Pulmonary Edema: Excessive accumulation of extravascular fluid in the lung, an indication of a serious underlying disease or disorder. Pulmonary edema prevents efficient PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE in the PULMONARY ALVEOLI, and can be life-threatening.Edema: Abnormal fluid accumulation in TISSUES or body cavities. Most cases of edema are present under the SKIN in SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE.Brain Edema: Increased intracellular or extracellular fluid in brain tissue. Cytotoxic brain edema (swelling due to increased intracellular fluid) is indicative of a disturbance in cell metabolism, and is commonly associated with hypoxic or ischemic injuries (see HYPOXIA, BRAIN). An increase in extracellular fluid may be caused by increased brain capillary permeability (vasogenic edema), an osmotic gradient, local blockages in interstitial fluid pathways, or by obstruction of CSF flow (e.g., obstructive HYDROCEPHALUS). (From Childs Nerv Syst 1992 Sep; 8(6):301-6)Altitude Sickness: Multiple symptoms associated with reduced oxygen at high ALTITUDE.Extravascular Lung Water: Water content outside of the lung vasculature. About 80% of a normal lung is made up of water, including intracellular, interstitial, and blood water. Failure to maintain the normal homeostatic fluid exchange between the vascular space and the interstitium of the lungs can result in PULMONARY EDEMA and flooding of the alveolar space.Blood-Air Barrier: The barrier between capillary blood and alveolar air comprising the alveolar EPITHELIUM and capillary ENDOTHELIUM with their adherent BASEMENT MEMBRANE and EPITHELIAL CELL cytoplasm. PULMONARY GAS EXCHANGE occurs across this membrane.Lung: Either of the pair of organs occupying the cavity of the thorax that effect the aeration of the blood.Pulmonary Circulation: The circulation of the BLOOD through the LUNGS.Capillary Permeability: The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.Edema, Cardiac: Abnormal fluid retention by the body due to impaired cardiac function or heart failure. It is usually characterized by increase in venous and capillary pressure, and swollen legs when standing. It is different from the generalized edema caused by renal dysfunction (NEPHROTIC SYNDROME).Pulmonary Alveoli: Small polyhedral outpouchings along the walls of the alveolar sacs, alveolar ducts and terminal bronchioles through the walls of which gas exchange between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood takes place.Laryngismus: A disorder in which the adductor muscles of the VOCAL CORDS exhibit increased activity leading to laryngeal spasm. Laryngismus causes closure of the VOCAL FOLDS and airflow obstruction during inspiration.SkatoleHydrostatic Pressure: The pressure due to the weight of fluid.Acute Lung Injury: A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).Mountaineering: A sport involving mountain climbing techniques.Scorpion Stings: The effects, both local and systemic, caused by the bite of SCORPIONS.Altitude: A vertical distance measured from a known level on the surface of a planet or other celestial body.Corneal Edema: An excessive amount of fluid in the cornea due to damage of the epithelium or endothelium causing decreased visual acuity.Radiography, Thoracic: X-ray visualization of the chest and organs of the thoracic cavity. It is not restricted to visualization of the lungs.Pulmonary Wedge Pressure: The blood pressure as recorded after wedging a CATHETER in a small PULMONARY ARTERY; believed to reflect the PRESSURE in the pulmonary CAPILLARIES.Fumonisins: A group of MYCOTOXINS found in CORN contaminated with FUSARIUM fungus. They are chains of about 20 carbons with acidic ester, acetylamino and sometimes other substituents. They inhibit ceramide synthetase conversion of SPHINGOLIPIDS to CERAMIDES.Explosive Agents: Substances that are energetically unstable and can produce a sudden expansion of the material, called an explosion, which is accompanied by heat, pressure and noise. Other things which have been described as explosive that are not included here are explosive action of laser heating, human performance, sudden epidemiological outbreaks, or fast cell growth.Body Water: Fluids composed mainly of water found within the body.Tocolysis: Any drug treatment modality designed to inhibit UTERINE CONTRACTION. It is used in pregnant women to arrest PREMATURE LABOR.Bombs: A weapon designed to explode when deployed. It frequently refers to a hollow case filled with EXPLOSIVE AGENTS.Ethchlorvynol: A sedative and hypnotic that has been used in the short-term management of INSOMNIA. Its use has been superseded by other drugs.Edema Disease of Swine: An acute disease of young pigs that is usually associated with weaning. It is characterized clinically by paresis and subcutaneous edema.Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Lung Injury: Damage to any compartment of the lung caused by physical, chemical, or biological agents which characteristically elicit inflammatory reaction. These inflammatory reactions can either be acute and dominated by NEUTROPHILS, or chronic and dominated by LYMPHOCYTES and MACROPHAGES.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Anoxia: Relatively complete absence of oxygen in one or more tissues.Tracheal DiseasesBronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid: Washing liquid obtained from irrigation of the lung, including the BRONCHI and the PULMONARY ALVEOLI. It is generally used to assess biochemical, inflammatory, or infection status of the lung.Burns, Inhalation: Burns of the respiratory tract caused by heat or inhaled chemicals.Respiratory Insufficiency: Failure to adequately provide oxygen to cells of the body and to remove excess carbon dioxide from them. (Stedman, 25th ed)Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Oleic Acids: A group of fatty acids that contain 18 carbon atoms and a double bond at the omega 9 carbon.Blood Gas Analysis: Measurement of oxygen and carbon dioxide in the blood.Pneumothorax: An accumulation of air or gas in the PLEURAL CAVITY, which may occur spontaneously or as a result of trauma or a pathological process. The gas may also be introduced deliberately during PNEUMOTHORAX, ARTIFICIAL.Positive-Pressure Respiration: A method of mechanical ventilation in which pressure is maintained to increase the volume of gas remaining in the lungs at the end of expiration, thus reducing the shunting of blood through the lungs and improving gas exchange.Laryngeal Edema: Abnormal accumulation of fluid in tissues of any part of the LARYNX, commonly associated with laryngeal injuries and allergic reactions.Hemoptysis: Expectoration or spitting of blood originating from any part of the RESPIRATORY TRACT, usually from hemorrhage in the lung parenchyma (PULMONARY ALVEOLI) and the BRONCHIAL ARTERIES.Peritoneovenous Shunt: An operation for the continuous emptying of ascitic fluid into the venous system. Fluid removal is based on intraperitoneal and intrathoracic superior vena cava pressure differentials and is performed via a pressure-sensitive one-way valve connected to a tube traversing the subcutaneous tissue of the chest wall to the neck where it enters the internal jugular vein and terminates in the superior vena cava. It is used in the treatment of intractable ascites.Mycotoxins: Toxic compounds produced by FUNGI.Body Fluids: Liquid components of living organisms.Thoracostomy: Surgical procedure involving the creation of an opening (stoma) into the chest cavity for drainage; used in the treatment of PLEURAL EFFUSION; PNEUMOTHORAX; HEMOTHORAX; and EMPYEMA.Diuretics: Agents that promote the excretion of urine through their effects on kidney function.Hypertension, Pulmonary: Increased VASCULAR RESISTANCE in the PULMONARY CIRCULATION, usually secondary to HEART DISEASES or LUNG DISEASES.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Noninvasive Ventilation: Techniques for administering artificial respiration without the need for INTRATRACHEAL INTUBATION.Pulmonary Gas Exchange: The exchange of OXYGEN and CARBON DIOXIDE between alveolar air and pulmonary capillary blood that occurs across the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Pulmonary Artery: The short wide vessel arising from the conus arteriosus of the right ventricle and conveying unaerated blood to the lungs.
  • In this study, we examined the contributions of hemodynamic and osmolarity factors, for which appropriate interventions are expected in critical care, to EVLW in patients with ALI/ARDS.Methods: We performed a subgroup analysis of a multicenter observational study of patients with acute pulmonary edema. (elsevier.com)
  • on behalf of the PiCCO Pulmonary Edema Study Group 2014, ' Global end-diastolic volume is an important contributor to increased extravascular lung water in patients with acute lung injury and acuterespiratory distress syndrome: A multicenter observational study ', Journal of Intensive Care , vol. 2, no. 1, 25. (elsevier.com)
  • A syndrome caused by inert gases coming out of solution in the body and forming bubbles in the tissues and the bloodstream during or after a sudden ascent from a compressed-gas dive. (diversalertnetwork.org)
  • Dogs that have edema as a result of a brain disorder, from a response to an electric cord bite injury, or from an upper airway obstruction might experience a systemic release of catecholamines (neurotransmitters and hormones). (petmd.com)
  • In anaphylaxis, an extra dose can help increase blood flow throughout your body and help reverse the immune system's aggressive response. (healthline.com)
  • Pulmonary Fibrosis - A Chronic disease where lungs become scarred and stiff. (trivita.com)
  • STUDY OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationship between pulmonary arterial systolic pressure (PASP) and submaximum capacity of exercise, using the six-minute walk test (6MWT) in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), and to investigate the relation between echocardiographic findings and results of 6MWT, clinical scores, chest radiograph scores and lung function tests. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Avoidance of excessive pre-swim hydration is advisable Nifedipine or sildenafil could theoretically be beneficial due to their ability to modify pulmonary artery pressure, but any use for SIPE is investigational and these agents are not approved for this use. (wikipedia.org)
  • Excessive fluid build-up in the lungs and/or other organs and body parts because of the inadequate pumping of the heart. (studystack.com)
  • where the blockages have been, all of the sudden see new, excessive blood flow, and they can develop some edema. (issuu.com)
  • Individuals with pulmonary edema may experience excessive sweating. (wisegeek.com)
  • In a healthy adult, nearly all fluid is contained in the intracellular, intravascular, or interstitial spaces, with the intracellular space holding about two-thirds of total body water. (nursingcenter.com)
  • Edema is a condition of abnormally large fluid volume in the circulatory system or in tissues between the body's cells (interstitial spaces). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Age frequency is bimodal, with individuals aged 1-3 years and those in the seventh decade of life at higher risk of foreign body aspiration. (medscape.com)
  • In some cases, an ankle edema may be the symptom of a much more serious condition, such as diabetes , gout , or pancreatitis. (wisegeek.com)
  • In the past five years, there is a growing body of published evidence on the feasibility, and oxygenation and lung protection benefits of high frequency oscillation (HFO) in the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Your liver breaks down toxins so your body can remove them. (webmd.com)
  • People consuming normal-appearing corn , peanuts , or grain have become critically ill and even died from acute aflatoxin poisoning, which can cause life-threatening hemorrhage, liver damage, pulmonary edema, convulsions and brain damage. (greenmedinfo.com)
  • Examination should also exclude other causes of gross edema-especially the cardiovascular and hepatic system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Measuring V/Q ratio is done via a test called a pulmonary ventilation/perfusion scan , which is performed in two separate parts. (verywellhealth.com)
  • Radiograph images of the thoracic (chest) cavity are essential for making a definitive diagnosis, and an echocardiogram may also be performed to rule out, or confirm, pulmonary (lung) edema caused by heart disease. (petmd.com)