (HDC/BMT), also high-dose chemotherapy with autologous bone marrow transplant ... The International Bone Marrow Transplant Registry estimated that at least 4,000 women were treated with HDC/BMT, from 1989 ... She requested her HMO to pay for High-Dose Chemotherapy and Bone Marrow Transplant (HDC/BMT) to treat her cancer. Her health ...

*Marrow Bone Spring Archeological Site

... is located in Vandergriff Park in Arlington, Texas, United States. It was added to the ...

*O-Toluidine

... bone marrow > brain > muscle > testes. The main excretion pathway is through the urine where up to one-third of the ...

*CD34

It may also mediate the attachment of stem cells to bone marrow extracellular matrix or directly to stromal cells. The CD34 ... Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally found in the umbilical cord and bone marrow as hematopoietic cells, or in ... Bellini A, Mattoli S (Sep 2007). "The role of the fibrocyte, a bone marrow-derived mesenchymal progenitor, in reactive and ... Antibodies are used to quantify and purify hematopoietic progenitor stem cells for research and for clinical bone marrow ...

*Ancestim

Bone Marrow Transplant. 34 (8): 683-91. doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1704602. PMID 15322567. Sobi's StemGen page]. ...

*Gianotti-Crosti syndrome

"Gianotti-Crosti syndrome associated with cytomegalovirus antigenemia after bone marrow transplantation". Bone Marrow ...

*Reticular dysgenesis

Aggressive treatment with antibiotics is required and bone marrow transplant is common. Patients undergoing bone marrow ... HLA non-identical bone marrow transplants in a series of 10 patients". Bone Marrow Transplantation. 29 (9): 759-762. doi: ... Bone marrow product is infused through a central vein over a period of several hours. The hematopoietic cells are able to go to ... This cure is commonly used in patients who are awaiting bone marrow transplantation. Response to this cure can vary. Those with ...

*Diamond-Blackfan anemia

"Unexpected complications after bone marrow transplantation in transfusion-dependent children". Bone marrow transplantation. 12 ... Typically, a diagnosis of DBA is made through a blood count and a bone marrow biopsy. A diagnosis of DBA is made on the basis ... Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) can cure hematological aspects of DBA. This option may be considered when patients become ... This is in contrast to Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome, in which the bone marrow defect results primarily in neutropenia, and ...

*Spinal cord injury

"Index of CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells in the bone marrow of spinal cord injury patients of different age groups: A ... Another problem lack of mobility can cause is loss of bone density and changes in bone structure. Loss of bone density (bone ... Bone Marrow Research. 2012: 1-8. doi:10.1155/2012/787414. PMC 3398573 . PMID 22830032. Adams 2012. Sabharwal 2013, p. 54. ... Spinal column injury is trauma that causes fracture of the bone or instability of the ligaments in the spine; this can coexist ...

*Primary immunodeficiency

Bone marrow transplant may be possible for Severe Combined Immune Deficiency and other severe immunodeficiences. Virus-specific ... June 2008). "Stem cell transplantation for primary immunodeficiencies". Bone Marrow Transplant. 41 Suppl 2: S83-6. doi:10.1038/ ...

*Nadir

"Bone marrow suppression". Chemotherapy Principles: An In-depth Discussion. American Cancer Society. Archived from the original ...

*Metachromatic leukodystrophy

Recent success has involved stem cells being taken from the bone marrow of children with the disorder and infecting the cells ... Several trials are underway to continue to improve the effectiveness and reduce the risks of bone marrow and stem cell ... Bone Marrow Transplant. 42 Suppl 2: S2-6. doi:10.1038/bmt.2008.275. PMID 18978739. "MLD gene therapy - San Raffaele - MLD ... can consider bone marrow transplantation (including stem cell transplantation), which may slow down progression of the disease ...

*Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor

"G-CSF-primed bone marrow as a source of stem cells for allografting: revisiting the concept". Bone Marrow Transplantation. 50 ( ... White blood cells The G-CSF-receptor is present on precursor cells in the bone marrow, and, in response to stimulation by G-CSF ... hematopoietic system G-CSF is also a potent inducer of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) mobilization from the bone marrow into the ... Tay J, Levesque JP, Winkler IG (December 2016). "Cellular players of hematopoietic stem cell mobilization in the bone marrow ...

*Stem cell marker

Perry SS, Wang H, Pierce LJ, Yang AM, Tsai S, Spangrude GJ (April 2004). "L-selectin defines a bone marrow analog to the thymic ... 1984). "Bone marrow monosomy 7: hematologic and clinical manifestations in childhood and adolescence". Hematological Oncology. ... May 2003). "Differentiation of bone marrow cells into cells that express liver-specific genes in vitro: implication of the ... Munoz JR, Stoutenger BR, Robinson AP, Spees JL, Prockop DJ (December 2005). "Human stem/progenitor cells from bone marrow ...

*Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis

The bone marrow may show hemophagocytosis. The liver function tests are usually elevated. A low level of the protein albumin in ... Bone marrow biopsy shows histiocytosis. The current (2008) diagnostic criteria for HLH are 1. A molecular diagnosis consistent ... Bone Marrow Transplant. 42 (7): 433-7. doi:10.1038/bmt.2008.232. PMID 18679369. Schram, Alison (May 7, 2015). "How I treat ...

*Cyclophosphamide

Lohrmann HP (1984). "The problem of permanent bone marrow damage after cytotoxic drug treatment". Oncology. 41 (3): 180-4. doi: ... bone marrow suppression, stomach ache, hemorrhagic cystitis, diarrhea, darkening of the skin/nails, alopecia (hair loss) or ... Bone Marrow Transplantation. 24 (12): 1367-8. doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1702097. PMID 10627651. Vigouroux D, Voltaire L (1995). " ... avoid drug-induced bladder complications and screen for bone marrow toxicity. The main use of cyclophosphamide is with other ...

*Propyphenazone/paracetamol/caffeine

... bone marrow deficiencies; glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency; acute hepatic porphyria; alcoholism; gastrointestinal ...

*Firestone Institute for Respiratory Health

... for asthma and COPD Mechanisms of airway hyperresponsiveness and airway remodelling Trafficking and lung homing of bone-marrow ...
Bone marrow biopsy and bone marrow aspiration are procedures to collect and examine bone marrow - the spongy tissue inside some of your larger bones. Bone marrow biopsy and bone marrow aspiration can show whether your bone marrow is healthy and making normal amounts of blood cells. Doctors use bone marrow biopsy and aspiration to diagnose and monitor blood and marrow diseases, including some cancers.
Certain diseases of the bone marrow like leukemia, multiple myeloma, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), pancytopenia, anemia etc. require examination of the bone marrow tissue. This is called bone marrow aspiration or bone marrow biopsy. A needle is used to withdraw samples of the marrow from within the bone. This is often a very painful process.. Bone marrow is suppressed with the use of cancer chemotherapy. This leads to severe drop in production of RBCs (leading to anemia), WBCs (leading to increased risk of life threatening infections) and platelets (leading to risk of bleeding tendencies).. With advent of medical science it is possible now to transplant the bone marrow in diseased individuals. This process has shown success in a number of cancer patients.. Reviewed by April Cashin-Garbutt, BA Hons (Cantab). ...
Cancers that begin in cells of the lymph system are referred to as malignant lymphomas. The lymph system includes the spleen, thymus, tonsils, bone marrow, lymph nodes and circulating white blood cells called lymphocytes. Lymphocytes and the lymph system are part of the immune system that protects the body from disease and infection. Cancers of the lymph system are referred to as Hodgkins lymphoma or non-Hodgkins lymphoma.. Newly diagnosed lymphoma patients are required to undergo a number of tests and procedures to ensure accurate diagnosis and staging. Tests may include a lymph node biopsy, blood tests, a CT scan, PET scan and bone marrow biopsy. Some patients report that of these, the most difficult is the bone marrow biopsy.. Bone marrow, found in the center of most large bones, is a spongy material that produces red blood cells, white blood cells and platelets. A bone marrow biopsy is used to evaluate how well the bone marrow is functioning and to determine if lymphoma is present. This is ...
1. Bone marrow is commonly collected and examined when abnormalities are found in the circulating blood. The most common abnormality is a persistent shortage of one of the blood cell types. This is a serious situation and may be due to a problem in the bone marrow. Examination of marrow can often provide information about the underlying cause, and may help to predict the outcome.. 2. Bone marrow is also collected and examined to look for certain types of cancer. Some cancers start right in the cells of the bone marrow and other cancers spread to the bone marrow from elsewhere in the body. Cancer that starts in the bone marrow is sometimes called "leukemia." Examination of the bone marrow helps to identify the cancer, and reveals how seriously the marrow is affected.. 3. Occasionally, bone marrow is collected and examined to investigate other problems such as persistent fever, unexplained weight loss, high blood calcium levels (see article on Hypercalcemia), and high serum protein level (see ...
The two types of bone marrow are "red marrow" (Latin: medulla ossium rubra), which consists mainly of hematopoietic tissue, and "yellow marrow" (Latin: medulla ossium flava), which is mainly made up of fat cells. Red blood cells, platelets, and most white blood cells arise in red marrow. Both types of bone marrow contain numerous blood vessels and capillaries. At birth, all bone marrow is red. With age, more and more of it is converted to the yellow type; only around half of adult bone marrow is red. Red marrow is found mainly in the flat bones, such as the pelvis, sternum, cranium, ribs, vertebrae and scapulae, and in the cancellous ("spongy") material at the epiphyseal ends of long bones such as the femur and humerus. Yellow marrow is found in the medullary cavity, the hollow interior of the middle portion of short bones. In cases of severe blood loss, the body can convert yellow marrow back to red marrow to increase blood cell production.. ...
The bone marrow biopsy will be done using a needle (biopsy needle), which will be introduced in a bone (typically the backbone or ribs, as these contain more marrow matter). However, if the dog is suspected of having bone cancer localized in certain areas, the vet will insert the needle in the affected bone. Bone marrow biopsies can be performed in the hip bones, shoulders or thigh bones. Using the needle, the vet will extract a bit of bone marrow fluid. The needle is gently extracted and the fluid will be taken for testing. The vet may perform the analysis or he may choose to send the bone marrow sample to a pathologist. The procedure may take up to 30 minutes, depending on the bone that is being analyzed. ...
Regulation of Bone Marrow Angiogenesis by Osteoblasts during Bone Development and Homeostasiss profile, publications, research topics, and co-authors
The invention comprises a method for removal of bone marrow tissue from a patients body. The method generally comprises the steps of providing an apparatus comprising an elongate member for receiving bone marrow tissue. The elongate member defines a lumen and comprises a distal end defining an aperture and a proximal end. The apparatus further comprises an elongate tissue removal member for conveying bone marrow tissue through the lumen. The tissue removal member is rotatably disposed within the lumen. The method further comprises gathering a sample of said tissue into said lumen; and conveying with said tissue removal member at least a portion of the tissue sample proximally along said lumen. The step of gathering may be accomplished by advancing the apparatus through the tissue.
This study will be a single-center, prospective, single-blinded, randomized, controlled study of patients with CCJ instability that are randomized to either bone marrow concentrate (BMC) treatment or a sham procedure to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of using an anterior approach through the posterior oropharynx for treating alar and transverse ligament injuries. Patients will undergo a bone marrow aspiration of approximately 30-60 cc from the posterior superior iliac crest. Platelet rich plasma (PRP) and platelet lysate (PL) will be derived from the bone marrow aspirate and later mixed with the bone marrow nucleated cell layer for those in the treatment group. While under unconscious TIVA anesthesia, the injectate is then injected under fluoroscopy into the area in need of treatment using an anterior approach through the posterior oropharynx with direct visualization of the injection site via endoscopy. Patients assigned to the sham control condition will also undergo a bone marrow ...
Despite association with low bone density and skeletal fractures, marrow adipose tissue (MAT) remains poorly understood. The marrow adipocyte originates from the mesenchymal stem cell pool (MSC) that gives rise also to osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and myocytes among other cell types. To date, the presence of MAT has been attributed to preferential biasing of MSC into the adipocyte rather than osteoblast lineage, thus negatively impacting bone formation. Here we focus on understanding the physiology of MAT in the setting of exercise, dietary interventions and pharmacologic agents that alter fat metabolism. The beneficial effect of exercise on musculoskeletal strength is known: exercise induces bone formation, encourages growth of skeletally-supportive tissues, inhibits bone resorption and alters skeletal architecture through direct and indirect effects on a multiplicity of cells involved in skeletal adaptation. MAT is less well studied due to the lack of reproducible quantification techniques. In recent
Once suitable stem cells are found, your child will receive high doses of chemotherapy or radiation (sometimes both) to destroy existing bone marrow. This gives the new bone marrow cells room to grow. This may be called ablative or myeloablative therapy. It stops new blood cells from being made. The bone marrow becomes empty. An empty marrow is needed to make room for the new stem cells to grow and create a new system to make new blood cells. Next, stem cells are given to your child through an IV in a large vein, often in the chest. This is called a central venous catheter. Getting the stem cells is like having a blood transfusion. The stem cells find their way into the bone marrow. They begin growing and making new, healthy blood cells. During infusion of the bone marrow, your child may have:. ...
This is a prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled, multicenter trial intended for subjects with critical limb ischemia (CLI) that are unsuitable for revascularization. The investigational treatment utilizes autologous concentrated bone marrow aspirate (cBMA) at the point of care. The bone marrow aspirate is obtained from the subjects hip, concentrated with a bone marrow concentration device, and delivered intramuscularly to the affected limb. Subjects meeting the inclusion/exclusion criteria will be randomized to receive either the investigational treatment (cBMA) or a placebo control (sham treatment ...
We have evaluated the usefulness of bilateral rather than unilateral posterior iliac spine trephine biopsies in searching for lymphoma and other neoplastic diseases in the bone marrow. Two hundred and eighty-two patients with these diseases were studied. Tumor was found on only one side in 22% of patients with non-Hodgkins malignant lymphoma, in 43% of patients with Hodgkins disease, and in 36% of patients with other neoplastic processes. Thus, the second biopsy yields an additional 11% to 22% of positive biopsies. We conclude that bilateral trephine bone marrow biopsies should be routinely performed when searching for tumor in the bone marrow. ...
Here we present evidence that CD22 is a specific receptor involved in the homing of long-lived recirculating B cells to the bone marrow. Our demonstration that CD22 ligands are constitutively expressed on endothelial cells in the bone marrow, but not in other organs, raises the attractive possibility that CD22 can function as a classical homing receptor for the bone marrow by targeting cells to the appropriate microenvironment. It has been reported that IgD+ recirculating cells are found in the extravascular space, mainly in perisinusoidal locations ((15)). The interaction with CD22 ligands on endothelial cells could be an important first step before transmigration of B cells into the bone marrow parenchyma. Another possibility is that CD22 serves as a retention signal, preventing the reexit of B cells from the bone marrow.. The reason for the incomplete block in B cell homing after the in vivo treatments could be related to the relatively low affinity of the carbohydrate binding region of CD22 ...
Bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC) is an FDA-approved, non-embryonic stem cell treatment in which the bodys stem cells are used to spur tissue regeneration and hasten healing.. Harvested from the patients own bone marrow, these regenerative cells are injected into the injury site in the same manner as platelet rich plasma (PRP). During BMAC, your orthopaedic surgeon extracts bone marrow from the hip or pelvic bone. Spinning the marrow in a centrifuge, he or she separates the regenerative stem cells and injects them into the painful site. After just two to three weeks, patients experience increased joint and muscle stability and may pursue physical therapy to strengthen the problem area.. ...
Objectives: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are primarily isolated from bone marrow. Peripheral blood is also reported as an alternative source of MSC. This study compared MSC which were isolated and cultured from bone marrow and those from peripheral blood of rats. Methods: MSC from bone marrow and peripheral blood were harvested from 5 male Sprague Dawley rats. After isolation, the cells were grown on tissue culture plates with concentration of 107 cells per well. Observations were conducted to evaluate the attachment of nucleated cells with fibroblast-like morphology. Characterization of MSC was done using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunocytochemistry assay. Results: The mean number of nucleated cells isolated from the bone marrow on day 0 was higher than those isolated from the peripheral blood. Bone marrow MSC with typical fibroblast-like morphology proliferated rapidly and reached 80% confluency on day 14. Subcultures were able to be conducted on day 15 ...
The typical procedure will start with a course of very high doses of chemotherapy, specifically tailored to obliterate the patients existing bone marrow. This procedure is called myeloablation, and is meant to kill the diseased bone marrow and affected blood cells. At this point, because of the lack of bone marrow and the cells that comprise it, including the immune cells, the patient becomes very susceptible to infection. This actually is the major cause of death and disability for HSCT.. After a few days, the hematopoietic stem cells, which are the stem cells that will become the patients new bone marrow, are given to the patient. Depending on the disease, this could be from the patients own stem cells, or from a matched donor. And once these have been implanted, they then start to function as the new bone marrow with potentially curative results.. The success rates for HSCT differ and would depend on a lot of factors, some are inherent in the patient, biology of the disease and facilities ...
Introduction Examination of the bone marrow (BM) aspirate and trephine biopsy is essential for the diagnosis of BM disorders. A comprehensive diagnosis of a BM disorder often requires the integration of various diagnostic approaches: peripheral blood (PB) counts and smear evaluation, BM aspirate and imprint smear, BM trephine biopsy Other investigations such as cytochemistry, immunophenotypic analysis, cytogenetic and molecular genetic techniques, Biochemical and microbiological test results, as appropriate. The aspirate and trephine biopsy provide complementary and useful information. It is recommended that both BM aspirate and biopsy be routinely performed so that respective findings can be correlated.
Bone marrow contains hematopoietic stem cells, the precursors to every blood cell type. These cells spring into action following bone marrow transplants, bone marrow injury and during
A bone marrow biopsy involves removing a small sample of the bone marrow inside your bones for testing. Bone marrow is a soft tissue in the center of most large bones. It makes most of the bodys blood cells. The biopsy is done using a small needle inserted into the bone
Ryser, J and Dutton, R W., "The humoral immune response of mouse bone marrow lymphocytes in vitro." (1977). Subject Strain Bibliography 1977. 3265 ...
In situ detection of CD73+ CD90+ CD105+ lineage: Mesenchymal stromal cells in human placenta and bone marrow specimens by chipcytometry2018-09-262018-09-26http://www.zellkraftwerk.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/zkw_logo.jpgZELLKRAFTWERKhttp://www.zellkraftwerk.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/09/zkw_logo.jpg200px200px ...
I have a sister who has been sick for a while, gradually getting worse. Over the last year she has lost a TON of hair, she has joint pains, shortness of breath, and very tired. She got blood work at her doctors office and he said she was very anemic and that there were some abnormal cells and he wanted her to go to a hematologist. She did. They took more blood and did a test for lupus and RA and those 2 tests were essentially negative but she was even more anemic, so they wanted to do a bone marrow biopsy. When they did the bone marrow, they did not get enough marrow to test but the bone biopsy showed caseating granulomas. They just did another bone marrow aspiration yesterday to test that and they had a real hard time getting anything to aspirate. They mentioned dust a few times.?? The pathologist said they got enough though for the doctor to make the diagnosis and that he was leaning towards 2 different things but could not say what. It will be another week before we hear anything from the ...
0031]The population of bone marrow cells from which the subpopulation is enriched may be combined with and stained by the fluorescing substrate, precursor, or analog thereof in any manner known to those skilled in the art. Typically, the population of bone marrow cells may be incubated with the same for a period of about 1 to 60 minutes prior to being subjected to the methods of determining internal fluorescence and orthogonal light scatter of the cells contained therein. Preferably, the protocol is one that is consistent with the use of the Aldefluor® kit, with slight modifications to identify and isolate the ALDHloSSClo progenitors. Briefly, control and test samples of a bone marrow or bone marrow derived cell sample are created. An aliquot of diethylaminobenzaldehyde (DEAB) is added to the control sample test tube and an aliquot of DMSO-activated Aldefluor® substrate is added to the test sample test tube. An aliquot of the test sample is then immediately combined with the control sample in ...
For purification of intracellular RNA from bone marrow samples in PAXgene Bone Marrow RNA Tubes To be used in conjunction with the PAXgene Bone Marrow RNA Tube Rapid purification of RNA with high integrity and purity Optimized protocol for heterogeneous bone marrow samples Integrated DNase treatment for gDNA removal
My husband just had his 20 something bone marrow biopsy to check how many leukemia cells are in his bones, There are 4 of us in the room talking to keep him distracted because its extremely painful ...
My husband just had his 20 something bone marrow biopsy to check how many leukemia cells are in his bones, There are 4 of us in the room talking to keep him distracted because its extremely painful ...
Semantic Scholar extracted view of [Selective exposure of bone marrow lymphocytes to massive doses of hydrocortisone for the purpose of facilitating the ultrastructural identification of hematopoietic stem cells]. by Z. A. Butenko et al.
Bone Marrow. This one full day hands one course offers the knowledge and skills necessary to perform a bone marrow harvesting, processing, and activation procedure. It comprises a 2 hour theoretical presentation and two practical cases.. Target Audience: Physicians, nurses and physician assistants. Goals and objectives:. Discuss the different points of access to obtain bone marrow aspirate and the anatomical markings. Familiarize the attendee with biological understanding of hematopoietic and mesenchimal Regenestem derived from bone marrow. Familiarize the attendee with latest literature to support the protocols of treatments. To provide the attendee with the abilities to perform the protocols provided in the class.. ...
Synonyms for bone marrows in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for bone marrows. 47 synonyms for marrow: core, heart, spirit, quick, soul, cream, substance, essence, kernel, gist, pith, quintessence, core, essence, gist, heart, kernel, meat. What are synonyms for bone marrows?
The purpose of this exploratory study was to identify patterns in BMC characteristics associated with either an increase or a decrease in infarct size in patients with STEMI. To accomplish this, we analyzed data from patients in the CCTRN TIME trial who provided consent to have their BMC product analyzed by the CCTRN Biorepository laboratories. Multivariable regression analysis showed that an increased percentage of CD31+ cells in the bone marrow was associated with a greater reduction in infarct size at 6 months after STEMI. In addition, a greater reduction in infarct size was associated with a faster BMC growth rate in CFU-Hill and ECFC functional assays. Thus, our findings suggest that phenotype and functional assessments of bone marrow may be important for understanding individual responses to cell therapy in patients with acute STEMI. In addition, they may provide a means to prognosticate outcomes after STEMI and to evaluate the mechanisms underlying responses to myocardial injury.. CD31 ...
This procedure is done by taking out small amounts of bone marrow. Bone marrow samples are usually taken from the back of the hip (pelvic) bone. For the bone marrow aspiration, the area over the hip is numbed. A thin, hollow needle is inserted through the skin and into the hip bone. A syringe is used to pull out a small amount of liquid bone marrow. You may have some brief pain when the marrow is removed. A bone marrow biopsy is usually done just after the aspiration. A small piece of bone and marrow is removed with a slightly larger needle that is pushed down into the bone. The biopsy may also cause some brief pain. The bone marrow is then checked for leukemia cells and tested in various ways (see below).. ...
In 2003, when I first found out that I was pregnant with #3, I was in total shock! Two kids seemed just right and really, how in the world could a 40 year old be pregnant? (No need to answer, I finally figured it out.) I accepted reality and trusted that God had a great plan in place. I quickly fell madly in love with "Baby E". After Nicolas birth, we realized that our family of 5 was perfect! We refer to Nicolas as "the frosting on our cake". This morning, I received a patient family report for bone marrow transplant which, after blood draws, shows which family member would be the best bone marrow donor. They gather this information early on in the event a bone marrow transplant is needed. Ive believed that God has a special plan for my kids. Presently, it is looking like God has a great purpose for Nicolas as Nicolas bone marrow would be the best match for Emilie. When things seem crazy and out of control, God is always in control and has a purpose and plan for everything. Im blown away by ...
Adding roasted bone marrow to scrambled eggs isnt something youd normally think to add. But bone marrow, even just a little, has wonderful health benefits and lends a luxurious creaminess to scrambled eggs. Bone marrow is one of the few natural sources of vitamin K, an essential nutrient that helps build bones, fight cancer, prevent heart disease, among many other benefits. There is also growing evidence that vitamin K has anti-inflammatory abilities and can help protect your brain against diseases such as Alzheimers and Parkinsons. Its also great for your teeth and gums!. This deliciously decadent ketogenic egg recipe (its also paleo-friendly) is adapted from The 30 Day Ketogenic Cleanse by Maria Emmerich. It can be difficult to find grass-fed marrow bones (and they are expensive!), so dont worry if you cant find them. Just buy the best-quality bones you can find. Your local butcher can help you. Roast more bones than you need, as I did, and freeze the extra marrow. Its to have on hand ...
This morning I am getting ready to go to the hospital to get a bone marrow biopsy. Not something Im particularly looking forward to. You see, in order to get some bone marrow from a person the doctor has to push a horse needle into your hip bone and then suck some marrow into the…
So, could you save Emilys life? You may be an eligible donor.. The Australian Bone Marrow Donor Registry states that bone marrow registration requires blood, taken through a needle in the arm. They would ideally take up to 470ml, as this would constitute a blood donation as well. Your bone marrow tissue type would be determined and the details recorded on the registry. There is a 1 in 1000 chance, per year, of being identified as a potential match. If so, more blood is required to harvest stem cells. Potential donors are retired form the registry on their 60th birthday.. The recruitment and education of potential bone marrow donors is essential. New members worldwide are needed to allow sufficient genetic diversity in the donor pool to meet patient needs. Only 1 in 3 donors are found from a patients family, with 2 out of 3 relying on bone marrow from international registries. The European registries have been established over a longer period of time. It is time now to educate the Asian ...
The degree of angiogenesis was determined by the microvessel density in defined areas of bone marrow sections according to the method of Weidner et al8 and an international consensus report.27 Microvessel counting was simultaneously assessed by 2 independent experienced investigators using light microscopy. The investigators were not aware of the diagnosis and clinical characteristics of the patient before performing the microvessel counting. The entire bone marrow section was systematically scanned, ie, field per field, at ×100 magnification to find the areas showing the most intense vascularization. The decision to start counting individual microvessels was based on observing restricted areas within a field at ×100 magnification with an impression of a higher density of vWF or TM antigen-positive cells and cell clusters relative to adjacent areas of the same field and to areas of the previous fields. The magnification was then changed to ×250, or to ×500, and the investigators were allowed ...
In this video I will teach you how to cook bone marrow. I will show you how easy it is to make roasted bone marrow that you can enjoy on toast with some wine. This is a delicious bone marrow ...
A lot of work is being done to find out why PNH happens. If you have PNH, your bone marrow may not be working normally. Some patients develop PNH after they have had treatment for a bone marrow disorder called aplastic anaemia (AA) which causes the bone marrow to produce fewer blood cells. You develop PNH when your bone marrow produces a gene called PIG-A. This genetic change (mutation) happens after birth which means you acquire PNH rather than inheriting it. The PIG-A gene causes your bone marrow to produce blood cells without a special protein known as the GPI anchor which protects normal blood cells against your own immune system. Without the GPI anchor, PNH blood cells are not protected against a series of complex reactions called "complement activation" which is part of your bodys normal immune response to help fight infections. It is this lack of protection which allows your immune system to destroy your PNH blood cells and results in haemolysis which is the main cause of the symptoms ...
Blood cells flow throughout the body delivering life-supporting oxygen and nutrients. As these cells are used and recycled they are regenerated by bone marrow, the soft tissue inside the bodys long and hollow bones.. Certain regions of bone marrow contain hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), the precursors of all blood and immune cells, said University of Illinois chemical and biomolecular engineering professor Brendan Harley, who led the research with postdoctoral researcher Ji Sun Choi.. "The tissue environment that surrounds these cells in the bone marrow provides a wealth of signals that can alter how these precursor cells behave. This paper looked at the signals provided by the tissue matrix itself," said Harley, who is also the theme leader of the Regenerative Biology & Tissue Engineering research theme at the IGB.. One of the major tools that oncologists use to treat leukemia and lymphoma involves transplanting HSCs. The donor stem cells must locate marrow cavities and start producing blood ...
About a year ago … they asked me to donate some blood to see if I was a match. I turned out to be a direct match for her," said Officer Young.. The girl was in need of help so he answered the call.. "I have an 8-year-old girl myself and it hits home and I know how the parents feel," he said. "I would want someone to help me in this situation.". With no time to lose, the marrow was extracted and flown to the girl for surgical injection.. "In November of 2016, Be The Match contacted me and said that the girl needed the bone marrow soon," he recalls. "So on Jan. 6, 2017, I went to the University of California at San Francisco and did a bone marrow harvest and donated about a liter of bone marrow.". He said its rewarding to know he was able to help.. "I would have donated anyway but it makes it a lot easier when you know it could save a life," Officer Young said. "I was very sore for about two weeks after but it was worth it.". He is a supporter of donating blood and marrow.. "I think that ...
Like Pourhouse, they cut the bone into three sections and provided a butter knife and a small spoon. I had to give up the spoon early because it was too wide to fit, so I couldnt use it to scoop out any marrow. Fortunately, the butter knife worked out nicely: I used it on the inside surface of the bone to loosen the marrow from the bone, and a bit of light shaking caused the marrow to come out more or less intact ...
Highly cellular bone marrow biopsy of the WHIM-mother, with increased mature neutrophil granulocytes showing prominent nuclear segmentation. Inset: bone marrow
Bone marrow is the soft, spongy part inside bones. It makes most of the bodys blood cells. Aspiration and biopsy are procedures done to take a sample of bone marrow out of the body for examination. Find out why these procedures are done and how to prepare for them.
The MRS results showed that people with more liver and muscle fat had higher levels of fat in their bone marrow, independent of body mass index, age and exercise status. HDL cholesterol, the "good" type of cholesterol that is associated with a lower risk of heart disease, was inversely associated with bone marrow fat content. Higher levels of bone marrow fat put people at increased risk of fracture, according to Dr. Bredella.. "Bone marrow fat makes bones weak," she said. "If you have a spine thats filled with fat, its not going to be as strong.". Triglycerides, the type of fat found in the blood, also had a positive correlation with bone marrow fat, possibly because they stimulate osteoclasts, a type of cell that breaks up bone tissue.. More research is needed to further illuminate the mechanism behind this differentiation of stem cells. Dr. Bredella noted that cell-signaling molecules called cytokines are known to promote the conversion of stem cells into fat.. "Obesity can shift stem cell ...
Scientists are researching a traditional Chinese compound called TSY-1, which is showing promising results in the treatment or cancer and blood disorders.
If your nurse said IV meds then I am sure its the same as I had. Since its not the same as a general anastetic they cant tell you you wont feel anything but I believe you wont. They told me I was talking a little bit and said "oh that stings" and they just gave me a little more medicine. Like I said I dont remember any of that or anything about the procedure at all just waking up and them telling me it was all over. Ive had this type of sedation three times now in my 15 month journey with the same result. Trust it, it works. Through the bone marrow biopsy the discovered it was in the marrow but my MD had prepared me for this by saying it will not matter. I trust him completely. Now I will be starting R CHOP on the 6th not because of the marrow but because of a large lump in my neck that they feel is my lymphoma command center (where it all started). Im nervous about it. I dont like taking anything and this is above and beyond my comfort level...nurses are not the best patients as a little ...
Absorbed dose to active bone marrow is a predictor of hematological toxicity in molecular radiotherapy. Due to the complex composition of bone marrow tissue, the necessity to improve the personalized dosimetry has led to the application of non-conventional imaging methods in nuclear medicine. The aim of this study is to apply magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for quantification of the fat fraction in lumbar vertebrae and to analyze its implications for bone marrow dosimetry. Methods First, a highly accelerated two-point Dixon MRI sequence for fat-water separation was validated in a 3T system against the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) gold standard ...
A team of scientists and engineers at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology (SMART) [新加坡-麻省理工学院科研中心] have invented a new technique to identify populations of rare stem cells from bone marrow based on their different combinations of biophysical characteristics such as cell size, cell stiffness and nucleus deformation.. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a type of cells which resides in the bone marrow, can differentiate into cells that produce bone, cartilage, fat or muscles - a trait that clinicians exploit for tissue repair. (See Factsheet). With better identification of MSCs, doctors can be certain that the concentration of highly enriched MSC mixture is as stated, making it easier for them to develop stem-cell-based treatment that would be more consistent and produce better results.. Currently, there is no good way to separate MSCs from bone marrow cells that have already begun to differentiate into other cell types, but share the same molecules on the ...
RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant using stem cells that closely match the patients stem cells, helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also stops the patients immune system from rejecting the donors stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patients immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the bodys normal cells. Giving antithymocyte globulin before transplant and cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and methotrexate before and after transplant may stop this from happening.. PURPOSE: Natural Killer (NK) cells from the donors bone marrow may be important in fighting leukemia. Bone marrow donors can be selected based on the type of NK cells they have, specifically the killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) type. This study provides information on KIR type from potential donors, which can be used in selecting the bone marrow donor. ...
RATIONALE: Giving chemotherapy before a donor stem cell transplant using stem cells that closely match the patients stem cells, helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It also stops the patients immune system from rejecting the donors stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patients immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the bodys normal cells. Giving antithymocyte globulin before transplant and cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and methotrexate before and after transplant may stop this from happening.. PURPOSE: Natural Killer (NK) cells from the donors bone marrow may be important in fighting leukemia. Bone marrow donors can be selected based on the type of NK cells they have, specifically the killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) type. This study provides information on KIR type from potential donors, which can be used in selecting the bone marrow donor. ...
A woman I have never met, but a fellow employee at my company, is in desperate need of a bone marrow donation. Matching bone marrow is a very tricky thing - basically a needle in a haystack. In order to up the odds of helping her and in turn others, my company is holding a bone marrow drive. While I am going to miss participating in the drive itself, the idea that something I have in abundance can save someones life led me directly to the website to sign up online ...
Successful engraftment of blood forming stem cells into recipients requires overcoming barriers that hinder access of stem cells to specialized niches in bone marrow. Doctors must currently use toxic chemotherapy and/or radiation to reduce these barriers to allow stem cells to engraft. Targeted elimination of recipient blood stem cells to achieve niche clearance would substantially reduce the morbidity and mortality of transplantation. We previously showed in mice that an anti-mouse antibody that targets a molecule called CD117 is able to safely deplete recipient blood stem cells and allow donor stem cells to engraft in mice with impaired immunity. In this report we show that a clinic-ready an anti-human CD117 antibody called AMG 191 has significant activity against human and non-human primate (NHP) blood stem and progenitor cells. AMG 191 transiently and potently depletes the blood stem and progenitor cells in the bone marrow of NHP, and facilitates replacement by donor stem cells in mice that ...
One ARL employee who has donated bone marrow to help save a loved one is Bertha Weaver, an administrative specialist with ARLs Human Research and Engineering Directorate.. "My brother was diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome, which is also known as pre-leukemia," said Weaver. "It was an easy decision for me to help him.". On Nov. 11, 2009, Weaver donated 343 million bone marrow cells at the University of Maryland Medical Center after taking special shots to help her exude bone marrow into the blood. The next day, she donated another 373 million cells.. "I am very grateful for my brother," she added. "Being tired and lying still in a bed was worth it for him and to save his life.". According to program specialist Sheryl Coleman, ARL registered over 35 employees during both drives. "All it takes is a few minutes and a simple swab between your cheek and gum for the process to be complete," she said. "It is important to save lives whether it is a relative, a co-worker, or a total stranger - this ...
Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation Bone marrow or stem cell transplant is a common treatment for blood cancers such as leukemia, multiple myeloma, and some types of lymphoma. It is also possible to treat some other blood diseases such as sickle cell disease, with stem cell transplants. Bone marrow, the soft, spongy tissue…
MicroRNAs: Novel Crossroads between Myeloma Cells and the Bone Marrow Microenvironment. . Biblioteca virtual para leer y descargar libros, documentos, trabajos y tesis universitarias en PDF. Material universiario, documentación y tareas realizadas por universitarios en nuestra biblioteca. Para descargar gratis y para leer online.
Daniel Kraft demos his Marrow Miner -- a new device that quickly harvests life-saving bone marrow with minimal pain to the donor. He emphasizes that the adult stem cells found in bone marrow can be used to treat many terminal conditions, from Parkinsons to heart disease.
This is a well-written, up-to-date, concise text of bone marrow morphology (structure) and physiology (function). In 14 concise chapters, the authors review bon
Bone marrow is a spongy tissue inside the bone that produces blood cells. The bone marrow produces red blood cells, platelets, and white blood cells.
Although a local anesthetic is used during a bone marrow biopsy, a deep, aching pain may occur once the needle is fully inserted into the bone and the syringe draws liquid from the marrow, according...
Epithelial organs such as the intestine and skin have a relatively high rate of cell loss and thus require a reservoir of stem cells capable of both replacing the lost epithelia and maintaining the reservoir. Whether the kidney has such a stem cell niche has been a subject of great interest; the majority of data suggest that replacement of renal epithelial cells occurs via dedifferentiation and proliferation of existing tubular cells, while some studies demonstrate the presence of potential tubular stem cells in the renal interstitium. However, recent reports have suggested that the bone marrow may also be a source of stem cells for tubule turnover and/or repair. In this issue of the JCI, 2 groups explore the role of endogenous cells versus bone marrow-derived cells in mediating tubule repair. Duffield and colleagues demonstrate that bone marrow does contain cells capable of protecting the kidney from ischemic injury, but found that these cells do not act by direct incorporation into the ...
For people with leukaemia and other blood cancers, a bone marrow transplant is often their last chance at life. Bone marrow is very specific and it is very difficult to find a match. The majority of people cannot find a match amongst their friends and family so have to turn to the bone marrow register. One person may only have one match in the whole world! To increase chances of finding a match, we need more people on the register ...
Non-Neoplastic Disorders of Bone Marrow: This Fascicle on non-neoplastic disorders is devoted to the assessment of bone marrow in pediatric and adult patients. Although the emphasis is clearly on the successful diagnosis of non-neoplastic bone marrow disorders, neoplastic processes are briefly highlighted in discussions of differential diagnostic ...
Buy Bone Marrow Nei Kung Taoist Ways to Improve Your Health by Rejuvenating Your Bone Marrow and Blood by Mantak Chia at TextbookX.com. ISBN/UPC: 9780935621174. Save an average of 50% on the marketplace.
In this video I will teach you how to cook bone marrow. I will show you how easy it is to make roasted bone marrow that you can enjoy on toast with some wine. This is a delicious bone marrow ...
The purpose of this study is to find out if the presence of cancer cells in the bone marrow can better help us to determine whether the cancer will spread and the best treatment to recommend for individual women (for example radiation or chemotherapy). This study will also collect blood and tissue specimens from the same individuals who have breast cancer and are tested for risk of cancer spreading to the bones. Bone Marrow Analysis in Breast Cancer Carcinoma in African American and Hispanic Patient Populations is an eagle-i resource of type Human Study at Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science.
Bone Marrow: The soft, spongy part in the centre of the bones where blood cells are produced. The bone marrow makes blood stem cells.. Bone Marrow Collection: A procedure in which bone marrow is collected from the donor.. Bone Marrow/ Blood Stem Cell Transplant (BMT): A treatment option for some people who have life-threatening blood or immune system diseases. It is the process of replacing unhealthy bone marrow cells with healthy cells.. Central Line: A catheter that is inserted under the skin of the chest into a vein. It is a long, hollow tube with two or three passages and stays in place during BMT and is used to collect blood samples and give. Engraftment: New cell growth. It takes place after the bone marrow/blood stem cell transplant when there is a sustained rise in new blood cell production.. GvHD: Graft versus host disease. When cells from the donors immune system which accompany the blood stem cells recognise an HLA mismatch and attack vital organs of the patient.. Leukapheresis: A ...
Baccin, C.*, Al-Sabah*, J., Velten, L.*@, Helbling, P. M., Grunschlager, F., Hernandez-Malmierca, P., Nombela-Arrieta, C., Steinmetz, L. [email protected], Trumpp, [email protected], & Haas, [email protected] (2019). Combined single-cell and spatial transcriptomics reveal the molecular, cellular and spatial bone marrow niche organization. Nature Cell Biology. doi: 10.1038/s41556-019-0439-6 *Shared first authors, @ Joint Supervising authors. ...
Done at diagnosis, it is the most precise way to diagnose CML as well as provide helpful information about your specific case of CML. An analysis of bone
Today Ive had a bone marrow biopsy, I was a little nervous about this procedure as its fairly invasive in its nature and I expected some pain or discomfort. Im fairly slim (apart from the growth in my bowel which makes me look like I have a beer belly!) which means that the bone in…
I was going to write yesterday to let everyone know that Parker was having his one month bone marrow aspiration today but I fell short on time. However, Parker did have his aspiration this morning at nine and it went well. They made five holes this time, two in one hip and three in the other. Normally there is very little bleeding afterwards, if any but today there was some in his right hip that we needed to change the gause before the first hour was up. Several hours later, there was some more blood accumulating but not nearly the amount the first time. My wife is waiting for the doctor to examine Parkers hip. We are just being cautious as we always do ...
Your blood cells are made in bone marrow, a soft spongy material that fills the inside of your bones. Most of your bodys bone marrow is found in larger bones such as your breast bone, ribs, skull, pelvis and spine.. The different blood cells made in your bone marrow are white blood cells, red blood cells and platelets. These cells can only last in your blood from days to months. Your bone marrow is always working to make new blood cells to replace damaged or old cells.. Cancer and some of its treatments can make it hard for your bone marrow to do its job making new blood cells. Cancer treatments work to damage and stop fast growing cancer cells, but they also damage your normal healthy cells. This change in the balance of blood cells can cause low blood counts for a period time.. Your doctor may order a blood test to check the different cells in your blood. A small sample of your blood is taken and sent to the lab.. Note: Some health problems may require ongoing monitoring or repeat testing. It ...
Human Bone Marrow Chip that effectively replicates drug- and radiation-induced toxicity responses observed in human patients at clinically relevant doses can be used to predict bone marrow failure.
Learn more about Bone Marrow Biopsy at Sky Ridge Medical Center DefinitionReasons for ProcedurePossible ComplicationsWhat to ExpectCall Your Doctorrevision ...
Learn more about Bone Marrow Biopsy at Memorial Hospital DefinitionReasons for ProcedurePossible ComplicationsWhat to ExpectCall Your Doctorrevision ...
Bone marrow stroma: part our commitment to scholarly and academic excellence, all articles receive editorial review.|||... World Heritage Encyclopedia, the aggregation of the largest online encyclopedias available, and the most definitive collection ever assembled.
Delta-like 4 (Dll4) is a ligand of the Notch pathway family which has been widely studied in the context of tumor angiogenesis, its blockade shown to result in non-productive angiogenesis and halted tumor growth. As Dll4 inhibitors enter the clinic, there is an emerging need to understand their side effects, namely the systemic consequences of Dll4:Notch blockade in tissues other than tumors. The present study focused on the effects of systemic anti-Dll4 targeting in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. Here we show that Dll4 blockade with monoclonal antibodies perturbs the BM vascular niche of sub-lethally irradiated mice, resulting in increased CD31(+), VE-Cadherin(+) and c-kit(+) vessel density, and also increased megakaryocytes, whereas CD105(+), VEGFR3(+), SMA(+) and lectin(+) vessel density remained unaltered. We investigated also the expression of angiocrine genes upon Dll4 treatment in vivo, and demonstrate that IGFbp2, IGFbp3, Angpt2, Dll4, DHH and VEGF-A are upregulated, while FGF1 and CSF2
A bone marrow match is a situation in which a bone marrow donor has marrow that matches with someone in need of a transplant. This...
Chemotherapy often results in acute bone marrow cytotoxicity and chronic defects in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function, but the mechanisms by which chemotherapy promotes hematopoietic dysregulation are unknown. Recent studies have implicated the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), which is also damaged by a subset of chemotherapeutic drugs, in HSC migration from the bone marrow, prompting Lucas and colleagues to hypothesize that chemotherapy-induced nerve damage impairs bone marrow regeneration. Mice treated with cisplatin, a neurotoxic chemotherapeutic, exhibited reduced HSC reconstitution after bone marrow transplantation, which was associated with loss of SNS fibers in the bone marrow. Moreover, specific depletion of sympathetic neurons delayed hematopoietic recovery after irradiation or 5-fluorouracil treatment, suggesting that the SNS is required for HSC expansion and survival after injury. This prosurvival effect was dependent on signaling through β2- and β3-adrenergic receptors and ...
Healthy Stem Cells are first collected from any of the 3 places.. Blood:. Time taken - 2 to 3 hours. The most common source of Bone Marrow cells, you might have to do it a couple of times in order to get the necessary amount of stem cells. The donor, i.e., you or someone else, is first treated with a drug called Growth Factor to help boost the stem cell count. At the time of collection, the blood is taken out from one arm through a thin tube; this blood then flows into a machine to filter out the stem cells. The rest of the blood goes out of the machine and back into the body through the other arm. The donor is wide awake through the whole procedure. This is a painless process, and there is no need for an overnight stay at the hospital. The Stem Cells collected are frozen if taken from the patient; else, they are readily used if taken from a donor.. Bone Marrow:. Time Taken - 1 to 2 hours the stem cells, along with some red blood cells, are extracted from different parts of the hip bone through ...
In the United States, someone receives a blood cancer diagnosis every three minutes. For many of them, a blood or marrow transplant is the only hope for a cure. But more than two-thirds of these patients dont have a matched marrow donor in the family. Don
In the United States, someone receives a blood cancer diagnosis every three minutes. For many of them, a blood or marrow transplant is the only hope for a cure. But more than two-thirds of these patients dont have a matched marrow donor in the family. Don
In the United States, someone receives a blood cancer diagnosis every three minutes. For many of them, a blood or marrow transplant is the only hope for a cure. But more than two-thirds of these patients dont have a matched marrow donor in the family. Don
In the United States, someone receives a blood cancer diagnosis every three minutes. For many of them, a blood or marrow transplant is the only hope for a cure. But more than two-thirds of these patients dont have a matched marrow donor in the family. Don
I registered myself as a bone marrow donor in around June 2013. How I got to know the Bone Marrow Donor Programme (BMDP) was indirectly through my part-time
Some of you will certainly comment on the higher prices at Hanjip, but after splitting the bill, the meal cost is similar to going to Genwa or other high end KBBQ places, and I very much enjoyed everything Ive tried here. Hanjip is definitely the best Korean BBQ option on the Westside (the only option?) but its become one of the top in the city as well. They have $12 lunch items, as well, if you wanted to try out the places for less first ...
Financial Assistance And Free Support Services To Cancer And Transplant Patients Financial Assistance And Free Support Services To Cancer And Transplant Patients The Bone Marrow & Cancer Foundation (BMCF) is dedicated to improving the quality of life for cancer, bone marrow/stem cell transplant patients, and their
Financial Assistance And Free Support Services To Cancer And Transplant Patients Financial Assistance And Free Support Services To Cancer And Transplant Patients The Bone Marrow & Cancer Foundation (BMCF) is dedicated to improving the quality of life for cancer, bone marrow/stem cell transplant patients, and their
13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 33 means of pinhole SPECT in a TNBS colitis mouse model. Nucl. Med. Biol. 31, 93-101. Hildebrandt, I. J. and Gambhir, S. S. (2004) Molecular imaging applications for immunology. Clin. Immunol. 111, 210-224. , et al. (2004) Magnetic resonance tracking of transplanted bone marrow and embryonic stem cells labeled by iron oxide nanoparticles in rat brain and spinal cord. J. Neurosci. Res. 76, 232-243. , et al. (2002) Tracking transplanted stem cell migration using bifunctional, contrast agent-enhanced, magnetic resonance imaging. 1. Retroviral Transduction of Murine Bone Marrow and Stem Cells 1. 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU; for human injection), American Pharmaceutical Partners, Inc. NDC 63323-117-10 (50 mg/mL, 10 mL). Stock concentration 25 mg/mL in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), aliquot, and store at -20°C. 2. Retroviral packaging cell line. 3. Retroviral expression plasmid. 4. Lipofectamine 2000 transfection reagent (Invitrogen, cat. no. 75 mL) (see Note 1). 5. ...
Pajunk s TrokaBone puncture set consists of a modular system for single and multiple extraction of bone and bone marrow samples. This set offers a high degree of operational comfort during puncture and aspiration. Equipped with an ergonomic handle and manufactured of highgrade stainless steel, TrokaBone distinguishes itself from similar products due to its high stability.. ...
Pajunk s TrokaBone puncture set consists of a modular system for single and multiple extraction of bone and bone marrow samples. This set offers a high degree of operational comfort during puncture and aspiration. Equipped with an ergonomic handle and manufactured of highgrade stainless steel, TrokaBone distinguishes itself from similar products due to its high stability.. ...
Pajunk s TrokaBone puncture set consists of a modular system for single and multiple extraction of bone and bone marrow samples. This set offers a high degree of operational comfort during puncture and aspiration. Equipped with an ergonomic handle and manufactured of highgrade stainless steel, TrokaBone distinguishes itself from similar products due to its high stability.. ...
He just knows that leukemia means a lot of not-so-fun stuff, such as too much time spent in the hospital; four rounds of chemotherapy; four spinal taps and bone marrow tests; and entirely too many doctor visits and blood tests in between.. But having a rare aggressive form of Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) has also taught this rising kindergartner something positive - that his familys community of Richmond Hill is compassionate, generous and concerned about Evans health.. Evan was diagnosed with AML in April, following a week of intense flu-like symptoms coupled with bruising and pain in his legs that was so extreme it prevented him from walking. His mother, Evette Cooper, later learned the leg pain was the result of the leukemia having entered Evans bone marrow.. Shortly after Evans diagnosis, Evette lost her job and, with it, her insurance. She went on COBRA to keep the medical coverage for Evans treatment.. Soon the much-needed community benefits for Evan began - bake sales, yard sales, ...
Authors: Nurgalieva Z, Liu CC, Du XL. Title: Chemotherapy use and risk of bone marrow suppression in a large population-based cohort of older women with breast and ovarian cancer.. Journal: Med Oncol 28(3):716-25. Date: 2011 Sep. Abstract: We studied 65,521 women with breast cancer and 7,420 women with ovarian cancer aged ≥ 65 identified from the 16 areas of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results program linked with Medicare data during 1991-2002. Bone marrow toxicity associated with chemotherapy was defined using diagnosis codes from Medicare inpatient, outpatient and physician claims. The time to event Cox regression was utilized to estimate the risk of bone marrow toxicity. Use of anthracyclines, taxanes or platinums was associated with increased risks of short- (≤3 months) and long-term (>3 months) anemia and neutropenia in patients with breast cancer. Alkylating agents or antimetabolites were additional significant predictors of anemia in women with ovarian cancer. Patients who ...
GVHD may occur after a bone marrow, or stem cell, transplant in which someone receives bone marrow tissue or cells from a donor. This type of transplant is called allogeneic. The new, transplanted cells regard the recipients body as foreign. When this happens, the cells attack the recipients body.. GVHD does not occur when people receive their own cells. This type of transplant is called autologous.. Before a transplant, tissue and cells from possible donors are checked to see how closely they match the recipient. GVHD is less likely to occur, or symptoms will be milder, when the match is close. The chance of GVHD is:. ...
THE PROCESS: Once Dylan is there, the first treatment that he will receive is a really high does of chemo drugs. This treatment with kill all of his bone marrow. Then they will go in and inject the healthy bone marrow, which will then take over and "set up shop". We are so thankful that he has 2 perfect matches!! They are cord blood matches and contain the stem cells that he needs in order for this to be successful. We are thankful to the family who donated the cord blood to the cord bank at the time of their childs birth--without this, Dylan may not have been able to survive. God works through all things!! It is an answer to prayer and leaves Dylan with a much better chance of survival. After the transfer is done, Dylan will be closely monitored. There are many horrible side effects that may happen, but those side effects are temporary and will go away eventually. We will give more details as time goes on and as we get closer to the BMT. It is hard to look at Dylan and know that he is going to ...
Bone Marrow has been desribed as gods butter and you can really see this in this recipe, these were wonderful beef marrow bones, that had been dry aged, the bones were cut in half lengthways, and are really rich, one large bone is enough per person. I sprinkled the marrow with a little barbecue rub…
Ethical approval was offered from the Childrens Hospital of Soochow Uni versity Ethics Committee, and informed consent was obtained in the parents or guar dians. AML diagnosis was created in accordance with the revised French American British classification. The primary clinical and laboratory characteristics from the individuals cohort are summarized in Table 1. Furthermore, bone marrow samples from ten healthier donors had been analyzed as controls. Bone marrow mononuclear cells had been isolated working with Ficoll option within two h after bone marrow samples harvested and instantly subjected for the ex traction of total RNA. RNA extraction For RNA extraction, bone marrow samples had been imme diately submerged in two ml Trizol, stored at 80 C until further processed.. A volume of 1 ml of each sample was spun at 4 C for 15 min at twelve,000 g to re move debris and DNA, 1 ml of supernatant was mixed with 200 ul chloroform, shaken for 15 seconds, incu bated at RT for two 3 minutes and spun for ...
Sewell was an even rarer case. On April 17, she became one of only a few donors who have to undergo surgery to extract the bone marrow. Surgeons had to intubate Sewell and put her to sleep, so as bone marrow extraction goes it was as involved as it could possibly be on the part of the donor. Sewells experience was a special case, as most donations of perphrial blood stem cells are similar to giving blood and not nearly as involved as undergoing surgery.. "Ive gone through nothing compared to what the patient or patients family has probably gone through," Sewell said. "I just needed to stay on a regular maintenance dose of an over-the-counter pain reliever; after a week, I was fine.". According to Ashley Collier, senior community engagement manager for Be the Match, college students are the most important demographic the organization targets, as 90 percent of all donors are between the ages of 18 and 24. She said the age group is the most requested by transplant centers when looking for ...
Bone marrow examination refers to the pathologic analysis of samples of bone marrow obtained by bone marrow biopsy (often called a trephine biopsy) and bone marrow aspiration. Bone marrow examination is used in the diagnosis of a number of conditions, including leukemia, multiple myeloma, lymphoma, anemia, and pancytopenia. The bone marrow produces the cellular elements of the blood, including platelets, red blood cells and white blood cells. While much information can be gleaned by testing the blood itself (drawn from a vein by phlebotomy), it is sometimes necessary to examine the source of the blood cells in the bone marrow to obtain more information on hematopoiesis; this is the role of bone marrow aspiration and biopsy. Bone marrow samples can be obtained by aspiration and trephine biopsy. Sometimes, a bone marrow examination will include both an aspirate and a biopsy. The aspirate yields semi-liquid bone marrow, which can be examined by a pathologist under a light microscope and analyzed by ...
The cells in the blood and lymph system originate from stem cells in the bone marrow. A bone marrow examination is performed to diagnose lymphoma, leukemia, and metastasis to bone marrow. The examination usually includes an aspiration and/or biopsy from the iliac crest. When diagnosing Hodgkins lymphoma, an aspirate and biopsy are taken from both sides. Sometimes, aspiration from the sternum is appropriate. In special cases, the aspiration is performed with the help of image guidance in cooperation with the nuclear medicine department. A bone marrow examination involves:. ...
Here, we reported the case of a patient who experienced persistent bone marrow necrosis after ATRA and IDA induction therapy for APL, despite cessation of ATRA. Although ATRA-induced bone marrow necrosis has been documented,18-20 this case is notable in that our patient demonstrated continual bone marrow necrosis several months subsequent to stopping ATRA therapy. It is interesting to note that the patient had evidence of hematopoietic recovery despite the necrotic effects of ATRA and shifting to ATO treatment.. Bone marrow necrosis is conjectured to result from poor blood supply to the marrow21 or increased oxygen demand of the marrow, as evidenced in necrosis of other tissue types. The most common cause of bone marrow necrosis is malignancy, in particular hematologic malignancy, including acute leukemia.18,21,22 It is reasonable to postulate that the APL by itself could have caused the bone marrow necrosis as evidenced in this patient23; however, one would have expected necrosis on the initial ...
Looking for online definition of autologous bone marrow transplantation in the Medical Dictionary? autologous bone marrow transplantation explanation free. What is autologous bone marrow transplantation? Meaning of autologous bone marrow transplantation medical term. What does autologous bone marrow transplantation mean?
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: There is wide interindividual variation in progenitor cell mobilization. The present study was aimed to analyze steady state hematopoiesis in healthy donors and its influence on hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) mobilization. DESIGN AND METHODS: Bone marrow (BM) was aspirated from 72 healthy donors prior to administration of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Analyses of CD34+ cells and semisolid cultures as well as long-term cultures were performed from BM or leukapheresis products. RESULTS: Male donors showed a higher number of BFU-E (p=0.007) and committed progenitors (p=0.05), a better stromal layer (p=0.02), and higher long-term bone marrow culture (LT-BMC) counts (p,0.05) when compared to those in female donors. When correlating the culture pattern of the BM with the data from the leukapheresis products, we observed that the number of the immature progenitors in BM correlated significantly with both the number of CD34 + cells and ...
BACKGROUND: Acute idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura(ITP) is one of the common hematologic disorders in children. Bone marrow aspiration(BMA) is often performed in children with acute ITP to rule out leukemia, aplastic anemia or other hematologic diseases. However, whether BMA is needed in children with typical clinical and hematological features of acute ITP have been questioned. This study was performed to examine the proper indication of BMA in acute childhood ITP. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The medical records and BMA reports of children with the provisional diagnosis of acute ITP were reviewed from January 1984 to December 2000. Patients were divided into two groups, one with typical and another with atypical clinical and hematological features of acute ITP. Typical acute ITP group was characterized by the history of previous viral infection, well being appearance, no hepatosplenomegaly, no lymphadenopathy, normal Hb, WBC, neutrophil count and peripheral blood smear except thrombocytopenia. A ...
The hypoproliferative anemias are normochromic, normocytic, or macrocytic and are characterized by a low reticulocyte count. Hypoproliferative anemia is also a prominent feature of hematologic diseases that are described as bone marrow failure states; these include aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), pure red cell aplasia (PRCA), and myelophthisis. Anemia in these disorders is often not a solitary or even the major hematologic finding. More frequent in bone marrow failure is pancytopenia: anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. Low blood counts in the marrow failure diseases result from deficient hematopoiesis, as distinguished from blood count depression due to peripheral destruction of red cells (hemolytic anemias), platelets (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura [ITP] or due to splenomegaly), and granulocytes (as in the immune leukopenias). Marrow damage and dysfunction also may be secondary to infection, inflammation, or cancer. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - The role of a composite, demineralized bone matrix and bone marrow in the treatment of osseous defects. AU - Tiedeman, J. J.. AU - Garvin, K. L.. AU - Kile, T. A.. AU - Connolly, J. F.. PY - 1995/1/1. Y1 - 1995/1/1. N2 - The efficacy of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) used alone and with bone marrow as a graft material in the treatment of osseous defects was evaluated in 48 patients. Of these 48 patients, 39 were available to follow up and review. Follow up averaged 19 months for all patients. In the entire series, 30 of 39 patients demonstrated osseous union for a 77% success rate. Patients with fracture nonunion represented the most recalcitrant group clinically, with union achieved in only 61% of these cases. Overall, the 39 patients grafted with DBM demonstrated healing that was comparable to results achieved with standard lilac crest bone graft. The results indicate the DBM and marrow composite grafting is a suitable alternative to autologous iliac crest bone graft for use ...

Bone marrow examination - WikipediaBone marrow examination - Wikipedia

Bone marrow examination refers to the pathologic analysis of samples of bone marrow obtained by bone marrow biopsy (often ... An Illustrated Guide to Performing the Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy MedlinePlus: Bone marrow biopsy eMedicine: Bone Marrow ... Sometimes, a bone marrow examination will include both an aspirate and a biopsy. The aspirate yields semi-liquid bone marrow, ... Bone Marrow Aspiration and Biopsy Article Last Updated: April 7, 2008 What to Expect During a Bone Marrow Aspirate and Biopsy, ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bone_marrow_examination

Bone Marrow Micrometastases Predict Breast Cancer Survival | Medpage TodayBone Marrow Micrometastases Predict Breast Cancer Survival | Medpage Today

Austria-The presence of bone marrow micrometastases in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer is a highly significant ... Among women with bone marrow micrometastases at diagnosis the hazard ratio for death was 2.26 (95% CI 1.72-2.97; P. Most of the ... 25-The presence of bone marrow micrometastases in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer is a highly significant predictor of ... Explain to women that the presence of bone marrow micrometastases may help determine effective treatment options.*While this ...
more infohttps://www.medpagetoday.com/hematologyoncology/breastcancer/1604

Bendamustine, etoposide and dexamethasone to mobilize peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells for autologous transplantation...Bendamustine, etoposide and dexamethasone to mobilize peripheral blood hematopoietic stem cells for autologous transplantation...

Bone marrow transplantation, 2016; doi:10.1038/bmt.2016.123. Authors: Green D J, Bensinger W I, Holmberg L A, Gooley T, Till B ... BED safely and effectively mobilizes hematopoietic stem cells.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 23 May ... Six nonhematologic serious adverse events were observed in 6 patients including: neutropenic fever (1, grade 3), bone pain (1, ...
more infohttps://scicurve.com/paper/27214069

Osteopetrosis core NGS panel | Connective Tissue Gene TestsOsteopetrosis core NGS panel | Connective Tissue Gene Tests

Malignant osteopetrosis patients have restricted cranial foramina, reduced bone marrow volume, fractures, deafness, ... Osteopetrosis is a disorder of increased bone density due to defects in bone resorption. Several different forms are recognized ... Osteopetrosis is a disorder of increased bone density due to defects in bone resorption. Several different forms are recognized ... sclerotic bone in the iliac wings, and sclerosis of the skull base. A second form of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (OPTA1; ...
more infohttp://ctgt.net/panel/osteopetrosis-core-ngs-panel

Bone marrow transplant: MedlinePlus Medical EncyclopediaBone marrow transplant: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

A bone marrow transplant is a procedure to replace damaged or destroyed bone marrow with healthy bone marrow stem cells. ... bone marrow transplant; Leukemia - bone marrow transplant; Lymphoma - bone marrow transplant; Multiple myeloma - bone marrow ... A bone marrow transplant is a procedure to replace damaged or destroyed bone marrow with healthy bone marrow stem cells. ... The bone marrow produces blood cells. Stem cells are immature cells in the bone marrow that give rise to all of your different ...
more infohttps://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003009.htm

Bone marrow biopsy: MedlinePlus Medical EncyclopediaBone marrow biopsy: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia

Bone marrow is the soft tissue inside bones that helps form blood cells. It is found in the hollow part of most bones. ... A bone marrow biopsy is the removal of marrow from inside bone. ... A bone marrow biopsy is the removal of marrow from inside bone ... Bone marrow aspiration analysis-specimen (biopsy, bone marrow iron stain, iron stain, bone marrow). In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ ... Bone marrow biopsy is not the same as bone marrow aspiration. An aspiration removes a small amount of marrow in liquid form for ...
more infohttps://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003934.htm

Bone marrow | anatomy | Britannica.comBone marrow | anatomy | Britannica.com

Bone marrow, soft, gelatinous tissue that fills the cavities of the bones. Bone marrow is either red or yellow, depending upon ... In humans the red bone marrow forms all of the blood cells with the exception of the lymphocytes, which ... Bone marrow, also called myeloid tissue, soft, gelatinous tissue that fills the cavities of the bones. Bone marrow is either ... radiation: Bone marrow. The blood-forming cells of the bone marrow are among the most radiosensitive cells in the body. If a ...
more infohttps://www.britannica.com/science/bone-marrow

Bone MarrowBone Marrow

Specialized soft tissue found within bone. Red bone marrow, widespread in the bones of children and found in some adult bones ( ... Fat-laden yellow bone marrow, more common in adults, is found primarily at the ends of long bones. ...
more infohttps://labtestsonline.org/glossary/bone-marrow

Bone Marrow DiseasesBone Marrow Diseases

Main bone marrow problems. Diseases of the bone marrow may lead to an abnormality in the production of any of the mature blood ... From the bone marrow only the mature cells are released into the blood stream. Apart from the stem cells the bone marrow ... The sites of bone marrow location include the sternum (middle of the chest), pelvis (hip bone), and femur (thigh bone). ... Other diseases and disorders of the bone marrow. Other diseases and disorders of the bone marrow include:. * Disorders of ...
more infohttps://www.news-medical.net/health/Bone-Marrow-Diseases.aspx

Bone Marrow | SpringerLinkBone Marrow | SpringerLink

The chapter examines pathologic findings seen in the human bone marrow. Diagnostic criteria are based on the 2008 WHO ... Bone marrow biopsy: interpretive guidelines for the surgical pathologist. Adv Anat Pathol. 2003;10:8-26.PubMedCrossRefGoogle ... Bone marrow involvement by marginal zone B-cell lymphomas of different types. Am J Clin Pathol. 2008;129(5):714-22PubMed ... Bone marrow Leukemia Lymphoma Infection Myeloproliferative neoplasms Myelodysplastic syndromes This is a preview of ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4419-6043-6_17

What is Bone Marrow?What is Bone Marrow?

require examination of the bone marrow tissue. This is called bone marrow aspiration or bone marrow biopsy. A needle is used to ... Types of bone marrow. There are two types of bone marrow:. * red marrow that is responsible for producing red blood cells, ... About half of adult bone marrow is red.. Functions of bone marrow. Red blood cells (erythrocytes) carry oxygen to the tissues. ... Bone marrow pathology and diagnosis. Certain diseases of the bone marrow like leukemia, multiple myeloma, myelodysplastic ...
more infohttps://www.news-medical.net/health/What-is-Bone-Marrow.aspx

Bone marrow adipocytes.  - PubMed - NCBIBone marrow adipocytes. - PubMed - NCBI

Bone marrow adipocytes have recently been shown to influence other cell populations within the marrow and can affect whole body ... Bone marrow adipocytes.. Horowitz MC1, Berry R1, Holtrup B2, Sebo Z2, Nelson T1, Fretz JA1, Lindskog D1, Kaplan JL3, Ables G4, ... adipocyte progenitors; lineage tracing; marrow adipocyte differentiation; marrow adipose tissue; marrow fat ... Adipocytes were identified in human bone marrow more than a century ago, yet until recently little has been known about their ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=28872979

bone marrow transplantationbone marrow transplantation

... is a medical procedure to replenish bone marrow - the soft tissue within bones that produces new ... bone marrow transplantation. Bone marrow transplantation is a medical procedure to replenish bone marrow - the soft tissue ... Bone marrow transplants are necessary when marrow has been destroyed by drug or radiation therapy for cancer, often leukemia. A ... bone marrow donor is usually a close relative of the patient. ...
more infohttp://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/B/bone_marrow_transplantation.html

bone marrow aspirationbone marrow aspiration

Our physician attempted a Bone Marrow Aspiration 38220, but a sample could not be obtained. Can you still charge for this since ... bone marrow aspiration for bone grafting. By DebiMax in forum General Surgery ... Our physician attempted a Bone Marrow Aspiration 38220, but a sample could not be obtained. Can you still charge for this since ... Bone marrow bx/aspiration ? - When billing medicare should. By cpccoder2008 in forum Hematology/Oncology ...
more infohttps://www.aapc.com/memberarea/forums/54588-bone-marrow-aspiration.html

Bone-marrow Grafts | The BMJBone-marrow Grafts | The BMJ

Bone-marrow Grafts. Br Med J 1964; 2 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.2.5408.523 (Published 29 August 1964) Cite this as: Br ...
more infohttp://www.bmj.com/content/2/5408/523

Bone Marrow Transplantation - Table of ContentsBone Marrow Transplantation - Table of Contents

Bone Marrow Transplantation is a high quality, peer-reviewed journal covering all aspects of clinical and basic haemopoietic ... Long-term follow-up of secondary malignancies in adults after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation FREE. W Hasegawa, G R Pond ... Life-threatening neurological complications after bone marrow transplantation in children FREE. D Uckan, M Cetin, Yigitkanli, ... Bone Marrow Transplant 35: 1-16; advance online publication, October 18, 2004; doi:10.1038/sj.bmt.1704716 ...
more infohttp://www.nature.com/bmt/journal/v35/n1/index.html?error=cookies_not_supported&code=9c98f990-3a86-45d8-a4f6-6d03bd8aa274

Bone Marrow Awareness WeekBone Marrow Awareness Week

Each day a bone marrow donor recruitment clinic will be held, where you will have the opportunity to join the bone marrow ... covering everything from why bone marrow matters to first hand experiences of donating and receiving bone marrow. The talks ... Marrow @ Warwick are holding their first ever Bone Marrow Awareness Week, with a whole week of events planned across campus. ... If youre not sure about joining the register, then just spend some time finding out more about bone marrow and the donation ...
more infohttps://warwick.ac.uk/insite/events/events/bone_marrow_awareness/

Bone Marrow Transplant: What HappensBone Marrow Transplant: What Happens

... a bone marrow transplant can save your life. WebMD shows you whats involved with one and what you can expect from the first ... What Happens During a Bone Marrow Transplant?. To understand what a bone marrow transplant is really like, it might help to ... Bone marrow. For this, your doctor uses a needle to get bone marrow from different parts of your hipbone. It takes 1 to 2 hours ... Michigan Medicine, Rogel Cancer Center: "Bone Marrow Transplant Program.". Johns Hopkins University: "Bone Marrow ...
more infohttps://www.webmd.com/cancer/lymphoma/marrow-transplant-18/marrow-transplant-surgery-explained

Bone Marrow FailureBone Marrow Failure

Diagnosing and treating rare problems with bone marrow in children requires special expertise and a team of doctors with ... Bone marrow failure syndromes are relatively rare and universally complex disorders. The Bone Marrow Failure Program at the ... For children whose bone marrow fails or who develop pre-malignant chromosomal changes, a stem cell transplant may be required. ... Given the increased risk of future cancers that occur in many bone marrow failure syndromes post-transplant, our team provides ...
more infohttps://www.childrens.com/specialties-services/specialty-centers-and-programs/cancer-and-blood-disorders/programs-and-services/hematology/bone-marrow-failure

Bone Marrow ImmunophenotypeBone Marrow Immunophenotype

Bone Marrow smears submitted to the lab will be used for assessing cell morphology only; immunophenotyping cannot be performed ... The preferred specimen type is bone marrow. Immunophenotyping may be performed on peripheral blood (EDTA) if there is a large ... on bone marrow smears. Call 614-722-5482 for more information about sample sources and additional markers. Result will include ...
more infohttps://www.nationwidechildrens.org/specialties/laboratory-services/lab-test-directory/leukocyte-immunophenotype

Bone marrow transplant | medicine | Britannica.comBone marrow transplant | medicine | Britannica.com

Bone marrow transplant, the transfer of bone marrow from a healthy donor to a recipient whose own bone marrow is affected by ... Bone marrow transplant may be used to treat aplastic anemia; sickle cell anemia; various malignant diseases of blood-forming ... bone marrow graft. Bone marrow transplant, the transfer of bone marrow from a healthy donor to a recipient whose own bone ... stem cell: Bone marrow and hematopoietic stem cells. Bone marrow transplants (also known as bone marrow grafts) represent a ...
more infohttps://www.britannica.com/science/bone-marrow-transplant

Bone marrow transplant - Mayo ClinicBone marrow transplant - Mayo Clinic

... risks and recovery after bone marrow transplant, also known as a stem cell transplant. ... Bone marrow transplant - Learn why its done, what to expect, ... A bone marrow transplant may be necessary if your bone marrow ... Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some bones. Its job is to produce blood cells. If your bone marrow isnt functioning ... Living with a bone marrow transplant or waiting for a bone marrow transplant can be difficult, and its normal to have fears ...
more infohttps://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/bone-marrow-transplant/about/pac-20384854?mc_id=us&utm_source=sharingmayoclinic&utm_medium=l&utm_content=content&utm_campaign=mayoclinic&geo=national&placementsite=enterprise&cauid=100717

Bone marrow transplant - Mayo ClinicBone marrow transplant - Mayo Clinic

This procedure replaces unhealthy bone marrow with new stem cells. It may be done with your own cells, or with cells from a ... A bone marrow transplant is also called a stem cell transplant.. You might need a bone marrow transplant if your bone marrow ... Bone marrow is the spongy tissue inside some bones. Its job is to produce blood cells. If your bone marrow isnt functioning ... After your bone marrow transplant. When the new stem cells enter your body, they travel through your blood to your bone marrow ...
more infohttps://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/bone-marrow-transplant/about/pac-20384854

Bone marrow and mental illness - NHSBone marrow and mental illness - NHS

These cells develop in the bone marrow and migrate to the brain. When the Hoxb8 mutant mice were given bone marrow from normal ... At least some of the bodys microglia develop in the bone marrow and then migrate to the brain. It was within these bone marrow ... When Hoxb8 mutant mice were given a bone marrow transplant with normal bone marrow cells, the amount of excessive grooming and ... The study does not suggest that bone marrow transplants can cure mental illness. Bone marrow transplant was simply one of the ...
more infohttps://www.nhs.uk/news/mental-health/bone-marrow-and-mental-illness/

Causes of subchondral bone marrow edemaCauses of subchondral bone marrow edema

... causes of subchondral bone marrow edema, emergency drug box contents basic, odt file extention, survival tools compass ... Comments to «Causes of subchondral bone marrow edema». * E_m_i_l_i_a_n_o. writes: 26.10.2015 at 19:57:36 The illness ... Causes of subchondral bone marrow edema,2011 ford edge for sale new york times,curing ed with grocery store items download,what ... Abnormal marrow in osteomyelitis and neuropathic reactive bone edema also can be assessed on MRI.Tendinopathy of the foot, ...
more infohttp://s3.amazonaws.com/transbed4survive/causes-of-subchondral-bone-marrow-edema.html
  • The bone marrow produces the cellular elements of the blood, including platelets, red blood cells and white blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • An aspiration, using a 20 mL syringe, yields approximately 300 μL of bone marrow. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once the needle is in the marrow cavity, a syringe is attached and used to aspirate ("suck out") liquid bone marrow. (wikipedia.org)
  • An aspirate needle is inserted through the skin using manual pressure and force until it abuts the bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Then, with a twisting motion of clinician's hand and wrist, the needle is advanced through the bony cortex (the hard outer layer of the bone) and into the marrow cavity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The needle is then advanced with a twisting motion and rotated to obtain a solid piece of bone marrow. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone marrow examination refers to the pathologic analysis of samples of bone marrow obtained by bone marrow biopsy (often called a trephine biopsy) and bone marrow aspiration. (wikipedia.org)
  • this is the role of bone marrow aspiration and biopsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone marrow samples can be obtained by aspiration and trephine biopsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone marrow aspiration and trephine biopsy are usually performed on the back of the hipbone, or posterior iliac crest. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone marrow aspiration may also be performed on the tibial (shinbone) site in children up to 2 years of age while spinous process aspiration is frequently done in a lumbar puncture position and on the L3-L4 vertebrae. (wikipedia.org)
  • INNSBRUCK, Austria, Aug. 25-The presence of bone marrow micrometastases in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer is a highly significant predictor of poor outcome, according to a pooled analysis of data from nine breast cancer studies. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Sometimes, a bone marrow examination will include both an aspirate and a biopsy. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are few contraindications to bone marrow examination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Explain to women that the presence of bone marrow micrometastases may help determine effective treatment options. (medpagetoday.com)
more