Human Body: The human being as a non-anatomical and non-zoological entity. The emphasis is on the philosophical or artistic treatment of the human being, and includes lay and social attitudes toward the body in history. (From J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)Movement: The act, process, or result of passing from one place or position to another. It differs from LOCOMOTION in that locomotion is restricted to the passing of the whole body from one place to another, while movement encompasses both locomotion but also a change of the position of the whole body or any of its parts. Movement may be used with reference to humans, vertebrate and invertebrate animals, and microorganisms. Differentiate also from MOTOR ACTIVITY, movement associated with behavior.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Hand: The distal part of the arm beyond the wrist in humans and primates, that includes the palm, fingers, and thumb.Anomia: A language dysfunction characterized by the inability to name people and objects that are correctly perceived. The individual is able to describe the object in question, but cannot provide the name. This condition is associated with lesions of the dominant hemisphere involving the language areas, in particular the TEMPORAL LOBE. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p484)Motor Cortex: Area of the FRONTAL LOBE concerned with primary motor control located in the dorsal PRECENTRAL GYRUS immediately anterior to the central sulcus. It is comprised of three areas: the primary motor cortex located on the anterior paracentral lobule on the medial surface of the brain; the premotor cortex located anterior to the primary motor cortex; and the supplementary motor area located on the midline surface of the hemisphere anterior to the primary motor cortex.Touch: Sensation of making physical contact with objects, animate or inanimate. Tactile stimuli are detected by MECHANORECEPTORS in the skin and mucous membranes.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Body Image: Individuals' concept of their own bodies.Proprioception: Sensory functions that transduce stimuli received by proprioceptive receptors in joints, tendons, muscles, and the INNER EAR into neural impulses to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Proprioception provides sense of stationary positions and movements of one's body parts, and is important in maintaining KINESTHESIA and POSTURAL BALANCE.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Illusions: The misinterpretation of a real external, sensory experience.Arm: The superior part of the upper extremity between the SHOULDER and the ELBOW.Extremities: The farthest or outermost projections of the body, such as the HAND and FOOT.Head Movements: Voluntary or involuntary motion of head that may be relative to or independent of body; includes animals and humans.Imagination: A new pattern of perceptual or ideational material derived from past experience.Somatosensory Disorders: Disorders of sensory information received from superficial and deep regions of the body. The somatosensory system conveys neural impulses which pertain to proprioception, tactile sensation, thermal sensation, pressure sensation, and pain. PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; SPINAL CORD DISEASES; and BRAIN DISEASES may be associated with impaired or abnormal somatic sensation.Somatosensory Cortex: Area of the parietal lobe concerned with receiving sensations such as movement, pain, pressure, position, temperature, touch, and vibration. It lies posterior to the central sulcus.Movement Disorders: Syndromes which feature DYSKINESIAS as a cardinal manifestation of the disease process. Included in this category are degenerative, hereditary, post-infectious, medication-induced, post-inflammatory, and post-traumatic conditions.Touch Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of tactile stimuli are recognized and interpreted by the brain, such as realizing the characteristics or name of an object being touched.Planarians: Nonparasitic free-living flatworms of the class Turbellaria. The most common genera are Dugesia, formerly Planaria, which lives in water, and Bipalium, which lives on land. Geoplana occurs in South America and California.Dystonia: An attitude or posture due to the co-contraction of agonists and antagonist muscles in one region of the body. It most often affects the large axial muscles of the trunk and limb girdles. Conditions which feature persistent or recurrent episodes of dystonia as a primary manifestation of disease are referred to as DYSTONIC DISORDERS. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p77)Fingers: Four or five slender jointed digits in humans and primates, attached to each HAND.Perceptual Distortion: Lack of correspondence between the way a stimulus is commonly perceived and the way an individual perceives it under given conditions.Off-Road Motor Vehicles: Motorized, recreational vehicles used on non-public roads. They include all-terrain vehicles, dirt-bikes, minibikes, motorbikes, trailbikes, and snowmobiles. Excludes MOTORCYCLES, which are considered public road vehicles.Head: The upper part of the human body, or the front or upper part of the body of an animal, typically separated from the rest of the body by a neck, and containing the brain, mouth, and sense organs.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Regeneration: The physiological renewal, repair, or replacement of tissue.Posture: The position or attitude of the body.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Plant Viral Movement Proteins: Viral proteins that facilitate the movement of viruses between plant cells by means of PLASMODESMATA, channels that traverse the plant cell walls.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Foot: The distal extremity of the leg in vertebrates, consisting of the tarsus (ANKLE); METATARSUS; phalanges; and the soft tissues surrounding these bones.Thorax: The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Fetal Movement: Physical activity of the FETUS in utero. Gross or fine fetal body movement can be monitored by the mother, PALPATION, or ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Parietal Lobe: Upper central part of the cerebral hemisphere. It is located posterior to central sulcus, anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE, and superior to the TEMPORAL LOBES.Cell Movement: The movement of cells from one location to another. Distinguish from CYTOKINESIS which is the process of dividing the CYTOPLASM of a cell.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.Orientation: Awareness of oneself in relation to time, place and person.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Brain Damage, Chronic: A condition characterized by long-standing brain dysfunction or damage, usually of three months duration or longer. Potential etiologies include BRAIN INFARCTION; certain NEURODEGENERATIVE DISORDERS; CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA; ANOXIA, BRAIN; ENCEPHALITIS; certain NEUROTOXICITY SYNDROMES; metabolic disorders (see BRAIN DISEASES, METABOLIC); and other conditions.Space Perception: The awareness of the spatial properties of objects; includes physical space.Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Saccades: An abrupt voluntary shift in ocular fixation from one point to another, as occurs in reading.Body Patterning: The processes occurring in early development that direct morphogenesis. They specify the body plan ensuring that cells will proceed to differentiate, grow, and diversify in size and shape at the correct relative positions. Included are axial patterning, segmentation, compartment specification, limb position, organ boundary patterning, blood vessel patterning, etc.Accidents, Occupational: Unforeseen occurrences, especially injuries in the course of work-related activities.Image Processing, Computer-Assisted: A technique of inputting two-dimensional images into a computer and then enhancing or analyzing the imagery into a form that is more useful to the human observer.Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Temporal Lobe: Lower lateral part of the cerebral hemisphere responsible for auditory, olfactory, and semantic processing. It is located inferior to the lateral fissure and anterior to the OCCIPITAL LOBE.Vocabulary: The sum or the stock of words used by a language, a group, or an individual. (From Webster, 3d ed)Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Recognition (Psychology): The knowledge or perception that someone or something present has been previously encountered.Fixation, Ocular: The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.Athletic Injuries: Injuries incurred during participation in competitive or non-competitive sports.Eye Movement Measurements: Methods and procedures for recording EYE MOVEMENTS.Musculoskeletal Diseases: Diseases of the muscles and their associated ligaments and other connective tissue and of the bones and cartilage viewed collectively.Visual Cortex: Area of the OCCIPITAL LOBE concerned with the processing of visual information relayed via VISUAL PATHWAYS.Pursuit, Smooth: Eye movements that are slow, continuous, and conjugate and occur when a fixed object is moved slowly.Cerebral Cortex: The thin layer of GRAY MATTER on the surface of the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES that develops from the TELENCEPHALON and folds into gyri and sulchi. It reaches its highest development in humans and is responsible for intellectual faculties and higher mental functions.Larva: Wormlike or grublike stage, following the egg in the life cycle of insects, worms, and other metamorphosing animals.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Motor Skills: Performance of complex motor acts.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Drosophila: A genus of small, two-winged flies containing approximately 900 described species. These organisms are the most extensively studied of all genera from the standpoint of genetics and cytology.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Motion Perception: The real or apparent movement of objects through the visual field.Macaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Electrooculography: Recording of the average amplitude of the resting potential arising between the cornea and the retina in light and dark adaptation as the eyes turn a standard distance to the right and the left. The increase in potential with light adaptation is used to evaluate the condition of the retinal pigment epithelium.Sleep, REM: A stage of sleep characterized by rapid movements of the eye and low voltage fast pattern EEG. It is usually associated with dreaming.Homeodomain Proteins: Proteins encoded by homeobox genes (GENES, HOMEOBOX) that exhibit structural similarity to certain prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA-binding proteins. Homeodomain proteins are involved in the control of gene expression during morphogenesis and development (GENE EXPRESSION REGULATION, DEVELOPMENTAL).Feedback, Sensory: A mechanism of communicating one's own sensory system information about a task, movement or skill.Volition: Voluntary activity without external compulsion.Kinesthesis: Sense of movement of a part of the body, such as movement of fingers, elbows, knees, limbs, or weights.Locomotion: Movement or the ability to move from one place or another. It can refer to humans, vertebrate or invertebrate animals, and microorganisms.Wrist: The region of the upper limb between the metacarpus and the FOREARM.Reflex, Vestibulo-Ocular: A reflex wherein impulses are conveyed from the cupulas of the SEMICIRCULAR CANALS and from the OTOLITHIC MEMBRANE of the SACCULE AND UTRICLE via the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM and the median longitudinal fasciculus to the OCULOMOTOR NERVE nuclei. It functions to maintain a stable retinal image during head rotation by generating appropriate compensatory EYE MOVEMENTS.Dyskinesias: Abnormal involuntary movements which primarily affect the extremities, trunk, or jaw that occur as a manifestation of an underlying disease process. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent episodes of dyskinesia as a primary manifestation of disease may be referred to as dyskinesia syndromes (see MOVEMENT DISORDERS). Dyskinesias are also a relatively common manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES.Muscle, Skeletal: A subtype of striated muscle, attached by TENDONS to the SKELETON. Skeletal muscles are innervated and their movement can be consciously controlled. They are also called voluntary muscles.Motion: Physical motion, i.e., a change in position of a body or subject as a result of an external force. It is distinguished from MOVEMENT, a process resulting from biological activity.Neurons: The basic cellular units of nervous tissue. Each neuron consists of a body, an axon, and dendrites. Their purpose is to receive, conduct, and transmit impulses in the NERVOUS SYSTEM.Nocturnal Myoclonus Syndrome: Excessive periodic leg movements during sleep that cause micro-arousals and interfere with the maintenance of sleep. This condition induces a state of relative sleep deprivation which manifests as excessive daytime hypersomnolence. The movements are characterized by repetitive contractions of the tibialis anterior muscle, extension of the toe, and intermittent flexion of the hip, knee and ankle. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p387)Acceleration: An increase in the rate of speed.Task Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Elbow Joint: A hinge joint connecting the FOREARM to the ARM.Muscle Contraction: A process leading to shortening and/or development of tension in muscle tissue. Muscle contraction occurs by a sliding filament mechanism whereby actin filaments slide inward among the myosin filaments.Microtubules: Slender, cylindrical filaments found in the cytoskeleton of plant and animal cells. They are composed of the protein TUBULIN and are influenced by TUBULIN MODULATORS.Robotics: The application of electronic, computerized control systems to mechanical devices designed to perform human functions. Formerly restricted to industry, but nowadays applied to artificial organs controlled by bionic (bioelectronic) devices, like automated insulin pumps and other prostheses.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Air Movements: The motion of air currents.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Sleep Stages: Periods of sleep manifested by changes in EEG activity and certain behavioral correlates; includes Stage 1: sleep onset, drowsy sleep; Stage 2: light sleep; Stages 3 and 4: delta sleep, light sleep, deep sleep, telencephalic sleep.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.United StatesElectric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Kinesis: Locomotor behavior not involving a steering reaction, but in which there may be a turning random in direction. It includes orthokinesis, the rate of movement and klinokinesis, the amount of turning, which are related to the intensity of stimulation.Oculomotor Muscles: The muscles that move the eye. Included in this group are the medial rectus, lateral rectus, superior rectus, inferior rectus, inferior oblique, superior oblique, musculus orbitalis, and levator palpebrae superioris.Models, Neurological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of the neurological system, processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Ocular Motility Disorders: Disorders that feature impairment of eye movements as a primary manifestation of disease. These conditions may be divided into infranuclear, nuclear, and supranuclear disorders. Diseases of the eye muscles or oculomotor cranial nerves (III, IV, and VI) are considered infranuclear. Nuclear disorders are caused by disease of the oculomotor, trochlear, or abducens nuclei in the BRAIN STEM. Supranuclear disorders are produced by dysfunction of higher order sensory and motor systems that control eye movements, including neural networks in the CEREBRAL CORTEX; BASAL GANGLIA; CEREBELLUM; and BRAIN STEM. Ocular torticollis refers to a head tilt that is caused by an ocular misalignment. Opsoclonus refers to rapid, conjugate oscillations of the eyes in multiple directions, which may occur as a parainfectious or paraneoplastic condition (e.g., OPSOCLONUS-MYOCLONUS SYNDROME). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p240)Forelimb: A front limb of a quadruped. (The Random House College Dictionary, 1980)Tobacco: A plant genus of the family SOLANACEAE. Members contain NICOTINE and other biologically active chemicals; its dried leaves are used for SMOKING.Jaw: Bony structure of the mouth that holds the teeth. It consists of the MANDIBLE and the MAXILLA.Parkinson Disease: A progressive, degenerative neurologic disease characterized by a TREMOR that is maximal at rest, retropulsion (i.e. a tendency to fall backwards), rigidity, stooped posture, slowness of voluntary movements, and a masklike facial expression. Pathologic features include loss of melanin containing neurons in the substantia nigra and other pigmented nuclei of the brainstem. LEWY BODIES are present in the substantia nigra and locus coeruleus but may also be found in a related condition (LEWY BODY DISEASE, DIFFUSE) characterized by dementia in combination with varying degrees of parkinsonism. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1059, pp1067-75)Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Hand Strength: Force exerted when gripping or grasping.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Biological Transport: The movement of materials (including biochemical substances and drugs) through a biological system at the cellular level. The transport can be across cell membranes and epithelial layers. It also can occur within intracellular compartments and extracellular compartments.Animal Migration: Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.Motor Neurons: Neurons which activate MUSCLE CELLS.Elbow: Region of the body immediately surrounding and including the ELBOW JOINT.Nystagmus, Optokinetic: Normal nystagmus produced by looking at objects moving across the field of vision.Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.Action Potentials: Abrupt changes in the membrane potential that sweep along the CELL MEMBRANE of excitable cells in response to excitation stimuli.Torque: The rotational force about an axis that is equal to the product of a force times the distance from the axis where the force is applied.Wakefulness: A state in which there is an enhanced potential for sensitivity and an efficient responsiveness to external stimuli.Paresis: A general term referring to a mild to moderate degree of muscular weakness, occasionally used as a synonym for PARALYSIS (severe or complete loss of motor function). In the older literature, paresis often referred specifically to paretic neurosyphilis (see NEUROSYPHILIS). "General paresis" and "general paralysis" may still carry that connotation. Bilateral lower extremity paresis is referred to as PARAPARESIS.Vestibule, Labyrinth: An oval, bony chamber of the inner ear, part of the bony labyrinth. It is continuous with bony COCHLEA anteriorly, and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS posteriorly. The vestibule contains two communicating sacs (utricle and saccule) of the balancing apparatus. The oval window on its lateral wall is occupied by the base of the STAPES of the MIDDLE EAR.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Joints: Also known as articulations, these are points of connection between the ends of certain separate bones, or where the borders of other bones are juxtaposed.Muscles: Contractile tissue that produces movement in animals.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Facial Muscles: Muscles of facial expression or mimetic muscles that include the numerous muscles supplied by the facial nerve that are attached to and move the skin of the face. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Chorea: Involuntary, forcible, rapid, jerky movements that may be subtle or become confluent, markedly altering normal patterns of movement. Hypotonia and pendular reflexes are often associated. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent episodes of chorea as a primary manifestation of disease are referred to as CHOREATIC DISORDERS. Chorea is also a frequent manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES.Actins: Filamentous proteins that are the main constituent of the thin filaments of muscle fibers. The filaments (known also as filamentous or F-actin) can be dissociated into their globular subunits; each subunit is composed of a single polypeptide 375 amino acids long. This is known as globular or G-actin. In conjunction with MYOSINS, actin is responsible for the contraction and relaxation of muscle.Exercise Movement Techniques: Methods or programs of physical activities which can be used to promote, maintain, or restore the physical and physiological well-being of an individual.Upper Extremity: The region of the upper limb in animals, extending from the deltoid region to the HAND, and including the ARM; AXILLA; and SHOULDER.Cytoplasmic Streaming: The movement of CYTOPLASM within a CELL. It serves as an internal transport system for moving essential substances throughout the cell, and in single-celled organisms, such as the AMOEBA, it is responsible for the movement (CELL MOVEMENT) of the entire cell.Plasmodesmata: Membrane-like channels of cytoplasm connecting adjacent plant cells. Plasmodesmata connect through pores in the CELL WALL and associate with the CYTOSKELETON machinery. They are essential for intercellular transport and communication.Gastrulation: A process of complicated morphogenetic cell movements that reorganizes a bilayer embryo into one with three GERM LAYERS and specific orientation (dorsal/ventral; anterior/posterior). Gastrulation describes the germ layer development of a non-mammalian BLASTULA or that of a mammalian BLASTOCYST.Thumb: The first digit on the radial side of the hand which in humans lies opposite the other four.Attention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Periodicity: The tendency of a phenomenon to recur at regular intervals; in biological systems, the recurrence of certain activities (including hormonal, cellular, neural) may be annual, seasonal, monthly, daily, or more frequently (ultradian).Sleep: A readily reversible suspension of sensorimotor interaction with the environment, usually associated with recumbency and immobility.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Nystagmus, Physiologic: Involuntary rhythmical movements of the eyes in the normal person. These can be naturally occurring as in end-position (end-point, end-stage, or deviational) nystagmus or induced by the optokinetic drum (NYSTAGMUS, OPTOKINETIC), caloric test, or a rotating chair.Gastrula: The developmental stage that follows BLASTULA or BLASTOCYST. It is characterized by the morphogenetic cell movements including invagination, ingression, and involution. Gastrulation begins with the formation of the PRIMITIVE STREAK, and ends with the formation of three GERM LAYERS, the body plan of the mature organism.Green Fluorescent Proteins: Protein analogs and derivatives of the Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein that emit light (FLUORESCENCE) when excited with ULTRAVIOLET RAYS. They are used in REPORTER GENES in doing GENETIC TECHNIQUES. Numerous mutants have been made to emit other colors or be sensitive to pH.Postural Balance: A POSTURE in which an ideal body mass distribution is achieved. Postural balance provides the body carriage stability and conditions for normal functions in stationary position or in movement, such as sitting, standing, or walking.Dyskinesia, Drug-Induced: Abnormal movements, including HYPERKINESIS; HYPOKINESIA; TREMOR; and DYSTONIA, associated with the use of certain medications or drugs. Muscles of the face, trunk, neck, and extremities are most commonly affected. Tardive dyskinesia refers to abnormal hyperkinetic movements of the muscles of the face, tongue, and neck associated with the use of neuroleptic agents (see ANTIPSYCHOTIC AGENTS). (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1199)Water Movements: The flow of water in enviromental bodies of water such as rivers, oceans, water supplies, aquariums, etc. It includes currents, tides, and waves.Superior Colliculi: The anterior pair of the quadrigeminal bodies which coordinate the general behavioral orienting responses to visual stimuli, such as whole-body turning, and reaching.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cats: The domestic cat, Felis catus, of the carnivore family FELIDAE, comprising over 30 different breeds. The domestic cat is descended primarily from the wild cat of Africa and extreme southwestern Asia. Though probably present in towns in Palestine as long ago as 7000 years, actual domestication occurred in Egypt about 4000 years ago. (From Walker's Mammals of the World, 6th ed, p801)Macaca: A genus of the subfamily CERCOPITHECINAE, family CERCOPITHECIDAE, consisting of 16 species inhabiting forests of Africa, Asia, and the islands of Borneo, Philippines, and Celebes.Vision, Binocular: The blending of separate images seen by each eye into one composite image.Efferent Pathways: Nerve structures through which impulses are conducted from a nerve center toward a peripheral site. Such impulses are conducted via efferent neurons (NEURONS, EFFERENT), such as MOTOR NEURONS, autonomic neurons, and hypophyseal neurons.Motion Pictures as Topic: The art, technique, or business of producing motion pictures for entertainment, propaganda, or instruction.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Tremor: Cyclical movement of a body part that can represent either a physiologic process or a manifestation of disease. Intention or action tremor, a common manifestation of CEREBELLAR DISEASES, is aggravated by movement. In contrast, resting tremor is maximal when there is no attempt at voluntary movement, and occurs as a relatively frequent manifestation of PARKINSON DISEASE.Mastication: The act and process of chewing and grinding food in the mouth.Lip: Either of the two fleshy, full-blooded margins of the mouth.Electrophysiology: The study of the generation and behavior of electrical charges in living organisms particularly the nervous system and the effects of electricity on living organisms.Gravitation: Acceleration produced by the mutual attraction of two masses, and of magnitude inversely proportional to the square of the distance between the two centers of mass. It is also the force imparted by the earth, moon, or a planet to an object near its surface. (From NASA Thesaurus, 1988)Hemiplegia: Severe or complete loss of motor function on one side of the body. This condition is usually caused by BRAIN DISEASES that are localized to the cerebral hemisphere opposite to the side of weakness. Less frequently, BRAIN STEM lesions; cervical SPINAL CORD DISEASES; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; and other conditions may manifest as hemiplegia. The term hemiparesis (see PARESIS) refers to mild to moderate weakness involving one side of the body.Neck Muscles: The neck muscles consist of the platysma, splenius cervicis, sternocleidomastoid(eus), longus colli, the anterior, medius, and posterior scalenes, digastric(us), stylohyoid(eus), mylohyoid(eus), geniohyoid(eus), sternohyoid(eus), omohyoid(eus), sternothyroid(eus), and thyrohyoid(eus).Electrodes, Implanted: Surgically placed electric conductors through which ELECTRIC STIMULATION is delivered to or electrical activity is recorded from a specific point inside the body.Plant Leaves: Expanded structures, usually green, of vascular plants, characteristically consisting of a bladelike expansion attached to a stem, and functioning as the principal organ of photosynthesis and transpiration. (American Heritage Dictionary, 2d ed)Microscopy, Video: Microscopy in which television cameras are used to brighten magnified images that are otherwise too dark to be seen with the naked eye. It is used frequently in TELEPATHOLOGY.Oculomotor Nerve: The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.Dystonic Disorders: Acquired and inherited conditions that feature DYSTONIA as a primary manifestation of disease. These disorders are generally divided into generalized dystonias (e.g., dystonia musculorum deformans) and focal dystonias (e.g., writer's cramp). They are also classified by patterns of inheritance and by age of onset.Visual Fields: The total area or space visible in a person's peripheral vision with the eye looking straightforward.Neural Pathways: Neural tracts connecting one part of the nervous system with another.Vision, Ocular: The process in which light signals are transformed by the PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS into electrical signals which can then be transmitted to the brain.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Cerebellum: The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.Basal Ganglia: Large subcortical nuclear masses derived from the telencephalon and located in the basal regions of the cerebral hemispheres.Luminescent Proteins: Proteins which are involved in the phenomenon of light emission in living systems. Included are the "enzymatic" and "non-enzymatic" types of system with or without the presence of oxygen or co-factors.Tongue: A muscular organ in the mouth that is covered with pink tissue called mucosa, tiny bumps called papillae, and thousands of taste buds. The tongue is anchored to the mouth and is vital for chewing, swallowing, and for speech.Abducens Nerve: The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.Reflex, Stretch: Reflex contraction of a muscle in response to stretching, which stimulates muscle proprioceptors.Dyneins: A family of multisubunit cytoskeletal motor proteins that use the energy of ATP hydrolysis to power a variety of cellular functions. Dyneins fall into two major classes based upon structural and functional criteria.Macaca fascicularis: A species of the genus MACACA which typically lives near the coast in tidal creeks and mangrove swamps primarily on the islands of the Malay peninsula.Polysomnography: Simultaneous and continuous monitoring of several parameters during sleep to study normal and abnormal sleep. The study includes monitoring of brain waves, to assess sleep stages, and other physiological variables such as breathing, eye movements, and blood oxygen levels which exhibit a disrupted pattern with sleep disturbances.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Pyramidal Tracts: Fibers that arise from cells within the cerebral cortex, pass through the medullary pyramid, and descend in the spinal cord. Many authorities say the pyramidal tracts include both the corticospinal and corticobulbar tracts.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Plants, Toxic: Plants or plant parts which are harmful to man or other animals.Potexvirus: A genus of plant viruses in the family FLEXIVIRIDAE, that cause mosaic and ringspot symptoms. Transmission occurs mechanically. Potato virus X is the type species.Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Morphogenesis: The development of anatomical structures to create the form of a single- or multi-cell organism. Morphogenesis provides form changes of a part, parts, or the whole organism.Hypokinesia: Slow or diminished movement of body musculature. It may be associated with BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES; MENTAL DISORDERS; prolonged inactivity due to illness; and other conditions.Blinking: Brief closing of the eyelids by involuntary normal periodic closing, as a protective measure, or by voluntary action.Pons: The front part of the hindbrain (RHOMBENCEPHALON) that lies between the MEDULLA and the midbrain (MESENCEPHALON) ventral to the cerebellum. It is composed of two parts, the dorsal and the ventral. The pons serves as a relay station for neural pathways between the CEREBELLUM to the CEREBRUM.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Swimming: An activity in which the body is propelled through water by specific movement of the arms and/or the legs. Swimming as propulsion through water by the movement of limbs, tail, or fins of animals is often studied as a form of PHYSICAL EXERTION or endurance.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Psychophysics: The science dealing with the correlation of the physical characteristics of a stimulus, e.g., frequency or intensity, with the response to the stimulus, in order to assess the psychologic factors involved in the relationship.Alveolar Process: The thickest and spongiest part of the maxilla and mandible hollowed out into deep cavities for the teeth.Apraxias: A group of cognitive disorders characterized by the inability to perform previously learned skills that cannot be attributed to deficits of motor or sensory function. The two major subtypes of this condition are ideomotor (see APRAXIA, IDEOMOTOR) and ideational apraxia, which refers to loss of the ability to mentally formulate the processes involved with performing an action. For example, dressing apraxia may result from an inability to mentally formulate the act of placing clothes on the body. Apraxias are generally associated with lesions of the dominant PARIETAL LOBE and supramarginal gyrus. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp56-7)Muscle Spindles: Skeletal muscle structures that function as the MECHANORECEPTORS responsible for the stretch or myotactic reflex (REFLEX, STRETCH). They are composed of a bundle of encapsulated SKELETAL MUSCLE FIBERS, i.e., the intrafusal fibers (nuclear bag 1 fibers, nuclear bag 2 fibers, and nuclear chain fibers) innervated by SENSORY NEURONS.Eyelids: Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.Athetosis: A dyskinesia characterized by an inability to maintain the fingers, toes, tongue, or other body parts in a stable position, resulting in continuous slow, sinusoidal, and flowing involuntary movements. This condition is frequently accompanied by CHOREA, where it is referred to as choreoathetosis. Athetosis may occur as a manifestation of BASAL GANGLIA DISEASES or DRUG TOXICITY. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p76)
Kromak - able to graft body parts together. Mekt Ranzz - Team leader. Generates electricity. Micro Lass - giant who shrinks ... Polar Boy - slows molecular movement. Telekinesis - telekinetic. Thoom - super-strength. Vrax Gozzl - Coluan who possesses a ... The two teams parted as friends. The Wanderers then reappeared as guests at Duo Damsel and Bouncing Boy's wedding, and also ... with quills coming out of his body and out of his hand like talons instead of his simply using them as weapons. Elvar (formerly ...
The movement of different parts of your body. Perceptual ability to see and understand logic systems as an arrangement of ... repeating a movement occurring outside one's body. Psychological or narrative content ascribed to movement. Movement of your ... realistic/non-realistic) Repetition - a) Internal: repeating a movement done with one's own body, and b) External: ... Viewpoints is part of the post-modern tradition, in that there is no hierarchy in the different elements that make "theatre." ...
Joints are responsible for the movement of body parts. It is a condition that can be experienced all over the body or in a ... The one part of the body that is most affected by arthritis is the knee and it can suffer from both rheumatoid or ... feeling of cracking or popping with movement of the joint), restricted movement and bony enlargement were found to be the most ... After attacking the smaller joints of the body, RA often progresses into larger joints, such as the shoulders, elbows, hips, ...
Dancing involve swaying body movements and footwork. Among the Khoisans extensive use of string instruments with emphasis on ... Dance involves moving multiple body parts. These aspects of Sub-Saharan music were transferred to the new world by enslaved Sub ... Nilo-Saharan in parts of the Sahara and the Sahel and parts of Eastern Africa, and Khoisan (indigenous minorities of Southern ... In some parts of the continent, the traditional diet features a preponderance of milk, curd and whey products. In much of ...
Rocking the body in parts or as a whole. Fragmentation: Breaking down movement into smaller and smaller parts, or "micromotions ... Basic components include: Rocking array: Rocking the body with focus on specific body parts. Sand tracings: executed from a ... ". Undulation Ornamental movement: Drawing curves with the body, in part or whole. Fascia awareness: Attention to the ... Gesture: Hands are most commonly used in gesturing, but the whole body or parts of it can create gestures. Deep state motion: " ...
Dancing involve swaying body movements and footwork. Among the San is extensive use of string instruments with emphasis on ... Dance involves moving multiple body parts. These aspect of Sub-Saharan music has been transferred to the new world by enslaved ... English Depending on classification Sudan is often not considered part of Sub-Saharan Africa, as it is considered part of North ... Countries that include parts of the Sahara Desert proper in their northern territories and parts of the Sahel in their southern ...
The focus and weight shifting moves through various parts of the body; poly-centric. Rhythmic movement. Not just a single ... An asymmetry and polyphonic look/feel to the body, characterized by an equality of body parts. No limb or part has precedence, ... It satisfied a Harlem need for a slower, fluid, but highly rhythmic dance with expressive body movements which could not be ... An athletic and grounded body posture and movement, characterized by the weight being held on the balls of the feet, the knees ...
"Inter-locking of body parts". pp 46-50. Woiwod, I.P.; Reynolds, D.R.; Thomas, C.D. (Eds) 2001. Insect Movement: Mechanisms and ... A wing has three velocity scales: the flapping velocity with respect to the body (u), the forward velocity of the body (U0), ... Another interesting feature of insect flight is the body tilt. As flight speed increases, the insect body tends to tilt nose- ... Since the up movements and the down movements of the wings are about equal in duration, the period T for a complete up-and-down ...
Gestures include movement of the hands, face, or other parts of the body. Physical non-verbal communication such as purely ... This sign began to be used during World War II to indicate "V for Victory". In the 1960s, the hippie-movement began to use the ... Sign of the Cross, used in many Christianity rituals, consists of drawing the shape of a cross over one's body or in the air. ... This gesture has the thumb leaning against the thumb-side portion of the index finger, which is part of a closed fist, or ...
Freedom of Movement. 2. Absence of pressure over any part of the body. 3. Not more weight than is necessary for warmth, and ... "Women on the Move: Cycling and the Rational Dress Movement". Cyclling History. Retrieved 1 January 2018. Upfold, Tony. "Since ...
2. Absence of pressure over any part of the body. 3. Not more weight than is necessary for warmth, and both weight and warmth ... impedes the movements of the body, or in any way tends to injure the health. It protests against the wearing of tightly-fitting ... In the catalogue of its inaugural exhibition, it listed the attributes of "perfect" dress as: 1. Freedom of Movement. ... as part of a belief that cycling offered women an opportunity to escape overly restrictive societal norms. In 1889, a member of ...
3. Awkward Movements. Movement roles are assigned to the body parts best able to perform them, thereby eliminating awkward ... No single body part will perform all labor. Instead, labor will be divided between all the body parts most able to perform it. ... Correct alignment of body parts is maintained under all conditions. Not only does this allow body parts to move within their ... All body parts will move within the mid-range of motion of the joint articulation from which they depend. Conversely, movements ...
However, Chartists and Owenites were "many parts but one body" in this initial stage. Robert Dale Owen emigrated to the United ... Owenism aimed for radical reform of society and is considered a forerunner of the cooperative movement. The Owenite movement ... many parts but one body". Labour History Review. 65 (1): 2-21. Wilentz, Sean (1984). Chants Democratic: New York City and the ... now envisioned as part of a broader Reform Movement). Between 1829 and 1835, Owenite socialism was politicized through two ...
It also controls movement as the speed increases while stretching parts of the body. This form of stretching prepares the body ... These movements should only be performed when the body is very warm; otherwise they can lead to injury. Each individual is born ... Movement demands include strength, endurance and range of motion. Training oversights occurs when the body is overused. ... As previously mentioned, each part of the body has its own limitations and combined, the range of motion can be affected. The ...
... or flexions of the affected body part. These occur during sleep (PLMS = periodic limb movement while sleeping) or while awake ( ... The sensation and the urge can occur in any body part; the most cited location is legs, followed by arms. Some people have ... The ferritin level, a measure of the body's iron stores, should be at least 50 µg/L (or ng/mL, an equivalent unit) for those ... Specific movements may be unique to each person. "Worsening of symptoms by relaxation." Sitting or lying down (reading, plane ...
The visible part of the body is red with cream markings. The foot of this mollusk is atrophied and it has lost its function of ... movement. This species can be found in the Mediterranean Sea - Eastern Basin and in the North Atlantic Ocean - European waters ...
... a sense of the position and movement of the parts of one's own body). Interoceptive senses are senses that perceive sensations ... provides the parietal cortex of the brain with information on the movement and relative positions of the parts of the body. ... Balance, equilibrioception, or vestibular sense is the sense that allows an organism to sense body movement, direction, and ... heat at wavelengths between 5 and 30 μm to a degree of accuracy such that a blind rattlesnake can target vulnerable body parts ...
... of the body. General Dystonia - affects most or all of the body. Focal Dystonia - localized to a specific part of the body. ... This is the part of the brain that controls coordination and movement ("Movement Disorders"). Symptoms of Parkinson's disease ... localized to two or more adjacent parts of the body. Hemidystonia - Involves the arm and leg on the same side of the body. Body ... Twitches or jerks of body parts may occur due to a startling sound or unexpected, sudden pain. Spasms and contractions are ...
As such, fighter's body parts could be switched and customized. The character models were designed to look like the action- ... Fighters are controlled by mouse movements, mouse buttons and the scroll wheel. Characters in the game were apparently action- ... Players were able to purchase extra body parts and outfits, to further customize their characters. Some purchasable items were ...
Sense of body parts and movement. Other. *Sensory receptor. *Multisensory integration. *Sensory processing ... For instance, the part of the world an eye can see, is its receptive field; the light that each rod or cone can see, is its ... and the sensations of muscle movement and joint position including posture, movement, and facial expression (collectively also ... The sensory nervous system is a part of the nervous system responsible for processing sensory information. A sensory system ...
Sense of body parts and movement. Other. *Sensory receptor. *Multisensory integration. *Sensory processing ... The olfactory system, or sense of smell, is the part of the sensory system used for smelling (olfaction). Most mammals and ...
Receptors in the muscles and joints are used to determine where parts of the body are located in space ... Difficulties with planning movement using feedback information. *Difficulties with planning movement using feedforward ... Damage in any part of the brain involved in multisensory processing can cause difficulties to adequately process stimuli in a ... Sensory processing disorder is characterized by significant problems in organizing sensation coming from the body and the ...
BA3a is involved with the sense of relative position of neighboring body parts and amount of effort being used during movement ... The first neuron always has its cell body in the dorsal root ganglion of the spinal nerve (if sensation is in parts of the head ... The somatosensory system is spread through all major parts of the vertebrate body. It consists both of sensory receptors and ... Proske U, Gandevia SC (October 2012). "The proprioceptive senses: their roles in signaling body shape, body position and ...
Schechter states that the symptoms have a tendency to move to other parts of the body. He considers symptom movement an ... John Sarno, Part I: Back Pain Is a State of Mind". Medscape Orthopaedics & Sports Medicine. Retrieved 2007-09-14. McGrath, Mike ... Schechter D, Smith AP, Beck J, Roach J, Karim R, Azen S (2007). "Outcomes of a Mind-Body Treatment Program for Chronic Back ... Sarno's protocol for treatment of TMS is used by the Harvard RSI Action Group, a student volunteer organization, as part of ...
The stage movements is part of a composite movement of the whole body. Chali or Chari is the basic dance movement in Manipuri ... The dance features rounded soft sensuous movements of women, and occasional fast movements by male characters. Unlike other ... The upper body is dressed in a velvet blouse, the head covered in a white translucent veil, to symbolically mark elusiveness. ... It is known as Pung cholom, and the dancer plays the drum and performs the dance jumps and other movements. Another dance ...
... movement emerged in New York and Chicago in the 1880s and again on a broader scale as part of the Modern School Movement during ... the leadership's view that public education should be secular and Socialist Sunday Schools were for purely educational bodies ... a b c Patti McGill Peterson, The Young Socialist Movement in America from 1905 to 1940: A Study of the Young People's Socialist ... a b c Christiane Harzig, "The Role of German Women in the German-American Working-Class Movement in Late Nineteenth-Century New ...
These movements are called chorea. Sometimes the chorea only involves one side of the body. ... Sydenhams chorea is part of a wider group of inflammatory responses called rheumatic fever, that may involve other parts of ... A movement disorder comes on over a period of hours to days with uncoordinated jerking movements in the arms, hands, legs, feet ... Some children go on to develop a different kind of movement problem - they may make movements or sounds that they cannot ...
Mine is a Paganism of the Body, Part III: Movement. Over the years Ive learned that most of the time when someone in the pagan ... A body is made for movement-in strict evolutionary terms, the body is the vehicle for DNA to replicate, both within itself ( ... And once I recognized the power of my bodys movement, it gave me a sense of agency in more immediate ways. I am more aware of ... More recently as Ive returned to the gym for treadmills and weightlifting, my bodys movement has become even more paramount. ...
Inhibiting use or movement of specific body part other than tail by re- straint carried solely by animal (e.g., for ear, head, ...
The birther movement wants another weigh-in. Many are also dubious of President Trumps new official height of 63, which is ... California Wildfire Becomes Deadliest Ever With 29 Victims; Body Parts Carried Out in Buckets. News18 ... Yes, while this movement is a standalone conspiracy, the name is strikingly similar to that of the longstanding, Trump-fueled ... Basically, the girther movement suggests that Jacksons report is false, specifically regarding Trumps height and weight. ...
Essentially, you are creating a body that is a compilation of body parts, instead of a powerful, functional unit that works ... body parts via single-joint exercises to the much more effective strategy of performing multi-joint complex movements. ... and excess body fat, then by all means, continue trying to isolate body parts. On the other hand, if you would rather have a ... large portions of the body assist other portions of the body in completing a complex movement. In fact, there really is no such ...
Part Two Support and Movement. 6 The Integumentary System 7 Bone Tissue 8 The Skeletal System 9 Joints 10 The Muscular System ... Part One Organization of the Body. 1 Major Themes of Anatomy and Physiology ATLAS A General Orientation to HumanAnatomy 2 The ... Part Three Integration and Control. 12 Nervous Tissue 13 The Spinal Cord, Spinal Nerves, and SomaticReflexes 14 The Brain and ... Part Four Regulation and Maintenance. 18 The Circulatory System: Blood 19 The Circulatory System: Heart 20 The Circulatory ...
... body-part splits rob us of growth. Heres what to do instead. ... and bodyweight to improve movement quality, strength, and body ... Body-Part Splits Are For Newbs and Drug Users. Body-part split routines are a rite of passage for just about every lifter. You ... Training one body part per day is outdated, and full-body workouts dont always cut it. Push-pull-legs is superior for any goal ... Body-Part Splits Are Dead. Five Reasons Your Workout Plan is Holding You Back. by Andy Van Grinsven , 04/21/17 ...
Language/Communication - Uses 2-4 word sentences; knows names of body parts ... Movement/Physical Development:. This domain is about how children use their bodies. It includes many milestones parents ...
Sense of body parts and movement. Other. *Sensory receptor. *Multisensory integration. *Sensory processing ... For instance, the part of the world an eye can see, is its receptive field; the light that each rod or cone can see, is its ... and the sensations of muscle movement and joint position including posture, movement, and facial expression (collectively also ... The sensory nervous system is a part of the nervous system responsible for processing sensory information. A sensory system ...
Sense of body parts and movement. Other. *Sensory receptor. *Multisensory integration. *Sensory processing ... The olfactory system, or sense of smell, is the part of the sensory system used for smelling (olfaction). Most mammals and ...
But the autoimmune condition can cause other warning signs in different parts of the body. These are the uncommon symptoms to ... While it can cause joint pain or restricted movement, these are some less common signs to watch out for. ... But the autoimmune condition can cause other warning signs in different parts of the body. These are the uncommon symptoms to ... "Essentially, your body uses or destroys platelets faster than theyre produced, which can cause you to bruise more easily." ...
Kromak - able to graft body parts together. Mekt Ranzz - Team leader. Generates electricity. Micro Lass - giant who shrinks ... Polar Boy - slows molecular movement. Telekinesis - telekinetic. Thoom - super-strength. Vrax Gozzl - Coluan who possesses a ... The two teams parted as friends. The Wanderers then reappeared as guests at Duo Damsel and Bouncing Boys wedding, and also ... with quills coming out of his body and out of his hand like talons instead of his simply using them as weapons. Elvar (formerly ...
4 Pink Ribbons Inc.: The Emergence of Cause-Related Marketing and the Corporatization of the Breast Cancer Movement. Download ... Part III: Transnational Body Politics. 7 The Pill in Puerto Ricoand Mainl and United States: Negotiating Discourses of Risk and ... In this final chapter of Governing the Female Body, I reflect on how in a Foucauldian sense we are formed as sexed agents with ... 9 Disciplining the Ethnic Body: Latinidad, Hybridized Bodies and Transnational Identities. Download PDF pp. 206-229 ...
Related to the mechanical movement of the body parts.. Biopsy search for term A biopsy is the surgical procedure where a piece ... An abbreviation for body mass index.. Body mass index search for term Body mass index (BMI) is a ratio of a persons weight ... Bi-partite means in two parts, and in the knee world usually refers to a kneecap (patella) which is in two parts - a bi- ... Biodegradable means able to be broken down by the body.. Biodex search for term Biodex is a trade name for an isokinetic ...
The movement of different parts of your body. Perceptual ability to see and understand logic systems as an arrangement of ... repeating a movement occurring outside ones body. Psychological or narrative content ascribed to movement. Movement of your ... realistic/non-realistic) Repetition - a) Internal: repeating a movement done with ones own body, and b) External: ... Viewpoints is part of the post-modern tradition, in that there is no hierarchy in the different elements that make "theatre." ...
9 things that cause acne on different parts of the body-and how to improve your health!. ... The Environmental Movements Ulterior Motives. Author Rupert Darwall says a political agenda behind environmental policy ... The radical leftists in Germany known as the "1968ers" became instrumental in the environmental movement. "They took the left- ... Polar Vortex Could Mean Brutal Cold Snap in Parts of the US. ... Polar Vortex Could Mean Brutal Cold Snap in Parts of the US ...
Learn more about what could be causing your involuntary movements and how to treat them. ... An involuntary movement occurs when you move your body in an uncontrollable and unintended way. ... Tremors are rhythmic movements of a body part. Theyre due to sporadic muscle contractions. ... Uncontrollable movements in one or more areas of the body may quickly subside in some cases. In others, these movements are an ...
You can experience these movements in almost any part of the... ... These movements can be anything from quick, jerking tics to ... An involuntary movement occurs when you move your body in an uncontrollable and unintended way. ... Tremors are rhythmic movements of a particular body part. Theyre due to sporadic muscle contractions. ... Uncontrollable movements in one or more areas of the body may quickly subside in some cases. In others, these movements are an ...
difficulty coordinating muscle movements;. *paralysis (not able to move certain parts of your body); ... This stage usually starts with a rash on one or more areas of your body. The rash can show up when your primary sore is healing ... If you do not receive treatment, you can continue to have syphilis in your body for years without any signs or symptoms. ... The sore is the location where syphilis entered your body. Sores are usually (but not always) firm, round, and painless. ...
Vertigo is most commonly associated with which body part?. An inner ear problem is the cause of most cases of vertigo. The most ... which is involuntary eye movements often triggered by inner ear stimulation. Basically, the eyes try to compensate for the ... Moving your head, changing body position, coughing, or sneezing may cause symptoms to worsen. If you experience vertigo ...
Children diagnosed with movement disorders cope with involuntary muscle movements in various parts of their body. The movements ... Movement Disorders Pediatric Movement Disorders. The Neurosciences Center at Childrens Health℠ offers the most advanced, ... Our research on movement disorders is opening the door to exciting possibilities for children with these diseases. Our ... Movement disorders can drastically disrupt a childs life, making school, activities and social settings challenging and ...
Quick Movements of the Lower Body Part. Squatting is not a single exercise where AI-based fitness apps may return errors. One ... There are exercises where body parts are occluded with other objects or body parts. An example of such exercise is snatching. ... 3D predictions for the lower part of the body does not reflect real movements since the 2D detections that are used as an input ... Men and Women Body Specifics. When training human pose estimation models for fitness apps, it is required to consider that men ...
The parts of the body affected.. *The types of movement patterns seen. ... The parts of the body affected. *quadriplegia - when both arms and both legs are affected - the muscles of trunk, face and ... It is caused by damage to, or lack of development in a part of the brain that controls movement. Cerebral palsy is the most ... Types of movement patterns seen. Many children have a mixture of the following movement patterns:. *spastic CP which is the ...
Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a computer model that can translate text describing physical movements ... "Synchrony between body parts is very important," Morency said. "Every time you move your legs, you also move your arms, your ... Do as I say: Translating language into movement. Carnegie Mellon University. Meeting. International Conference on 3D Vision. ... The body animations need to coordinate these different components, while at the same time achieving complex actions. Bringing ...
Loss of movement of any body part. * Loss of sensation in any body part ... Sarcoidosis is a chronic disease that affects many parts of the body, mostly the lungs. In a small number of people, the ... The condition can also affect the parts of the brain involved in regulating many body functions, such as temperature, sleep, ... Any part of the nervous system can be affected. Involvement of the brain or cranial nerves can cause:. *Confusion, ...
  • It can affect the heart, brain, and other organs of the body. (cdc.gov)
  • NUTRIENTS -Vitamins control the functioning of many of the organs in our body and help us stay healthy. (slideshare.net)
  • Brain scans of professional female ballet dancers revealed differences from other people in two parts of the brain: one that processes input from the balancing organs in the inner ear, and another responsible for the perception of dizziness. (abc.net.au)
  • They found that the part of the cerebellum that processes the signal from the balancing organs, was smaller in the dancers. (abc.net.au)
  • On the other hand, if you would rather have a lean, muscular, injury-free, functional body that works as a complete powerful unit to perform complex movements (in athletics or even everyday tasks), then you need to shift your focus away from muscle isolation. (blogspot.com)
  • how the muscular system interacts with other systems Supports your body so you can stand. (prezi.com)
  • Movement disorders can drastically disrupt a child's life, making school, activities and social settings challenging and frustrating. (childrens.com)
  • We can do that by (1) creating the right outdoor environment, (2) allowing children time to use it, (3) encouraging movement awareness, (4) teaching physical movement skills, (5) supporting children as they begin to develop and use those skills in increasingly complex and controlled ways, and (6) helping children develop a positive attitude about wellness and physical health. (scholastic.com)
  • As part of developing movement awareness and, later on, motor planning, help them begin to see how they hold different things in different ways: 'Look at how Sarah is carrying the long stick. (scholastic.com)
  • This song is great for body part awareness, especially by giving gentle pressure to the joints. (tsbvi.edu)
  • Most current methods of information input to computers or other mechanisms require the manipulation of body extremity parts, such as utilization of the fingers or feet, to actuate keys, for example typewriter keys, or organ pedals. (google.com)
  • In the hands, the tremors result in a peculiar 'pill rolling' movement of the fingers, more obvious between the thumb and the index finger. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • A green brittle star with five arms and another with six arms showing different 'pumping ' movement patterns. (eurekalert.org)
  • Scientists at Hokkaido University and Hiroshima University have found that green brittle stars with five arms show a different "pumping" movement pattern than those with six arms. (eurekalert.org)
  • First, the researchers looked at five-armed brittle stars and discovered a repeated movement in five fan-shaped parts between the arms that shrink and expand, which they named "pumping. (eurekalert.org)
  • For an upper body workout, add an arm-pumping motion, swinging arms backward and forward alternatively, to enhance breathing and to work the arms, shoulders and chest. (lifescript.com)
  • Believe me, focusing on how well your body functions will give you the side effect of a body that looks even better than it would have if you focused on muscle isolation. (blogspot.com)
  • a specific purpose for integration, which have complex functions of their own, each part of the brain interacts with one another in complex ways that contribute to the integration of sensory information to the reality we are all so familiar with (Eagleman, 2015a). (bartleby.com)
  • Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have developed a computer model that can translate text describing physical movements directly into simple computer-generated animations, a first step toward someday generating movies directly. (eurekalert.org)
  • Activities like these get children to think about, plan for, and use physical movements. (scholastic.com)
  • Now if you really want to end up hobbling around in a body bandaged up with joint problems, tendonitis, and excess body fat, then by all means, continue trying to 'isolate' body parts. (blogspot.com)
  • There are many cases of how technologies might help to improve your body - from tracking exercise activity to adjusting nutrition. (infoq.com)
  • The substatia nigra plays a large role in both movement, motivation, and learning responses to stimuli. (forbes.com)
  • 2. Non-specific responses- In the second line of defense, leukocytes, or white blood cells, travel throughout the body, and will attempt to inhibit or destroy a pathogen should one get past the first line of defense. (prezi.com)
  • The antibodies do so by recognizing antigens, typically a specific part of the pathogen that will bind to certain antibodies, and the antibodies then neutralize the pathogen by coating the outside of it and labeling the pathogen so that other immune responses will target it. (prezi.com)
  • Foliate papillae - these are ridges and grooves towards the posterior part of the tongue. (wikibooks.org)
  • Circumvallate papillae - there are only about 3-14 of these papillae on most people and they are present at the back of the oral part of the tongue. (wikibooks.org)
  • The lymphatic system is a network of channels and glands throughout the body that helps fight infection and remove excess fluid. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Using a mathematical model, they have shown that such movements can be coordinated by the flow of internal body fluid alone, rather than neuronal activity. (eurekalert.org)
  • Then, the team built a mathematical model and found that coordinated movement can be achieved by an internal fluid flow created by changing volume and pressure in each part. (eurekalert.org)
  • It's natural to reach for water when you're exercising because you tend to sweat more, so your body needs to replace that fluid," Farmer attests. (theweeklychallenger.com)
  • it is used to determine the position and orientation of the human body given an image containing a person. (infoq.com)
  • Rollin Leonard has spent more than 10 years of exploration on the human body, and more than 3,000 human subjects captured in every imaginable way. (1stdibs.com)
  • Review parts of the human body with this science printable. (teachervision.com)
  • Today, the ISS astronauts are the main target of the studies about the microgravity effects on human body in light of the forecasted long duration future space flights, as a trip to Mars could be. (plos.org)