Bocavirus: A genus in the subfamily PARVOVIRINAE comprising three species: Bovine parvovirus, Canine minute virus, and HUMAN BOCAVIRUS.Human bocavirus: A member of the family PARVOVIRIDAE, subfamily PARVOVIRINAE, originally isolated from human nasopharyngeal aspirates in patients with respiratory disease.Parvoviridae Infections: Virus infections caused by the PARVOVIRIDAE.Parvovirinae: A subfamily of DNA vertebrate viruses, in the family PARVOVIRIDAE. There are three genera: PARVOVIRUS; ERYTHROVIRUS; and DEPENDOVIRUS.Respiratory Tract Infections: Invasion of the host RESPIRATORY SYSTEM by microorganisms, usually leading to pathological processes or diseases.Nasopharynx: The top portion of the pharynx situated posterior to the nose and superior to the SOFT PALATE. The nasopharynx is the posterior extension of the nasal cavities and has a respiratory function.DNA, Viral: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Parvovirus: A genus of the family PARVOVIRIDAE, subfamily PARVOVIRINAE, infecting a variety of vertebrates including humans. Parvoviruses are responsible for a number of important diseases but also can be non-pathogenic in certain hosts. The type species is MINUTE VIRUS OF MICE.Gastroenteritis: INFLAMMATION of any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM. Causes of gastroenteritis are many including genetic, infection, HYPERSENSITIVITY, drug effects, and CANCER.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Viruses: Minute infectious agents whose genomes are composed of DNA or RNA, but not both. They are characterized by a lack of independent metabolism and the inability to replicate outside living host cells.Metapneumovirus: A genus of the subfamily PNEUMOVIRINAE, containing two members: Turkey rhinotracheitis virus and a human Metapneumovirus. Virions lack HEMAGGLUTININ and NEURAMINIDASE.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Parvovirus B19, Human: The type species of ERYTHROVIRUS and the etiological agent of ERYTHEMA INFECTIOSUM, a disease most commonly seen in school-age children.Virus Diseases: A general term for diseases produced by viruses.Pneumonia, Viral: Inflammation of the lung parenchyma that is caused by a viral infection.Child, Hospitalized: Child hospitalized for short term care.Genome, Viral: The complete genetic complement contained in a DNA or RNA molecule in a virus.Ipomoea: A plant genus in the family CONVOLVULACEAE best known for morning glories (a common name also used with CONVOLVULUS) and sweet potato.Coronavirus OC43, Human: A species in the genus CORONAVIRUS causing the common cold and possibly nervous system infections in humans. It contains hemagglutinin-esterase.Respiratory Syncytial Viruses: A group of viruses in the PNEUMOVIRUS genus causing respiratory infections in various mammals. Humans and cattle are most affected but infections in goats and sheep have also been reported.Bronchiolitis: Inflammation of the BRONCHIOLES.Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections: Pneumovirus infections caused by the RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUSES. Humans and cattle are most affected but infections in goats and sheep have been reported.IranSeasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Erythema Infectiosum: Contagious infection with human B19 Parvovirus most commonly seen in school age children and characterized by fever, headache, and rashes of the face, trunk, and extremities. It is often confused with rubella.Biological Ontologies: Structured vocabularies describing concepts from the fields of biology and relationships between concepts.Viral Load: The quantity of measurable virus in a body fluid. Change in viral load, measured in plasma, is sometimes used as a SURROGATE MARKER in disease progression.Clostridium difficile: A common inhabitant of the colon flora in human infants and sometimes in adults. It produces a toxin that causes pseudomembranous enterocolitis (ENTEROCOLITIS, PSEUDOMEMBRANOUS) in patients receiving antibiotic therapy.IraqAcinetobacter baumannii: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria, commonly found in the clinical laboratory, and frequently resistant to common antibiotics.Acinetobacter Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus ACINETOBACTER.Clostridium Infections: Infections with bacteria of the genus CLOSTRIDIUM.Clostridium: A genus of motile or nonmotile gram-positive bacteria of the family Clostridiaceae. Many species have been identified with some being pathogenic. They occur in water, soil, and in the intestinal tract of humans and lower animals.Enterocolitis, Pseudomembranous: An acute inflammation of the INTESTINAL MUCOSA that is characterized by the presence of pseudomembranes or plaques in the SMALL INTESTINE (pseudomembranous enteritis) and the LARGE INTESTINE (pseudomembranous colitis). It is commonly associated with antibiotic therapy and CLOSTRIDIUM DIFFICILE colonization.Poetry as Topic: Literary and oral genre expressing meaning via symbolism and following formal or informal patterns.ChileNeurilemmoma: A neoplasm that arises from SCHWANN CELLS of the cranial, peripheral, and autonomic nerves. Clinically, these tumors may present as a cranial neuropathy, abdominal or soft tissue mass, intracranial lesion, or with spinal cord compression. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, highly vascular, and composed of a homogenous pattern of biphasic fusiform-shaped cells that may have a palisaded appearance. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp964-5)Melanesia: The collective name for the islands of the Pacific Ocean northeast of Australia, including NEW CALEDONIA; VANUATU; New Hebrides, Solomon Islands, Admiralty Islands, Bismarck Archipelago, FIJI, etc. Melanesia (from the Greek melas, black + nesos, island) is so called from the black color of the natives who are generally considered to be descended originally from the Negroid Papuans and the Polynesians or Malays. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p748 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p344)Peripheral Nervous System Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from peripheral nerve tissue. This includes NEUROFIBROMAS; SCHWANNOMAS; GRANULAR CELL TUMORS; and malignant peripheral NERVE SHEATH NEOPLASMS. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp1750-1)Azores: A group of nine islands and several islets belonging to Portugal in the north Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Portugal. The islands are named after the acores, the Portuguese for goshawks, living there in abundance. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p102 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p42)Pinnipedia: The suborder of aquatic CARNIVORA comprising the WALRUSES; FUR SEALS; SEA LIONS; and EARLESS SEALS. They have fusiform bodies with very short tails and are found on all sea coasts. The offspring are born on land.Otitis Media: Inflammation of the MIDDLE EAR including the AUDITORY OSSICLES and the EUSTACHIAN TUBE.Otitis Media with Effusion: Inflammation of the middle ear with a clear pale yellow-colored transudate.Pediatrics: A medical specialty concerned with maintaining health and providing medical care to children from birth to adolescence.Picornaviridae Infections: Virus diseases caused by the PICORNAVIRIDAE.Rhinovirus: A genus of PICORNAVIRIDAE inhabiting primarily the respiratory tract of mammalian hosts. It includes over 100 human serotypes associated with the COMMON COLD.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Indigo Carmine: Indolesulfonic acid used as a dye in renal function testing for the detection of nitrates and chlorates, and in the testing of milk.BooksClassification: The systematic arrangement of entities in any field into categories classes based on common characteristics such as properties, morphology, subject matter, etc.Red Cross: International collective of humanitarian organizations led by volunteers and guided by its Congressional Charter and the Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross Movement, to provide relief to victims of disaster and help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies.Vanilla: A plant genus of the family ORCHIDACEAE that is the source of the familiar flavoring used in foods and medicines (FLAVORING AGENTS).Paeonia: A plant genus of the family Paeoniaceae, order Dilleniales, subclass Dilleniidae, class Magnoliopsida. These perennial herbs are up to 2 m (6') tall. Leaves are alternate and are divided into three lobes, each lobe being further divided into three smaller lobes. The large flowers are symmetrical, bisexual, have 5 sepals, 5 petals (sometimes 10), and many stamens.

Human bocavirus infection in young children in the United States: molecular epidemiological profile and clinical characteristics of a newly emerging respiratory virus. (1/69)

BACKGROUND: Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly identified human parvovirus that was originally identified in the respiratory secretions of children with respiratory tract disease. To further investigate the epidemiological profile and clinical characteristics of HBoV infection, we screened infants and children <2 years of age (hereafter referred to as "children") for HBoV. METHODS: Children for whom respiratory specimens submitted to a diagnostic laboratory tested negative for respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza viruses (types 1-3), influenza A and B viruses, and adenovirus, as well as asymptomatic children, underwent screening for HBoV by use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Respiratory specimens were obtained from the children from 1 January 2004 through 31 December 2004. RESULTS: Twenty-two (5.2%) of the 425 children who had a respiratory specimen submitted to the diagnostic laboratory and 0 of the 96 asymptomatic children were found to be positive for HBoV by PCR (P=.02). Fever, rhinorrhea, cough, and wheezing were observed in > or =50% of the HBoV-positive children. Of the 17 children who had chest radiography performed, 12 (70.6%) had abnormal findings. HBoV appeared to have a seasonal distribution. Nucleotide polymorphisms were detected in the viral capsid protein (VP) 1/VP2 genes. Two distinct HBoV genotypes circulated during the study period. CONCLUSIONS: HBoV is circulating in the United States and is associated with both upper and lower respiratory tract disease in infants and young children.  (+info)

Human bocavirus infection among children, Jordan. (2/69)

Human bocavirus was detected in 57 (18.3%) of 312 children with acute respiratory infection (ARI) who required hospitalization in Jordan. It was also detected in 30 (21.7%) of 138 children with severe ARI, in 27 (15.5%) of 174 with mild or moderate disease, and in 41 (72%) of 57 with other pathogens.  (+info)

Detection of human bocavirus in Canadian children in a 1-year study. (3/69)

Human bocavirus was detected by PCR in 65 (5.1%) of 1,265 respiratory specimens collected in 2002 and 2003 from the Stollery Children's Hospital from children <17 years of age. The spectrum of illness included upper respiratory infection, croup, bronchiolitis, and pneumonia with a prominence of cough and fever.  (+info)

High prevalence of human bocavirus detected in young children with severe acute lower respiratory tract disease by use of a standard PCR protocol and a novel real-time PCR protocol. (4/69)

The human bocavirus (HBoV) was recently isolated from respiratory tract samples. Within a study collective of children with severe lower respiratory tract disease, the patients testing positive for HBoV (12.8%) had a higher rate of underlying cardiopulmonary disease. Viral loads in respiratory tract specimens varied from 10(2) to 10(10) genome equivalents/ml.  (+info)

Human bocavirus: a novel parvovirus epidemiologically associated with pneumonia requiring hospitalization in Thailand. (5/69)

BACKGROUND: We detected human bocavirus (HBoV) infection in 4.5% of hospitalized patients with pneumonia in rural Thailand. However, the role of HBoV as a pathogen is unclear. METHODS: We compared HBoV infection in patients with pneumonia with that in asymptomatic control patients enrolled between 1 September 2004 and 31 August 2005 in the same hospitals in Thailand. We examined outpatients with influenza-like illness for HBoV infection and tested for 13 additional respiratory viruses. Epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of HBoV infection are described. RESULTS: HBoV infection was detected in 20 (3.9%) of 512 outpatients and 3 (1%) of 280 control patients. Coinfection with other viruses was detected in 83% of patients with pneumonia and in 90% of outpatients. Compared with control patients, HBoV infection was significantly associated with pneumonia requiring hospitalization (adjusted odds ratio, 3.56 [95% confidence interval, 1.06-11.91]; P=.04). Eighty-three percent of HBoV infections were detected in patients with pneumonia who were <5 years old. More patients with pneumonia associated with HBoV-respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) or human parainfluenza virus (HPIV) coinfections had wheezing than patients with RSV and HPIV infections alone (9 [53%] of 17 vs. 32 [23%] of 138]; P=.01). CONCLUSIONS: HBoV infection was epidemiologically associated with pneumonia among young children in rural Thailand, but infection and illness may be dependent on coinfection with other viruses.  (+info)

Human bocavirus and acute wheezing in children. (6/69)

BACKGROUND: Human bocavirus is a newly discovered parvovirus. It has been detected primarily in children with acute lower respiratory tract infection, but its occurrence, clinical profile, and role as a causative agent of respiratory tract disease are not clear. METHODS: We investigated the presence of human bocavirus by quantitative polymerase chain reaction of nasopharyngeal aspirate specimens and selected serum samples obtained from 259 children (median age, 1.6 years) who had been hospitalized for acute expiratory wheezing. The samples were analyzed for 16 respiratory viruses by polymerase chain reaction, virus culture, antigen detection, and serological assays. RESULTS: At least 1 potential etiologic agent was detected in 95% of children, and >1 agent was detected in 34% of children. Human bocavirus was detected in 49 children (19%). A large proportion of the cases were mixed infections with other viruses, but human bocavirus was the only virus detected in 12 children (5%). High viral loads of human bocavirus were noted mainly in the absence of other viral agents, suggesting a causative role for acute wheezing. In addition, infections that had uncertain clinical relevance and low viral loads were prevalent. Human bocavirus DNA was frequently detected in serum specimens obtained from patients with acute wheezing, suggesting systemic infection. CONCLUSIONS: Human bocavirus is prevalent among children with acute wheezing and can cause systemic infection. Results suggest a model for bocavirus infection in which high viral loads are potentially associated with respiratory symptoms and low viral loads indicate asymptomatic shedding. Therefore, quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis may be important for additional studies of human bocavirus.  (+info)

Human bocavirus infection, People's Republic of China. (7/69)

A newly identified parvovirus, human bocavirus (HBoV), was found in 21 (8.3%) of 252 nasopharyngeal aspirates from hospitalized children with lower respiratory tract infection in Hunan Province, People's Republic of China. Viral loads were 10(4) to 10(10) copies/mL. Phylogenetic analysis of the VP1 gene showed a single genetic lineage of HBoV worldwide.  (+info)

Comparison of tissue distribution, persistence, and molecular epidemiology of parvovirus B19 and novel human parvoviruses PARV4 and human bocavirus. (8/69)

BACKGROUND: PARV4 and human bocavirus (HBoV) are newly discovered human parvoviruses with poorly understood epidemiologies and disease associations. We investigated the frequencies of persistence, tissue distribution, and influence of immunosuppression on replication of these viruses. METHODS: At autopsy, bone marrow, lymphoid tissue, and brain tissue from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and those without AIDS and from HIV-uninfected individuals were screened for parvovirus B19, PARV4, and HBoV DNA by means of quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses. RESULTS: B19 DNA was detected both in HIV-infected study subjects (13 of 24) and in HIV-uninfected study subjects (8 of 8), whereas PARV4 DNA was detected only in HIV-infected study subjects (17 of 24). HBoV DNA was not detected in any study subjects. The degree of immunosuppression with HIV infection did not influence B19 or PARV4 viral loads. B19 or PARV4 plasma viremia was not detected in any study subjects (n=76; viral load <25 DNA copies/mL). A significantly older age distribution was found for study subjects infected with B19 genotype 2, compared with those infected with B19 genotype 1. Two genotypes of PARV4 were detected; study subjects carrying prototype PARV4 (genotype 1) were younger (all born after 1958) than those infected with genotype 2 (PARV5; study subjects born between 1949 and 1956). CONCLUSIONS: Tight immune control of replication of B19 and PARV4 was retained despite profound immunosuppression. Recent genotype replacement of PARV4, combined with absent sequence diversity among genotype 1 sequences, suggests a recent, epidemic spread in the United Kingdom, potentially through transmission routes shared by HIV.  (+info)

*Human bocavirus

... 3 appears to be a recombinant of human bocavirus 1 and human bocavirus 2 and 4. Bocaviruses have been isolated ... The name bocavirus is derived from bovine and canine, referring to the two known hosts for other members of this genus; the ... Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a parvovirus that has been suggested to cause human disease. It is a probable cause of lower ... Sun B, Cai Y, Li Y, Li J, Liu K, Li Y, Yang Y (2013). "The nonstructural protein NP1 of human bocavirus 1 induces cell cycle ...

*Canine minute virus

A virus causing respiratory disease in humans has been called human bocavirus due to its similarity to these viruses. Canine ... McIntosh K (2006). "Human bocavirus: developing evidence for pathogenicity". J Infect Dis. 194 (9): 1197-9. doi:10.1086/508228 ...

*Statgraphics

Brieu, Nathalie; Guyon, Gaël; Rodière, Michel; Segondy, Michel; Foulongne, Vincent (1 November 2008). "Human Bocavirus ...

*Qubit fluorometer

2009). "Detection and quantification of human bocavirus in riverwater". J Gen Virol. 90 (Pt 11): 2634-2637. doi:10.1099/vir. ...

*Parvovirus B19

Human bocavirus Erythema infectiosum Servey JT, Reamy BV, Hodge J (February 2007). "Clinical presentations of parvovirus B19 ... July 2008). "Seroepidemiology of human bocavirus defined using recombinant virus-like particles". J. Infect. Dis. 198 (1): 41- ...

*Human coronavirus HKU1

"Evidence of human coronavirus HKU1 and human bocavirus in Australian children". Journal of Clinical Virology. 35 (1): 99-102. ...

*Bocaparvovirus

Qu XW, Liu WP, Qi ZY, Duan ZJ, Zheng LS, Kuang ZZ, Zhang WJ, Hou YD (2008) Phospholipase A2-like activity of human bocavirus ... The incidence of bocavirus in patients with cancer is higher than that of healthy controls. Like other parvoviruses, ... June 2010). "Human bocavirus capsid structure: insights into the structural repertoire of the parvoviridae". J. Virol. 84 (12 ... The former (pre-2014) "type species" of the genus, Bovine bocavirus, is now recognized as the founder virus sequence in a ...

*Parvoviridae

2012). "Association of human bocavirus 1 infection with respiratory disease in childhood follow-up study, Finland". Emerg. ... Currently, viruses that infect humans are recognized in 5 genera: Bocaparvovirus (human bocavirus 1-4, HboV1-4), ... "Establishment of a reverse genetics system for studying human bocavirus in human airway epithelia". PLoS Pathog. 8 (8): ...

*Tetraparvovirus

2010) Widespread infection with homologues of human parvoviruses B19, PARV4, and human bocavirus of chimpanzees and gorillas in ...

*NASBA (molecular biology)

... human bocavirus (HBoV) and also parasites like Trypanosoma brucei. Compton, J (1991). "Nucleic acid sequence-based ...

*Viral pneumonia

... human bocavirus, and parainfluenza viruses. Viruses must invade cells in order to reproduce. Typically, a virus will reach the ...

*Parvovirus

... human bocavirus 1), ii) Dependoparvovirus (e.g. adeno-associated virus 2), iii) Erythroparvovirus (e.g. parvovirus B19), iv) ...
Main Article. The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.. ...
A partir del 6 de octubre de 2011 el registro de folletos y documentos con los Datos Fundamentales para el Inversor (DFI) de las Sociedades de Inversión no requiere la previa verificación de la CNMV, de acuerdo con la normativa vigente. ...
A partir del 6 de octubre de 2011 el registro de folletos y documentos con los Datos Fundamentales para el Inversor (DFI) de las Sociedades de Inversión no requiere la previa verificación de la CNMV, de acuerdo con la normativa vigente. ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - High Human Bocavirus Viral Load Is Associated with Disease Severity in Children under Five Years of Age. AU - Zhao, Baihui. AU - Yu, Xuelian. AU - Wang, Chuanxian. AU - Teng, Zheng. AU - Wang, Chun. AU - Shen, Jiaren. AU - Gao, Ye. AU - Zhu, Zhaokui. AU - Wang, Jiayu. AU - Yuan, Zhengan. AU - Wu, Fan. AU - Zhang, Xi. AU - GHILDYAL, Reena. PY - 2013/4/30. Y1 - 2013/4/30. N2 - Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a parvovirus and detected worldwide in lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs), but its pathogenic role in respiratory illness is still debatable due to high incidence of co-infection with other respiratory viruses. To determine the prevalence of HBoV infection in patients with LRTI in Shanghai and its correlation with disease severity, we performed a 3-year prospective study of HBoV in healthy controls, outpatients and inpatients under five years of age with X-ray diagnosed LRTIs. Nasopharyngeal aspirates were tested by PCR for common respiratory viruses and by real time PCR for ...
Background. Molecular methods of pathogen discovery have recently led to the description of several new respiratory viruses. Human bocavirus (HBoV), a proposed member of the family Parvoviridae, is one of the most recently described respiratory viruses. Initial reports indicate that HBoV is a common cause of respiratory tract infection in children.. Methods. A total of 1474 nasal scraping specimens collected over a 20-month period were screened by polymerase chain reaction for the presence of HBoV nucleic acid. Positive results were confirmed with a second polymerase chain reaction assay from a different genomic region. The medical records of patients with positive results were reviewed for demographic and clinical data.. Results. HBoV DNA was identified in 82 samples (5.6%). The peak rate of HBoV infection occurred during the period of March through May in both 2004 and 2005. Sixty-three percent of infected patients were ,12 months of age. The most common symptoms were cough, rhinorrhea, and ...
Human Bocavirus (HBoV) was discovered in 2005 using a molecular virus screening technique. It is often found in respiratory samples and is a likely cause for respiratory diseases in children. HBoV is distributed worldwide and has been found not only in respiratory samples, but also in feces, urine and serum. HBoV infections are mostly found in young children and coinfections with other respiratory viruses are often found, exacerbating the efforts to link HBoV to specific symptoms. The purpose of this review is to give an overview of recent HBoV research, highlighting some recent findings.
BACKGROUND: Although the DNA of parvovirus B19 (B19V) is frequently detected in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy or myocarditis, whether the parvovirus causes disease is questionable, since even in healthy individuals the virus persists in various tissues. The same question applies to human bocavirus (HBoV). We have determined the prevalence and quantity of B19V and HBoV DNA in heart tissue of patients who were not experiencing virus-related heart diseases and analyzed whether the seroprevalence corresponded to DNA prevalence in the heart. METHODS: Samples of left-atrium heart tissue and serum were obtained from 100 patients who underwent open-heart surgery. Serum immunoglobulin (Ig) G and IgM against proteins encoded by B19V and HBoV were detected by enzyme-linked immunoabsorption assay and immunoblotting. B19V and HBoV DNA concentrations were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in heart tissue and serum samples. Nested PCRs for VP1, K71, and GT3 identified ...
Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) was detected in a young child hospitalized for pneumonia and subsequently in his twin brother and other family members. The mothers nasopharyngeal samples intermittently showed HBoV1 DNA; the grandmother had HBoV1 reinfection. Findings in this family lead to consideration of HBoV virulence, latency, and reactivation ...
Human bocavirus (HBoV) was identified as the second human parvovirus with pathogenic potential in 2005 in respiratory samples from children suffering from viral respiratory infections of unknown etiology. Since its first description, a large number of clinical studies have been performed that address the clinical significance of HBoV detection and the molecular biology of the virus. This review summarizes the most important steps taken in HBoV research to date and addresses open questions that need to be answered in the future to provide a better understanding of the role of a virus that is difficult to grow in cell culture and is suspected to be a pathogen, although it has not yet fulfilled Kochs postulates.
The family Parvoviridae is divided into two subfamilies: the Densovirinae, which infect insects, and the Parvovirinae, which infect vertebrates. The members of the Parvovirinae that infect humans are the focus of this chapter. The parvoviruses known to infect humans include B19 parvovirus in the genus Erythrovirus, adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) in the genus Dependovirus, human bocavirus (HBoV) in the genus Bocavirus, and PARV4 and PARV5, not yet placed into a genus. With the appropriate helper virus, AAVs can replicate in a variety of tissue culture systems. If a helper virus is not present, AAV integrates into the host cell genomic DNA in a site-specific fashion. Nosocomial transmission can, however, occur, and standard precautions are recommended for all B19-infected patients and droplet precautions are recommended for those most likely to have high-titer infection, i.e., those with chronic B19 infection and those with transient aplastic crisis. The occurrence of rash in an immunocompromised patient
Main Article. The conclusions, findings, and opinions expressed by authors contributing to this journal do not necessarily reflect the official position of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Public Health Service, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or the authors affiliated institutions. Use of trade names is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by any of the groups named above.. ...
Tobias Allander and Björn Andersson, of the Karolinska Institutet (KI), identified a previously unknown virus called human bocavirus that can cause respiratory illness in children. The researchers discovered the virus in respiratory tract samples from children at Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm utilizing a new method for virus discovery. Currently, infections of the lower respiratory tract are a significant cause of hospitalization of children. In about 20% of cases, doctors are presently unable to determine the cause of the infection. Dr. Allander, a scientist at KIs Centre for Molecular Medicine and Department of Clinical Microbiology and an associate professor at KIs Centre for Genomics and Bioinformatics along with his colleague Dr. Andersson, pioneered a method that allows for the systematic scanning of samples to detect unidentified viruses. The Swedish team found bocavirus contributed to at least 3% of serious lower respiratory tract infections. Dr. Allender commented: We ...
MADRID (MarketWatch) -- The Spanish stock market regulator the CNMV Wednesday said it is lifting a ban on short selling of financial stocks that had been in force since August, saying market volatility had eased in recent weeks.. The lifting of the ban will be effective Thursday and affects shares in 16 financial companies traded on the Spanish stock exchange, the CNMV said in a press release. It comes just days after France and Belgium eased their restrictions on short selling of financial stocks.. A similar prohibition in Italy expires Feb. 24.. Short-selling allows investors to sell borrowed shares in hopes that prices will fall, allowing them to repurchase the stock at a lower price. Spain will keep a prohibition on so-called net naked short selling, in which investors make a commitment to sell shares, but without actually borrowing the stock.. The CNMV also said investors taking significant short positions must disclose these positions to the regulator.. ...
Objective: To investigate the prevalence of 14 viruses in infants with bronchiolitis and to study demographic and clinical differences in those with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human bocavirus (hBoV) and rhinovirus (RV) infection.. Methods: 182 infants aged ,12 months hospitalised for bronchiolitis were enrolled. Infants underwent nasal washing for the detection of RSV, influenza virus A and B, human coronavirus OC43, 229E, NL-63, HUK1, adenovirus, RV, parainfluenza 1-3, human metapneumovirus and hBoV. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data were obtained from parents and from patient medical files. Main outcome measurements were age, breastfeeding history, family smoking habits, family history for asthma and atopy, blood eosinophil count, chest radiological findings, clinical severity score and number of days of hospitalisation.. Results: A virus was detected in 57.2% of the 182 infants. The most frequently detected viruses were RSV (41.2%), hBoV (12.2%) and RV (8.8%). Infants with ...
Background. Common cold viruses create significant health and financial burdens, and understanding key loci of transmission would help focus control strategies. This study (1) examines factors that influence when individuals transition from a negative to positive test (acquisition) or a positive to negative test (loss) of rhinovirus (HRV) and other respiratory tract viruses in 26 households followed weekly for one year, (2) investigates evidence for intrahousehold and interhousehold transmission and the characteristics of individuals implicated in transmission, and (3) builds data-based simulation models to identify factors that most strongly affect patterns of prevalence. Methods. We detected HRV, coronavirus, paramyxovirus, influenza and bocavirus with the FilmArray polymerase chain reaction (PCR) platform (BioFire Diagnostics, LLC). We used logistic regression to find covariates affecting acquisition or loss of HRV including demographic characteristics of individuals, their household, their ...
Background. Common cold viruses create significant health and financial burdens, and understanding key loci of transmission would help focus control strategies. This study (1) examines factors that influence when individuals transition from a negative to positive test (acquisition) or a positive to negative test (loss) of rhinovirus (HRV) and other respiratory tract viruses in 26 households followed weekly for one year, (2) investigates evidence for intrahousehold and interhousehold transmission and the characteristics of individuals implicated in transmission, and (3) builds data-based simulation models to identify factors that most strongly affect patterns of prevalence. Methods. We detected HRV, coronavirus, paramyxovirus, influenza and bocavirus with the FilmArray polymerase chain reaction (PCR) platform (BioFire Diagnostics, LLC). We used logistic regression to find covariates affecting acquisition or loss of HRV including demographic characteristics of individuals, their household, their ...
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The Parvoviridae is a family of small non-enveloped ssDNA viruses with a broad range of natural vertebrate and invertebrate hosts, including humans, monkeys, dogs, cats, mice, and insects. Pathogenic members cause severe disease in the young and immunocompromised adults. As examples, the newly discovered human bocavirus causes respiratory tract infections and gastroenteritis in young children and human parvovirus B19, which causes a mild rash in children infects, can cause acute severe or chronic anemia. Severe anemia due to B19 infection of an unborn baby can result in miscarriage in ~5% of pregnant women who are not immune to the virus. Non-pathogenic members, such as the Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs), are being developed for therapeutic gene deliver applications. The ssDNA parvovirus genome, ~5000 bases, is packaged into a T=1 capsid that is ~260 Å in diameter (Chapman and Agbandje-McKenna, 2006)[1]. The capsid is assembled from 60 copies (in total) of the common C-terminal region (~520 ...
Test your knowledge of the Parvoviridae virus family with this interactive quiz and printable worksheet. You can use the practice questions to...
The clinical research unit KFO309 ist funded by the DFG. Acute lower respiratory tract infections represent an increasing public health problem.
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Until the discovery of Human bocavirus, Parvovirus B19 was the only member of the large Parvoviridae family to be associated unequivocally with human disease. During acute infection, parvovirus B19 has been detected in the nasopharynx, blood, bone marrow, liver, skin, cerebrospinal fluid, and synovium. It is not clear whether parvovirus B19 is eliminated from the host or remains in an inactive state capable of reactivation. It is possible that parvovirus B19 may integrate into the human genome, as occurs with other parvoviruses, such as minute virus of mice and dependoviruses. Acquisition of parvovirus B19 infection begins in childhood and continues throughout life. Infection with parvovirus occurs year-round but may peak in late winter to early summer. Parvovirus B19 has also been linked to myocarditis, a variety of neurologic syndromes, uveitis, hepatitis, renal syndromes, vasculitis, and chronic fatigue syndrome. No vaccine or antiviral is available for parvovirus B19 infection. Detection of
The role of Chlamydia pneumoniae in the etiology of acute lower respiratory tract infections in infants and children is little understood. We studied the prevalence of C. pneumoniae infection in hospitalized infants and children with acute lower resp
Pharmacists fill a lot of prescriptions for oral steroids for patients with acute lower respiratory tract infections. But for those who dont have asthma, prednisolone appears to be generally ineffective in shortening the duration of the illness. Here are the details. ...
Descoberto em 1975 o Parvov rus B19 (B19V) o nico membro da fam lia Parvoviridae que apresenta comportamento patog nico em humanos. A persist ncia do v rus em ...

Human bocavirus - WikipediaHuman bocavirus - Wikipedia

Human bocavirus 3 appears to be a recombinant of human bocavirus 1 and human bocavirus 2 and 4. Bocaviruses have been isolated ... The name bocavirus is derived from bovine and canine, referring to the two known hosts for other members of this genus; the ... Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a parvovirus that has been suggested to cause human disease. It is a probable cause of lower ... Sun B, Cai Y, Li Y, Li J, Liu K, Li Y, Yang Y (2013). "The nonstructural protein NP1 of human bocavirus 1 induces cell cycle ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Human_bocavirus

Pathogens  | Free Full-Text | Human Bocavirus: Lessons Learned to Date | NotesPathogens | Free Full-Text | Human Bocavirus: Lessons Learned to Date | Notes

Human bocavirus (HBoV) was identified as the second human parvovirus with pathogenic potential in 2005 in respiratory samples ...
more infohttp://www.mdpi.com/2076-0817/2/1/1/notes

Human bocavirus, TEM - Stock Image - M050/1224 - Science Photo LibraryHuman bocavirus, TEM - Stock Image - M050/1224 - Science Photo Library

The human bocavirus (HBoV), of the Parvoviridae family, was newly identified in 2005. ... Human bocavirus particles, coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM). ... Human bocavirus particles, coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM). The human bocavirus (HBoV), of the Parvoviridae ...
more infohttps://www.sciencephoto.com/media/248989/view/human-bocavirus-tem

Bocavirus - Volume 13, Number 4-April 2007 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDCBocavirus - Volume 13, Number 4-April 2007 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC

Bocavirus. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2007;13(4):637. doi:10.3201/eid1304.e11304.. ... A parvovirus of human origin was recently discovered and called human bocavirus because it is closely related to bovine ... Human bocavirus is associated with respiratory tract infections, particularly in infants and young children. ... 2007). Bocavirus. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 13(4), 637. https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1304.e11304.. ...
more infohttps://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/13/4/e1-1304_article

Viruses | Free Full-Text | Human Bocavirus - Insights into a Newly Identified Respiratory VirusViruses | Free Full-Text | Human Bocavirus - Insights into a Newly Identified Respiratory Virus

Human Bocavirus (HBoV) was discovered in 2005 using a molecular virus screening technique. It is often found in respiratory ... Keywords: Bocavirus; Respiratory virus; HBoV Bocavirus; Respiratory virus; HBoV This is an open access article distributed ... Human Bocavirus (HBoV) was discovered in 2005 using a molecular virus screening technique. It is often found in respiratory ... "Human Bocavirus - Insights into a Newly Identified Respiratory Virus." Viruses 1, no. 1: 3-12. ...
more infohttp://www.mdpi.com/1999-4915/1/1/3

Human Bocavirus in Children - Volume 12, Number 5-May 2006 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDCHuman Bocavirus in Children - Volume 12, Number 5-May 2006 - Emerging Infectious Diseases journal - CDC

Evidence of human coronavirus HKU1 and human bocavirus in Australian children. J Clin Virol. 2005;35:99-102. DOIPubMed ... Foulongne V, Rodière M, Segondy M. Human Bocavirus in Children. Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2006;12(5):862-863. doi:10.3201/ ... Foulongne, V., Rodière, M., & Segondy, M. (2006). Human Bocavirus in Children. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 12(5), 862-863. ... This virus has been provisionally named human Bocavirus (HBoV) (2). HBoV in respiratory samples from Australian children was ...
more infohttps://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/12/5/05-1523_article

First molecular detection of porcine bocavirus in Malaysia | Springer for Research & DevelopmentFirst molecular detection of porcine bocavirus in Malaysia | Springer for Research & Development

Porcine bocavirus: Achievements in the past five years. Viruses, 6, 4946-4960CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar ... Human bocavirus: lessons learned to date. Pathogens, 2, 1-12CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar ... Porcine bocavirus Swine Detection Sequencing Phylogenetic analysis This is a preview of subscription content, log in to check ... Complete genome sequence of a novel species of porcine bocavirus, PBoV5. Journal of Virology, 86, 1286-1287CrossRefPubMed ...
more infohttps://rd.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11250-017-1489-z

Welcome to CDC stacks | Human Bocavirus Infection, Canada - 16140 | Emerging Infectious DiseasesWelcome to CDC stacks | Human Bocavirus Infection, Canada - 16140 | Emerging Infectious Diseases

Bocavirus Child Child, Preschool Cough Dispatch DNA, Viral Female Fever HBoV Humans Infant Male Middle Aged Molecular Sequence ... In Spain, human bocavirus (HBoV) was detected in 48 (9.1%) of 527 children with gastroenteritis at similar frequency as for ... Human Bocavirus was detected in 18 (1.5%) of 1,209 respiratory specimens collected in 2003 and 2004 in Canada. The main ... Studies have reported human bocavirus (HBoV) in children with respiratory tract infections (RTIs), but only occasionally in ...
more infohttps://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/16140

Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Species of Porcine Bocavirus, PBoV5 | Journal of VirologyComplete Genome Sequence of a Novel Species of Porcine Bocavirus, PBoV5 | Journal of Virology

Porcine bocavirus 5 is a novel porcine bocavirus species found in a pig with clinical diarrhea from a farm in China. Here, we ... gorilla bocavirus, four species of human bocaviruses, and porcine bocavirus (PBoV) (1, 2, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 13). ... Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Species of Porcine Bocavirus, PBoV5. Bin Li, Junjie Ma, Shaobo Xiao, Liurong Fang, Songlin ... Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Species of Porcine Bocavirus, PBoV5. Bin Li, Junjie Ma, Shaobo Xiao, Liurong Fang, Songlin ...
more infohttps://jvi.asm.org/content/86/2/1286

Welcome to CDC stacks | Human Bocavirus in Tonsillar Lymphocytes - 17249 | Emerging Infectious DiseasesWelcome to CDC stacks | Human Bocavirus in Tonsillar Lymphocytes - 17249 | Emerging Infectious Diseases

Bocavirus Child Child, Preschool DNA, Viral Female Humans Infant Letter Letters To The Editor Lymphocytes Male Palatine Tonsil ...
more infohttps://stacks.cdc.gov/view/cdc/17249

LightMix® Modular Bocavirus (HBoV)LightMix® Modular Bocavirus (HBoV)

Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a ssDNA virus of the family Parvoviridae, which may cause in particular in children lower respiratory ... LightMix® Modular Bocavirus (HBoV). Kit with reagents for 96 PCR reactions 20 μl for detection of HBoV [lyophilized]. TIB ...
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Respiratory syncytial virus, human bocavirus and rhinovirus bronchiolitis in infants | Archives of Disease in ChildhoodRespiratory syncytial virus, human bocavirus and rhinovirus bronchiolitis in infants | Archives of Disease in Childhood

... human bocavirus (hBoV) and rhinovirus (RV) infection. ... Respiratory syncytial virus, human bocavirus and rhinovirus ...
more infohttp://adc.bmj.com/content/95/1/35

The Human Bocavirus 1 NP1 Protein Is a Multifunctional Regulator of Viral RNA Processing | Journal of VirologyThe Human Bocavirus 1 NP1 Protein Is a Multifunctional Regulator of Viral RNA Processing | Journal of Virology

The NP1 protein of human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), similar to NP1 of the bocavirus minute virus of canine (MVC), regulates viral ... The Human Bocavirus 1 NP1 Protein Is a Multifunctional Regulator of Viral RNA Processing. Yanming Dong, Olufemi O. Fasina, ... Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) encodes a genus-specific protein, NP1, which regulates viral alternative pre-mRNA processing. Similar ... The Human Bocavirus 1 NP1 Protein Is a Multifunctional Regulator of Viral RNA Processing ...
more infohttps://jvi.asm.org/content/92/22/e01187-18

Bocavirus infection may be associated with pneumonia in Thailand, especially i...( The newly identified human bocavirus wa...)Bocavirus infection may be associated with pneumonia in Thailand, especially i...( The newly identified human bocavirus wa...)

Our preliminary data suggests that human bocavirus may be associated ...Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a recently identified ... parvovirus that has be...The research was carried out through the Thailand International Emergi...,Bocavirus,infection,may,be, ... The newly identified human bocavirus was found in nearly 5 percent of ... ... Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a recently identified parvovirus that has been found in respiratory secretions of children with lower ...
more infohttp://news.bio-medicine.org/biology-news-3/Bocavirus-infection-may-be-associated-with-pneumonia-in-Thailand--especially-in-children-7637-1/

Human bocavirus infections and co-infections with respiratory syncytial virus and Rotavirus in children with acute respiratory...Human bocavirus infections and co-infections with respiratory syncytial virus and Rotavirus in children with acute respiratory...

Summary of "Human bocavirus infections and co-infections with respiratory syncytial virus and Rotavirus in children with acute ... Human bocavirus infections and co-infections with respiratory syncytial virus and Rotavirus in children with acute respiratory ... Home » Topics » Respiratory » Research » Human bocavirus infections and co-infections with respiratory syncytial virus and ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/pmarticle/2480812/Human-bocavirus-infections-and-co-infections-with-respiratory-syncytial-virus-and-Rotavirus.html

Human bocavirus infection in children with acute respiratory tract infection in India. - Semantic ScholarHuman bocavirus infection in children with acute respiratory tract infection in India. - Semantic Scholar

Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a new human parvovirus identified in children with respiratory tract disease. Nasopharyngeal ... Detection of human bocavirus in children with acute respiratory tract infections in Lanzhou and Nanjing, China.. *Jian Wu, Yu ... Human Bocavirus Infection in Children with Acute Respiratory Infection in Nairobi , Kenya. *Samwel Morris Lifumo Symekher, ... Bocavirus Viremia and Hepatitis in an Immunocompetent Child. *Zeliha Haytoğlu, Oğuz Canan ...
more infohttps://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Human-bocavirus-infection-in-children-with-acute-in-Bharaj-Sullender/f36380a57da5a5236256cf54128746d90b12fa76

Detection and genetic characterization of feline bocavirus in Northeast China | Virology Journal | Full TextDetection and genetic characterization of feline bocavirus in Northeast China | Virology Journal | Full Text

These strains exhibited the typical genome organization of bocavirus and were closely related to FBoV. Two FBoV-2 identified ... California sea lion bocavirus; CBoV, canine bocavirus; FBoV, feline bocavirus; HBoV, human bocavirus; PBoV, porcine bocavirus; ... canine bocavirus (CBoV), feline bocavirus (FBoV), human bocavirus (HBoV), gorilla bocavirus (GBoV), bovine parvovirus (BPV), ... Feline bocavirus (FBoV) belongs to the species Carnivore bocaparvovirus 3 in the genus Bocavirus. In 2012, a novel bocavirus ...
more infohttps://virologyj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12985-018-1034-3

Detection of human bocavirus from children and adults with acute respiratory tract illness in Guangzhou, southern China | BMC...Detection of human bocavirus from children and adults with acute respiratory tract illness in Guangzhou, southern China | BMC...

Human bocavirus (HBoV) is a newly discovered parvovirus associated with acute respiratory tract illness (ARTI) and ... 8] reported a previously undescribed human parvovirus, human bocavirus (HBoV) that belongs to the genus Bocavirus, in ... Cheng WX, Jin Y, Duan ZJ, Xu ZQ, Qi HM, Zhang Q, Yu JM, Zhu L, Jin M, Liu N, Cui SX, Li HY, Fang ZY: Human bocavirus in ... Bastien N, Brandt K, Dust K, Ward D, Li Y: Human bocavirus infection, Canada. Emerg Infect Dis. 2006, 12: 848-850.View Article ...
more infohttps://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2334-11-345

Comorbidity and high viral load linked to clinical presentation of respiratory human bocavirus infection, Archives of Virology ...Comorbidity and high viral load linked to clinical presentation of respiratory human bocavirus infection, Archives of Virology ...

"Comorbidity and high viral load linked to clinical presentation of respiratory human bocavirus infection, Archives of Virology ... A newly identified bocavirus species in human stool. Kapoor, A; Slikas, E; Simmonds, P; Chieochansin, T; Naeem, A; Shaukat, S; ... Human bocavirus and acute wheezing in children. Allander, T; Jartti, T; Gupta, S; Niesters, HG; Lehtinen, P; Osterback, R; ... Human bocavirus infection in children with respiratory tract disease. Brieu, N; Guyon, G; Rodiere, M; Segondy, M; Foulongne, V ...
more infohttps://www.deepdyve.com/lp/springer_journal/comorbidity-and-high-viral-load-linked-to-clinical-presentation-of-dR2sdv4WIQ

Simultaneous atelectasis in human bocavirus infected monozygotic twins: was it plastic bronchitis? | BMC Pediatrics | Full TextSimultaneous atelectasis in human bocavirus infected monozygotic twins: was it plastic bronchitis? | BMC Pediatrics | Full Text

Oikawa J, Ogita J, Ishiwada N, Okada T, Endo R, Ishiguro N, Ubukata K, Kohno Y: Human bocavirus DNA detected in a boy with ... Jartti T, Hedman K, Jartti L, Ruuskanen O, Allander T, Söderlund-Venermo M: Human bocavirus-the first 5 years. Rev Med Virol. ... In this second report related to human bocavirus, we show additional evidence that this condition can be triggered by a simple ... Although a bocavirus infection simultaneously affecting monozygotic twins is an unusual event, acute bronchial obstruction due ...
more infohttps://bmcpediatr.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2431-13-209

Human Bocavirus in French Children - COREHuman Bocavirus in French Children - CORE

Human bocavirus (HBoV), a new member of the genus Bocavirus in the family Parvoviridae, has been recently associated with ... Evidence of human coronavirus HKU1 and human bocavirus in Australian children. * (2006). Human bocavirus in children. Emerg ... Human Bocavirus in French Children By Vincent Foulongne, Yann Olejnik, Virginie Perez, Stéphane Elaerts, Michel Rodière and ... Detection of human bocavirus in Japanese children with lower respiratory tract infections. ...
more infohttps://core.ac.uk/display/8689079

Gentaur Molecular :BioBiZ \ PowerChekTM Human Adenovirus Bocavirus IPC Real time RT PCR Kit \ R6100Gentaur Molecular :BioBiZ \ PowerChekTM Human Adenovirus Bocavirus IPC Real time RT PCR Kit \ R6100

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Prevalence of parvovirus B19 and human bocavirus DNA in the heart of patients with no evidence of dilated cardiomyopathy or...Prevalence of parvovirus B19 and human bocavirus DNA in the heart of patients with no evidence of dilated cardiomyopathy or...

The same question applies to human bocavirus (HBoV). We have determined the prevalence and quantity of B19V and HBoV DNA in ... The same question applies to human bocavirus (HBoV). We have determined the prevalence and quantity of B19V and HBoV DNA in ... Prevalence of parvovirus B19 and human bocavirus DNA in the heart of patients with no evidence of dilated cardiomyopathy or ... Prevalence of parvovirus B19 and human bocavirus DNA in the heart of patients with no evidence of dilated cardiomyopathy or ...
more infohttps://epub.uni-regensburg.de/12578/

A novel bocavirus in canine liver | Virology Journal | Full TextA novel bocavirus in canine liver | Virology Journal | Full Text

... we identified and characterized a novel bocavirus we named Canine bocavirus 3 (CnBoV3). The three major ORFs of CnBoV3 (NS1, ... We genetically characterized a bocavirus in a dog liver that is highly distinct from prior canine bocaviruses found in ... and Canine bocavirus (CBoV), associated with respiratory disease. In this study using deep sequencing of enriched viral ... we identified and characterized a novel bocavirus we named Canine bocavirus 3 (CnBoV3). The three major ORFs of CnBoV3 (NS1, ...
more infohttps://virologyj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1743-422X-10-54

Bocavirus Infection in Otherwise Healthy Children with Respiratory Disease - omicXBocavirus Infection in Otherwise Healthy Children with Respiratory Disease - omicX

Human bocavirus was detected using the respiratory virus panel fast assay and real-time PCR. Of the 1,823 nasopharyngeal ... To evaluate the role of human bocavirus (hBoV) as a causative agent of respiratory disease, the importance of the viral load in ... Bocavirus Infection in Otherwise Healthy Children with Respiratory Disease. To evaluate the role of human bocavirus (hBoV) as a ... Human bocavirus was detected using the respiratory virus panel fast assay and real-time PCR. Of the 1,823 nasopharyngeal ...
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  • Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) encodes a genus-specific protein, NP1, which regulates viral alternative pre-mRNA processing. (asm.org)
  • Feline bocavirus (FBoV) belongs to the species Carnivore bocaparvovirus 3 in the genus Bocavirus . (biomedcentral.com)
  • Similar to NP1 of the related bocavirus minute virus of canine (MVC), HBoV1 NP1 suppressed cleavage and polyadenylation of RNAs at the viral internal polyadenylation site (pA)p. (asm.org)
  • The NP1 protein of human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), similar to NP1 of the bocavirus minute virus of canine (MVC), regulates viral alternative RNA processing by both suppressing polyadenylation at an internal site, (pA)p, and facilitating splicing of an upstream adjacent intron. (asm.org)
  • In this article we describe two monozygotic twins without underlying conditions suffering from respiratory distress following a common, human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) positive respiratory tract infection. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Kesebir D , Vazquez M , Weibel C , Shapiro ED , Ferguson D , Landry ML , Human bocavirus infection in young children in the United States: molecular epidemiological profile and clinical characteristics of a newly emerging respiratory virus. (cdc.gov)
  • The term human bocavirus can refer to any bocaparvovirus strain in the Primate bocaparvovirus 1 and Primate bocaparvovirus 2 species that infects humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Using deep sequencing, we characterized viral sequences present in the dog's liver revealing a third species of canine bocavirus described here. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These strains exhibited the typical genome organization of bocavirus and were closely related to FBoV. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The sequence was extended by degenerate PCR targeting conserved bocavirus regions, yielding a ~2.5 kb partial genome sequence. (biomedcentral.com)