Bone Diseases: Diseases of BONES.Bone and Bones: A specialized CONNECTIVE TISSUE that is the main constituent of the SKELETON. The principle cellular component of bone is comprised of OSTEOBLASTS; OSTEOCYTES; and OSTEOCLASTS, while FIBRILLAR COLLAGENS and hydroxyapatite crystals form the BONE MATRIX.Bone Diseases, MetabolicBone Remodeling: The continuous turnover of BONE MATRIX and mineral that involves first an increase in BONE RESORPTION (osteoclastic activity) and later, reactive BONE FORMATION (osteoblastic activity). The process of bone remodeling takes place in the adult skeleton at discrete foci. The process ensures the mechanical integrity of the skeleton throughout life and plays an important role in calcium HOMEOSTASIS. An imbalance in the regulation of bone remodeling's two contrasting events, bone resorption and bone formation, results in many of the metabolic bone diseases, such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Endocrine Glands: Ductless glands that secrete HORMONES directly into the BLOOD CIRCULATION. These hormones influence the METABOLISM and other functions of cells in the body.Bone Resorption: Bone loss due to osteoclastic activity.Endocrine System: The system of glands that release their secretions (hormones) directly into the circulatory system. In addition to the ENDOCRINE GLANDS, included are the CHROMAFFIN SYSTEM and the NEUROSECRETORY SYSTEMS.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Renal Osteodystrophy: Decalcification of bone or abnormal bone development due to chronic KIDNEY DISEASES, in which 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D3 synthesis by the kidneys is impaired, leading to reduced negative feedback on PARATHYROID HORMONE. The resulting SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM eventually leads to bone disorders.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Diphosphonates: Organic compounds which contain P-C-P bonds, where P stands for phosphonates or phosphonic acids. These compounds affect calcium metabolism. They inhibit ectopic calcification and slow down bone resorption and bone turnover. Technetium complexes of diphosphonates have been used successfully as bone scanning agents.Osteomalacia: Disorder caused by an interruption of the mineralization of organic bone matrix leading to bone softening, bone pain, and weakness. It is the adult form of rickets resulting from disruption of VITAMIN D; PHOSPHORUS; or CALCIUM homeostasis.Endocrine System Diseases: Pathological processes of the ENDOCRINE GLANDS, and diseases resulting from abnormal level of available HORMONES.Endocrine Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ENDOCRINE GLANDS.Endocrine Disruptors: Exogenous agents, synthetic and naturally occurring, which are capable of disrupting the functions of the ENDOCRINE SYSTEM including the maintenance of HOMEOSTASIS and the regulation of developmental processes. Endocrine disruptors are compounds that can mimic HORMONES, or enhance or block the binding of hormones to their receptors, or otherwise lead to activating or inhibiting the endocrine signaling pathways and hormone metabolism.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Osteolysis: Dissolution of bone that particularly involves the removal or loss of calcium.Osteoclasts: A large multinuclear cell associated with the BONE RESORPTION. An odontoclast, also called cementoclast, is cytomorphologically the same as an osteoclast and is involved in CEMENTUM resorption.Bone Development: The growth and development of bones from fetus to adult. It includes two principal mechanisms of bone growth: growth in length of long bones at the epiphyseal cartilages and growth in thickness by depositing new bone (OSTEOGENESIS) with the actions of OSTEOBLASTS and OSTEOCLASTS.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Multiple Myeloma: A malignancy of mature PLASMA CELLS engaging in monoclonal immunoglobulin production. It is characterized by hyperglobulinemia, excess Bence-Jones proteins (free monoclonal IMMUNOGLOBULIN LIGHT CHAINS) in the urine, skeletal destruction, bone pain, and fractures. Other features include ANEMIA; HYPERCALCEMIA; and RENAL INSUFFICIENCY.Osteitis Fibrosa Cystica: A fibrous degeneration, cyst formation, and the presence of fibrous nodules in bone, usually due to HYPERPARATHYROIDISM.Osteoblasts: Bone-forming cells which secrete an EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX. HYDROXYAPATITE crystals are then deposited into the matrix to form bone.Parathyroid Hormone: A polypeptide hormone (84 amino acid residues) secreted by the PARATHYROID GLANDS which performs the essential role of maintaining intracellular CALCIUM levels in the body. Parathyroid hormone increases intracellular calcium by promoting the release of CALCIUM from BONE, increases the intestinal absorption of calcium, increases the renal tubular reabsorption of calcium, and increases the renal excretion of phosphates.Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Alkaline Phosphatase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of an orthophosphoric monoester and water to an alcohol and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.1.Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Bone Matrix: Extracellular substance of bone tissue consisting of COLLAGEN fibers, ground substance, and inorganic crystalline minerals and salts.Osteitis Deformans: A disease marked by repeated episodes of increased bone resorption followed by excessive attempts at repair, resulting in weakened, deformed bones of increased mass. The resultant architecture of the bone assumes a mosaic pattern in which the fibers take on a haphazard pattern instead of the normal parallel symmetry.Osteolysis, Essential: Syndromes of bone destruction where the cause is not obvious such as neoplasia, infection, or trauma. The destruction follows various patterns: massive (Gorham disease), multicentric (HAJDU-CHENEY SYNDROME), or carpal/tarsal.Osteogenesis: The process of bone formation. Histogenesis of bone including ossification.Hyperparathyroidism: A condition of abnormally elevated output of PARATHYROID HORMONE (or PTH) triggering responses that increase blood CALCIUM. It is characterized by HYPERCALCEMIA and BONE RESORPTION, eventually leading to bone diseases. PRIMARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is caused by parathyroid HYPERPLASIA or PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. SECONDARY HYPERPARATHYROIDISM is increased PTH secretion in response to HYPOCALCEMIA, usually caused by chronic KIDNEY DISEASES.Aluminum: A metallic element that has the atomic number 13, atomic symbol Al, and atomic weight 26.98.RANK Ligand: A transmembrane protein belonging to the tumor necrosis factor superfamily that specifically binds RECEPTOR ACTIVATOR OF NUCLEAR FACTOR-KAPPA B and OSTEOPROTEGERIN. It plays an important role in regulating OSTEOCLAST differentiation and activation.Bone Regeneration: Renewal or repair of lost bone tissue. It excludes BONY CALLUS formed after BONE FRACTURES but not yet replaced by hard bone.Ilium: The largest of three bones that make up each half of the pelvic girdle.Bone Density Conservation Agents: Agents that inhibit BONE RESORPTION and/or favor BONE MINERALIZATION and BONE REGENERATION. They are used to heal BONE FRACTURES and to treat METABOLIC BONE DISEASES such as OSTEOPOROSIS.Osteoprotegerin: A secreted member of the TNF receptor superfamily that negatively regulates osteoclastogenesis. It is a soluble decoy receptor of RANK LIGAND that inhibits both CELL DIFFERENTIATION and function of OSTEOCLASTS by inhibiting the interaction between RANK LIGAND and RECEPTOR ACTIVATOR OF NUCLEAR FACTOR-KAPPA B.Dihydrotachysterol: A VITAMIN D that can be regarded as a reduction product of vitamin D2.Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1: A form of multiple endocrine neoplasia that is characterized by the combined occurrence of tumors in the PARATHYROID GLANDS, the PITUITARY GLAND, and the PANCREATIC ISLETS. The resulting clinical signs include HYPERPARATHYROIDISM; HYPERCALCEMIA; HYPERPROLACTINEMIA; CUSHING DISEASE; GASTRINOMA; and ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME. This disease is due to loss-of-function of the MEN1 gene, a tumor suppressor gene (GENES, TUMOR SUPPRESSOR) on CHROMOSOME 11 (Locus: 11q13).Hyperparathyroidism, Secondary: Abnormally elevated PARATHYROID HORMONE secretion as a response to HYPOCALCEMIA. It is caused by chronic KIDNEY FAILURE or other abnormalities in the controls of bone and mineral metabolism, leading to various BONE DISEASES, such as RENAL OSTEODYSTROPHY.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Fractures, Spontaneous: Fractures occurring as a result of disease of a bone or from some undiscoverable cause, and not due to trauma. (Dorland, 27th ed)Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Bone Diseases, Endocrine: Diseases of the bones related to hyperfunction or hypofunction of the endocrine glands.Osteocalcin: Vitamin K-dependent calcium-binding protein synthesized by OSTEOBLASTS and found primarily in BONES. Serum osteocalcin measurements provide a noninvasive specific marker of bone metabolism. The protein contains three residues of the amino acid gamma-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla), which, in the presence of CALCIUM, promotes binding to HYDROXYAPATITE and subsequent accumulation in BONE MATRIX.Osteocytes: Mature osteoblasts that have become embedded in the BONE MATRIX. They occupy a small cavity, called lacuna, in the matrix and are connected to adjacent osteocytes via protoplasmic projections called canaliculi.Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia: A group of autosomal dominant diseases characterized by the combined occurrence of tumors involving two or more ENDOCRINE GLANDS that secrete PEPTIDE HORMONES or AMINES. These neoplasias are often benign but can be malignant. They are classified by the endocrine glands involved and the degree of aggressiveness. The two major forms are MEN1 and MEN2 with gene mutations on CHROMOSOME 11 and CHROMOSOME 10, respectively.Phosphorus: A non-metal element that has the atomic symbol P, atomic number 15, and atomic weight 31. It is an essential element that takes part in a broad variety of biochemical reactions.Hypercalcemia: Abnormally high level of calcium in the blood.Rickets: Disorders caused by interruption of BONE MINERALIZATION manifesting as OSTEOMALACIA in adults and characteristic deformities in infancy and childhood due to disturbances in normal BONE FORMATION. The mineralization process may be interrupted by disruption of VITAMIN D; PHOSPHORUS; or CALCIUM homeostasis, resulting from dietary deficiencies, or acquired, or inherited metabolic, or hormonal disturbances.Bone Morphogenetic Proteins: Bone-growth regulatory factors that are members of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily of proteins. They are synthesized as large precursor molecules which are cleaved by proteolytic enzymes. The active form can consist of a dimer of two identical proteins or a heterodimer of two related bone morphogenetic proteins.Bone Substitutes: Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.Strontium Isotopes: Stable strontium atoms that have the same atomic number as the element strontium, but differ in the atomic weight. Sr-84, 86, 87, and 88 are the stable strontium isotopes.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Fibrous Dysplasia of Bone: A disease of bone marked by thinning of the cortex by fibrous tissue containing bony spicules, producing pain, disability, and gradually increasing deformity. Only one bone may be involved (FIBROUS DYSPLASIA, MONOSTOTIC) or several (FIBROUS DYSPLASIA, POLYOSTOTIC).Osteonecrosis: Death of a bone or part of a bone, either atraumatic or posttraumatic.Technetium Tc 99m Medronate: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used primarily in skeletal scintigraphy. Because of its absorption by a variety of tumors, it is useful for the detection of neoplasms.Clodronic Acid: A diphosphonate which affects calcium metabolism. It inhibits bone resorption and soft tissue calcification.Osteopetrosis: Excessive formation of dense trabecular bone leading to pathological fractures; OSTEITIS; SPLENOMEGALY with infarct; ANEMIA; and extramedullary hemopoiesis (HEMATOPOIESIS, EXTRAMEDULLARY).Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Calcification, Physiologic: Process by which organic tissue becomes hardened by the physiologic deposit of calcium salts.Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor-kappa B: A tumor necrosis factor receptor family member that is specific for RANK LIGAND and plays a role in bone homeostasis by regulating osteoclastogenesis. It is also expressed on DENDRITIC CELLS where it plays a role in regulating dendritic cell survival. Signaling by the activated receptor occurs through its association with TNF RECEPTOR-ASSOCIATED FACTORS.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Etidronic Acid: A diphosphonate which affects calcium metabolism. It inhibits ectopic calcification and slows down bone resorption and bone turnover.Renal Dialysis: Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2a: A form of multiple endocrine neoplasia characterized by the presence of medullary carcinoma (CARCINOMA, MEDULLARY) of the THYROID GLAND, and usually with the co-occurrence of PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA, producing CALCITONIN and ADRENALINE, respectively. Less frequently, it can occur with hyperplasia or adenoma of the PARATHYROID GLANDS. This disease is due to gain-of-function mutations of the MEN2 gene on CHROMOSOME 10 (Locus: 10q11.2), also known as the RET proto-oncogene that encodes a RECEPTOR PROTEIN-TYROSINE KINASE. It is an autosomal dominant inherited disease.Calcium Metabolism Disorders: Disorders in the processing of calcium in the body: its absorption, transport, storage, and utilization.Bone Morphogenetic Protein 2: A potent osteoinductive protein that plays a critical role in the differentiation of osteoprogenitor cells into OSTEOBLASTS.Kidney Failure, Chronic: The end-stage of CHRONIC RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. It is characterized by the severe irreversible kidney damage (as measured by the level of PROTEINURIA) and the reduction in GLOMERULAR FILTRATION RATE to less than 15 ml per min (Kidney Foundation: Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative, 2002). These patients generally require HEMODIALYSIS or KIDNEY TRANSPLANTATION.Minerals: Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Calcium: A basic element found in nearly all organized tissues. It is a member of the alkaline earth family of metals with the atomic symbol Ca, atomic number 20, and atomic weight 40. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body and combines with phosphorus to form calcium phosphate in the bones and teeth. It is essential for the normal functioning of nerves and muscles and plays a role in blood coagulation (as factor IV) and in many enzymatic processes.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Potassium Citrate: A powder that dissolves in water, which is administered orally, and is used as a diuretic, expectorant, systemic alkalizer, and electrolyte replenisher.Vitamin D: A vitamin that includes both CHOLECALCIFEROLS and ERGOCALCIFEROLS, which have the common effect of preventing or curing RICKETS in animals. It can also be viewed as a hormone since it can be formed in SKIN by action of ULTRAVIOLET RAYS upon the precursors, 7-dehydrocholesterol and ERGOSTEROL, and acts on VITAMIN D RECEPTORS to regulate CALCIUM in opposition to PARATHYROID HORMONE.Osteosclerosis: An abnormal hardening or increased density of bone tissue.Temporal Bone: Either of a pair of compound bones forming the lateral (left and right) surfaces and base of the skull which contains the organs of hearing. It is a large bone formed by the fusion of parts: the squamous (the flattened anterior-superior part), the tympanic (the curved anterior-inferior part), the mastoid (the irregular posterior portion), and the petrous (the part at the base of the skull).Hydroxycholecalciferols: Hydroxy analogs of vitamin D 3; (CHOLECALCIFEROL); including CALCIFEDIOL; CALCITRIOL; and 24,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D 3.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Uremia: A clinical syndrome associated with the retention of renal waste products or uremic toxins in the blood. It is usually the result of RENAL INSUFFICIENCY. Most uremic toxins are end products of protein or nitrogen CATABOLISM, such as UREA or CREATININE. Severe uremia can lead to multiple organ dysfunctions with a constellation of symptoms.Jaw DiseasesSkull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Collagen Type I: The most common form of fibrillar collagen. It is a major constituent of bone (BONE AND BONES) and SKIN and consists of a heterotrimer of two alpha1(I) and one alpha2(I) chains.X-Ray Microtomography: X-RAY COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY with resolution in the micrometer range.Biological Markers: Measurable and quantifiable biological parameters (e.g., specific enzyme concentration, specific hormone concentration, specific gene phenotype distribution in a population, presence of biological substances) which serve as indices for health- and physiology-related assessments, such as disease risk, psychiatric disorders, environmental exposure and its effects, disease diagnosis, metabolic processes, substance abuse, pregnancy, cell line development, epidemiologic studies, etc.Parietal Bone: One of a pair of irregularly shaped quadrilateral bones situated between the FRONTAL BONE and OCCIPITAL BONE, which together form the sides of the CRANIUM.Parathyroid Glands: Two pairs of small oval-shaped glands located in the front and the base of the NECK and adjacent to the two lobes of THYROID GLAND. They secrete PARATHYROID HORMONE that regulates the balance of CALCIUM; PHOSPHORUS; and MAGNESIUM in the body.Bone Diseases, Infectious: Bone diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms.Osteogenesis Imperfecta: COLLAGEN DISEASES characterized by brittle, osteoporotic, and easily fractured bones. It may also present with blue sclerae, loose joints, and imperfect dentin formation. Most types are autosomal dominant and are associated with mutations in COLLAGEN TYPE I.Mice, Inbred C57BLPancreas: A nodular organ in the ABDOMEN that contains a mixture of ENDOCRINE GLANDS and EXOCRINE GLANDS. The small endocrine portion consists of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS secreting a number of hormones into the blood stream. The large exocrine portion (EXOCRINE PANCREAS) is a compound acinar gland that secretes several digestive enzymes into the pancreatic ductal system that empties into the DUODENUM.Enteroendocrine Cells: Cells found throughout the lining of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT that contain and secrete regulatory PEPTIDE HORMONES and/or BIOGENIC AMINES.Technetium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain TECHNETIUM as an integral part of the molecule. Technetium 99m (m=metastable) is an isotope of technetium that has a half-life of about 6 hours. Technetium 99, which has a half-life of 210,000 years, is a decay product of technetium 99m.Alendronate: A nonhormonal medication for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis in women. This drug builds healthy bone, restoring some of the bone loss as a result of osteoporosis.Calcium Carbonate: Carbonic acid calcium salt (CaCO3). An odorless, tasteless powder or crystal that occurs in nature. It is used therapeutically as a phosphate buffer in hemodialysis patients and as a calcium supplement.Hyperparathyroidism, Primary: A condition of abnormally elevated output of PARATHYROID HORMONE due to parathyroid HYPERPLASIA or PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. It is characterized by the combination of HYPERCALCEMIA, phosphaturia, elevated renal 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D3 synthesis, and increased BONE RESORPTION.Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2b: Similar to MEN2A, it is also caused by mutations of the MEN2 gene, also known as the RET proto-oncogene. Its clinical symptoms include medullary carcinoma (CARCINOMA, MEDULLARY) of THYROID GLAND and PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA of ADRENAL MEDULLA (50%). Unlike MEN2a, MEN2b does not involve PARATHYROID NEOPLASMS. It can be distinguished from MEN2A by its neural abnormalities such as mucosal NEUROMAS on EYELIDS; LIP; and TONGUE, and ganglioneuromatosis of GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT leading to MEGACOLON. It is an autosomal dominant inherited disease.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Alveolar Bone Loss: Resorption or wasting of the tooth-supporting bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS) in the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE.Parathyroidectomy: Excision of one or more of the parathyroid glands.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Islets of Langerhans: Irregular microscopic structures consisting of cords of endocrine cells that are scattered throughout the PANCREAS among the exocrine acini. Each islet is surrounded by connective tissue fibers and penetrated by a network of capillaries. There are four major cell types. The most abundant beta cells (50-80%) secrete INSULIN. Alpha cells (5-20%) secrete GLUCAGON. PP cells (10-35%) secrete PANCREATIC POLYPEPTIDE. Delta cells (~5%) secrete SOMATOSTATIN.Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal: Metabolic disorder associated with fractures of the femoral neck, vertebrae, and distal forearm. It occurs commonly in women within 15-20 years after menopause, and is caused by factors associated with menopause including estrogen deficiency.Phosphates: Inorganic salts of phosphoric acid.Ergocalciferols: Derivatives of ERGOSTEROL formed by ULTRAVIOLET RAYS breaking of the C9-C10 bond. They differ from CHOLECALCIFEROL in having a double bond between C22 and C23 and a methyl group at C24.Trapidil: A coronary vasodilator agent.Haversian System: A circular structural unit of bone tissue. It consists of a central hole, the Haversian canal through which blood vessels run, surrounded by concentric rings, called lamellae.Bone Cysts: Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.Hypophosphatemia: A condition of an abnormally low level of PHOSPHATES in the blood.Calcitriol: The physiologically active form of vitamin D. It is formed primarily in the kidney by enzymatic hydroxylation of 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (CALCIFEDIOL). Its production is stimulated by low blood calcium levels and parathyroid hormone. Calcitriol increases intestinal absorption of calcium and phosphorus, and in concert with parathyroid hormone increases bone resorption.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal: Antineoplastic agents that are used to treat hormone-sensitive tumors. Hormone-sensitive tumors may be hormone-dependent, hormone-responsive, or both. A hormone-dependent tumor regresses on removal of the hormonal stimulus, by surgery or pharmacological block. Hormone-responsive tumors may regress when pharmacologic amounts of hormones are administered regardless of whether previous signs of hormone sensitivity were observed. The major hormone-responsive cancers include carcinomas of the breast, prostate, and endometrium; lymphomas; and certain leukemias. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual 1994, p2079)Hormones: Chemical substances having a specific regulatory effect on the activity of a certain organ or organs. The term was originally applied to substances secreted by various ENDOCRINE GLANDS and transported in the bloodstream to the target organs. It is sometimes extended to include those substances that are not produced by the endocrine glands but that have similar effects.Imidazoles: Compounds containing 1,3-diazole, a five membered aromatic ring containing two nitrogen atoms separated by one of the carbons. Chemically reduced ones include IMIDAZOLINES and IMIDAZOLIDINES. Distinguish from 1,2-diazole (PYRAZOLES).Hypocalcemia: Reduction of the blood calcium below normal. Manifestations include hyperactive deep tendon reflexes, Chvostek's sign, muscle and abdominal cramps, and carpopedal spasm. (Dorland, 27th ed)Nephrolithiasis: Formation of stones in the KIDNEY.Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.N-substituted Glycines: AMINO ACIDS composed of GLYCINE substituted at the nitrogen rather than the usual carbon position, resulting in the loss of HYDROGEN BONDING donors. Polymers of these compounds are called PEPTOIDS.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Medullary Sponge Kidney: A non-hereditary KIDNEY disorder characterized by the abnormally dilated (ECTASIA) medullary and inner papillary portions of the collecting ducts. These collecting ducts usually contain CYSTS or DIVERTICULA filled with jelly-like material or small calculi (KIDNEY STONES) leading to infections or obstruction. It should be distinguished from congenital or hereditary POLYCYSTIC KIDNEY DISEASES.Endocrinology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the metabolism, physiology, and disorders of the ENDOCRINE SYSTEM.Mesenchymal Stromal Cells: Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance: Conditions characterized by the presence of M protein (Monoclonal protein) in serum or urine without clinical manifestations of plasma cell dyscrasia.Spine: The spinal or vertebral column.Femoral NeoplasmsRadionuclide Imaging: The production of an image obtained by cameras that detect the radioactive emissions of an injected radionuclide as it has distributed differentially throughout tissues in the body. The image obtained from a moving detector is called a scan, while the image obtained from a stationary camera device is called a scintiphotograph.Acid Phosphatase: An enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of an orthophosphoric monoester and water to an alcohol and orthophosphate. EC 3.1.3.2.Frontal Bone: The bone that forms the frontal aspect of the skull. Its flat part forms the forehead, articulating inferiorly with the NASAL BONE and the CHEEK BONE on each side of the face.Calcium, Dietary: Calcium compounds used as food supplements or in food to supply the body with calcium. Dietary calcium is needed during growth for bone development and for maintenance of skeletal integrity later in life to prevent osteoporosis.Core Binding Factor Alpha 1 Subunit: A transcription factor that dimerizes with CORE BINDING FACTOR BETA SUBUNIT to form core binding factor. It contains a highly conserved DNA-binding domain known as the runt domain and is involved in genetic regulation of skeletal development and CELL DIFFERENTIATION.Pancreatic Polypeptide: A 36-amino acid pancreatic hormone that is secreted mainly by endocrine cells found at the periphery of the ISLETS OF LANGERHANS and adjacent to cells containing SOMATOSTATIN and GLUCAGON. Pancreatic polypeptide (PP), when administered peripherally, can suppress gastric secretion, gastric emptying, pancreatic enzyme secretion, and appetite. A lack of pancreatic polypeptide (PP) has been associated with OBESITY in rats and mice.Tamoxifen: One of the SELECTIVE ESTROGEN RECEPTOR MODULATORS with tissue-specific activities. Tamoxifen acts as an anti-estrogen (inhibiting agent) in the mammary tissue, but as an estrogen (stimulating agent) in cholesterol metabolism, bone density, and cell proliferation in the ENDOMETRIUM.OsteomyelitisLumbar Vertebrae: VERTEBRAE in the region of the lower BACK below the THORACIC VERTEBRAE and above the SACRAL VERTEBRAE.Bone Morphogenetic Protein 7: A bone morphogenetic protein that is widely expressed during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT. It is both a potent osteogenic factor and a specific regulator of nephrogenesis.Bone Marrow DiseasesHyperphosphatemia: A condition of abnormally high level of PHOSPHATES in the blood, usually significantly above the normal range of 0.84-1.58 mmol per liter of serum.Phosphorus Metabolism Disorders: Disorders in the processing of phosphorus in the body: its absorption, transport, storage, and utilization.PHEX Phosphate Regulating Neutral Endopeptidase: A membrane-bound metalloendopeptidase that may play a role in the degradation or activation of a variety of PEPTIDE HORMONES and INTERCELLULAR SIGNALING PEPTIDES AND PROTEINS. Genetic mutations that result in loss of function of this protein are a cause of HYPOPHOSPHATEMIC RICKETS, X-LINKED DOMINANT.Calcinosis: Pathologic deposition of calcium salts in tissues.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Cellular Microenvironment: Local surroundings with which cells interact by processing various chemical and physical signals, and by contributing their own effects to this environment.Mice, Knockout: Strains of mice in which certain GENES of their GENOMES have been disrupted, or "knocked-out". To produce knockouts, using RECOMBINANT DNA technology, the normal DNA sequence of the gene being studied is altered to prevent synthesis of a normal gene product. Cloned cells in which this DNA alteration is successful are then injected into mouse EMBRYOS to produce chimeric mice. The chimeric mice are then bred to yield a strain in which all the cells of the mouse contain the disrupted gene. Knockout mice are used as EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS for diseases (DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL) and to clarify the functions of the genes.Cathepsin K: A cysteine protease that is highly expressed in OSTEOCLASTS and plays an essential role in BONE RESORPTION as a potent EXTRACELLULAR MATRIX-degrading enzyme.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Ovariectomy: The surgical removal of one or both ovaries.Receptors, Tumor Necrosis Factor: Cell surface receptors that bind TUMOR NECROSIS FACTORS and trigger changes which influence the behavior of cells.Aurintricarboxylic Acid: A dye which inhibits protein biosynthesis at the initial stages. The ammonium salt (aluminon) is a reagent for the colorimetric estimation of aluminum in water, foods, and tissues.Adenoma, Islet Cell: A benign tumor of the pancreatic ISLET CELLS. Usually it involves the INSULIN-producing PANCREATIC BETA CELLS, as in INSULINOMA, resulting in HYPERINSULINISM.Mice, Transgenic: Laboratory mice that have been produced from a genetically manipulated EGG or EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN.Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear: Intracellular receptors that can be found in the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. They bind to extracellular signaling molecules that migrate through or are transported across the CELL MEMBRANE. Many members of this class of receptors occur in the cytoplasm and are transported to the CELL NUCLEUS upon ligand-binding where they signal via DNA-binding and transcription regulation. Also included in this category are receptors found on INTRACELLULAR MEMBRANES that act via mechanisms similar to CELL SURFACE RECEPTORS.Endocrine Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on any endocrine gland.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Maxillary DiseasesVitamin D Deficiency: A nutritional condition produced by a deficiency of VITAMIN D in the diet, insufficient production of vitamin D in the skin, inadequate absorption of vitamin D from the diet, or abnormal conversion of vitamin D to its bioactive metabolites. It is manifested clinically as RICKETS in children and OSTEOMALACIA in adults. (From Cecil Textbook of Medicine, 19th ed, p1406)Leg Bones: The bones of the free part of the lower extremity in humans and of any of the four extremities in animals. It includes the FEMUR; PATELLA; TIBIA; and FIBULA.Aromatase Inhibitors: Compounds that inhibit AROMATASE in order to reduce production of estrogenic steroid hormones.Acidosis, Renal Tubular: A group of genetic disorders of the KIDNEY TUBULES characterized by the accumulation of metabolically produced acids with elevated plasma chloride, hyperchloremic metabolic ACIDOSIS. Defective renal acidification of URINE (proximal tubules) or low renal acid excretion (distal tubules) can lead to complications such as HYPOKALEMIA, hypercalcinuria with NEPHROLITHIASIS and NEPHROCALCINOSIS, and RICKETS.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Bone Marrow Neoplasms: Neoplasms located in the bone marrow. They are differentiated from neoplasms composed of bone marrow cells, such as MULTIPLE MYELOMA. Most bone marrow neoplasms are metastatic.Somatostatin: A 14-amino acid peptide named for its ability to inhibit pituitary GROWTH HORMONE release, also called somatotropin release-inhibiting factor. It is expressed in the central and peripheral nervous systems, the gut, and other organs. SRIF can also inhibit the release of THYROID-STIMULATING HORMONE; PROLACTIN; INSULIN; and GLUCAGON besides acting as a neurotransmitter and neuromodulator. In a number of species including humans, there is an additional form of somatostatin, SRIF-28 with a 14-amino acid extension at the N-terminal.Prostatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PROSTATE.Bone Marrow Examination: Removal of bone marrow and evaluation of its histologic picture.Glycoproteins: Conjugated protein-carbohydrate compounds including mucins, mucoid, and amyloid glycoproteins.Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Gastrinoma: A GASTRIN-secreting neuroendocrine tumor of the non-beta ISLET CELLS, the GASTRIN-SECRETING CELLS. This type of tumor is primarily located in the PANCREAS or the DUODENUM. Majority of gastrinomas are malignant. They metastasize to the LIVER; LYMPH NODES; and BONE but rarely elsewhere. The presence of gastrinoma is one of three requirements to be met for identification of ZOLLINGER-ELLISON SYNDROME, which sometimes occurs in families with MULTIPLE ENDOCRINE NEOPLASIA TYPE 1; (MEN 1).Metacarpal Bones: The five cylindrical bones of the METACARPUS, articulating with the CARPAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF FINGERS distally.Gene Expression: The phenotypic manifestation of a gene or genes by the processes of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION and GENETIC TRANSLATION.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Chromogranins: A group of acidic proteins that are major components of SECRETORY GRANULES in the endocrine and neuroendocrine cells. They play important roles in the aggregation, packaging, sorting, and processing of secretory protein prior to secretion. They are cleaved to release biologically active peptides. There are various types of granins, usually classified by their sources.Estradiol: The 17-beta-isomer of estradiol, an aromatized C18 steroid with hydroxyl group at 3-beta- and 17-beta-position. Estradiol-17-beta is the most potent form of mammalian estrogenic steroids.Boronic Acids: Inorganic or organic compounds that contain the basic structure RB(OH)2.Collagen: A polypeptide substance comprising about one third of the total protein in mammalian organisms. It is the main constituent of SKIN; CONNECTIVE TISSUE; and the organic substance of bones (BONE AND BONES) and teeth (TOOTH).Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein: A ubiquitously expressed, secreted protein with bone resorption and renal calcium reabsorption activities that are similar to PARATHYROID HORMONE. It does not circulate in appreciable amounts in normal subjects, but rather exerts its biological actions locally. Overexpression of parathyroid hormone-related protein by tumor cells results in humoral calcemia of malignancy.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Hypophosphatasia: A genetic metabolic disorder resulting from serum and bone alkaline phosphatase deficiency leading to hypercalcemia, ethanolamine phosphatemia, and ethanolamine phosphaturia. Clinical manifestations include severe skeletal defects resembling vitamin D-resistant rickets, failure of the calvarium to calcify, dyspnea, cyanosis, vomiting, constipation, renal calcinosis, failure to thrive, disorders of movement, beading of the costochondral junction, and rachitic bone changes. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Bone Morphogenetic Protein 4: A bone morphogenetic protein that is a potent inducer of bone formation. It also functions as a regulator of MESODERM formation during EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Glucagonoma: An almost always malignant GLUCAGON-secreting tumor derived from the PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS. It is characterized by a distinctive migratory ERYTHEMA; WEIGHT LOSS; STOMATITIS; GLOSSITIS; DIABETES MELLITUS; hypoaminoacidemia; and normochromic normocytic ANEMIA.Metatarsal Bones: The five long bones of the METATARSUS, articulating with the TARSAL BONES proximally and the PHALANGES OF TOES distally.Tarsal Bones: The seven bones which form the tarsus - namely, CALCANEUS; TALUS; cuboid, navicular, and the internal, middle, and external cuneiforms.Receptors, CCR1: CCR receptors with specificity for a broad variety of CC CHEMOKINES. They are expressed at high levels in MONOCYTES; tissue MACROPHAGES; NEUTROPHILS; and EOSINOPHILS.Glucagon: A 29-amino acid pancreatic peptide derived from proglucagon which is also the precursor of intestinal GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDES. Glucagon is secreted by PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS and plays an important role in regulation of BLOOD GLUCOSE concentration, ketone metabolism, and several other biochemical and physiological processes. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 9th ed, p1511)Dihydroxycholecalciferols: Cholecalciferols substituted with two hydroxy groups in any position.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Technetium: The first artificially produced element and a radioactive fission product of URANIUM. Technetium has the atomic symbol Tc, atomic number 43, and atomic weight 98.91. All technetium isotopes are radioactive. Technetium 99m (m=metastable) which is the decay product of Molybdenum 99, has a half-life of about 6 hours and is used diagnostically as a radioactive imaging agent. Technetium 99 which is a decay product of technetium 99m, has a half-life of 210,000 years.Adrenal Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the ADRENAL GLANDS.Cholecalciferol: Derivative of 7-dehydroxycholesterol formed by ULTRAVIOLET RAYS breaking of the C9-C10 bond. It differs from ERGOCALCIFEROL in having a single bond between C22 and C23 and lacking a methyl group at C24.Insulinoma: A benign tumor of the PANCREATIC BETA CELLS. Insulinoma secretes excess INSULIN resulting in HYPOGLYCEMIA.Estrogens: Compounds that interact with ESTROGEN RECEPTORS in target tissues to bring about the effects similar to those of ESTRADIOL. Estrogens stimulate the female reproductive organs, and the development of secondary female SEX CHARACTERISTICS. Estrogenic chemicals include natural, synthetic, steroidal, or non-steroidal compounds.Pituitary Gland: A small, unpaired gland situated in the SELLA TURCICA. It is connected to the HYPOTHALAMUS by a short stalk which is called the INFUNDIBULUM.Environmental Pollutants: Substances or energies, for example heat or light, which when introduced into the air, water, or land threaten life or health of individuals or ECOSYSTEMS.Mice, SCID: Mice homozygous for the mutant autosomal recessive gene "scid" which is located on the centromeric end of chromosome 16. These mice lack mature, functional lymphocytes and are thus highly susceptible to lethal opportunistic infections if not chronically treated with antibiotics. The lack of B- and T-cell immunity resembles severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndrome in human infants. SCID mice are useful as animal models since they are receptive to implantation of a human immune system producing SCID-human (SCID-hu) hematochimeric mice.

Vitamin D receptor activators can protect against vascular calcification. (1/1)

 (+info)

*Endocrine bone disease

An endocrine bone disease is a bone disease associated with a disorder of the endocrine system. An example is osteitis fibrosa ... which in turn leads to condition that are not desirable such as bone disorders or other endocrine related diseases. Bone ... Joplin, GF (1973). "Endocrine bone disease". Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine. 66 (5): 447. PMC 1644927 . PMID ... There are many bone disorders such as osteoporosis, Paget's disease, hypothyroidism. Although there are many forms of bone ...

*McCune-Albright syndrome

... is a complex genetic disorder affecting the bone, skin, and endocrine systems. It is a mosaic disease ... In other cases, children are diagnosed in early infancy, show obvious bone disease, and obvious increased endocrine secretions ... Various endocrine diseases may present in McCune-Albright syndrome due to increased hormone production. Precocious puberty: The ... For example, one child with McCune-Albright syndrome may be entirely healthy, with no outward evidence of bone or endocrine ...

*Paget's disease of bone

"Paget's disease of bone: an endocrine society clinical practice guideline". The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and ... and does not spread from bone to bone. Rarely, a bone affected by Paget's disease can transform into a malignant bone cancer. ... Ethel, SS; Roodman, GD (2008). "Paget's disease of bone". In Rosen. Primer on the metabolic bone diseases and disorders of ... Paget's Disease of Bone Overview - NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center. ...

*Chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder

The mineral and endocrine functions disrupted in CKD are critically important in the regulation of both initial bone formation ... Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder (NIDDKD) Overview of chronic kidney disease-mineral bone disease (CKD-MBD) ( ... Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes ERA-EDTA WORKING GROUP ON CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE AND MINERAL BONE DISORDER (CKD-MBD) ... during growth (bone modeling) and bone structure and function during adulthood (bone remodeling). As a result, bone ...

*Global waste trade

... hormone disruptions from endocrine disruptors, skin alterations, neurotoxicity, kidney damage, liver damage, bone disease, ... emphysema, ovotoxicity, reproductive damage, and many other fatal diseases. The improper disposal of these hazardous wastes ...

*Henry Kronenberg

He has served as the President of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research and the Endocrine Society. He was a member ... of the Board of Advisors of the Rolanette and Berdon Lawrence Bone Disease Program of Texas from 2006-2012. Cloning and ... and studies that identified a role for parathyroid hormone in the regulation of the bone marrow stem cell niche. ... mouse models to understand the role of parathyroid hormone and parathyroid hormone-related protein in the regulation of bone ...

*Kolling Institute of Medical Research

The Bone and Joint group investigates diseases of the bone, cartilage, tendons, ligaments and joints, with particular research ... ovary and endocrine organs, as well as regulation of normal body growth and bone metabolism. Research Focus Adrenal Lab Bill ... pregnancy and childbirth to cancer and genetics kidney and heart disease pain and neurological disorders diseases of bones and ... which contribute to the morbidity of bone and joint disease in the Australian community Apart from supporting research ...

*Rajesh Thakker

Molecular Genetics of Endocrine Disorders, and Genetics of Bone Biology and Skeletal Disease. Thakker was elected a Fellow of ... Thakker, R. V; Whyte, Michael P; Eisman, John; Igarashi, Takashi (2013). Genetics of Bone Biology and Skeletal Disease. ISBN ... Genetic and Molecular Biological Aspects of Endocrine Disease. ISBN 9780702019456. Thakker, R. (4 September 1998). Molecular ... Thakker has edited several books including Genetic and Molecular Biological Aspects of Endocrine Disease, ...

*Camptocormia

... may also lead to muscle weakness in the upper back and to arthritis and other bone-degeneration diseases. Because ... Camptocormia can lead to infection, tumors, and diseases of the endocrine system and connective tissues. The success of the ... BSS often appears in individuals afflicted with Parkinson's disease, muscular dystrophies, endocrine disorders, inflammatory ... and inflammatory muscle diseases; metabolic or endocrine disorders; and mitochondrial myopathies. A muscle biopsy can clearly ...

*Donovan James McCune

McCune-Albright syndrome, a rare genetic endocrine disease affecting the bones and pigmentation of the skin, was described ... He was a resident physician in pediatrics and contagious diseases at Cincinnati General Hospital from 1929-30, and then a ...

*Renal osteodystrophy

... bone may now be considered a new endocrine organ at the heart of CKD-MBD. . Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) ... leading to low bone turnover or adynamic bone disease. Both high and low bone turnover diseases are currently observed equally ... Bone pain Joint pain Bone deformation Bone fracture The broader concept of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder ( ... "Adynamic bone disease: from bone to vessels in chronic kidney disease". Seminars in Nephrology. 34 (6): 626-40. doi:10.1016/j. ...

*Scintigraphy

ISBN 1-4051-0386-8. Rosen, Clifford J. (2008-11-18). Primer on the Metabolic Bone Diseases and Disorders of Mineral Metabolism ... Endocrine-Related Cancer. Bioscientifica. 14: 799-807. doi:10.1677/ERC-07-0120. PMID 17914109. Scarsbrook AF, Ganeshan A, ... Any increased physiological function, such as a fracture in the bone, will usually mean increased concentration of the tracer. ... By chemically attaching technetium-99m to MDP, radioactivity can be transported and attached to bone via the hydroxyapatite for ...

*Lysosomal acid lipase deficiency

... endocrine, and neuropsychological outcome of hematopoietic cell transplantation for Wolman disease". Bone Marrow ... The disease is often undiagnosed in adults.The person may have a history of premature cardiac disease or premature stroke. ... also known as bone marrow transplant, to try to prevent the disease from getting worse. Data are sparse but there is a known ... "Cholesteryl ester storage disease: Review of the findings in 135 reported patients with an underdiagnosed disease". Journal of ...

*Norethisterone

... a major risk-factor for veno-occlusive disease in the liver after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation". Blood. 92 (12): 4568 ... Jeffrey K. Aronson (21 February 2009). Meyler's Side Effects of Endocrine and Metabolic Drugs. Elsevier. pp. 217, 253, 275. ... High-dose (10 mg/day) norethisterone has been associated with hepatic veno-occlusive disease, and because of this adverse ... effect, norethisterone should not be given to patients undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, as it has been ...

*Hormone receptor

"Nuclear Receptors in Bone Physiology and Diseases". Physiological Reviews. 93 (2): 481-523. doi:10.1152/physrev.00008.2012. ... "e.hormone , Endocrine System : Types of Hormones". e.hormone.tulane.edu. Retrieved 2017-04-06. "The Endocrine System". classes. ... Water-soluble hormones come from amino acids and are located and stored in endocrine cells until actually needed. The main two ... Deficiencies in nuclear receptor-mediated pathways play a key role in the development of disease, like osteoporosis. Water- ...

*Michael F. Holick

"Sunlight and vitamin D for bone health and prevention of autoimmune diseases, cancers, and cardiovascular disease". Am J Clin ... Holick honored by Endocrine Society". "BUSM professor receives 2011 ACN Communication Media Award". Boston University School of ... Holick made discoveries in the field of vitamin D that have led to novel therapies for metabolic bone diseases, hypocalcemic ... and its role in causing not only metabolic bone disease, and osteoporosis in adults, but increasing risk of children and adults ...

*Bone pain

A number of diseases can cause bone pain, including the following: Endocrine, such as hyperparathyroidism, osteoporosis, renal ... that innervate bone tissue leads to the sensation of bone pain. Bone pain originates from both the periosteum and the bone ... and other bone diseases. Thus there are several types of bone pain, each with many potential sources or origins of cause. From ... Paget's disease of bone (also termed osteitis deformans or ambiguously, just Paget's disease). Pain caused by cancer within ...

*Hyperphosphatemia

"KDIGO Guideline for Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral and Bone Disorder (CKD-MBD)". Retrieved 7 February 2016. Longo et al., ... Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 18th ed., p.3089 "Hyperphosphatemia - Endocrine and Metabolic Disorders - Merck ... metabolism such as hyperphosphatemia are included in the definition of the new chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder ...

*American Society for Bone and Mineral Research

In the late 1980s, the most cutting-edge scientific knowledge on bone and diseases of bone was largely contained within the ... This led to the rise of a new field - bone and mineral research. In 1974, while attending the annual meeting of The Endocrine ... The Society was a founding member of the National Coalition for Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ("Bone Coalition") in ... and founded the National Bone Health Alliance to serve as a resource and raise public awareness of bone diseases. It has also ...

*Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

... of Genome Regulation Behavioral Determinants and Developmental Imaging Bone and Matrix Biology in Development and Disease Cell ... and Molecular Genetics Perinatal and Obstetrical Research Reproductive Endocrine and Gynecology NICHD has made numerous ... Health and Disease Branch Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Branch Maternal and Pediatric Infectious Disease Branch ... free from disease or disability, and to ensure the health, productivity, independence, and well-being of all people through ...

*Fibrous dysplasia of bone

All patients with fibrous dysplasia should be evaluated and treated for endocrine diseases associated with McCune-Albright ... incidental lesions to severe disabling disease. Disease can affect one bone (monostotic) or multiple (polyostotic), and may ... Bone scan. This test uses radioactive tracers, which are injected into your bloodstream. The damaged parts of your bones take ... In bone, constitutive Gsα signaling results in impaired differentiation and proliferation of bone marrow stromal cells. ...

*Ma'in Hot Springs

... skin diseases, and overall body activation of nervous and psychological exhaustion, endocrine secretion and chronic sinusitis. ... and bone, joint, back and muscular pains. The water in the springs contains elements with healing properties, including sodium ... Tourists frequent the hot springs, seeking treatment for chronic physical ailments such as skin and circulatory diseases, ... The steam treatment helps to cure chronic respiratory diseases especially among smokers.. ...

*Nikhil Tandon

... diabetes and metabolic bone diseases and has participated in many clinical trials. His research findings have been published in ... "Endocrine Society of India". Endocrine Society of India. 2015. Retrieved March 5, 2015. "Padma Awards". Padma Awards. 2015. ... "Indian Society for Bone and Mineral Research". Indian Society for Bone and Mineral Research. 2015. Retrieved March 6, 2015. " ... He has served as an executive committee member of the Endocrine Society of India and is its president. He is an elected fellow ...

*Langerhans cell histiocytosis

Bone: The most-frequently seen symptom in both unifocal and multifocal disease is painful bone swelling. The skull is most ... Assessment of endocrine function and bonemarrow biopsy are also performed when indicated. S-100 protein is expressed in a ... It can be a monostotic (involving only one bone) or polyostotic (involving more than one bone) disease. It typically has no ... The disease has gone by several names, including Hand-Schüller-Christian disease, Abt-Letterer-Siwe disease, Hashimoto-Pritzker ...

*Endocrine disease

Paget's disease of bone) Rickets and osteomalacia Diabetes insipidus Hypopituitarism (or Panhypopituitarism) Pituitary tumors ... Endocrine diseases are disorders of the endocrine system. The branch of medicine associated with endocrine disorders is known ... nutritional and metabolic diseases List of ICD-9 codes 240-279: Endocrine, nutritional and metabolic diseases, and immunity ... Endocrine gland hypersecretion (leading to hormone excess) Tumours (benign or malignant) of endocrine glands Endocrine ...

*Cushing's syndrome

at The National Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Information Service. July 2008. Citing: * Nieman, LK; Ilias, I (December 2005 ... Rapid weight gain Moodiness, irritability, or depression Muscle and bone weakness Memory and attention dysfunction Osteoporosis ... "Cushing's Syndrome". National Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases Information Service (NEMDIS). July 2008. Archived from the ... While all Cushing's disease gives Cushing's syndrome, not all Cushing's syndrome is due to Cushing's disease. Brain changes ...
Shunmugavel, S., Tosi, I., H. Rasmussen, K., E. Jensen, R., Taarning, E., Meier, S. & Riisager, A., 2016. 1 p.. Research output: Contribution to conference › Conference abstract for conference › Research › peer-review ...

Vitamin D - Wilkinson Health Services / Non-retailVitamin D - Wilkinson Health Services / Non-retail

... those with bone disease caused by aluminum; those with chronic liver disease; or those with bone disease associated with kidney ... as well as to prevent osteoporosis in people who have endocrine or nutrition problems. B. ... Metabolic bone disease is common among people with chronic liver disease, and osteoporosis accounts for the majority of cases. ... The use of substances similar to vitamin D has been found to increase bone density in people with kidney disease. The effect of ...
more infohttp://www.wilkinsonpharmacy.com/ns/DisplayMonograph.asp?storeID=CA16677413FA4D59A0FF53842F6ED4E5&DocID=bottomline-vitamind

Infantile hypophosphatasiaInfantile hypophosphatasia

... an inherited metabolic bone disease also characterized by spontaneous seizures. Initially, these seizures were attributed ... ... Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type II; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine ... Machado-Joseph Disease Type 3; Machado-Joseph Disease Type 2; Machado-Joseph Disease Type 1; Lethal Ataxia With Deafness and ... Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) Syndrome; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; ...
more infohttp://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/Infantile+hypophosphatasia/8660

Chromosome 16Chromosome 16

Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type II; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine ... Machado-Joseph Disease Type 3; Machado-Joseph Disease Type 2; Machado-Joseph Disease Type 1; Lethal Ataxia With Deafness and ... FA patients display congenital abnormalities, and develop bone marrow failure, and cancer susceptibility. We identified ... Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia (MEN) Syndrome; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; ...
more infohttp://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/1466

Metabolic Bone Disease & Endocrine Calcium Center | Cleveland ClinicMetabolic Bone Disease & Endocrine Calcium Center | Cleveland Clinic

Endocrine Calcium Center helps streamline the evaluation and treatment of problems associated with calcium disorders and ... Metabolic Bone Disease & Endocrine Calcium Center Metabolic Bone Disease & Endocrine Calcium Center ... Elevated markers of bone turnover. The Metabolic Bone Disease & Endocrine Calcium Center may also provide evaluation and ... The Metabolic Bone Disease & Endocrine Calcium Center and the Department of Endocrine Surgery continue to collaborate to ...
more infohttps://my.clevelandclinic.org/departments/endocrinology-metabolism/depts/endocrine-calcium

Endocrine bone disease - WikipediaEndocrine bone disease - Wikipedia

An endocrine bone disease is a bone disease associated with a disorder of the endocrine system. An example is osteitis fibrosa ... which in turn leads to condition that are not desirable such as bone disorders or other endocrine related diseases. Bone ... Joplin, GF (1973). "Endocrine bone disease". Proceedings of the Royal Society of Medicine. 66 (5): 447. PMC 1644927 . PMID ... There are many bone disorders such as osteoporosis, Pagets disease, hypothyroidism. Although there are many forms of bone ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Endocrine_bone_disease

Endocrine Fellows Series: 2018 Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Diseases | the Endocrine Society Center for LearningEndocrine Fellows Series: 2018 Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Diseases | the Endocrine Society Center for Learning

The annual Endocrine Fellows Series: Osteoporosis and Metabolic Bone Diseases is a CME-certified conference of pediatric and ... Identify patients with Pagets disease. *Evaluate best treatment strategies for the management of patients with Pagets disease ... Pagets disease, adult forms of osteogenesis imperfecta, fibrous dysplasia of bone, etc.) ... adult endocrine fellows held in conjunction with the Santa Fe Bone Symposium (August 3-4,2018) in Santa Fe, New Mexico. Faculty ...
more infohttps://education.endocrine.org/education.endocrine.org/Osteo2018

Safety and Efficacy of Octreotide Long Acting Release (LAR) in Treatment Naïve Acromegalic Patients - Full Text View -...Safety and Efficacy of Octreotide Long Acting Release (LAR) in Treatment Naïve Acromegalic Patients - Full Text View -...

Bone Diseases, Endocrine. Bone Diseases. Musculoskeletal Diseases. Hyperpituitarism. Pituitary Diseases. Hypothalamic Diseases ... Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Endocrine System Diseases. Octreotide. ... Octreotide LAR is approved for treatment of acromegaly after surgery if the disease is not controlled. This study was aimed to ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT00128232

Comparison of Oral Octreotide Capsules to Injectable Somatostatin Analogs in Acromegaly - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.govComparison of Oral Octreotide Capsules to Injectable Somatostatin Analogs in Acromegaly - Full Text View - ClinicalTrials.gov

Bone Diseases, Endocrine. Bone Diseases. Musculoskeletal Diseases. Hyperpituitarism. Pituitary Diseases. Hypothalamic Diseases ... Brain Diseases. Central Nervous System Diseases. Nervous System Diseases. Endocrine System Diseases. Octreotide. Lanreotide. ... Condition or disease Intervention/treatment Phase Acromegaly Drug: Octreotide capsules Drug: Injectable Somatostatin Analogs ( ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02685709?term=chiasma&rank=1

Hyperthyroidism | Providence Saint JohnsHyperthyroidism | Providence Saint John's

Johns, our endocrine specialists are one of the best in the world. ... Endocrine Tumor and Bone Disease Program. 2121 Santa Monica Blvd.. Garden Level - Patient Care. Santa Monica, CA 90404 ... Fairly absolute indications for surgery include moderate or severe eye disease in Graves disease, large goiter with ... The most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the US is overproduction of thyroid hormone due to Graves disease, toxic ...
more infohttps://california.providence.org/saint-johns/services/surgery/thyroid-surgery/hyperthyroidism/

Tachdjians Pediatric Orthopaedics: From the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children. Expert Consult: Online and Print, 3-...Tachdjian's Pediatric Orthopaedics: From the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital for Children. Expert Consult: Online and Print, 3-...

42 Metabolic and Endocrine Bone Diseases. 43 Hematologic Disorders Note: Product cover images may vary from those shown ... 30 Malignant Bone Tumors. Section V Injuries. 31 General Principles of Managing Orthopaedic Injuries. 32 Spinal Injuries. 33 ... 26 Arthritis and Bone. 27 Infections of the Musculoskeletal System. Section IV Musculoskeletal Tumors. 28 General Principles of ... 39 Muscle Diseases. Section VII Other Orthopaedic Disorders. 40 Skeletal Dysplasias. 41 Orthopaedic-Related Syndromes. ...
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Edward Merker |  Icahn School of MedicineEdward Merker | Icahn School of Medicine

Diabetes and Bone Disease ASSOCIATE CLINICAL PROFESSOR , Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at ... Endocrine, Diabetes and Bone Diseases *Email. Contact Information. Business Offices. Business Office 1 ... ASSOCIATE CLINICAL PROFESSOR , Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease. *ASSOCIATE CLINICAL PROFESSOR , Geriatrics ...
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Phechromocytomas | Providence Saint JohnsPhechromocytomas | Providence Saint John's

Endocrine Tumor and Bone Disease Program. 2121 Santa Monica Blvd.. Garden Level - Patient Care. Santa Monica, CA 90404 ... The most common of these are: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndrome types 2A and 2B, von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome, ...
more infohttps://california.providence.org/saint-johns/services/surgery/adrenal-surgery/phechromocytomas/

Maria Skamagas |  Icahn School of MedicineMaria Skamagas | Icahn School of Medicine

Diabetes and Bone Disease at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai ... ASSISTANT PROFESSOR , Medicine, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Bone Disease. Specialty:. Endocrine, Diabetes and Bone Diseases ... and Bone Disease. Her clinical interests include type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus, bone diseases, adrenal disorders, female ... She is actively involved in medical education of housestaff and medical staff in diabetes and other endocrine diseases. She is ...
more infohttp://icahn.mssm.edu/profiles/maria-skamagas

OWL Directory Search for ortho* - Orthopaedic Web LinksOWL Directory Search for ortho* - Orthopaedic Web Links

OCOSH Classification: Bone Diseases: Endocrine Bone Diseases: Gigantism View Details Visit Resource Review It Rate It Bookmark ... PubMed search for myxoma AND (orthopaedic OR bone) [Categories]. - OCOSH Classification: Orthopaedic Oncology: Connective and ... DeGenovas expertise includes treatment of all conditions affecting the spine including arthritis, degenerative disc disease, ... OCOSH Classification: Bone Diseases: Bone Developmental Diseases: Osteochondrodysplasia: Osteosclerosis: Osteopoikilosis View ...
more infohttps://www.orthopaedicweblinks.com/cgi-bin/owl/search.cgi?query=ortho

Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms: 2013-09-15Rheumatoid Arthritis Symptoms: 2013-09-15

Underlying conditions such as hyperparathyroidism are often the catalyst for this type of bone disease. This type of endocrine ... Buergers disease, Alzheimers disease, Weils disease), some diseases on the basis of area where the disease is common or ... One such problem is endocrine bone disease such as Osteitis Fibrosa Cystica. ... Exploring the Mystery of Endocrine Disorders. Disorders involving the endocrine system can result in a number of other diseases ...
more infohttp://rheumatoidarthritism.blogspot.com/2013_09_15_archive.html

Smita  Jha, M.D.Smita Jha, M.D.

Fellow Travel Grant, American Diabetes Association Fellows Forum on Metabolic Bone Diseases - 2014, Endocrine Fellows ... Fellow Travel Grant, Santa Fe Bone Symposium - 2017, Endocrine Society. *Fellow Travel Grant, American Society of Bone and ... Fellow Travel Grant, Endocrine Society Annual Meeting - 2017, Endocrine Society. *Fellow Travel Grant, Endocrine Fellows ... Bethesda MD in areas of metabolic bone diseases, genetics and adrenal diseases. Her interests also include diabetes and thyroid ...
more infohttps://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/profiles/results/directory/profile/10000419/smita-jha

Hyperparathyroidism, Neonatal Severe disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical TrialsHyperparathyroidism, Neonatal Severe disease: Malacards - Research Articles, Drugs, Genes, Clinical Trials

Global: Genetic diseases Rare diseases Fetal diseases Anatomical: Bone diseases Endocrine diseases See all MalaCards categories ... The MalaCards human disease database index: 1-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z ... NIH Rare Diseases : 53 The following summary is from Orphanet, a European reference portal for information on rare diseases and ... Affiliated tissues include bone and thyroid, and related phenotypes are muscular hypotonia and splenomegaly OMIM : 57 Neonatal ...
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Combination therapy with dexamethasone and osteoprotegerin protects against arthritis-induced bone alterations in antigen...Combination therapy with dexamethasone and osteoprotegerin protects against arthritis-induced bone alterations in antigen...

... on bone alterations and disease activity in antigen-induced arthritis (AIA) in the... ... Delling G. Endocrine bone diseases. Stuttgart: Fischer; 1975. p. 3-33.Google Scholar ... Baron R. Anatomy and ultrastructure of bone. In: Favus MJ, editor. Primer on the metabolic bone diseases and disorders of ... Receptor activator of nuclear factor kappaB ligand and osteoprotegerin regulation of bone remodeling in health and disease. ...
more infohttps://rd.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00011-010-0184-6

Steven Ing MD | Ohio State University Wexner Medical CenterSteven Ing MD | Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Bone Diseases, Endocrine. *Hyperphosphatemia. *Bone Densities. *Bone Diseases, Metabolic. *Hyperparathyroidism. *Osteosclerosis ... Often, physicians focus their practice on certain disease categories, treatment methods or patient types. Physicians can ...
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Exercise Treatment of Obesity  - PubMed - NCBIExercise Treatment of Obesity - PubMed - NCBI

Director of the Endocrine/Bone Disease Program, John Wayne Cancer Institute at Saint Johns Health Center, Santa Monica, CA; ... Professor of Medicine, University of California - San Francisco, CA; Staff Physician and Chief of the Endocrine Clinic, San ... Inactivity and obesity are closely linked conditions accounting for a large burden of chronic disease and impaired function, ... Endocrine Clinic, West Los Angeles VA Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA. 7. Professor, University of Mississippi Medical Center, ...
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How does alpha thalassemia affect the severity of beta thalassemia?How does alpha thalassemia affect the severity of beta thalassemia?

Longitudinal changes of endocrine and bone disease in adults with β-thalassemia major receiving different iron chelators over 5 ... Drugs & Diseases , Hematology , Beta Thalassemia Q&A How does alpha thalassemia affect the severity of beta thalassemia?. ... Basu S, Kumar A. Hair-on-end appearance in radiograph of skull and facial bones in a case of beta thalassaemia. Br J Haematol. ... Rivella S. β-thalassemias: paradigmatic diseases for scientific discoveries and development of innovative therapies. ...
more infohttps://www.medscape.com/answers/206490-184787/how-does-alpha-thalassemia-affect-the-severity-of-beta-thalassemia

Beta Thalassemia Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Surgical Treatment, Investigational TherapyBeta Thalassemia Treatment & Management: Approach Considerations, Surgical Treatment, Investigational Therapy

Longitudinal changes of endocrine and bone disease in adults with β-thalassemia major receiving different iron chelators over 5 ... Basu S, Kumar A. Hair-on-end appearance in radiograph of skull and facial bones in a case of beta thalassaemia. Br J Haematol. ... Treatment of Anemia in Patients With Renal Disease Reviewed * First Worldwide Survey of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation ... Transplantation-related issues such as graft versus host disease, graft failure, chronic immunosuppressive therapy, and ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/206490-treatment

Transfusion-Induced Iron Overload: Practice Essentials, Pathophysiology, EpidemiologyTransfusion-Induced Iron Overload: Practice Essentials, Pathophysiology, Epidemiology

Longitudinal changes of endocrine and bone disease in adults with β-thalassemia major receiving different iron chelators over 5 ... Italian Working Group on Endocrine Complications in Non-endocrine Diseases. Multicentre study on prevalence of endocrine ... Related Conditions and Diseases. * General Principles of Radiation Therapy * Gamma Knife and Other Stereotactic Radiotherapies ... Prevention of cardiac disease by subcutaneous deferoxamine in patients with thalassemia major. N Engl J Med. 1985 Jun 20. 312( ...
more infohttps://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1389732-overview

Books by Subject - Lane Medical Library - Stanford University School of MedicineBooks by Subject - Lane Medical Library - Stanford University School of Medicine

Soft tissue and bone tumors -- Part 7: Metabolic and endocrine disorders. Metabolic bone disease -- Endocrine disorders -- Part ... et al.] -- Stem cells in skeletal physiology and endocrine diseases of bone / Bianco, P., Sacchetti, B., Riminucci, M. -- ... Bone density and imaging of osteoporosis -- Chronic kidney disease mineral and bone disorder -- Disorders of calcification: ... Liver Disease in Older Children. Autoimmune Liver Disease / Giorgina Mieli-Vergani, Diego Vergani -- Drug-Induced Liver Disease ...
more infohttps://lane.stanford.edu/biomed-resources/ebsubjectbrowse.html?m=Pediatrics&sourceid=lpch-epic

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... or bone health; although evidence was often limited and of poor quality. No study evaluated clinical endocrine or bone disease ... Soy has also been claimed to show benefits in heart disease, bone growth, and easing menopausal discomfort. The medical studies ... No study evaluated clinical cardiovascular disease. The evidence does not support an effect of soy products on endocrine ... Exercise And Bone Health Walking For Fitness No More Pain Healthy Eating Heart Healthy Eating Types Of Eating Disorders Help ...
more infohttp://www.surfinthespirit.com/healthy-living/supplements2.html
  • Based in the Department of Endocrinology, the Metabolic Bone Disease & Endocrine Calcium Center provides superior access to a multidisciplinary team, providing Center-of-Excellence DXA bone density testing and interpretation, on-site laboratory testing, and a fully staffed infusion center for even the most sophisticated testing and drug administration requirements. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • Dr. Skamagas is currently an Assistant Professor in the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Bone Disease. (mssm.edu)
  • In addition we will ask colleagues in other Endocrinology Departments (or other specialties such as Clinical Genetics,Pathology, General Medicine ) to identify potentially suitable patients with endocrine & pituitary tumours from their records. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • By mastering the principles involved in evaluating a child with a potential endocrine condition and developing a sound knowledge base of endocrinology, the pediatric resident will be prepared to perform well as a general pediatrician in the community after graduation. (slideshare.net)
  • This is a condition where a person's calcified bone is reabsorbed and then replaced by fibrous tissues. (blogspot.com)
  • McCune-Albright syndrome is suspected when two or more of the following features are present: Fibrous dysplasia Café au lait macules Hyperfunctioning endocrine disease Patients may have one or many of these features, which may occur in any combination. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute Pediatric Neurology provides an accessible, clinically focused guide to assist physicians in the emergency ward or intensive care unit in decisions on diagnosis and therapeutic interventions in all major acute pediatric neurological diseases. (stanford.edu)
  • Definitions of adherence, types of adherence, problems, and adherence rates -- Consequences of nonadherence and correlates of adherence -- Adherence theories: review, critique, and clinical implications -- Measurement issues: assessing adherence and disease and health outcomes -- Strategies for improving adherence to pediatric medical regimens -- Review of adherence intervention studies and top ten ways to advance research on adherence to pediatric medical regimens. (stanford.edu)
  • Goal: To acquire and demonstrate the fund of knowledge and practical skills necessary to manage common and complex pediatric endocrine conditions in infants, children, and adolescents. (slideshare.net)
  • Pituitary and other endocrine tumour samples will be collected at surgery and kept in liquid nitrogen or −80 C. They will be coded with unique ID numbers. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • It helps maintain normal muscle and nerve function, keeps heart rhythm steady, promotes energy metabolism and protein synthesis, supports the immune system, and keeps bones strong. (surfinthespirit.com)
  • Several of the biomarkers, such as blood pressure, LDL, and bone mineral density, do have known meaningful correlations with clinical outcomes. (surfinthespirit.com)
  • Often, physicians focus their practice on certain disease categories, treatment methods or patient types. (osu.edu)
  • Fairly absolute indications for surgery include moderate or severe eye disease in Graves' disease, large goiter with compressive symptoms, any suspicion of cancer, and pregnant patients or those wanting to become pregnant in the next one to two years. (providence.org)
  • At the opposite end of the spectrum, many children are entirely healthy, and have little or no outward evidence of bone or endocrine involvement. (doctors.am)
  • [ 3 ] In patients who receive numerous transfusions-notably those with thalassemia major , sickle cell disease , myelodysplastic syndrome , aplastic anemia , hemolytic anemia , and refractory sideroblastic anemias , who may become transfusion dependent-the excess iron from the transfused erythrocytes gradually accumulates in various tissues, causing morbidity and mortality. (medscape.com)
  • To describe the severity of sickle cell disease (SCD) in newborns in Belgium and evaluate the impact of neonatal screening (NS) on clinical outcome. (thalassaemia.org.cy)
  • Sickle cell disease is still associated with high morbidity and mortality but clinical care has improved and no death has occurred in the last 10 years. (thalassaemia.org.cy)
  • The most common of these are: Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Syndrome types 2A and 2B, von Hippel-Lindau Syndrome, Neurofibromatosis 1, Familial Paraganglioma Syndromes (SDH mutations). (providence.org)
  • To establish if the candidate gene is also causing possibly sporadic (not familial) cases of the disease, samples (blood and tissue) will be collected from patients with sporadic disease and will be analysed as above. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Our facilities allow our experts to perform specialized testing not found in most medical centers, and patients are provided access to a wide variety of therapies using the most up to date medications to diagnose and treat both common and rare bone diseases. (clevelandclinic.org)
  • She is also the principal investigator in a study looking at the prevalence of valvular heart disease in patients taking cabergoline to treat hyperprolactinemia. (mssm.edu)
  • We will recruit patients from our own Endocrine outpatient clinics and inpatient wards. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Two patients presenting homozygous hemoglobin S disease died due to septicemia due to non-compliance with antibiotic therapy in one case and severe anemia in one case. (thalassaemia.org.cy)
  • As such, the clinical presentation of patients with McCune Albright Syndrome varies greatly depending on the disease features. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, it represents the most common malignant endocrine neoplasia whose incidence has progressively increased over the past two decades, according to the majority of Tumors Registries. (hindawi.com)
  • 2. GOAL : Common Conditions Not Referred (Endocrine). (slideshare.net)
  • Inactivity and obesity are closely linked conditions accounting for a large burden of chronic disease and impaired function, indeed the popular press has called inactivity the "new cancer. (nih.gov)
  • Delayed puberty due to chronic disease or anorexia nervosa v. Exogenous obesity vi. (slideshare.net)
  • Endocrine and genetic causes of obesity viii. (slideshare.net)
  • Complicated feedback loops are involved in intricate regulation of virtually all body functions through the endocrine system. (slideshare.net)
  • Basu S, Kumar A. Hair-on-end appearance in radiograph of skull and facial bones in a case of beta thalassaemia. (medscape.com)
  • A computed tomography scan displayed a marked widening of the diploic space of the calvaria with lytic and sclerotic regions ( Figure , A and B), which is pathognomonic of advanced Paget disease affecting the skull. (mja.com.au)
  • It is a mosaic disease arising from somatic activating mutations in GNAS, which encodes the alpha-subunit of the Gs G-coupled protein receptor. (wikipedia.org)