The introduction of whole blood or blood component directly into the blood stream. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Reinfusion of blood or blood products derived from the patient's own circulation. (Dorland, 27th ed)
The transfer of erythrocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.
The transfer of blood platelets from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.
Repetitive withdrawal of small amounts of blood and replacement with donor blood until a large proportion of the blood volume has been exchanged. Used in treatment of fetal erythroblastosis, hepatic coma, sickle cell anemia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, septicemia, burns, thrombotic thrombopenic purpura, and fulminant malaria.
The transfer of blood components such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma from a donor to a recipient or back to the donor. This process differs from the procedures undertaken in PLASMAPHERESIS and types of CYTAPHERESIS; (PLATELETPHERESIS and LEUKAPHERESIS) where, following the removal of plasma or the specific cell components, the remainder is transfused back to the donor.
Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.
In utero transfusion of BLOOD into the FETUS for the treatment of FETAL DISEASES, such as fetal erythroblastosis (ERYTHROBLASTOSIS, FETAL).
Centers for collecting, characterizing and storing human blood.
'Blood donors' are individuals who voluntarily and safely donate a specific amount of their own blood, which can be further separated into components, to be used for transfusion purposes or for manufacturing medical products, without receiving remuneration that is intended to reward them financially.
Testing erythrocytes to determine presence or absence of blood-group antigens, testing of serum to determine the presence or absence of antibodies to these antigens, and selecting biocompatible blood by crossmatching samples from the donor against samples from the recipient. Crossmatching is performed prior to transfusion.
Recovery of blood lost from surgical procedures for reuse by the same patient in AUTOLOGOUS BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS. It is collected during (intraoperatively) or after completion of (postoperatively) the surgical procedures.
Passage of blood from one fetus to another via an arteriovenous communication or other shunt, in a monozygotic twin pregnancy. It results in anemia in one twin and polycythemia in the other. (Lee et al., Wintrobe's Clinical Hematology, 9th ed, p737-8)
A reduction in the number of circulating ERYTHROCYTES or in the quantity of HEMOGLOBIN.
Hemorrhage following any surgical procedure. It may be immediate or delayed and is not restricted to the surgical wound.
Antifibrinolytic hemostatic used in severe hemorrhage.
The oxygen-carrying proteins of ERYTHROCYTES. They are found in all vertebrates and some invertebrates. The number of globin subunits in the hemoglobin quaternary structure differs between species. Structures range from monomeric to a variety of multimeric arrangements.
Agents that prevent fibrinolysis or lysis of a blood clot or thrombus. Several endogenous antiplasmins are known. The drugs are used to control massive hemorrhage and in other coagulation disorders.
Patient care procedures performed during the operation that are ancillary to the actual surgery. It includes monitoring, fluid therapy, medication, transfusion, anesthesia, radiography, and laboratory tests.
Members of a religious denomination founded in the United States during the late 19th century in which active evangelism is practiced, the imminent approach of the millennium is preached, and war and organized government authority in matters of conscience are strongly opposed (from American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language, 4th ed). Jehovah's Witnesses generally refuse blood transfusions and other blood-based treatments based on religious belief.
The process by which blood or its components are kept viable outside of the organism from which they are derived (i.e., kept from decay by means of a chemical agent, cooling, or a fluid substitute that mimics the natural state within the organism).
An antigenic mismatch between donor and recipient blood. Antibodies present in the recipient's serum may be directed against antigens in the donor product. Such a mismatch may result in a transfusion reaction in which, for example, donor blood is hemolyzed. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984).
Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.
Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.
The degree to which the blood supply for BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS is free of harmful substances or infectious agents, and properly typed and crossmatched (BLOOD GROUPING AND CROSSMATCHING) to insure serological compatibility between BLOOD DONORS and recipients.
The mildest form of erythroblastosis fetalis in which anemia is the chief manifestation.
The transfer of leukocytes from a donor to a recipient or reinfusion to the donor.
Reduction of blood viscosity usually by the addition of cell free solutions. Used clinically (1) in states of impaired microcirculation, (2) for replacement of intraoperative blood loss without homologous blood transfusion, and (3) in cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia.
Interventions to provide care prior to, during, and immediately after surgery.
Substances that are used in place of blood, for example, as an alternative to BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS after blood loss to restore BLOOD VOLUME and oxygen-carrying capacity to the blood circulation, or to perfuse isolated organs.
The preparation of platelet concentrates with the return of red cells and platelet-poor plasma to the donor.
A disorder characterized by reduced synthesis of the beta chains of hemoglobin. There is retardation of hemoglobin A synthesis in the heterozygous form (thalassemia minor), which is asymptomatic, while in the homozygous form (thalassemia major, Cooley's anemia, Mediterranean anemia, erythroblastic anemia), which can result in severe complications and even death, hemoglobin A synthesis is absent.
A condition characterized by the abnormal presence of ERYTHROBLASTS in the circulation of the FETUS or NEWBORNS. It is a disorder due to BLOOD GROUP INCOMPATIBILITY, such as the maternal alloimmunization by fetal antigen RH FACTORS leading to HEMOLYSIS of ERYTHROCYTES, hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC), general edema (HYDROPS FETALIS), and SEVERE JAUNDICE IN NEWBORN.
Antibodies from an individual that react with ISOANTIGENS of another individual of the same species.
Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.
Agents acting to arrest the flow of blood. Absorbable hemostatics arrest bleeding either by the formation of an artificial clot or by providing a mechanical matrix that facilitates clotting when applied directly to the bleeding surface. These agents function more at the capillary level and are not effective at stemming arterial or venous bleeding under any significant intravascular pressure.
Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the KIDNEY in the adult and the LIVER in the FETUS, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the BONE MARROW to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.
The removal of LEUKOCYTES from BLOOD to reduce BLOOD TRANSFUSION reactions and lower the chance of transmitting VIRUSES. This may be performed by FILTRATION or by CYTAPHERESIS.
A disease characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs. It is the clinical expression of homozygosity for hemoglobin S.
Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.
Control of bleeding during or after surgery.
An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.
Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.
Care given during the period prior to undergoing surgery when psychological and physical preparations are made according to the special needs of the individual patient. This period spans the time between admission to the hospital to the time the surgery begins. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
International collective of humanitarian organizations led by volunteers and guided by its Congressional Charter and the Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross Movement, to provide relief to victims of disaster and help people prevent, prepare for, and respond to emergencies.
Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.
Transplacental passage of fetal blood into the circulation of the maternal organism. (Dorland, 27th ed)
Surgery which could be postponed or not done at all without danger to the patient. Elective surgery includes procedures to correct non-life-threatening medical problems as well as to alleviate conditions causing psychological stress or other potential risk to patients, e.g., cosmetic or contraceptive surgery.
Infectious organisms in the BLOOD, of which the predominant medical interest is their contamination of blood-soiled linens, towels, gowns, BANDAGES, other items from individuals in risk categories, NEEDLES and other sharp objects, MEDICAL WASTE and DENTAL WASTE, all of which health workers are exposed to. This concept is differentiated from the clinical conditions of BACTEREMIA; VIREMIA; and FUNGEMIA where the organism is present in the blood of a patient as the result of a natural infectious process.
Diversion of the flow of blood from the entrance of the right atrium directly to the aorta (or femoral artery) via an oxygenator thus bypassing both the heart and lungs.
The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)
INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by HEPATITIS C VIRUS, a single-stranded RNA virus. Its incubation period is 30-90 days. Hepatitis C is transmitted primarily by contaminated blood parenterally, and is often associated with transfusion and intravenous drug abuse. However, in a significant number of cases, the source of hepatitis C infection is unknown.
The process by which fetal Rh+ erythrocytes enter the circulation of an Rh- mother, causing her to produce IMMUNOGLOBULIN G antibodies, which can cross the placenta and destroy the erythrocytes of Rh+ fetuses. Rh isoimmunization can also be caused by BLOOD TRANSFUSION with mismatched blood.
Agents which improve the quality of the blood, increasing the hemoglobin level and the number of erythrocytes. They are used in the treatment of anemias.
Bleeding in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT from ESOPHAGUS to RECTUM.
A single-chain polypeptide derived from bovine tissues consisting of 58 amino-acid residues. It is an inhibitor of proteolytic enzymes including CHYMOTRYPSIN; KALLIKREIN; PLASMIN; and TRYPSIN. It is used in the treatment of HEMORRHAGE associated with raised plasma concentrations of plasmin. It is also used to reduce blood loss and transfusion requirements in patients at high risk of major blood loss during and following open heart surgery with EXTRACORPOREAL CIRCULATION. (Reynolds JEF(Ed): Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia (electronic version). Micromedex, Inc, Englewood, CO, 1995)
Replacement of the knee joint.
An excessive accumulation of iron in the body due to a greater than normal absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract or from parenteral injection. This may arise from idiopathic hemochromatosis, excessive iron intake, chronic alcoholism, certain types of refractory anemia, or transfusional hemosiderosis. (From Churchill's Illustrated Medical Dictionary, 1989)
The period of confinement of a patient to a hospital or other health facility.
Therapy of heavy metal poisoning using agents which sequester the metal from organs or tissues and bind it firmly within the ring structure of a new compound which can be eliminated from the body.
Surgery performed on the heart.
Excess blood loss from uterine bleeding associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR or CHILDBIRTH. It is defined as blood loss greater than 500 ml or of the amount that adversely affects the maternal physiology, such as BLOOD PRESSURE and HEMATOCRIT. Postpartum hemorrhage is divided into two categories, immediate (within first 24 hours after birth) or delayed (after 24 hours postpartum).
An infant during the first month after birth.
The residual portion of BLOOD that is left after removal of BLOOD CELLS by CENTRIFUGATION without prior BLOOD COAGULATION.
The number of PLATELETS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.
A group of hereditary hemolytic anemias in which there is decreased synthesis of one or more hemoglobin polypeptide chains. There are several genetic types with clinical pictures ranging from barely detectable hematologic abnormality to severe and fatal anemia.
A subnormal level of BLOOD PLATELETS.
Antibodies to the HEPATITIS C ANTIGENS including antibodies to envelope, core, and non-structural proteins.
Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.
Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)
The techniques used to draw blood from a vein for diagnostic purposes or for treatment of certain blood disorders such as erythrocytosis, hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, and porphyria cutanea tarda.
Excision of all or part of the liver. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A distribution in which a variable is distributed like the sum of the squares of any given independent random variable, each of which has a normal distribution with mean of zero and variance of one. The chi-square test is a statistical test based on comparison of a test statistic to a chi-square distribution. The oldest of these tests are used to detect whether two or more population distributions differ from one another.
The number of RETICULOCYTES per unit volume of BLOOD. The values are expressed as a percentage of the ERYTHROCYTE COUNT or in the form of an index ("corrected reticulocyte index"), which attempts to account for the number of circulating erythrocytes.
The volume of packed RED BLOOD CELLS in a blood specimen. The volume is measured by centrifugation in a tube with graduated markings, or with automated blood cell counters. It is an indicator of erythrocyte status in disease. For example, ANEMIA shows a low value; POLYCYTHEMIA, a high value.
An antifibrinolytic agent that acts by inhibiting plasminogen activators which have fibrinolytic properties.
INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans due to infection by VIRUSES. There are several significant types of human viral hepatitis with infection caused by enteric-transmission (HEPATITIS A; HEPATITIS E) or blood transfusion (HEPATITIS B; HEPATITIS C; and HEPATITIS D).
Replacement of the hip joint.
A rare transmissible encephalopathy most prevalent between the ages of 50 and 70 years. Affected individuals may present with sleep disturbances, personality changes, ATAXIA; APHASIA, visual loss, weakness, muscle atrophy, MYOCLONUS, progressive dementia, and death within one year of disease onset. A familial form exhibiting autosomal dominant inheritance and a new variant CJD (potentially associated with ENCEPHALOPATHY, BOVINE SPONGIFORM) have been described. Pathological features include prominent cerebellar and cerebral cortical spongiform degeneration and the presence of PRIONS. (From N Engl J Med, 1998 Dec 31;339(27))
Bleeding from a PEPTIC ULCER that can be located in any segment of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT.
EPIDEMIOLOGIC STUDIES based on the detection through serological testing of characteristic change in the serum level of specific ANTIBODIES. Latent subclinical infections and carrier states can thus be detected in addition to clinically overt cases.
The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.
The indelible marking of TISSUES, primarily SKIN, by pricking it with NEEDLES to imbed various COLORING AGENTS. Tattooing of the CORNEA is done to colorize LEUKOMA spots.
Erythrocyte isoantigens of the Rh (Rhesus) blood group system, the most complex of all human blood groups. The major antigen Rh or D is the most common cause of erythroblastosis fetalis.
Organic chemicals that form two or more coordination links with an iron ion. Once coordination has occurred, the complex formed is called a chelate. The iron-binding porphyrin group of hemoglobin is an example of a metal chelate found in biological systems.
The religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus Christ: the religion that believes in God as the Father Almighty who works redemptively through the Holy Spirit for men's salvation and that affirms Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior who proclaimed to man the gospel of salvation. (From Webster, 3d ed)
The period during a surgical operation.
Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery of the fetus and amniotic cavity through abdominal or uterine entry.
The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)
Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.
INFLAMMATION of the LIVER in humans caused by a member of the ORTHOHEPADNAVIRUS genus, HEPATITIS B VIRUS. It is primarily transmitted by parenteral exposure, such as transfusion of contaminated blood or blood products, but can also be transmitted via sexual or intimate personal contact.
Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.
Bleeding from the nose.
The removal of fluids or discharges from the body, such as from a wound, sore, or cavity.
Sets of cell surface antigens located on BLOOD CELLS. They are usually membrane GLYCOPROTEINS or GLYCOLIPIDS that are antigenically distinguished by their carbohydrate moieties.
Solutions having the same osmotic pressure as blood serum, or another solution with which they are compared. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)
A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.
The aggregate of various economic, political, and social policies by which an imperial power maintains or extends its control over other areas or peoples. It includes the practice of or belief in acquiring and retaining colonies. The emphasis is less on its identity as an ideological political system than on its designation in a period of history. (Webster, 3d ed; from Dr. J. Cassedy, NLM History of Medicine Division)
Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.
The number of RED BLOOD CELLS per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD.
Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.
Acquired hemolytic anemia due to the presence of AUTOANTIBODIES which agglutinate or lyse the patient's own RED BLOOD CELLS.
A test to detect non-agglutinating ANTIBODIES against ERYTHROCYTES by use of anti-antibodies (the Coombs' reagent.) The direct test is applied to freshly drawn blood to detect antibody bound to circulating red cells. The indirect test is applied to serum to detect the presence of antibodies that can bind to red blood cells.
Use of a thrombelastograph, which provides a continuous graphic record of the physical shape of a clot during fibrin formation and subsequent lysis.
Red blood cells. Mature erythrocytes are non-nucleated, biconcave disks containing HEMOGLOBIN whose function is to transport OXYGEN.
Conditions in which there is a generalized increase in the iron stores of body tissues, particularly of liver and the MONONUCLEAR PHAGOCYTE SYSTEM, without demonstrable tissue damage. The name refers to the presence of stainable iron in the tissue in the form of hemosiderin.
A vital statistic measuring or recording the rate of death from any cause in hospitalized populations.
A condition of lung damage that is characterized by bilateral pulmonary infiltrates (PULMONARY EDEMA) rich in NEUTROPHILS, and in the absence of clinical HEART FAILURE. This can represent a spectrum of pulmonary lesions, endothelial and epithelial, due to numerous factors (physical, chemical, or biological).
The major human blood type system which depends on the presence or absence of two antigens A and B. Type O occurs when neither A nor B is present and AB when both are present. A and B are genetic factors that determine the presence of enzymes for the synthesis of certain glycoproteins mainly in the red cell membrane.
Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.
The destruction of ERYTHROCYTES by many different causal agents such as antibodies, bacteria, chemicals, temperature, and changes in tonicity.
Transplantation between individuals of the same species. Usually refers to genetically disparate individuals in contradistinction to isogeneic transplantation for genetically identical individuals.
The insertion of a catheter through the skin and body wall into the kidney pelvis, mainly to provide urine drainage where the ureter is not functional. It is used also to remove or dissolve renal calculi and to diagnose ureteral obstruction.
A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.
The senescence of RED BLOOD CELLS. Lacking the organelles that make protein synthesis possible, the mature erythrocyte is incapable of self-repair, reproduction, and carrying out certain functions performed by other cells. This limits the average life span of an erythrocyte to 120 days.
Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.
The time periods immediately before, during and following a surgical operation.
Specialized hospital facilities which provide diagnostic and therapeutic services for trauma patients.
Agents used to prevent or reverse the pathological events leading to sickling of erythrocytes in sickle cell conditions.
A space in which the pressure is far below atmospheric pressure so that the remaining gases do not affect processes being carried on in the space.
The number of LEUKOCYTES and ERYTHROCYTES per unit volume in a sample of venous BLOOD. A complete blood count (CBC) also includes measurement of the HEMOGLOBIN; HEMATOCRIT; and ERYTHROCYTE INDICES.
Measurement of hemoglobin concentration in blood.
Organized procedures for establishing patient identity, including use of bracelets, etc.
An autologous or commercial tissue adhesive containing FIBRINOGEN and THROMBIN. The commercial product is a two component system from human plasma that contains more than fibrinogen and thrombin. The first component contains highly concentrated fibrinogen, FACTOR VIII, fibronectin, and traces of other plasma proteins. The second component contains thrombin, calcium chloride, and antifibrinolytic agents such as APROTININ. Mixing of the two components promotes BLOOD CLOTTING and the formation and cross-linking of fibrin. The tissue adhesive is used for tissue sealing, HEMOSTASIS, and WOUND HEALING.
A procedure in which a laparoscope (LAPAROSCOPES) is inserted through a small incision near the navel to examine the abdominal and pelvic organs in the PERITONEAL CAVITY. If appropriate, biopsy or surgery can be performed during laparoscopy.
Acute hemorrhage or excessive fluid loss resulting in HYPOVOLEMIA.
A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of medical care.
The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.
Natural product isolated from Streptomyces pilosus. It forms iron complexes and is used as a chelating agent, particularly in the mesylate form.
Surgical procedure involving either partial or entire removal of the spleen.
Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA. Most cases are transient self-limiting (PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE) occurring in the first week of life, but some can be a sign of pathological disorders, particularly LIVER DISEASES.
A mucosal tumor of the urinary bladder or nasal cavity in which proliferating epithelium is invaginated beneath the surface and is more smoothly rounded than in other papillomas. (Stedman, 25th ed)
A form of anemia in which the bone marrow fails to produce adequate numbers of peripheral blood elements.
The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.
The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.
Acquired degenerative dilation or expansion (ectasia) of normal BLOOD VESSELS, often associated with aging. They are isolated, tortuous, thin-walled vessels and sources of bleeding. They occur most often in mucosal capillaries of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT leading to GASTROINTESTINAL HEMORRHAGE and ANEMIA.
A species of protozoa infecting humans via the intermediate tick vector IXODES scapularis. The other hosts are the mouse PEROMYSCUS leucopus and meadow vole MICROTUS pennsylvanicus, which are fed on by the tick. Other primates can be experimentally infected with Babesia microti.
Volume of circulating BLOOD. It is the sum of the PLASMA VOLUME and ERYTHROCYTE VOLUME.
A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.
Organic and inorganic compounds that contain iron as an integral part of the molecule.
A process of separating particulate matter from a fluid, such as air or a liquid, by passing the fluid carrier through a medium that will not pass the particulates. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The restoration to life or consciousness of one apparently dead. (Dorland, 27th ed)
A metallic element with atomic symbol Fe, atomic number 26, and atomic weight 55.85. It is an essential constituent of HEMOGLOBINS; CYTOCHROMES; and IRON-BINDING PROTEINS. It plays a role in cellular redox reactions and in the transport of OXYGEN.
The survival of a graft in a host, the factors responsible for the survival and the changes occurring within the graft during growth in the host.
Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.
The black, tarry, foul-smelling FECES that contain degraded blood.
The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens. When transmission is within the same species, the mode can be horizontal or vertical (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).
Therapy for the insufficient cleansing of the BLOOD by the kidneys based on dialysis and including hemodialysis, PERITONEAL DIALYSIS, and HEMODIAFILTRATION.
Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.
A republic in western Africa, south of NIGER between BENIN and CAMEROON. Its capital is Abuja.
The practice of medicine as applied to special circumstances associated with military operations.
A family of RNA viruses, many of which cause disease in humans and domestic animals. There are three genera FLAVIVIRUS; PESTIVIRUS; and HEPACIVIRUS, as well as several unassigned species.
Techniques for controlling bleeding.
A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.
The proportion of survivors in a group, e.g., of patients, studied and followed over a period, or the proportion of persons in a specified group alive at the beginning of a time interval who survive to the end of the interval. It is often studied using life table methods.
Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.
A condition of inadequate circulating red blood cells (ANEMIA) or insufficient HEMOGLOBIN due to premature destruction of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES).
A genus of FLAVIVIRIDAE causing parenterally-transmitted HEPATITIS C which is associated with transfusions and drug abuse. Hepatitis C virus is the type species.
Multiple erythrocytic antigens that comprise at least three pairs of alternates and amorphs, determined by one complex gene or possibly several genes at closely linked loci. The system is important in transfusion reactions. Its expression involves the X-chromosome.
A membrane or barrier with micrometer sized pores used for separation purification processes.
Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.
'Infant, Premature, Diseases' refers to health conditions or abnormalities that specifically affect babies born before 37 weeks of gestation, often resulting from their immature organ systems and increased vulnerability due to preterm birth.
A class of statistical methods applicable to a large set of probability distributions used to test for correlation, location, independence, etc. In most nonparametric statistical tests, the original scores or observations are replaced by another variable containing less information. An important class of nonparametric tests employs the ordinal properties of the data. Another class of tests uses information about whether an observation is above or below some fixed value such as the median, and a third class is based on the frequency of the occurrence of runs in the data. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1284; Corsini, Concise Encyclopedia of Psychology, 1987, p764-5)
Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.
The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.
An anatomic severity scale based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and developed specifically to score multiple traumatic injuries. It has been used as a predictor of mortality.
Those hepatitis B antigens found on the surface of the Dane particle and on the 20 nm spherical and tubular particles. Several subspecificities of the surface antigen are known. These were formerly called the Australia antigen.
Antigens that exist in alternative (allelic) forms in a single species. When an isoantigen is encountered by species members who lack it, an immune response is induced. Typical isoantigens are the BLOOD GROUP ANTIGENS.
Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.
Immunoglobulins raised by any form of viral hepatitis; some of these antibodies are used to diagnose the specific kind of hepatitis.
Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.
Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.
Shortened forms of written words or phrases used for brevity.
Injuries caused by impact with a blunt object where there is no penetration of the skin.
A prolonged painful erection that may lasts hours and is not associated with sexual activity. It is seen in patients with SICKLE CELL ANEMIA, advanced malignancy, spinal trauma; and certain drug treatments.
Multiple physical insults or injuries occurring simultaneously.
A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.
Iron-containing proteins that are widely distributed in animals, plants, and microorganisms. Their major function is to store IRON in a nontoxic bioavailable form. Each ferritin molecule consists of ferric iron in a hollow protein shell (APOFERRITINS) made of 24 subunits of various sequences depending on the species and tissue types.
Hospitals maintained by a university for the teaching of medical students, postgraduate training programs, and clinical research.
Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.
A group of tick-borne diseases of mammals including ZOONOSES in humans. They are caused by protozoa of the genus BABESIA, which parasitize erythrocytes, producing hemolysis. In the U.S., the organism's natural host is mice and transmission is by the deer tick IXODES SCAPULARIS.
Identification of the major histocompatibility antigens of transplant DONORS and potential recipients, usually by serological tests. Donor and recipient pairs should be of identical ABO blood group, and in addition should be matched as closely as possible for HISTOCOMPATIBILITY ANTIGENS in order to minimize the likelihood of allograft rejection. (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)
Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.
Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.
Antigens determined by leukocyte loci found on chromosome 6, the major histocompatibility loci in humans. They are polypeptides or glycoproteins found on most nucleated cells and platelets, determine tissue types for transplantation, and are associated with certain diseases.
Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.
Accumulations of blood in the PERITONEAL CAVITY due to internal HEMORRHAGE.
The period following a surgical operation.

Reduction in baroreflex cardiovascular responses due to venous infusion in the rabbit. (1/3107)

We studied reflex bradycardia and depression of mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) during left aortic nerve (LAN) stimulation before and after volume infusion in the anesthetized rabbit. Step increases in mean right atrial pressure (MRAP) to 10 mm Hg did not result in a significant change in heart rate or MAP. After volume loading, responses to LAN stimulation were not as great and the degree of attenuation was propoetional to the level of increased MRAP. A change in responsiveness was observed after elevation of MRAP by only 1 mm Hg, corresponding to less than a 10% increase in average calculated blood volume. after an increase in MRAP of 10 mm Hg, peak responses were attenuated by 44% (heart rate) and 52% (MAP), and the initial slopes (rate of change) were reduced by 46% (heart rate) and 66% (MAP). Comparison of the responses after infusion with blood and dextran solutions indicated that hemodilution was an unlikely explanation for the attenuation of the reflex responses. Total arterial baroreceptor denervation (ABD) abolished the volume-related attenuation was still present following bilateral aortic nerve section or vagotomy. It thus appears that the carotid sinus responds to changes inblood volume and influences the reflex cardiovascular responses to afferent stimulation of the LAN. On the other hand, cardiopulmonary receptors subserved by vagal afferents do not appear to be involved.  (+info)

A prospective study on TT virus infection in transfusion-dependent patients with beta-thalassemia. (2/3107)

A novel DNA virus designated TT virus (TTV) has been reported to be involved in the development of posttransfusion non-A-C hepatitis. We evaluated the frequency and natural course of TTV infection in a cohort of transfusion-dependent thalassemic patients in a 3-year follow-up study. Ninety-three serum hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody-negative patients (median age of 8 years; range, 0 to 25) from eight centers were studied. Of them, 34 (37%) had an abnormal alanine-aminotransferase (ALT) baseline pattern, and the other 12 (13%) showed ALT flare-ups during the follow-up. TTV DNA in patient sera collected at the time of enrollment and at the end of follow-up was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In parallel, serum samples from 100 healthy blood donors were also tested. At baseline, 87 patient sera (93.5%) tested positive for the TTV DNA. Of these TTV DNA-positive patients, 84 (96.5%) remained viremic at the end of the study period. Of the 6 TTV DNA-negative patients, 3 acquired TTV infection during follow-up. However, no definite relation was observed between the results of TTV DNA determination and ALT patterns. TTV viremia was also detectable in 22% of blood donors. In conclusion, TTV infection is frequent and persistent among Italian transfusion-dependent patients. The high rate of viremia observed in healthy donors indicates that the parenteral route is not the only mode of TTV spread.  (+info)

Soluble HLA class I, HLA class II, and Fas ligand in blood components: a possible key to explain the immunomodulatory effects of allogeneic blood transfusions. (3/3107)

The immunomodulatory effect of allogeneic blood transfusions (ABT) has been known for many years. However, a complete understanding of the effects of ABT on the recipient's immune system has remained elusive. Soluble HLA class I (sHLA-I), HLA class II (sHLA-II), and Fas ligand (sFasL) molecules may play immunoregulatory roles. We determined by double-determinant immunoenzymatic assay (DDIA) sHLA-I, sHLA-II, and sFasL concentrations in different blood components. sHLA-I and sFasL levels in red blood cells (RBCs) stored for up to 30 days and in random-donor platelets are significantly (P <.001) higher than in other blood components and their amount is proportionate to the number of residual donor leukocytes and to the length of storage. Blood components with high sHLA-I and sFasL levels play immunoregulatory roles in vitro as in allogeneic mixed lymphocyte responses (MLR) and antigen-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) activity, and induce apoptosis in Fas-positive cells. These data suggest that soluble molecules in blood components are functional. If these results are paralleled in vivo, they should be taken into account in transfusion practice. Blood components that can cause immunosuppression should be chosen to induce transplantation tolerance, whereas blood components that lack immunosuppressive effects should be preferred to reduce the risk of postoperative complications and cancer recurrence.  (+info)

Structural and functional consequences of antigenic modulation of red blood cells with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol). (4/3107)

We previously showed that the covalent modification of the red blood cell (RBC) surface with methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) [mPEG; MW approximately 5 kD] could significantly attenuate the immunologic recognition of surface antigens. However, to make these antigenically silent RBC a clinically viable option, the mPEG-modified RBC must maintain normal cellular structure and functions. To this end, mPEG-derivatization was found to have no significant detrimental effects on RBC structure or function at concentrations that effectively blocked antigenic recognition of a variety of RBC antigens. Importantly, RBC lysis, morphology, and hemoglobin oxidation state were unaffected by mPEG-modification. Furthermore, as shown by functional studies of Band 3, a major site of modification, PEG-binding does not affect protein function, as evidenced by normal SO4- flux. Similarly, Na+ and K+ homeostasis were unaffected. The functional aspects of the mPEG-modified RBC were also maintained, as evidenced by normal oxygen binding and cellular deformability. Perhaps most importantly, mPEG-derivatized mouse RBC showed normal in vivo survival ( approximately 50 days) with no sensitization after repeated transfusions. These data further support the hypothesis that the covalent attachment of nonimmunogenic materials (eg, mPEG) to intact RBC may have significant application in transfusion medicine, especially for the chronically transfused and/or allosensitized patient.  (+info)

Endoscopic retreatment compared with surgery in patients with recurrent bleeding after initial endoscopic control of bleeding ulcers. (5/3107)

BACKGROUND AND METHODS: After endoscopic treatment to control bleeding of peptic ulcers, bleeding recurs in 15 to 20 percent of patients. In a prospective, randomized study, we compared endoscopic retreatment with surgery after initial endoscopy. Over a 40-month period, 1169 of 3473 adults who were admitted to our hospital with bleeding peptic ulcers underwent endoscopy to reestablish hemostasis. Of 100 patients with recurrent bleeding, 7 patients with cancer and 1 patient with cardiac arrest were excluded from the study; 48 patients were randomly assigned to undergo immediate endoscopic retreatment and 44 were assigned to undergo surgery. The type of operation used was left to the surgeon. Bleeding was considered to have recurred in the event of any one of the following: vomiting of fresh blood, hypotension and melena, or a requirement for more than four units of blood in the 72-hour period after endoscopic treatment. RESULTS: Of the 48 patients who were assigned to endoscopic retreatment, 35 had long-term control of bleeding. Thirteen underwent salvage surgery, 11 because retreatment failed and 2 because of perforations resulting from thermocoagulation. Five patients in the endoscopy group died within 30 days, as compared with eight patients in the surgery group (P=0.37). Seven patients in the endoscopy group (including 6 who underwent salvage surgery) had complications, as compared with 16 in the surgery group (P=0.03). The duration of hospitalization, the need for hospitalization in the intensive care unit and the resultant duration of that stay, and the number of blood transfusions were similar in the two groups. In multivariate analysis, hypotension at randomization (P=0.01) and an ulcer size of at least 2 cm (P=0.03) were independent factors predictive of the failure of endoscopic retreatment. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with peptic ulcers and recurrent bleeding after initial endoscopic control of bleeding, endoscopic retreatment reduces the need for surgery without increasing the risk of death and is associated with fewer complications than is surgery.  (+info)

Primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty performed for acute myocardial infarction in a patient with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura. (6/3107)

A 72-year-old female with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) complained of severe chest pain. Electrocardiography showed ST-segment depression and negative T wave in I, aVL and V4-6. Following a diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), urgent coronary angiography revealed 99% organic stenosis with delayed flow in the proximal segment and 50% in the middle segment of the left anterior descending artery (LAD). Subsequently, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) for the stenosis in the proximal LAD was performed. In the coronary care unit, her blood pressure dropped. Hematomas around the puncture sites were observed and the platelet count was 28,000/mm3. After transfusion, electrocardiography revealed ST-segment elevation in I, aVL and V1-6. Urgent recatheterization disclosed total occlusion in the middle segment of the LAD. Subsequently, PTCA was performed successfully. Then, intravenous immunoglobulin increased the platelet count and the bleeding tendency disappeared. A case of AMI with ITP is rare. The present case suggests that primary PTCA can be a useful therapeutic strategy, but careful attention must be paid to hemostasis and to managing the platelet count.  (+info)

Hormonal changes in thalassaemia major. (7/3107)

Patients with severe thalassaemia major suffer endocrine and other abnormalities before their eventual death from iron overload due to repeated blood transfusions. The endocrine status of 31 thalassaemic patients aged 2-5 to 23 years was investigated. Exact data were available on the rate and duration of blood transfusion in all of them and in many the liver iron concentration was also known. Although the patients were euthyroid, the mean serum thyroxine level was significantly lower, and the mean thyrotrophic hormone level significantly higher, compared with the values found in normal children. Forty oral glucose tolerance tests with simultaneous insulin levels were performed in 19 children, of whom 5 developed symptomatic diabetes and one had impaired tolerance. Previous tests on all 6 patients were available and some showed raised insulin levels possibly due to insulin resistance. 2 patients had clinical hypoparathyroidism and are described. The parathyroid hormone levels determined by radioimmunoassay in 25 patients were below the mean for the age group in all and outside the reference range in 16. Nonfasting plasma calcium levels were not reduced. Puberty was delayed in some patients. Concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) measured in urine from 7 girls and 5 boys showed considerable variation. In the boys there was an overall tendency for FSH and LH excretion to be low with regard to age, but with respect to puberty rating FSH exretions were normal or low and LH normal or raised. The girls showed a tendency for LH but not FSH excretion to be raised in relation to puberty rating. The severity of the endocrine changes was related to the degree of iron loading and is discussed in relation to previous work in which the iron loading has rarely been accurately indicated nor parathyroid status assessed.  (+info)

Prospective randomized multicenter study comparing cyclosporin alone versus the combination of antithymocyte globulin and cyclosporin for treatment of patients with nonsevere aplastic anemia: a report from the European Blood and Marrow Transplant (EBMT) Severe Aplastic Anaemia Working Party. (8/3107)

We report the results of the first prospective randomized multicenter study of immunosuppressive treatment in patients with previously untreated nonsevere aplastic anemia (AA) as defined by a neutrophil count of at least 0.5 x 10(9)/L and transfusion dependence. Patients were randomized to receive cyclosporin (CSA) alone or the combination of horse antithymocyte globulin ([ATG] Lymphoglobuline; Merieux, Lyon, France) and CSA. The endpoint of the study was the hematologic response at 6 months. One hundred fifteen patients were randomized and assessable with a median follow-up period of 36 months; 61 received CSA and 54 ATG and CSA. In the CSA group, the percentage of complete and partial responders was 23% and 23%, respectively, for an overall response rate of 46%. A significantly higher overall response rate of 74% was found in the ATG and CSA group, with 57% complete and 17% partial responders (P =. 02). Compared with CSA alone, the combination of ATG and CSA resulted in a significantly higher median hemoglobin level and platelet count at 6 months. Fewer patients required a second course of treatment before 6 months due to a nonresponse. In the CSA group, 15 of 61 (25%) patients required a course of ATG before 6 months because of disease progression, compared with only 3 of 54 (6%) in the ATG and CSA group. The survival probabilities for the two groups were comparable, 93% (CSA group) and 91% (ATG and CSA group), but at 180 days, the prevalence of patients surviving free of transfusions, which excluded patients requiring second treatment because of nonresponse, death, disease progression, or relapse, was 67% in the CSA group and 90% in the ATG and CSA group (P =.001). We conclude that the combination of ATG and CSA is superior to CSA alone in terms of the hematologic response, the quality of response, and early mortality, and a second course of immunosuppression is less frequently required.  (+info)

A blood transfusion is a medical procedure in which blood or its components are transferred from one individual (donor) to another (recipient) through a vein. The donated blood can be fresh whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, plasma, or cryoprecipitate, depending on the recipient's needs. Blood transfusions are performed to replace lost blood due to severe bleeding, treat anemia, support patients undergoing major surgeries, or manage various medical conditions such as hemophilia, thalassemia, and leukemia. The donated blood must be carefully cross-matched with the recipient's blood type to minimize the risk of transfusion reactions.

Autologous blood transfusion is a medical procedure in which a patient receives their own blood that has been collected and stored prior to surgery or a medical treatment that may cause significant blood loss. The blood is drawn from the patient, typically in the days or weeks leading up to the scheduled procedure, and then stored until it is needed during or after the surgery.

The primary advantage of autologous blood transfusion is that it eliminates the risk of transfusion reactions, infectious disease transmission, and immunomodulation associated with allogeneic (donor) blood transfusions. However, not all patients are candidates for this type of transfusion due to various factors such as medical conditions, low hemoglobin levels, or insufficient time to collect and store the blood before the procedure.

Autologous blood transfusion can be performed using several methods, including preoperative blood donation, acute normovolemic hemodilution, intraoperative cell salvage, and postoperative blood collection. The choice of method depends on various factors, such as the patient's medical condition, the type and extent of surgery, and the availability of resources.

In summary, autologous blood transfusion is a safe and effective way to reduce the need for allogeneic blood transfusions during or after surgical procedures, but it may not be suitable for all patients.

An erythrocyte transfusion, also known as a red blood cell (RBC) transfusion, is the process of transferring compatible red blood cells from a donor to a recipient. This procedure is typically performed to increase the recipient's oxygen-carrying capacity, usually in situations where there is significant blood loss, anemia, or impaired red blood cell production.

During the transfusion, the donor's red blood cells are collected, typed, and tested for compatibility with the recipient's blood to minimize the risk of a transfusion reaction. Once compatible units are identified, they are infused into the recipient's circulation through a sterile intravenous (IV) line. The recipient's body will eventually eliminate the donated red blood cells within 100-120 days as part of its normal turnover process.

Erythrocyte transfusions can be lifesaving in various clinical scenarios, such as trauma, surgery, severe anemia due to chronic diseases, and hematologic disorders. However, they should only be used when necessary, as there are potential risks associated with the procedure, including allergic reactions, transmission of infectious diseases, transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI), and iron overload in cases of multiple transfusions.

A platelet transfusion is the process of medically administering platelets, which are small blood cells that help your body form clots to stop bleeding. Platelet transfusions are often given to patients with low platelet counts or dysfunctional platelets due to various reasons such as chemotherapy, bone marrow transplantation, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), and other medical conditions leading to increased consumption or destruction of platelets. This procedure helps to prevent or treat bleeding complications in these patients. It's important to note that platelet transfusions should be given under the supervision of a healthcare professional, taking into account the patient's clinical condition, platelet count, and potential risks associated with transfusion reactions.

An exchange transfusion of whole blood is a medical procedure in which a patient's blood is gradually replaced with donor whole blood. This procedure is typically performed in newborns or infants who have severe jaundice caused by excessive levels of bilirubin, a yellowish pigment that forms when hemoglobin from red blood cells breaks down.

During an exchange transfusion, the baby's blood is removed through a vein or artery and replaced with donor whole blood through another vein or artery. The process is repeated several times until a significant portion of the baby's blood has been exchanged with donor blood. This helps to reduce the levels of bilirubin in the baby's blood, which can help prevent or treat brain damage caused by excessive bilirubin.

Exchange transfusions are typically performed in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and require close monitoring by a team of healthcare professionals. The procedure carries some risks, including infection, bleeding, and changes in blood pressure or heart rate. However, it can be a lifesaving treatment for newborns with severe jaundice who are at risk of developing serious complications.

A blood component transfusion is the process of transferring a specific component of donated blood into a recipient's bloodstream. Blood components include red blood cells, plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate (a fraction of plasma that contains clotting factors). These components can be separated from whole blood and stored separately to allow for targeted transfusions based on the individual needs of the patient.

For example, a patient who is anemic may only require a red blood cell transfusion, while a patient with severe bleeding may need both red blood cells and plasma to replace lost volume and clotting factors. Platelet transfusions are often used for patients with low platelet counts or platelet dysfunction, and cryoprecipitate is used for patients with factor VIII or fibrinogen deficiencies.

Blood component transfusions must be performed under strict medical supervision to ensure compatibility between the donor and recipient blood types and to monitor for any adverse reactions. Proper handling, storage, and administration of blood components are also critical to ensure their safety and efficacy.

Surgical blood loss is the amount of blood that is lost during a surgical procedure. It can occur through various routes such as incisions, punctures or during the removal of organs or tissues. The amount of blood loss can vary widely depending on the type and complexity of the surgery being performed.

Surgical blood loss can be classified into three categories:

1. Insensible losses: These are small amounts of blood that are lost through the skin, respiratory tract, or gastrointestinal tract during surgery. They are not usually significant enough to cause any clinical effects.
2. Visible losses: These are larger amounts of blood that can be seen and measured directly during surgery. They may require transfusion or other interventions to prevent hypovolemia (low blood volume) and its complications.
3. Hidden losses: These are internal bleeding that cannot be easily seen or measured during surgery. They can occur in the abdominal cavity, retroperitoneal space, or other areas of the body. They may require further exploration or imaging studies to diagnose and manage.

Surgical blood loss can lead to several complications such as hypovolemia, anemia, coagulopathy (disorders of blood clotting), and organ dysfunction. Therefore, it is essential to monitor and manage surgical blood loss effectively to ensure optimal patient outcomes.

Intrauterine blood transfusion (IUT) is a medical procedure in which blood is transfused into the fetal circulation through the umbilical vein while the fetus is still in the uterus. This procedure is typically performed to treat severe anemia in the fetus, most commonly caused by hemolytic disease of the newborn due to Rh incompatibility or ABO incompatibility between the mother and fetus.

During the procedure, ultrasound guidance is used to insert a thin needle through the mother's abdomen and uterus and into the umbilical vein of the fetus. The blood is then transfused slowly, allowing the fetal body to adjust to the increased volume. The procedure may need to be repeated every 2-4 weeks until the baby is mature enough for delivery.

IUT is a highly specialized procedure that requires significant expertise and experience in maternal-fetal medicine and interventional radiology. It carries risks such as preterm labor, infection, fetal bradycardia (abnormally slow heart rate), and fetal loss, but it can be life-saving for the fetus when performed appropriately.

A blood bank is a facility that collects, tests, stores, and distributes blood and blood components for transfusion purposes. It is a crucial part of the healthcare system, as it ensures a safe and adequate supply of blood products to meet the needs of patients undergoing various medical procedures or treatments. The term "blood bank" comes from the idea that collected blood is "stored" or "banked" until it is needed for transfusion.

The primary function of a blood bank is to ensure the safety and quality of the blood supply. This involves rigorous screening and testing of donated blood to detect any infectious diseases, such as HIV, hepatitis B and C, syphilis, and West Nile virus. Blood banks also perform compatibility tests between donor and recipient blood types to minimize the risk of transfusion reactions.

Blood banks offer various blood products, including whole blood, red blood cells, platelets, plasma, and cryoprecipitate. These products can be used to treat a wide range of medical conditions, such as anemia, bleeding disorders, cancer, and trauma. In addition, some blood banks may also provide specialized services, such as apheresis (a procedure that separates specific blood components) and therapeutic phlebotomy (the removal of excess blood).

Blood banks operate under strict regulations and guidelines to ensure the safety and quality of their products and services. These regulations are established by national and international organizations, such as the American Association of Blood Banks (AABB), the World Health Organization (WHO), and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

A blood donor is a person who voluntarily gives their own blood or blood components to be used for the benefit of another person in need. The blood donation process involves collecting the donor's blood, testing it for infectious diseases, and then storing it until it is needed by a patient. There are several types of blood donations, including:

1. Whole blood donation: This is the most common type of blood donation, where a donor gives one unit (about 450-500 milliliters) of whole blood. The blood is then separated into its components (red cells, plasma, and platelets) for transfusion to patients with different needs.
2. Double red cell donation: In this type of donation, the donor's blood is collected using a special machine that separates two units of red cells from the whole blood. The remaining plasma and platelets are returned to the donor during the donation process. This type of donation can be done every 112 days.
3. Platelet donation: A donor's blood is collected using a special machine that separates platelets from the whole blood. The red cells and plasma are then returned to the donor during the donation process. This type of donation can be done every seven days, up to 24 times a year.
4. Plasma donation: A donor's blood is collected using a special machine that separates plasma from the whole blood. The red cells and platelets are then returned to the donor during the donation process. This type of donation can be done every 28 days, up to 13 times a year.

Blood donors must meet certain eligibility criteria, such as being in good health, aged between 18 and 65 (in some countries, the upper age limit may vary), and weighing over 50 kg (110 lbs). Donors are also required to answer medical questionnaires and undergo a mini-physical examination before each donation. The frequency of blood donations varies depending on the type of donation and the donor's health status.

Blood grouping, also known as blood typing, is the process of determining a person's ABO and Rh (Rhesus) blood type. The ABO blood group system includes four main blood types: A, B, AB, and O, based on the presence or absence of antigens A and B on the surface of red blood cells. The Rh blood group system is another important classification system that determines whether the Rh factor (a protein also found on the surface of red blood cells) is present or absent.

Knowing a person's blood type is crucial in transfusion medicine to ensure compatibility between donor and recipient blood. If a patient receives an incompatible blood type, it can trigger an immune response leading to serious complications such as hemolysis (destruction of red blood cells), kidney failure, or even death.

Crossmatching is a laboratory test performed before a blood transfusion to determine the compatibility between the donor's and recipient's blood. It involves mixing a small sample of the donor's red blood cells with the recipient's serum (the liquid portion of the blood containing antibodies) and observing for any agglutination (clumping) or hemolysis. If there is no reaction, the blood is considered compatible, and the transfusion can proceed.

In summary, blood grouping and crossmatching are essential tests in transfusion medicine to ensure compatibility between donor and recipient blood and prevent adverse reactions that could harm the patient's health.

Operative blood salvage, also known as intraoperative blood recovery or cell salvage, is a medical procedure that involves the collection, washing, and reinfusion of a patient's own blood during surgery. The blood is collected from the surgical site using a suction device and then processed to remove any debris, clots, and free hemoglobin. The resulting red blood cells are then washed and suspended in a sterile solution before being returned to the patient through a transfusion.

This technique is commonly used during surgeries where significant blood loss is expected, such as orthopedic, cardiovascular, and major cancer surgeries. It offers several advantages over allogeneic (donor) blood transfusions, including reduced exposure to potential transfusion reactions, decreased risk of infectious disease transmission, and lower costs. However, it may not be appropriate for all patients or surgical procedures, and its use should be carefully considered based on the individual patient's medical history and condition.

Fetofetal transfusion is a medical condition that can occur in pregnancies with multiple fetuses, such as twins or higher-order multiples. It refers to the transfer of blood from one fetus (donor) to another (recipient) through anastomotic connections in their shared placenta.

In some cases, these anastomoses can result in an imbalance in blood flow between the fetuses, leading to a net transfer of blood from one fetus to the other. This situation is more likely to occur when there is a significant weight or size difference between the fetuses, known as twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS).

In TTTS, the recipient fetus receives an excess of blood, which can lead to high-output cardiac failure, hydrops, and potential intrauterine demise. Meanwhile, the donor fetus may become anemic, growth-restricted, and at risk for hypovolemia and intrauterine demise as well. Fetofetal transfusion can be diagnosed through ultrasound evaluation and managed with various interventions, including laser ablation of anastomotic vessels or fetoscopic surgery, depending on the severity and gestational age at diagnosis.

Anemia is a medical condition characterized by a lower than normal number of red blood cells or lower than normal levels of hemoglobin in the blood. Hemoglobin is an important protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. Anemia can cause fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, and a pale complexion because the body's tissues are not getting enough oxygen.

Anemia can be caused by various factors, including nutritional deficiencies (such as iron, vitamin B12, or folate deficiency), blood loss, chronic diseases (such as kidney disease or rheumatoid arthritis), inherited genetic disorders (such as sickle cell anemia or thalassemia), and certain medications.

There are different types of anemia, classified based on the underlying cause, size and shape of red blood cells, and the level of hemoglobin in the blood. Treatment for anemia depends on the underlying cause and may include dietary changes, supplements, medication, or blood transfusions.

Postoperative hemorrhage is a medical term that refers to bleeding that occurs after a surgical procedure. This condition can range from minor oozing to severe, life-threatening bleeding. Postoperative hemorrhage can occur soon after surgery or even several days later, as the surgical site begins to heal.

The causes of postoperative hemorrhage can vary, but some common factors include:

1. Inadequate hemostasis during surgery: This means that all bleeding was not properly controlled during the procedure, leading to bleeding after surgery.
2. Blood vessel injury: During surgery, blood vessels may be accidentally cut or damaged, causing bleeding after the procedure.
3. Coagulopathy: This is a condition in which the body has difficulty forming blood clots, increasing the risk of postoperative hemorrhage.
4. Use of anticoagulant medications: Medications that prevent blood clots can increase the risk of bleeding after surgery.
5. Infection: An infection at the surgical site can cause inflammation and bleeding.

Symptoms of postoperative hemorrhage may include swelling, pain, warmth, or discoloration around the surgical site, as well as signs of shock such as rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, and confusion. Treatment for postoperative hemorrhage depends on the severity of the bleeding and may include medications to control bleeding, transfusions of blood products, or additional surgery to stop the bleeding.

Tranexamic acid is an antifibrinolytic medication that is used to reduce or prevent bleeding. It works by inhibiting the activation of plasminogen to plasmin, which is a protease that degrades fibrin clots. By preventing the breakdown of blood clots, tranexamic acid helps to reduce bleeding and promote clot formation.

Tranexamic acid is available in various forms, including tablets, capsules, and injectable solutions. It is used in a variety of clinical settings, such as surgery, trauma, and heavy menstrual bleeding. The medication can be taken orally or administered intravenously, depending on the severity of the bleeding and the patient's medical condition.

Common side effects of tranexamic acid include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headache. Less commonly, the medication may cause allergic reactions, visual disturbances, or seizures. It is important to follow the prescribing physician's instructions carefully when taking tranexamic acid to minimize the risk of side effects and ensure its safe and effective use.

Hemoglobin (Hb or Hgb) is the main oxygen-carrying protein in the red blood cells, which are responsible for delivering oxygen throughout the body. It is a complex molecule made up of four globin proteins and four heme groups. Each heme group contains an iron atom that binds to one molecule of oxygen. Hemoglobin plays a crucial role in the transport of oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues, and also helps to carry carbon dioxide back to the lungs for exhalation.

There are several types of hemoglobin present in the human body, including:

* Hemoglobin A (HbA): This is the most common type of hemoglobin, making up about 95-98% of total hemoglobin in adults. It consists of two alpha and two beta globin chains.
* Hemoglobin A2 (HbA2): This makes up about 1.5-3.5% of total hemoglobin in adults. It consists of two alpha and two delta globin chains.
* Hemoglobin F (HbF): This is the main type of hemoglobin present in fetal life, but it persists at low levels in adults. It consists of two alpha and two gamma globin chains.
* Hemoglobin S (HbS): This is an abnormal form of hemoglobin that can cause sickle cell disease when it occurs in the homozygous state (i.e., both copies of the gene are affected). It results from a single amino acid substitution in the beta globin chain.
* Hemoglobin C (HbC): This is another abnormal form of hemoglobin that can cause mild to moderate hemolytic anemia when it occurs in the homozygous state. It results from a different single amino acid substitution in the beta globin chain than HbS.

Abnormal forms of hemoglobin, such as HbS and HbC, can lead to various clinical disorders, including sickle cell disease, thalassemia, and other hemoglobinopathies.

Antifibrinolytic agents are a class of medications that inhibit the breakdown of blood clots. They work by blocking the action of enzymes called plasminogen activators, which convert plasminogen to plasmin, the main enzyme responsible for breaking down fibrin, a protein that forms the framework of a blood clot.

By preventing the conversion of plasminogen to plasmin, antifibrinolytic agents help to stabilize existing blood clots and prevent their premature dissolution. These medications are often used in clinical settings where excessive bleeding is a concern, such as during or after surgery, childbirth, or trauma.

Examples of antifibrinolytic agents include tranexamic acid, aminocaproic acid, and epsilon-aminocaproic acid. While these medications can be effective in reducing bleeding, they also carry the risk of thromboembolic events, such as deep vein thrombosis or pulmonary embolism, due to their pro-coagulant effects. Therefore, they should be used with caution and only under the close supervision of a healthcare provider.

Intraoperative care refers to the medical care and interventions provided to a patient during a surgical procedure. This care is typically administered by a team of healthcare professionals, including anesthesiologists, surgeons, nurses, and other specialists as needed. The goal of intraoperative care is to maintain the patient's physiological stability throughout the surgery, minimize complications, and ensure the best possible outcome.

Intraoperative care may include:

1. Anesthesia management: Administering and monitoring anesthetic drugs to keep the patient unconscious and free from pain during the surgery.
2. Monitoring vital signs: Continuously tracking the patient's heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, body temperature, and other key physiological parameters to ensure they remain within normal ranges.
3. Fluid and blood product administration: Maintaining adequate intravascular volume and oxygen-carrying capacity through the infusion of fluids and blood products as needed.
4. Intraoperative imaging: Utilizing real-time imaging techniques, such as X-ray, ultrasound, or CT scans, to guide the surgical procedure and ensure accurate placement of implants or other devices.
5. Neuromonitoring: Using electrophysiological methods to monitor the functional integrity of nerves and neural structures during surgery, particularly in procedures involving the brain, spine, or peripheral nerves.
6. Intraoperative medication management: Administering various medications as needed for pain control, infection prophylaxis, or the treatment of medical conditions that may arise during the surgery.
7. Temperature management: Regulating the patient's body temperature to prevent hypothermia or hyperthermia, which can have adverse effects on surgical outcomes and overall patient health.
8. Communication and coordination: Ensuring effective communication among the members of the surgical team to optimize patient care and safety.

I must clarify that "Jehovah's Witnesses" is not a medical term or condition. It is a religious group with specific beliefs and practices, one of which is the refusal of blood transfusions, even in life-threatening situations, due to their interpretation of biblical passages. This can have significant implications for their healthcare and medical decision-making. However, it does not constitute a medical definition.

Blood preservation refers to the process of keeping blood viable and functional outside of the body for transfusion purposes. This is typically achieved through the addition of various chemical additives, such as anticoagulants and nutrients, to a storage solution in which the blood is contained. The preserved blood is then refrigerated or frozen until it is needed for transfusion.

The goal of blood preservation is to maintain the structural integrity and functional capacity of the red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets, as well as the coagulation factors, in order to ensure that the transfused blood is safe and effective. Different storage conditions and additives are used for the preservation of different components of blood, depending on their specific requirements.

It's important to note that while blood preservation extends the shelf life of donated blood, it does not last indefinitely. The length of time that blood can be stored depends on several factors, including the type of blood component and the storage conditions. Regular testing is performed to ensure that the preserved blood remains safe and effective for transfusion.

Blood group incompatibility refers to a situation where the blood type of a donor and a recipient are not compatible, leading to an immune response and destruction of the donated red blood cells. This is because the recipient's immune system recognizes the donor's red blood cells as foreign due to the presence of incompatible antigens on their surface.

The most common type of blood group incompatibility occurs between individuals with different ABO blood types, such as when a person with type O blood receives type A, B, or AB blood. This can lead to agglutination and hemolysis of the donated red blood cells, causing potentially life-threatening complications such as hemolytic transfusion reaction.

Another type of blood group incompatibility occurs between Rh-negative mothers and their Rh-positive fetuses. If a mother's immune system is exposed to her fetus's Rh-positive red blood cells during pregnancy or childbirth, she may develop antibodies against them. This can lead to hemolytic disease of the newborn if the mother becomes pregnant with another Rh-positive fetus in the future.

To prevent these complications, it is essential to ensure that donated blood is compatible with the recipient's blood type before transfusion and that appropriate measures are taken during pregnancy and childbirth to prevent sensitization of Rh-negative mothers to Rh-positive red blood cells.

Retrospective studies, also known as retrospective research or looking back studies, are a type of observational study that examines data from the past to draw conclusions about possible causal relationships between risk factors and outcomes. In these studies, researchers analyze existing records, medical charts, or previously collected data to test a hypothesis or answer a specific research question.

Retrospective studies can be useful for generating hypotheses and identifying trends, but they have limitations compared to prospective studies, which follow participants forward in time from exposure to outcome. Retrospective studies are subject to biases such as recall bias, selection bias, and information bias, which can affect the validity of the results. Therefore, retrospective studies should be interpreted with caution and used primarily to generate hypotheses for further testing in prospective studies.

Treatment outcome is a term used to describe the result or effect of medical treatment on a patient's health status. It can be measured in various ways, such as through symptoms improvement, disease remission, reduced disability, improved quality of life, or survival rates. The treatment outcome helps healthcare providers evaluate the effectiveness of a particular treatment plan and make informed decisions about future care. It is also used in clinical research to compare the efficacy of different treatments and improve patient care.

Blood safety is a term used to describe the measures taken to ensure that blood and blood products are free from infectious agents and are safe for transfusion. This includes rigorous screening processes for donors, testing of donated blood for various infectious diseases such as HIV, hepatitis B and C, syphilis, and West Nile virus, and proper handling, storage, and distribution of blood products. Additionally, strict quality control measures are in place to ensure the accuracy and reliability of test results. The goal of blood safety is to protect recipients from transfusion-transmitted infections while ensuring an adequate supply of safe blood for those in need.

Neonatal anemia is a condition characterized by a lower-than-normal number of red blood cells or lower-than-normal levels of hemoglobin in the blood of a newborn infant. Hemoglobin is the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to the body's tissues.

There are several types and causes of neonatal anemia, including:

1. Anemia of prematurity: This is the most common type of anemia in newborns, especially those born before 34 weeks of gestation. It occurs due to a decrease in red blood cell production and a shorter lifespan of red blood cells in premature infants.
2. Hemolytic anemia: This type of anemia is caused by the destruction of red blood cells at a faster rate than they can be produced. It can result from various factors, such as incompatibility between the mother's and baby's blood types, genetic disorders like G6PD deficiency, or infections.
3. Fetomaternal hemorrhage: This condition occurs when there is a significant transfer of fetal blood into the maternal circulation during pregnancy or childbirth, leading to anemia in the newborn.
4. Iron-deficiency anemia: Although rare in newborns, iron-deficiency anemia can occur if the mother has low iron levels during pregnancy, and the infant does not receive adequate iron supplementation after birth.
5. Anemia due to nutritional deficiencies: Rarely, neonatal anemia may result from a lack of essential vitamins or minerals like folate, vitamin B12, or copper in the newborn's diet.

Symptoms of neonatal anemia can vary but may include pallor, lethargy, poor feeding, rapid heartbeat, and difficulty breathing. Diagnosis typically involves a complete blood count (CBC) to measure red blood cell count, hemoglobin levels, and other parameters. Treatment depends on the underlying cause of anemia and may include iron supplementation, transfusions, or management of any underlying conditions.

Leukocyte transfusion, also known as white blood cell (WBC) transfusion, involves the intravenous administration of leukocytes (white blood cells) from a donor to a recipient. This procedure is typically used in patients with severe immunodeficiency or those undergoing bone marrow transplantation, where they are unable to produce sufficient white blood cells to fight off infections.

Leukocyte transfusions can help boost the recipient's immune system and provide them with temporary protection against infections. However, this procedure carries some risks, including febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions, allergic reactions, transmission of infectious diseases, and the potential for transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease (TA-GVHD). Therefore, leukocyte transfusions are usually reserved for specific clinical situations where the benefits outweigh the risks.

Hemodilution is a medical term that refers to the reduction in the concentration of certain components in the blood, usually referring to red blood cells (RBCs) or hemoglobin. This occurs when an individual's plasma volume expands due to the infusion of intravenous fluids or the body's own production of fluid, such as during severe infection or inflammation. As a result, the number of RBCs per unit of blood decreases, leading to a lower hematocrit and hemoglobin level. It is important to note that while hemodilution reduces the concentration of RBCs in the blood, it does not necessarily indicate anemia or blood loss.

Perioperative care is a multidisciplinary approach to the management of patients before, during, and after surgery with the goal of optimizing outcomes and minimizing complications. It encompasses various aspects such as preoperative evaluation and preparation, intraoperative monitoring and management, and postoperative recovery and rehabilitation. The perioperative period begins when a decision is made to pursue surgical intervention and ends when the patient has fully recovered from the procedure. This care is typically provided by a team of healthcare professionals including anesthesiologists, surgeons, nurses, physical therapists, and other specialists as needed.

Blood substitutes, also known as artificial blood or blood surrogates, are fluids that are designed to mimic some of the properties and functions of human blood. They are used as a replacement for blood transfusions in situations where blood is not available or when it is not safe to use. Blood substitutes can be divided into two main categories: oxygen-carrying and non-oxygen-carrying.

Oxygen-carrying blood substitutes contain artificial molecules called hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOCs) that are designed to carry oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues. These HBOCs can be derived from human or animal hemoglobin, or they can be synthetically produced.

Non-oxygen-carrying blood substitutes, on the other hand, do not contain hemoglobin and are used primarily to restore intravascular volume and maintain blood pressure in cases of hypovolemia (low blood volume) caused by bleeding or dehydration. These products include crystalloids, such as saline solution and lactated Ringer's solution, and colloids, such as albumin and hydroxyethyl starch solutions.

It is important to note that while blood substitutes can be useful in certain situations, they are not a perfect substitute for human blood. They do not provide all of the functions of blood, such as immune defense and clotting, and their use is associated with some risks, including allergic reactions, kidney damage, and increased oxygen free radical production. Therefore, they should only be used when there is no suitable alternative available.

Plateletpheresis is a medical procedure that involves the collection of platelets from a donor's blood through a process called apheresis. In this process, whole blood is withdrawn from the donor, and the platelets are separated from other blood components using a specialized machine. The separated platelets are then collected in a sterile bag, while the remaining blood components (red blood cells, white blood cells, and plasma) are returned to the donor's body.

Plateletpheresis is often used to collect platelets for transfusion purposes, particularly for patients who require large volumes of platelets due to conditions such as leukemia, aplastic anemia, or other forms of cancer. It is also used in the treatment of thrombocytopenia, a condition characterized by abnormally low levels of platelets in the blood.

The procedure typically takes between one to two hours and requires the use of a specialized machine and trained medical staff. Donors may experience mild side effects such as fatigue, bruising, or discomfort at the site where the needle was inserted, but serious complications are rare.

Beta-thalassemia is a genetic blood disorder that affects the production of hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. Specifically, beta-thalassemia is caused by mutations in the beta-globin gene, which leads to reduced or absent production of the beta-globin component of hemoglobin.

There are two main types of beta-thalassemia:

1. Beta-thalassemia major (also known as Cooley's anemia): This is a severe form of the disorder that typically becomes apparent in early childhood. It is characterized by a significant reduction or absence of beta-globin production, leading to anemia, enlarged spleen and liver, jaundice, and growth retardation.
2. Beta-thalassemia intermedia: This is a milder form of the disorder that may not become apparent until later in childhood or even adulthood. It is characterized by a variable reduction in beta-globin production, leading to mild to moderate anemia and other symptoms that can range from nonexistent to severe.

Treatment for beta-thalassemia depends on the severity of the disorder and may include blood transfusions, iron chelation therapy, and/or bone marrow transplantation. In some cases, genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis may also be recommended for families with a history of the disorder.

Erythroblastosis, fetal is a medical condition that occurs in the fetus or newborn when there is an incompatibility between the fetal and maternal blood types, specifically related to the Rh factor or ABO blood group system. This incompatibility leads to the destruction of the fetal red blood cells by the mother's immune system, resulting in the release of bilirubin, which can cause jaundice, anemia, and other complications.

In cases where the mother is Rh negative and the fetus is Rh positive, the mother may develop antibodies against the Rh factor during pregnancy or after delivery, leading to hemolysis (breakdown) of the fetal red blood cells in subsequent pregnancies if preventive measures are not taken. This is known as hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN).

Similarly, incompatibility between the ABO blood groups can also lead to HDN, although it is generally less severe than Rh incompatibility. In this case, the mother's immune system produces antibodies against the fetal red blood cells, leading to their destruction and subsequent complications.

Fetal erythroblastosis is a serious condition that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated. Treatment options include intrauterine transfusions, phototherapy, and exchange transfusions in severe cases. Preventive measures such as Rh immune globulin (RhIG) injections can help prevent the development of antibodies in Rh-negative mothers, reducing the risk of HDN in subsequent pregnancies.

Isoantibodies are antibodies produced by the immune system that recognize and react to antigens (markers) found on the cells or tissues of another individual of the same species. These antigens are typically proteins or carbohydrates present on the surface of red blood cells, but they can also be found on other cell types.

Isoantibodies are formed when an individual is exposed to foreign antigens, usually through blood transfusions, pregnancy, or tissue transplantation. The exposure triggers the immune system to produce specific antibodies against these antigens, which can cause a harmful immune response if the individual receives another transfusion or transplant from the same donor in the future.

There are two main types of isoantibodies:

1. Agglutinins: These are IgM antibodies that cause red blood cells to clump together (agglutinate) when mixed with the corresponding antigen. They develop rapidly after exposure and can cause immediate transfusion reactions or hemolytic disease of the newborn in pregnant women.
2. Hemolysins: These are IgG antibodies that destroy red blood cells by causing their membranes to become more permeable, leading to lysis (bursting) of the cells and release of hemoglobin into the plasma. They take longer to develop but can cause delayed transfusion reactions or hemolytic disease of the newborn in pregnant women.

Isoantibodies are detected through blood tests, such as the crossmatch test, which determines compatibility between a donor's and recipient's blood before transfusions or transplants.

Postoperative complications refer to any unfavorable condition or event that occurs during the recovery period after a surgical procedure. These complications can vary in severity and may include, but are not limited to:

1. Infection: This can occur at the site of the incision or inside the body, such as pneumonia or urinary tract infection.
2. Bleeding: Excessive bleeding (hemorrhage) can lead to a drop in blood pressure and may require further surgical intervention.
3. Blood clots: These can form in the deep veins of the legs (deep vein thrombosis) and can potentially travel to the lungs (pulmonary embolism).
4. Wound dehiscence: This is when the surgical wound opens up, which can lead to infection and further complications.
5. Pulmonary issues: These include atelectasis (collapsed lung), pneumonia, or respiratory failure.
6. Cardiovascular problems: These include abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias), heart attack, or stroke.
7. Renal failure: This can occur due to various reasons such as dehydration, blood loss, or the use of certain medications.
8. Pain management issues: Inadequate pain control can lead to increased stress, anxiety, and decreased mobility.
9. Nausea and vomiting: These can be caused by anesthesia, opioid pain medication, or other factors.
10. Delirium: This is a state of confusion and disorientation that can occur in the elderly or those with certain medical conditions.

Prompt identification and management of these complications are crucial to ensure the best possible outcome for the patient.

Hemostatics are substances or agents that promote bleeding cessation or prevent the spread of bleeding. They can act in various ways, such as by stimulating the body's natural clotting mechanisms, constricting blood vessels to reduce blood flow, or forming a physical barrier to block the bleeding site.

Hemostatics are often used in medical settings to manage wounds, injuries, and surgical procedures. They can be applied directly to the wound as a powder, paste, or gauze, or they can be administered systemically through intravenous injection. Examples of hemostatic agents include fibrin sealants, collagen-based products, thrombin, and oxidized regenerated cellulose.

It's important to note that while hemostatics can be effective in controlling bleeding, they should be used with caution and only under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Inappropriate use or overuse of hemostatic agents can lead to complications such as excessive clotting, thrombosis, or tissue damage.

Erythropoietin (EPO) is a hormone that is primarily produced by the kidneys and plays a crucial role in the production of red blood cells in the body. It works by stimulating the bone marrow to produce more red blood cells, which are essential for carrying oxygen to various tissues and organs.

EPO is a glycoprotein that is released into the bloodstream in response to low oxygen levels in the body. When the kidneys detect low oxygen levels, they release EPO, which then travels to the bone marrow and binds to specific receptors on immature red blood cells called erythroblasts. This binding triggers a series of events that promote the maturation and proliferation of erythroblasts, leading to an increase in the production of red blood cells.

In addition to its role in regulating red blood cell production, EPO has also been shown to have neuroprotective effects and may play a role in modulating the immune system. Abnormal levels of EPO have been associated with various medical conditions, including anemia, kidney disease, and certain types of cancer.

EPO is also used as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of anemia caused by chronic kidney disease, chemotherapy, or other conditions that affect red blood cell production. Recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) is a synthetic form of the hormone that is produced using genetic engineering techniques and is commonly used in clinical practice to treat anemia. However, misuse of rhEPO for performance enhancement in sports has been a subject of concern due to its potential to enhance oxygen-carrying capacity and improve endurance.

Leukocyte reduction procedures are medical processes that aim to decrease the number of white blood cells (leukocytes) in a unit of blood or blood component, such as red blood cells or platelets. These procedures are often used during transfusions for patients who have heightened reactions to leukocytes, or to lower the risk of complications like febrile non-hemolytic transfusion reactions, allergic reactions, and transmission of certain infectious agents.

The most common method for leukocyte reduction is filtration, where the blood component passes through a specialized filter that captures and removes the white blood cells. This process can reduce the leukocyte count to less than 1 x 10^6 per unit, which is significantly lower than the typical 5-10 x 10^6 leukocytes per unit found in unprocessed components.

Leukocyte reduction procedures are beneficial for specific patient populations, such as those undergoing chemotherapy or bone marrow transplantation, and help improve overall transfusion safety and efficacy.

Sickle cell anemia is a genetic disorder that affects the hemoglobin in red blood cells. Hemoglobin is responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body. In sickle cell anemia, the hemoglobin is abnormal and causes the red blood cells to take on a sickle shape, rather than the normal disc shape. These sickled cells are stiff and sticky, and they can block blood vessels, causing tissue damage and pain. They also die more quickly than normal red blood cells, leading to anemia.

People with sickle cell anemia often experience fatigue, chronic pain, and jaundice. They may also have a higher risk of infections and complications such as stroke, acute chest syndrome, and priapism. The disease is inherited from both parents, who must both be carriers of the sickle cell gene. It primarily affects people of African descent, but it can also affect people from other ethnic backgrounds.

There is no cure for sickle cell anemia, but treatments such as blood transfusions, medications to manage pain and prevent complications, and bone marrow transplantation can help improve quality of life for affected individuals. Regular medical care and monitoring are essential for managing the disease effectively.

Hemorrhage is defined in the medical context as an excessive loss of blood from the circulatory system, which can occur due to various reasons such as injury, surgery, or underlying health conditions that affect blood clotting or the integrity of blood vessels. The bleeding may be internal, external, visible, or concealed, and it can vary in severity from minor to life-threatening, depending on the location and extent of the bleeding. Hemorrhage is a serious medical emergency that requires immediate attention and treatment to prevent further blood loss, organ damage, and potential death.

Surgical hemostasis refers to the methods and techniques used during surgical procedures to stop bleeding or prevent hemorrhage. This can be achieved through various means, including the use of surgical instruments such as clamps, ligatures, or staples to physically compress blood vessels and stop the flow of blood. Electrosurgical tools like cautery may also be used to coagulate and seal off bleeding vessels using heat. Additionally, topical hemostatic agents can be applied to promote clotting and control bleeding in wounded tissues. Effective surgical hemostasis is crucial for ensuring a successful surgical outcome and minimizing the risk of complications such as excessive blood loss, infection, or delayed healing.

Medical Definition:

"Risk factors" are any attribute, characteristic or exposure of an individual that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or injury. They can be divided into modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors. Modifiable risk factors are those that can be changed through lifestyle choices or medical treatment, while non-modifiable risk factors are inherent traits such as age, gender, or genetic predisposition. Examples of modifiable risk factors include smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diet, while non-modifiable risk factors include age, sex, and family history. It is important to note that having a risk factor does not guarantee that a person will develop the disease, but rather indicates an increased susceptibility.

Prospective studies, also known as longitudinal studies, are a type of cohort study in which data is collected forward in time, following a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure over a period of time. The researchers clearly define the study population and exposure of interest at the beginning of the study and follow up with the participants to determine the outcomes that develop over time. This type of study design allows for the investigation of causal relationships between exposures and outcomes, as well as the identification of risk factors and the estimation of disease incidence rates. Prospective studies are particularly useful in epidemiology and medical research when studying diseases with long latency periods or rare outcomes.

Preoperative care refers to the series of procedures, interventions, and preparations that are conducted before a surgical operation. The primary goal of preoperative care is to ensure the patient's well-being, optimize their physical condition, reduce potential risks, and prepare them mentally and emotionally for the upcoming surgery.

Preoperative care typically includes:

1. Preoperative assessment: A thorough evaluation of the patient's overall health status, including medical history, physical examination, laboratory tests, and diagnostic imaging, to identify any potential risk factors or comorbidities that may impact the surgical procedure and postoperative recovery.
2. Informed consent: The process of ensuring the patient understands the nature of the surgery, its purpose, associated risks, benefits, and alternative treatment options. The patient signs a consent form indicating they have been informed and voluntarily agree to undergo the surgery.
3. Preoperative instructions: Guidelines provided to the patient regarding their diet, medication use, and other activities in the days leading up to the surgery. These instructions may include fasting guidelines, discontinuing certain medications, or arranging for transportation after the procedure.
4. Anesthesia consultation: A meeting with the anesthesiologist to discuss the type of anesthesia that will be used during the surgery and address any concerns related to anesthesia risks, side effects, or postoperative pain management.
5. Preparation of the surgical site: Cleaning and shaving the area where the incision will be made, as well as administering appropriate antimicrobial agents to minimize the risk of infection.
6. Medical optimization: Addressing any underlying medical conditions or correcting abnormalities that may negatively impact the surgical outcome. This may involve adjusting medications, treating infections, or managing chronic diseases such as diabetes.
7. Emotional and psychological support: Providing counseling, reassurance, and education to help alleviate anxiety, fear, or emotional distress related to the surgery.
8. Preoperative holding area: The patient is transferred to a designated area near the operating room where they are prepared for surgery by changing into a gown, having intravenous (IV) lines inserted, and receiving monitoring equipment.

By following these preoperative care guidelines, healthcare professionals aim to ensure that patients undergo safe and successful surgical procedures with optimal outcomes.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Red Cross" is not a medical term per se. It is the name of an international humanitarian organization that provides emergency assistance, disaster relief, and education in communities around the world. The Red Cross, along with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) and other national societies that make up the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, is guided by the Geneva Conventions to protect and assist victims of war and armed conflict.

However, in a broader sense, when people refer to "Red Cross" in a medical context, they might be referring to the American Red Cross or other national societies that provide various health-related services, such as blood donation and transfusion, first aid, CPR and AED training, disaster mental health services, and emergency preparedness education.

In the field of medicine, "time factors" refer to the duration of symptoms or time elapsed since the onset of a medical condition, which can have significant implications for diagnosis and treatment. Understanding time factors is crucial in determining the progression of a disease, evaluating the effectiveness of treatments, and making critical decisions regarding patient care.

For example, in stroke management, "time is brain," meaning that rapid intervention within a specific time frame (usually within 4.5 hours) is essential to administering tissue plasminogen activator (tPA), a clot-busting drug that can minimize brain damage and improve patient outcomes. Similarly, in trauma care, the "golden hour" concept emphasizes the importance of providing definitive care within the first 60 minutes after injury to increase survival rates and reduce morbidity.

Time factors also play a role in monitoring the progression of chronic conditions like diabetes or heart disease, where regular follow-ups and assessments help determine appropriate treatment adjustments and prevent complications. In infectious diseases, time factors are crucial for initiating antibiotic therapy and identifying potential outbreaks to control their spread.

Overall, "time factors" encompass the significance of recognizing and acting promptly in various medical scenarios to optimize patient outcomes and provide effective care.

Fetomaternal transfusion, also known as fetal-maternal hemorrhage, is a medical condition where there is a transfer of fetal blood cells into the maternal circulation. This can occur during pregnancy, childbirth, or in the postpartum period due to various reasons such as placental abnormalities, trauma, or invasive procedures like amniocentesis. In some cases, it may lead to complications for both the fetus and the mother, including fetal anemia, hydrops fetalis, and maternal alloimmunization.

Elective surgical procedures are operations that are scheduled in advance because they do not involve a medical emergency. These surgeries are chosen or "elective" based on the patient's and doctor's decision to improve the patient's quality of life or to treat a non-life-threatening condition. Examples include but are not limited to:

1. Aesthetic or cosmetic surgery such as breast augmentation, rhinoplasty, etc.
2. Orthopedic surgeries like knee or hip replacements
3. Cataract surgery
4. Some types of cancer surgeries where the tumor is not spreading or causing severe symptoms
5. Gastric bypass for weight loss

It's important to note that while these procedures are planned, they still require thorough preoperative evaluation and preparation, and carry risks and benefits that need to be carefully considered by both the patient and the healthcare provider.

Blood-borne pathogens are microorganisms that are present in human blood and can cause disease. They include viruses such as HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and other bacteria and parasites. These pathogens can be transmitted through contact with infected blood or other bodily fluids, primarily through needlesticks or other sharps-related injuries, mucous membrane exposure, or skin exposure with open wounds or cuts. It's important for healthcare workers and others who may come into contact with blood or bodily fluids to be aware of the risks and take appropriate precautions to prevent exposure and transmission.

Cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is a medical procedure that temporarily takes over the functions of the heart and lungs during major heart surgery. It allows the surgeon to operate on a still, bloodless heart.

During CPB, the patient's blood is circulated outside the body with the help of a heart-lung machine. The machine pumps the blood through a oxygenator, where it is oxygenated and then returned to the body. This bypasses the heart and lungs, hence the name "cardiopulmonary bypass."

CPB involves several components, including a pump, oxygenator, heat exchanger, and tubing. The patient's blood is drained from the heart through cannulas (tubes) and passed through the oxygenator, where it is oxygenated and carbon dioxide is removed. The oxygenated blood is then warmed to body temperature in a heat exchanger before being pumped back into the body.

While on CPB, the patient's heart is stopped with the help of cardioplegia solution, which is infused directly into the coronary arteries. This helps to protect the heart muscle during surgery. The surgeon can then operate on a still and bloodless heart, allowing for more precise surgical repair.

After the surgery is complete, the patient is gradually weaned off CPB, and the heart is restarted with the help of electrical stimulation or medication. The patient's condition is closely monitored during this time to ensure that their heart and lungs are functioning properly.

While CPB has revolutionized heart surgery and allowed for more complex procedures to be performed, it is not without risks. These include bleeding, infection, stroke, kidney damage, and inflammation. However, with advances in technology and technique, the risks associated with CPB have been significantly reduced over time.

Postoperative care refers to the comprehensive medical treatment and nursing attention provided to a patient following a surgical procedure. The goal of postoperative care is to facilitate the patient's recovery, prevent complications, manage pain, ensure proper healing of the incision site, and maintain overall health and well-being until the patient can resume their normal activities.

This type of care includes monitoring vital signs, managing pain through medication or other techniques, ensuring adequate hydration and nutrition, helping the patient with breathing exercises to prevent lung complications, encouraging mobility to prevent blood clots, monitoring for signs of infection or other complications, administering prescribed medications, providing wound care, and educating the patient about postoperative care instructions.

The duration of postoperative care can vary depending on the type and complexity of the surgical procedure, as well as the individual patient's needs and overall health status. It may be provided in a hospital setting, an outpatient surgery center, or in the patient's home, depending on the level of care required.

Hepatitis C is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It's primarily spread through contact with contaminated blood, often through sharing needles or other equipment to inject drugs. For some people, hepatitis C is a short-term illness but for most — about 75-85% — it becomes a long-term, chronic infection that can lead to serious health problems like liver damage, liver failure, and even liver cancer. The virus can infect and inflame the liver, causing symptoms like jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), abdominal pain, fatigue, and dark urine. Many people with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms, so they might not know they have the infection until they experience complications. There are effective treatments available for hepatitis C, including antiviral medications that can cure the infection in most people. Regular testing is important to diagnose and treat hepatitis C early, before it causes serious health problems.

Rh isoimmunization is a condition that occurs when an Rh-negative individual (usually a woman) develops an immune response to the Rh-positive blood of another individual (usually a fetus during pregnancy or a transfused blood). The Rh-negative person's immune system recognizes the Rh-positive blood as foreign and produces antibodies against it. This sensitization can lead to hemolytic disease of the newborn if the mother becomes pregnant with another Rh-positive fetus, as the maternal antibodies can cross the placenta and attack the fetal red blood cells, potentially causing anemia, jaundice, or more severe complications.

The first exposure to Rh-positive blood typically does not cause a significant reaction because the mother's immune system has not yet produced enough antibodies. However, subsequent exposures can lead to increasingly severe reactions due to the presence of pre-existing antibodies. Preventive measures such as administering Rh immunoglobulin (RhIg) to Rh-negative women during pregnancy and after delivery help prevent sensitization and reduce the risk of hemolytic disease of the newborn.

Hematinics are a class of medications and dietary supplements that are used to enhance the production of red blood cells or hemoglobin in the body. They typically contain iron, vitamin B12, folic acid, or other nutrients that are essential for the synthesis of hemoglobin and the formation of red blood cells.

Iron is a critical component of hematinics because it plays a central role in the production of hemoglobin, which is the protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. Vitamin B12 and folic acid are also important nutrients for red blood cell production, as they help to regulate the growth and division of red blood cells in the bone marrow.

Hematinics are often prescribed to treat anemia, which is a condition characterized by a low red blood cell count or abnormally low levels of hemoglobin in the blood. Anemia can be caused by a variety of factors, including nutritional deficiencies, chronic diseases, and inherited genetic disorders.

Examples of hematinics include ferrous sulfate (an iron supplement), cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12), and folic acid. These medications are available in various forms, such as tablets, capsules, and liquids, and can be taken orally or by injection. It is important to follow the dosage instructions carefully and to inform your healthcare provider of any other medications you are taking, as hematinics can interact with certain drugs and may cause side effects.

Gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage is a term used to describe any bleeding that occurs in the gastrointestinal tract, which includes the esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, and rectum. The bleeding can range from mild to severe and can produce symptoms such as vomiting blood, passing black or tarry stools, or having low blood pressure.

GI hemorrhage can be classified as either upper or lower, depending on the location of the bleed. Upper GI hemorrhage refers to bleeding that occurs above the ligament of Treitz, which is a point in the small intestine where it becomes narrower and turns a corner. Common causes of upper GI hemorrhage include gastritis, ulcers, esophageal varices, and Mallory-Weiss tears.

Lower GI hemorrhage refers to bleeding that occurs below the ligament of Treitz. Common causes of lower GI hemorrhage include diverticulosis, colitis, inflammatory bowel disease, and vascular abnormalities such as angiodysplasia.

The diagnosis of GI hemorrhage is often made based on the patient's symptoms, medical history, physical examination, and diagnostic tests such as endoscopy, CT scan, or radionuclide scanning. Treatment depends on the severity and cause of the bleeding and may include medications, endoscopic procedures, surgery, or a combination of these approaches.

Aprotinin is a medication that belongs to a class of drugs called serine protease inhibitors. It works by inhibiting the activity of certain enzymes in the body that can cause tissue damage and bleeding. Aprotinin is used in medical procedures such as heart bypass surgery to reduce blood loss and the need for blood transfusions. It is administered intravenously and its use is typically stopped a few days after the surgical procedure.

Aprotinin was first approved for use in the United States in 1993, but its use has been restricted or withdrawn in many countries due to concerns about its safety. In 2006, a study found an increased risk of kidney damage and death associated with the use of aprotinin during heart bypass surgery, leading to its withdrawal from the market in Europe and Canada. However, it is still available for use in the United States under a restricted access program.

It's important to note that the use of aprotinin should be carefully considered and discussed with the healthcare provider, taking into account the potential benefits and risks of the medication.

Arthroplasty, replacement, knee is a surgical procedure where the damaged or diseased joint surface of the knee is removed and replaced with an artificial joint or prosthesis. The procedure involves resurfacing the worn-out ends of the femur (thigh bone) and tibia (shin bone) with metal components, and the back of the kneecap with a plastic button. This surgery is usually performed to relieve pain and restore function in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or traumatic injuries that have damaged the joint beyond repair. The goal of knee replacement surgery is to improve mobility, reduce pain, and enhance the quality of life for the patient.

Iron overload is a condition characterized by an excessive accumulation of iron in the body's tissues and organs, particularly in the liver, heart, and pancreas. This occurs when the body absorbs more iron than it can use or eliminate, leading to iron levels that are higher than normal.

Iron overload can result from various factors, including hereditary hemochromatosis, a genetic disorder that affects how the body absorbs iron from food; frequent blood transfusions, which can cause iron buildup in people with certain chronic diseases such as sickle cell anemia or thalassemia; and excessive consumption of iron supplements or iron-rich foods.

Symptoms of iron overload may include fatigue, joint pain, abdominal discomfort, irregular heartbeat, and liver dysfunction. If left untreated, it can lead to serious complications such as cirrhosis, liver failure, diabetes, heart problems, and even certain types of cancer. Treatment typically involves regular phlebotomy (removal of blood) to reduce iron levels in the body, along with dietary modifications and monitoring by a healthcare professional.

"Length of Stay" (LOS) is a term commonly used in healthcare to refer to the amount of time a patient spends receiving care in a hospital, clinic, or other healthcare facility. It is typically measured in hours, days, or weeks and can be used as a metric for various purposes such as resource planning, quality assessment, and reimbursement. The length of stay can vary depending on the type of illness or injury, the severity of the condition, the patient's response to treatment, and other factors. It is an important consideration in healthcare management and can have significant implications for both patients and providers.

Chelation therapy is a medical treatment that involves the use of chelating agents to remove heavy metals and minerals from the body. A chelating agent is a molecule that bonds with the metal ions, forming a stable, water-soluble complex that can be excreted through urine or stool.

The most common chelating agent used in medical settings is ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA), which is administered intravenously. EDTA binds with metals such as lead, mercury, iron, and calcium, and helps to eliminate them from the body.

Chelation therapy is primarily used to treat heavy metal poisoning, such as lead or mercury toxicity. It may also be used in some cases to treat cardiovascular disease, although its effectiveness for this use is still a matter of debate and controversy.

It's important to note that chelation therapy should only be administered under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional, as improper use can lead to serious side effects and complications.

Cardiac surgical procedures are operations that are performed on the heart or great vessels (the aorta and vena cava) by cardiothoracic surgeons. These surgeries are often complex and require a high level of skill and expertise. Some common reasons for cardiac surgical procedures include:

1. Coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG): This is a surgery to improve blood flow to the heart in patients with coronary artery disease. During the procedure, a healthy blood vessel from another part of the body is used to create a detour around the blocked or narrowed portion of the coronary artery.
2. Valve repair or replacement: The heart has four valves that control blood flow through and out of the heart. If one or more of these valves become damaged or diseased, they may need to be repaired or replaced. This can be done using artificial valves or valves from animal or human donors.
3. Aneurysm repair: An aneurysm is a weakened area in the wall of an artery that can bulge out and potentially rupture. If an aneurysm occurs in the aorta, it may require surgical repair to prevent rupture.
4. Heart transplantation: In some cases, heart failure may be so severe that a heart transplant is necessary. This involves removing the diseased heart and replacing it with a healthy donor heart.
5. Arrhythmia surgery: Certain types of abnormal heart rhythms (arrhythmias) may require surgical treatment. One such procedure is called the Maze procedure, which involves creating a pattern of scar tissue in the heart to disrupt the abnormal electrical signals that cause the arrhythmia.
6. Congenital heart defect repair: Some people are born with structural problems in their hearts that require surgical correction. These may include holes between the chambers of the heart or abnormal blood vessels.

Cardiac surgical procedures carry risks, including bleeding, infection, stroke, and death. However, for many patients, these surgeries can significantly improve their quality of life and longevity.

Postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is a significant obstetrical complication defined as the loss of more than 500 milliliters of blood within the first 24 hours after childbirth, whether it occurs vaginally or through cesarean section. It can also be defined as a blood loss of more than 1000 mL in relation to the amount of blood lost during the procedure and the patient's baseline hematocrit level.

Postpartum hemorrhage is classified into two types: primary (early) PPH, which occurs within the first 24 hours after delivery, and secondary (late) PPH, which happens between 24 hours and 12 weeks postpartum. The most common causes of PPH are uterine atony, trauma to the genital tract, retained placental tissue, and coagulopathy.

Uterine atony is the inability of the uterus to contract effectively after delivery, leading to excessive bleeding. Trauma to the genital tract can occur during childbirth, causing lacerations or tears that may result in bleeding. Retained placental tissue refers to the remnants of the placenta left inside the uterus, which can cause infection and heavy bleeding. Coagulopathy is a condition where the blood has difficulty clotting, leading to uncontrolled bleeding.

Symptoms of PPH include excessive vaginal bleeding, low blood pressure, increased heart rate, decreased urine output, and signs of shock such as confusion, rapid breathing, and pale skin. Treatment for PPH includes uterotonics, manual removal of retained placental tissue, repair of genital tract lacerations, blood transfusions, and surgery if necessary.

Preventing PPH involves proper antenatal care, monitoring high-risk pregnancies, active management of the third stage of labor, and prompt recognition and treatment of any bleeding complications during or after delivery.

A newborn infant is a baby who is within the first 28 days of life. This period is also referred to as the neonatal period. Newborns require specialized care and attention due to their immature bodily systems and increased vulnerability to various health issues. They are closely monitored for signs of well-being, growth, and development during this critical time.

In the context of medicine, plasma refers to the clear, yellowish fluid that is the liquid component of blood. It's composed of water, enzymes, hormones, antibodies, clotting factors, and other proteins. Plasma serves as a transport medium for cells, nutrients, waste products, gases, and other substances throughout the body. Additionally, it plays a crucial role in the immune response and helps regulate various bodily functions.

Plasma can be collected from blood donors and processed into various therapeutic products, such as clotting factors for people with hemophilia or immunoglobulins for patients with immune deficiencies. This process is called plasma fractionation.

A platelet count is a laboratory test that measures the number of platelets, also known as thrombocytes, in a sample of blood. Platelets are small, colorless cell fragments that circulate in the blood and play a crucial role in blood clotting. They help to stop bleeding by sticking together to form a plug at the site of an injured blood vessel.

A normal platelet count ranges from 150,000 to 450,000 platelets per microliter (µL) of blood. A lower than normal platelet count is called thrombocytopenia, while a higher than normal platelet count is known as thrombocytosis.

Abnormal platelet counts can be a sign of various medical conditions, including bleeding disorders, infections, certain medications, and some types of cancer. It is important to consult with a healthcare provider if you have any concerns about your platelet count or if you experience symptoms such as easy bruising, prolonged bleeding, or excessive menstrual flow.

Thalassemia is a group of inherited genetic disorders that affect the production of hemoglobin, a protein in red blood cells responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body. The disorder results in less efficient or abnormal hemoglobin, which can lead to anemia, an insufficient supply of oxygen-rich red blood cells.

There are two main types of Thalassemia: alpha and beta. Alpha thalassemia occurs when there is a problem with the alpha globin chain production, while beta thalassemia results from issues in beta globin chain synthesis. These disorders can range from mild to severe, depending on the number of genes affected and their specific mutations.

Severe forms of Thalassemia may require regular blood transfusions, iron chelation therapy, or even a bone marrow transplant to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

Thrombocytopenia is a medical condition characterized by an abnormally low platelet count (thrombocytes) in the blood. Platelets are small cell fragments that play a crucial role in blood clotting, helping to stop bleeding when a blood vessel is damaged. A healthy adult typically has a platelet count between 150,000 and 450,000 platelets per microliter of blood. Thrombocytopenia is usually diagnosed when the platelet count falls below 150,000 platelets/µL.

Thrombocytopenia can be classified into three main categories based on its underlying cause:

1. Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP): An autoimmune disorder where the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys its own platelets, leading to a decreased platelet count. ITP can be further divided into primary or secondary forms, depending on whether it occurs alone or as a result of another medical condition or medication.
2. Decreased production: Thrombocytopenia can occur when there is insufficient production of platelets in the bone marrow due to various causes, such as viral infections, chemotherapy, radiation therapy, leukemia, aplastic anemia, or vitamin B12 or folate deficiency.
3. Increased destruction or consumption: Thrombocytopenia can also result from increased platelet destruction or consumption due to conditions like disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), or severe bacterial infections.

Symptoms of thrombocytopenia may include easy bruising, prolonged bleeding from cuts, spontaneous nosebleeds, bleeding gums, blood in urine or stools, and skin rashes like petechiae (small red or purple spots) or purpura (larger patches). The severity of symptoms can vary depending on the degree of thrombocytopenia and the presence of any underlying conditions. Treatment for thrombocytopenia depends on the cause and may include medications, transfusions, or addressing the underlying condition.

Hepatitis C antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to an infection with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Detection of these antibodies in the blood indicates a past or present HCV infection. However, it does not necessarily mean that the person is currently infected, as antibodies can persist for years even after the virus has been cleared from the body. Additional tests are usually needed to confirm whether the infection is still active and to guide treatment decisions.

Blood coagulation disorders, also known as bleeding disorders or clotting disorders, refer to a group of medical conditions that affect the body's ability to form blood clots properly. Normally, when a blood vessel is injured, the body's coagulation system works to form a clot to stop the bleeding and promote healing.

In blood coagulation disorders, there can be either an increased tendency to bleed due to problems with the formation of clots (hemorrhagic disorder), or an increased tendency for clots to form inappropriately even without injury, leading to blockages in the blood vessels (thrombotic disorder).

Examples of hemorrhagic disorders include:

1. Hemophilia - a genetic disorder that affects the ability to form clots due to deficiencies in clotting factors VIII or IX.
2. Von Willebrand disease - another genetic disorder caused by a deficiency or abnormality of the von Willebrand factor, which helps platelets stick together to form a clot.
3. Liver diseases - can lead to decreased production of coagulation factors, increasing the risk of bleeding.
4. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) - a serious condition where clotting and bleeding occur simultaneously due to widespread activation of the coagulation system.

Examples of thrombotic disorders include:

1. Factor V Leiden mutation - a genetic disorder that increases the risk of inappropriate blood clot formation.
2. Antithrombin III deficiency - a genetic disorder that impairs the body's ability to break down clots, increasing the risk of thrombosis.
3. Protein C or S deficiencies - genetic disorders that lead to an increased risk of thrombosis due to impaired regulation of the coagulation system.
4. Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) - an autoimmune disorder where the body produces antibodies against its own clotting factors, increasing the risk of thrombosis.

Treatment for blood coagulation disorders depends on the specific diagnosis and may include medications to manage bleeding or prevent clots, as well as lifestyle changes and monitoring to reduce the risk of complications.

Operative surgical procedures refer to medical interventions that involve manual manipulation of tissues, structures, or organs in the body, typically performed in an operating room setting under sterile conditions. These procedures are carried out with the use of specialized instruments, such as scalpels, forceps, and scissors, and may require regional or general anesthesia to ensure patient comfort and safety.

Operative surgical procedures can range from relatively minor interventions, such as a biopsy or the removal of a small lesion, to more complex and extensive surgeries, such as open heart surgery or total joint replacement. The specific goals of operative surgical procedures may include the diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions, the repair or reconstruction of damaged tissues or organs, or the prevention of further disease progression.

Regardless of the type or complexity of the procedure, all operative surgical procedures require careful planning, execution, and postoperative management to ensure the best possible outcomes for patients.

Phlebotomy is a medical term that refers to the process of making an incision in a vein, usually in the arm, in order to draw blood. It is also commonly known as venipuncture. This procedure is performed by healthcare professionals for various purposes such as diagnostic testing, blood donation, or therapeutic treatments like phlebotomy for patients with hemochromatosis (a condition where the body absorbs too much iron from food).

The person who performs this procedure is called a phlebotomist. They must be trained in the proper techniques to ensure that the process is safe and relatively pain-free for the patient, and that the blood sample is suitable for laboratory testing.

Hepatectomy is a surgical procedure that involves the removal of part or all of the liver. This procedure can be performed for various reasons, such as removing cancerous or non-cancerous tumors, treating liver trauma, or donating a portion of the liver to another person in need of a transplant (live donor hepatectomy). The extent of the hepatectomy depends on the medical condition and overall health of the patient. It is a complex procedure that requires significant expertise and experience from the surgical team due to the liver's unique anatomy, blood supply, and regenerative capabilities.

The Chi-square distribution is a continuous probability distribution that is often used in statistical hypothesis testing. It is the distribution of a sum of squares of k independent standard normal random variables. The resulting quantity follows a chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom, denoted as χ²(k).

The probability density function (pdf) of the Chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom is given by:

f(x; k) = (1/ (2^(k/2) * Γ(k/2))) \* x^((k/2)-1) \* e^(-x/2), for x > 0 and 0, otherwise.

Where Γ(k/2) is the gamma function evaluated at k/2. The mean and variance of a Chi-square distribution with k degrees of freedom are k and 2k, respectively.

The Chi-square distribution has various applications in statistical inference, including testing goodness-of-fit, homogeneity of variances, and independence in contingency tables.

A reticulocyte count is a laboratory test that measures the percentage of reticulocytes in the peripheral blood. Reticulocytes are immature red blood cells produced in the bone marrow and released into the bloodstream. They contain residual ribosomal RNA, which gives them a reticular or net-like appearance under a microscope when stained with certain dyes.

The reticulocyte count is often used as an indicator of the rate of red blood cell production in the bone marrow. A higher than normal reticulocyte count may indicate an increased production of red blood cells, which can be seen in conditions such as hemolysis, blood loss, or response to treatment of anemia. A lower than normal reticulocyte count may suggest a decreased production of red blood cells, which can be seen in conditions such as bone marrow suppression, aplastic anemia, or vitamin deficiencies.

The reticulocyte count is usually expressed as a percentage of the total number of red blood cells, but it can also be reported as an absolute reticulocyte count (the actual number of reticulocytes per microliter of blood). The normal range for the reticulocyte count varies depending on the laboratory and the population studied.

Hematocrit is a medical term that refers to the percentage of total blood volume that is made up of red blood cells. It is typically measured as part of a complete blood count (CBC) test. A high hematocrit may indicate conditions such as dehydration, polycythemia, or living at high altitudes, while a low hematocrit may be a sign of anemia, bleeding, or overhydration. It is important to note that hematocrit values can vary depending on factors such as age, gender, and pregnancy status.

Aminocaproic acid is an antifibrinolytic medication, which means it helps to prevent the breakdown of blood clots. It works by blocking plasmin, an enzyme in your body that dissolves blood clots.

This drug is used for the treatment of bleeding conditions due to various causes, such as:

1. Excessive menstrual bleeding (menorrhagia)
2. Bleeding after tooth extraction or surgery
3. Hematuria (blood in urine) due to certain medical procedures or conditions like kidney stones
4. Intracranial hemorrhage (bleeding inside the skull)
5. Hereditary angioedema, a genetic disorder that causes swelling of various parts of the body

Aminocaproic acid is available in oral and injectable forms. Common side effects include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headache. Serious side effects are rare but may include allergic reactions, seizures, or vision changes. It's essential to use this medication under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as improper usage might lead to blood clots, stroke, or other severe complications.

Viral hepatitis in humans refers to inflammation of the liver caused by infection with viruses that primarily target the liver. There are five main types of human viral hepatitis, designated as Hepatitis A, B, C, D, and E virus (HAV, HBV, HCV, HDV, and HEV). These viruses can cause a range of illnesses, from acute self-limiting hepatitis to chronic hepatitis, which can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer.

1. Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is typically spread through the fecal-oral route, often through contaminated food or water. It usually results in an acute self-limiting infection, but rarely can cause chronic hepatitis in individuals with weakened immune systems.
2. Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is primarily transmitted through contact with infected blood, semen, and other bodily fluids. It can lead to both acute and chronic hepatitis, which may result in cirrhosis and liver cancer if left untreated.
3. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is predominantly spread through exposure to infected blood, such as through sharing needles or receiving contaminated blood transfusions. Chronic hepatitis C is common, and it can lead to serious liver complications like cirrhosis and liver cancer if not treated.
4. Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is an incomplete virus that requires the presence of HBV for its replication. HDV infection occurs only in individuals already infected with HBV, leading to more severe liver disease compared to HBV monoinfection.
5. Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is primarily transmitted through the fecal-oral route, often through contaminated food or water. It usually results in an acute self-limiting infection but can cause chronic hepatitis in pregnant women and individuals with weakened immune systems.

Prevention measures include vaccination for HAV and HBV, safe sex practices, avoiding sharing needles, and ensuring proper hygiene and sanitation to prevent fecal-oral transmission.

Hip arthroplasty, also known as hip replacement surgery, is a medical procedure where the damaged or diseased joint surfaces of the hip are removed and replaced with artificial components. These components typically include a metal or ceramic ball that replaces the head of the femur (thigh bone), and a polyethylene or ceramic socket that replaces the acetabulum (hip socket) in the pelvis.

The goal of hip arthroplasty is to relieve pain, improve joint mobility, and restore function to the hip joint. This procedure is commonly performed in patients with advanced osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, hip fractures, or other conditions that cause significant damage to the hip joint.

There are several types of hip replacement surgeries, including traditional total hip arthroplasty, partial (hemi) hip arthroplasty, and resurfacing hip arthroplasty. The choice of procedure depends on various factors, such as the patient's age, activity level, overall health, and the extent of joint damage.

After surgery, patients typically require rehabilitation to regain strength, mobility, and function in the affected hip. With proper care and follow-up, most patients can expect significant pain relief and improved quality of life following hip arthroplasty.

Creutzfeldt-Jakob syndrome (CJD) is a rare, degenerative, and fatal brain disorder. It is caused by an abnormal form of protein called prion that can cause normal proteins in the brain to fold into abnormal shapes and accumulate, leading to damage and death of brain cells.

The symptoms of CJD usually develop over a period of several months and include rapidly progressing dementia, memory loss, confusion, coordination problems, muscle stiffness, twitching, and shaking. Some people may also experience visual hallucinations, changes in personality, or depression.

There are three main types of CJD: sporadic, inherited, and acquired. Sporadic CJD is the most common form and accounts for about 85% of all cases. It occurs spontaneously with no known cause. Inherited CJD is caused by a genetic mutation that is passed down from parents to their children. Acquired CJD is caused by exposure to contaminated tissue or bodily fluids, such as through a medical procedure or eating contaminated beef (variant CJD).

There is no cure for Creutzfeldt-Jakob syndrome and it is fatal, usually within a year of onset of symptoms. Treatment focuses on managing the symptoms and making the patient as comfortable as possible.

Peptic ulcer hemorrhage is a medical condition characterized by bleeding in the gastrointestinal tract due to a peptic ulcer. Peptic ulcers are open sores that develop on the lining of the stomach, lower esophagus, or small intestine. They are usually caused by infection with the bacterium Helicobacter pylori or long-term use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

When a peptic ulcer bleeds, it can cause symptoms such as vomiting blood or passing black, tarry stools. In severe cases, the bleeding can lead to shock, which is a life-threatening condition characterized by a rapid heartbeat, low blood pressure, and confusion. Peptic ulcer hemorrhage is a serious medical emergency that requires immediate treatment. Treatment may include medications to reduce stomach acid, antibiotics to eliminate H. pylori infection, and endoscopic procedures to stop the bleeding. In some cases, surgery may be necessary to repair the ulcer or remove damaged tissue.

Seroepidemiologic studies are a type of epidemiological study that measures the presence and levels of antibodies in a population's blood serum to investigate the prevalence, distribution, and transmission of infectious diseases. These studies help to identify patterns of infection and immunity within a population, which can inform public health policies and interventions.

Seroepidemiologic studies typically involve collecting blood samples from a representative sample of individuals in a population and testing them for the presence of antibodies against specific pathogens. The results are then analyzed to estimate the prevalence of infection and immunity within the population, as well as any factors associated with increased or decreased risk of infection.

These studies can provide valuable insights into the spread of infectious diseases, including emerging and re-emerging infections, and help to monitor the effectiveness of vaccination programs. Additionally, seroepidemiologic studies can also be used to investigate the transmission dynamics of infectious agents, such as identifying sources of infection or tracking the spread of antibiotic resistance.

Pregnancy is a physiological state or condition where a fertilized egg (zygote) successfully implants and grows in the uterus of a woman, leading to the development of an embryo and finally a fetus. This process typically spans approximately 40 weeks, divided into three trimesters, and culminates in childbirth. Throughout this period, numerous hormonal and physical changes occur to support the growing offspring, including uterine enlargement, breast development, and various maternal adaptations to ensure the fetus's optimal growth and well-being.

Tattooing is defined medically as the process of inserting pigment into the skin's dermis layer to change its color. This procedure creates a permanent design or image. The equipment used for tattooing includes an electrically powered tattoo machine, needles, and ink. Tattooing can carry potential risks such as infection, allergic reactions, and scarring. It is essential to ensure that all tattooing procedures are performed under sterile conditions and by a licensed professional to minimize these risks.

The Rh-Hr blood group system is a complex system of antigens found on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs), which is separate from the more well-known ABO blood group system. The term "Rh" refers to the Rhesus monkey, as these antigens were first discovered in rhesus macaques.

The Rh system consists of several antigens, but the most important ones are the D antigen (also known as the Rh factor) and the hr/Hr antigens. The D antigen is the one that determines whether a person's blood is Rh-positive or Rh-negative. If the D antigen is present, the blood is Rh-positive; if it is absent, the blood is Rh-negative.

The hr/Hr antigens are less well known but can still cause problems in blood transfusions and pregnancy. The Hr antigen is relatively rare, found in only about 1% of the population, while the hr antigen is more common.

When a person with Rh-negative blood is exposed to Rh-positive blood (for example, through a transfusion or during pregnancy), their immune system may produce antibodies against the D antigen. This can cause problems if they later receive a transfusion with Rh-positive blood or if they become pregnant with an Rh-positive fetus.

The Rh-Hr blood group system is important in blood transfusions and obstetrics, as it can help ensure that patients receive compatible blood and prevent complications during pregnancy.

Iron chelating agents are medications that bind to iron in the body, forming a stable complex that can then be excreted from the body. These agents are primarily used to treat iron overload, a condition that can occur due to frequent blood transfusions or certain genetic disorders such as hemochromatosis. By reducing the amount of iron in the body, these medications can help prevent or reduce damage to organs such as the heart and liver. Examples of iron chelating agents include deferoxamine, deferasirox, and deferiprone.

Christianity is a monotheistic religion based on the life, teachings, and sacrificial death of Jesus Christ. It is one of the largest religions in the world, with followers known as Christians. The fundamental tenets of Christianity include the belief in the Holy Trinity (the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit), the divinity of Jesus Christ, the resurrection of Jesus, and the forgiveness of sins through faith in Jesus Christ.

The Christian Bible, consisting of the Old Testament and the New Testament, is considered to be the sacred scripture of Christianity. The New Testament contains four Gospels (Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John) that provide accounts of the life, ministry, teachings, miracles, crucifixion, and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Other important texts in Christianity include the letters of the Apostles, known as the Epistles, which provide guidance on Christian living and theology.

There are various denominations within Christianity, including Roman Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, Anglicanism, Lutheranism, Presbyterianism, Methodism, Baptists, and many others. These denominations may have different beliefs, practices, and organizational structures, but they all share a common belief in the life, teachings, and sacrificial death of Jesus Christ.

It's important to note that while this definition provides an overview of Christianity as a religion, it does not capture the full depth and richness of Christian beliefs, practices, and traditions, which can vary widely among different communities and individuals.

The intraoperative period is the phase of surgical treatment that refers to the time during which the surgery is being performed. It begins when the anesthesia is administered and the patient is prepared for the operation, and it ends when the surgery is completed, the anesthesia is discontinued, and the patient is transferred to the recovery room or intensive care unit (ICU).

During the intraoperative period, the surgical team, including surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, and other healthcare professionals, work together to carry out the surgical procedure safely and effectively. The anesthesiologist monitors the patient's vital signs, such as heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, and body temperature, throughout the surgery to ensure that the patient remains stable and does not experience any complications.

The surgeon performs the operation, using various surgical techniques and instruments to achieve the desired outcome. The surgical team also takes measures to prevent infection, control bleeding, and manage pain during and after the surgery.

Overall, the intraoperative period is a critical phase of surgical treatment that requires close collaboration and communication among members of the healthcare team to ensure the best possible outcomes for the patient.

Fetoscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure that allows direct visualization of the fetus and the intrauterine environment through the use of a fiber-optic scope. It is typically performed during the second trimester of pregnancy to diagnose or treat various fetal conditions, such as twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome, congenital diaphragmatic hernia, or spina bifida. The procedure involves inserting a thin tube called a fetoscope through the mother's abdomen and uterus to access the fetus. Fetoscopy can also be used for taking fetal tissue samples for genetic testing.

It is important to note that while fetoscopy can provide valuable information and treatment options, it does carry some risks, including preterm labor, premature rupture of membranes, infection, and bleeding. Therefore, the decision to undergo fetoscopy should be made carefully, in consultation with a medical professional, and based on a thorough evaluation of the potential benefits and risks.

Risk assessment in the medical context refers to the process of identifying, evaluating, and prioritizing risks to patients, healthcare workers, or the community related to healthcare delivery. It involves determining the likelihood and potential impact of adverse events or hazards, such as infectious diseases, medication errors, or medical devices failures, and implementing measures to mitigate or manage those risks. The goal of risk assessment is to promote safe and high-quality care by identifying areas for improvement and taking action to minimize harm.

Intraoperative complications refer to any unforeseen problems or events that occur during the course of a surgical procedure, once it has begun and before it is completed. These complications can range from minor issues, such as bleeding or an adverse reaction to anesthesia, to major complications that can significantly impact the patient's health and prognosis.

Examples of intraoperative complications include:

1. Bleeding (hemorrhage) - This can occur due to various reasons such as injury to blood vessels or organs during surgery.
2. Infection - Surgical site infections can develop if the surgical area becomes contaminated during the procedure.
3. Anesthesia-related complications - These include adverse reactions to anesthesia, difficulty maintaining the patient's airway, or cardiovascular instability.
4. Organ injury - Accidental damage to surrounding organs can occur during surgery, leading to potential long-term consequences.
5. Equipment failure - Malfunctioning surgical equipment can lead to complications and compromise the safety of the procedure.
6. Allergic reactions - Patients may have allergies to certain medications or materials used during surgery, causing an adverse reaction.
7. Prolonged operative time - Complications may arise if a surgical procedure takes longer than expected, leading to increased risk of infection and other issues.

Intraoperative complications require prompt identification and management by the surgical team to minimize their impact on the patient's health and recovery.

Hepatitis B is a viral infection that attacks the liver and can cause both acute and chronic disease. The virus is transmitted through contact with infected blood, semen, and other bodily fluids. It can also be passed from an infected mother to her baby at birth.

Acute hepatitis B infection lasts for a few weeks to several months and often causes no symptoms. However, some people may experience mild to severe flu-like symptoms, yellowing of the skin and eyes (jaundice), dark urine, and fatigue. Most adults with acute hepatitis B recover completely and develop lifelong immunity to the virus.

Chronic hepatitis B infection can lead to serious liver damage, including cirrhosis and liver cancer. People with chronic hepatitis B may experience long-term symptoms such as fatigue, joint pain, and depression. They are also at risk for developing liver failure and liver cancer.

Prevention measures include vaccination, safe sex practices, avoiding sharing needles or other drug injection equipment, and covering wounds and skin rashes. There is no specific treatment for acute hepatitis B, but chronic hepatitis B can be treated with antiviral medications to slow the progression of liver damage.

Follow-up studies are a type of longitudinal research that involve repeated observations or measurements of the same variables over a period of time, in order to understand their long-term effects or outcomes. In medical context, follow-up studies are often used to evaluate the safety and efficacy of medical treatments, interventions, or procedures.

In a typical follow-up study, a group of individuals (called a cohort) who have received a particular treatment or intervention are identified and then followed over time through periodic assessments or data collection. The data collected may include information on clinical outcomes, adverse events, changes in symptoms or functional status, and other relevant measures.

The results of follow-up studies can provide important insights into the long-term benefits and risks of medical interventions, as well as help to identify factors that may influence treatment effectiveness or patient outcomes. However, it is important to note that follow-up studies can be subject to various biases and limitations, such as loss to follow-up, recall bias, and changes in clinical practice over time, which must be carefully considered when interpreting the results.

Epistaxis is the medical term for nosebleed. It refers to the bleeding from the nostrils or nasal cavity, which can be caused by various factors such as dryness, trauma, inflammation, high blood pressure, or use of blood-thinning medications. Nosebleeds can range from minor nuisances to potentially life-threatening emergencies, depending on the severity and underlying cause. If you are experiencing a nosebleed that does not stop after 20 minutes of applying direct pressure, or if you are coughing up or vomiting blood, seek medical attention immediately.

Drainage, in medical terms, refers to the removal of excess fluid or accumulated collections of fluids from various body parts or spaces. This is typically accomplished through the use of medical devices such as catheters, tubes, or drains. The purpose of drainage can be to prevent the buildup of fluids that may cause discomfort, infection, or other complications, or to treat existing collections of fluid such as abscesses, hematomas, or pleural effusions. Drainage may also be used as a diagnostic tool to analyze the type and composition of the fluid being removed.

Blood group antigens are molecular markers found on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs) and sometimes other types of cells in the body. These antigens are proteins, carbohydrates, or glycoproteins that can stimulate an immune response when foreign antigens are introduced into the body.

There are several different blood group systems, but the most well-known is the ABO system, which includes A, B, AB, and O blood groups. The antigens in this system are called ABO antigens. Individuals with type A blood have A antigens on their RBCs, those with type B blood have B antigens, those with type AB blood have both A and B antigens, and those with type O blood have neither A nor B antigens.

Another important blood group system is the Rh system, which includes the D antigen. Individuals who have this antigen are considered Rh-positive, while those who do not have it are considered Rh-negative.

Blood group antigens can cause complications during blood transfusions and pregnancy if there is a mismatch between the donor's or fetus's antigens and the recipient's antibodies. For example, if a person with type A blood receives type B blood, their anti-B antibodies will attack the foreign B antigens on the donated RBCs, causing a potentially life-threatening transfusion reaction. Similarly, if an Rh-negative woman becomes pregnant with an Rh-positive fetus, her immune system may produce anti-D antibodies that can cross the placenta and attack the fetal RBCs, leading to hemolytic disease of the newborn.

It is important for medical professionals to determine a patient's blood group before performing a transfusion or pregnancy-related procedures to avoid these complications.

Isotonic solutions are defined in the context of medical and physiological sciences as solutions that contain the same concentration of solutes (dissolved particles) as another solution, usually the bodily fluids like blood. This means that if you compare the concentration of solute particles in two isotonic solutions, they will be equal.

A common example is a 0.9% sodium chloride (NaCl) solution, also known as normal saline. The concentration of NaCl in this solution is approximately equal to the concentration found in the fluid portion of human blood, making it isotonic with blood.

Isotonic solutions are crucial in medical settings for various purposes, such as intravenous (IV) fluids replacement, wound care, and irrigation solutions. They help maintain fluid balance, prevent excessive water movement across cell membranes, and reduce the risk of damaging cells due to osmotic pressure differences between the solution and bodily fluids.

A premature infant is a baby born before 37 weeks of gestation. They may face various health challenges because their organs are not fully developed. The earlier a baby is born, the higher the risk of complications. Prematurity can lead to short-term and long-term health issues, such as respiratory distress syndrome, jaundice, anemia, infections, hearing problems, vision problems, developmental delays, and cerebral palsy. Intensive medical care and support are often necessary for premature infants to ensure their survival and optimal growth and development.

Colonialism, in a medical context, can refer to the process by which colonial powers imposed their own medical practices and systems upon the colonized peoples. This could include the introduction of new diseases (through forced contact or migration), the spread of infectious diseases due to poor living conditions and lack of access to healthcare, and the imposition of Western medical theories and treatments on non-Western cultures. Colonialism also had a profound impact on the social determinants of health, such as poverty, education, and housing, which further exacerbated health disparities between colonizers and the colonized. Additionally, colonial powers often used medicine as a tool of control and domination, for example by forcing indigenous peoples to undergo medical procedures or experiments without their consent.

A wound is a type of injury that occurs when the skin or other tissues are cut, pierced, torn, or otherwise broken. Wounds can be caused by a variety of factors, including accidents, violence, surgery, or certain medical conditions. There are several different types of wounds, including:

* Incisions: These are cuts that are made deliberately, often during surgery. They are usually straight and clean.
* Lacerations: These are tears in the skin or other tissues. They can be irregular and jagged.
* Abrasions: These occur when the top layer of skin is scraped off. They may look like a bruise or a scab.
* Punctures: These are wounds that are caused by sharp objects, such as needles or knives. They are usually small and deep.
* Avulsions: These occur when tissue is forcibly torn away from the body. They can be very serious and require immediate medical attention.

Injuries refer to any harm or damage to the body, including wounds. Injuries can range from minor scrapes and bruises to more severe injuries such as fractures, dislocations, and head trauma. It is important to seek medical attention for any injury that is causing significant pain, swelling, or bleeding, or if there is a suspected bone fracture or head injury.

In general, wounds and injuries should be cleaned and covered with a sterile bandage to prevent infection. Depending on the severity of the wound or injury, additional medical treatment may be necessary. This may include stitches for deep cuts, immobilization for broken bones, or surgery for more serious injuries. It is important to follow your healthcare provider's instructions carefully to ensure proper healing and to prevent complications.

Erythrocyte count, also known as red blood cell (RBC) count, is a laboratory test that measures the number of red blood cells in a sample of blood. Red blood cells are important because they carry oxygen from the lungs to the rest of the body. A low erythrocyte count may indicate anemia, while a high count may be a sign of certain medical conditions such as polycythemia. The normal range for erythrocyte count varies depending on a person's age, sex, and other factors.

Plasma substitutes are fluids that are used to replace the plasma volume in conditions such as hypovolemia (low blood volume) or plasma loss, for example due to severe burns, trauma, or major surgery. They do not contain cells or clotting factors, but they help to maintain intravascular volume and tissue perfusion. Plasma substitutes can be divided into two main categories: crystalloids and colloids.

Crystalloid solutions contain small molecules that can easily move between intracellular and extracellular spaces. Examples include normal saline (0.9% sodium chloride) and lactated Ringer's solution. They are less expensive and have a lower risk of allergic reactions compared to colloids, but they may require larger volumes to achieve the same effect due to their rapid distribution in the body.

Colloid solutions contain larger molecules that tend to stay within the intravascular space for longer periods, thus increasing the oncotic pressure and helping to maintain fluid balance. Examples include albumin, fresh frozen plasma, and synthetic colloids such as hydroxyethyl starch (HES) and gelatin. Colloids may be more effective in restoring intravascular volume, but they carry a higher risk of allergic reactions and anaphylaxis, and some types have been associated with adverse effects such as kidney injury and coagulopathy.

The choice of plasma substitute depends on various factors, including the patient's clinical condition, the underlying cause of plasma loss, and any contraindications or potential side effects of the available products. It is important to monitor the patient's hemodynamic status, electrolyte balance, and coagulation profile during and after the administration of plasma substitutes to ensure appropriate resuscitation and avoid complications.

Hemolytic anemia, autoimmune is a type of anemia characterized by the premature destruction of red blood cells (RBCs) in which the immune system mistakenly attacks and destroys its own RBCs. This occurs when the body produces autoantibodies that bind to the surface of RBCs, leading to their rupture (hemolysis). The symptoms may include fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, and dark colored urine. The diagnosis is made through blood tests that measure the number and size of RBCs, reticulocyte count, and the presence of autoantibodies. Treatment typically involves suppressing the immune system with medications such as corticosteroids or immunosuppressive drugs, and sometimes removal of the spleen (splenectomy) may be necessary.

The Coombs test is a laboratory procedure used to detect the presence of antibodies on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs). It is named after the scientist, Robin Coombs, who developed the test. There are two types of Coombs tests: direct and indirect.

1. Direct Coombs Test (DCT): This test is used to detect the presence of antibodies directly attached to the surface of RBCs. It is often used to diagnose hemolytic anemia, a condition in which RBCs are destroyed prematurely, leading to anemia. A positive DCT indicates that the patient's RBCs have been coated with antibodies, which can occur due to various reasons such as autoimmune disorders, blood transfusion reactions, or drug-induced immune hemolysis.
2. Indirect Coombs Test (ICT): This test is used to detect the presence of antibodies in the patient's serum that can agglutinate (clump) foreign RBCs. It is commonly used before blood transfusions or during pregnancy to determine if the patient has antibodies against the RBCs of a potential donor or fetus, respectively. A positive ICT indicates that the patient's serum contains antibodies capable of binding to and agglutinating foreign RBCs.

In summary, the Coombs test is a crucial diagnostic tool in identifying various hemolytic disorders and ensuring safe blood transfusions by detecting the presence of harmful antibodies against RBCs.

Thromboelastography (TEG) is a viscoelastic method used to assess the kinetics of clot formation, clot strength, and fibrinolysis in whole blood. It provides a global assessment of hemostasis by measuring the mechanical properties of a clot as it forms and dissolves over time. The TEG graph displays several parameters that reflect the different stages of clotting, including reaction time (R), clot formation time (K), angle of clot formation (α), maximum amplitude (MA), and percentage lysis at 30 minutes (LY30). These parameters can help guide transfusion therapy and inform decisions regarding the management of coagulopathy in various clinical settings, such as trauma, cardiac surgery, liver transplantation, and obstetrics.

Erythrocytes, also known as red blood cells (RBCs), are the most common type of blood cell in circulating blood in mammals. They are responsible for transporting oxygen from the lungs to the body's tissues and carbon dioxide from the tissues to the lungs.

Erythrocytes are formed in the bone marrow and have a biconcave shape, which allows them to fold and bend easily as they pass through narrow blood vessels. They do not have a nucleus or mitochondria, which makes them more flexible but also limits their ability to reproduce or repair themselves.

In humans, erythrocytes are typically disc-shaped and measure about 7 micrometers in diameter. They contain the protein hemoglobin, which binds to oxygen and gives blood its red color. The lifespan of an erythrocyte is approximately 120 days, after which it is broken down in the liver and spleen.

Abnormalities in erythrocyte count or function can lead to various medical conditions, such as anemia, polycythemia, and sickle cell disease.

Hemosiderosis is a medical condition characterized by the abnormal accumulation of hemosiderin, an iron-containing protein, in various organs and tissues of the body. Hemosiderin is derived from the breakdown of hemoglobin, which is the oxygen-carrying protein in red blood cells. When there is excessive breakdown of red blood cells or impaired clearance of hemosiderin, it can lead to its accumulation in organs such as the liver, spleen, and lungs.

Hemosiderosis can be classified into two types: primary and secondary. Primary hemosiderosis is a rare condition that is caused by genetic disorders affecting red blood cells, while secondary hemosiderosis is more common and is associated with various conditions that cause excessive breakdown of red blood cells or chronic inflammation. These conditions include hemolytic anemias, repeated blood transfusions, liver diseases, infections, and certain autoimmune disorders.

The accumulation of hemosiderin can lead to tissue damage and organ dysfunction, particularly in the lungs, where it can cause pulmonary fibrosis, and in the heart, where it can lead to heart failure. Hemosiderosis is typically diagnosed through a combination of medical history, physical examination, and laboratory tests, including blood tests and imaging studies such as chest X-rays or MRI scans. Treatment of hemosiderosis depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, blood transfusions, or supportive care to manage symptoms and prevent complications.

Hospital mortality is a term used to describe the number or rate of deaths that occur in a hospital setting during a specific period. It is often used as a measure of the quality of healthcare provided by a hospital, as a higher hospital mortality rate may indicate poorer care or more complex cases being treated. However, it's important to note that hospital mortality rates can be influenced by many factors, including the severity of illness of the patients being treated, patient demographics, and the availability of resources and specialized care. Therefore, hospital mortality rates should be interpreted with caution and in the context of other quality metrics.

Acute Lung Injury (ALI) is a medical condition characterized by inflammation and damage to the lung tissue, which can lead to difficulty breathing and respiratory failure. It is often caused by direct or indirect injury to the lungs, such as pneumonia, sepsis, trauma, or inhalation of harmful substances.

The symptoms of ALI include shortness of breath, rapid breathing, cough, and low oxygen levels in the blood. The condition can progress rapidly and may require mechanical ventilation to support breathing. Treatment typically involves addressing the underlying cause of the injury, providing supportive care, and managing symptoms.

In severe cases, ALI can lead to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), a more serious and life-threatening condition that requires intensive care unit (ICU) treatment.

The ABO blood-group system is a classification system used in blood transfusion medicine to determine the compatibility of donated blood with a recipient's blood. It is based on the presence or absence of two antigens, A and B, on the surface of red blood cells (RBCs), as well as the corresponding antibodies present in the plasma.

There are four main blood types in the ABO system:

1. Type A: These individuals have A antigens on their RBCs and anti-B antibodies in their plasma.
2. Type B: They have B antigens on their RBCs and anti-A antibodies in their plasma.
3. Type AB: They have both A and B antigens on their RBCs but no natural antibodies against either A or B antigens.
4. Type O: They do not have any A or B antigens on their RBCs, but they have both anti-A and anti-B antibodies in their plasma.

Transfusing blood from a donor with incompatible ABO antigens can lead to an immune response, causing the destruction of donated RBCs and potentially life-threatening complications such as acute hemolytic transfusion reaction. Therefore, it is crucial to match the ABO blood type between donors and recipients before performing a blood transfusion.

Logistic models, specifically logistic regression models, are a type of statistical analysis used in medical and epidemiological research to identify the relationship between the risk of a certain health outcome or disease (dependent variable) and one or more independent variables, such as demographic factors, exposure variables, or other clinical measurements.

In contrast to linear regression models, logistic regression models are used when the dependent variable is binary or dichotomous in nature, meaning it can only take on two values, such as "disease present" or "disease absent." The model uses a logistic function to estimate the probability of the outcome based on the independent variables.

Logistic regression models are useful for identifying risk factors and estimating the strength of associations between exposures and health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders, and predicting the probability of an outcome given certain values of the independent variables. They can also be used to develop clinical prediction rules or scores that can aid in decision-making and patient care.

Hemolysis is the destruction or breakdown of red blood cells, resulting in the release of hemoglobin into the surrounding fluid (plasma). This process can occur due to various reasons such as chemical agents, infections, autoimmune disorders, mechanical trauma, or genetic abnormalities. Hemolysis may lead to anemia and jaundice, among other complications. It is essential to monitor hemolysis levels in patients undergoing medical treatments that might cause this condition.

Homologous transplantation is a type of transplant surgery where organs or tissues are transferred between two genetically non-identical individuals of the same species. The term "homologous" refers to the similarity in structure and function of the donated organ or tissue to the recipient's own organ or tissue.

For example, a heart transplant from one human to another is an example of homologous transplantation because both organs are hearts and perform the same function. Similarly, a liver transplant, kidney transplant, lung transplant, and other types of organ transplants between individuals of the same species are also considered homologous transplantations.

Homologous transplantation is in contrast to heterologous or xenogeneic transplantation, where organs or tissues are transferred from one species to another, such as a pig heart transplanted into a human. Homologous transplantation is more commonly performed than heterologous transplantation due to the increased risk of rejection and other complications associated with xenogeneic transplants.

A percutaneous nephrostomy is a medical procedure in which a tube (catheter) is inserted through the skin into the kidney to drain urine. "Percutaneous" means that the procedure is performed through the skin. The term "nephrostomy" refers specifically to the creation of an opening into the kidney.

This procedure is typically performed under local anesthesia and imaging guidance, such as ultrasound or fluoroscopy, to ensure accurate placement of the catheter. It may be used in cases where there is a blockage in the urinary tract that prevents the normal flow of urine, such as a kidney stone or tumor. By creating a nephrostomy, urine can be drained from the kidney, helping to alleviate pressure and prevent further complications.

Percutaneous nephrostomy is generally a safe procedure, but like any medical intervention, it carries some risks. These may include bleeding, infection, injury to surrounding organs, or failure to properly place the catheter. Patients who undergo this procedure will typically require follow-up care to manage the catheter and monitor their kidney function.

Multivariate analysis is a statistical method used to examine the relationship between multiple independent variables and a dependent variable. It allows for the simultaneous examination of the effects of two or more independent variables on an outcome, while controlling for the effects of other variables in the model. This technique can be used to identify patterns, associations, and interactions among multiple variables, and is commonly used in medical research to understand complex health outcomes and disease processes. Examples of multivariate analysis methods include multiple regression, factor analysis, cluster analysis, and discriminant analysis.

Erythrocyte aging, also known as red cell aging, is the natural process of changes and senescence that occur in red blood cells (erythrocytes) over time. In humans, mature erythrocytes are devoid of nuclei and organelles, and have a lifespan of approximately 120 days.

During aging, several biochemical and structural modifications take place in the erythrocyte, including:

1. Loss of membrane phospholipids and proteins, leading to increased rigidity and decreased deformability.
2. Oxidative damage to hemoglobin, resulting in the formation of methemoglobin and heinz bodies.
3. Accumulation of denatured proteins and aggregates, which can impair cellular functions.
4. Changes in the cytoskeleton, affecting the shape and stability of the erythrocyte.
5. Increased expression of surface markers, such as Band 3 and CD47, that signal the spleen to remove aged erythrocytes from circulation.

The spleen plays a crucial role in removing senescent erythrocytes by recognizing and phagocytosing those with altered membrane composition or increased expression of surface markers. This process helps maintain the overall health and functionality of the circulatory system.

A cohort study is a type of observational study in which a group of individuals who share a common characteristic or exposure are followed up over time to determine the incidence of a specific outcome or outcomes. The cohort, or group, is defined based on the exposure status (e.g., exposed vs. unexposed) and then monitored prospectively to assess for the development of new health events or conditions.

Cohort studies can be either prospective or retrospective in design. In a prospective cohort study, participants are enrolled and followed forward in time from the beginning of the study. In contrast, in a retrospective cohort study, researchers identify a cohort that has already been assembled through medical records, insurance claims, or other sources and then look back in time to assess exposure status and health outcomes.

Cohort studies are useful for establishing causality between an exposure and an outcome because they allow researchers to observe the temporal relationship between the two. They can also provide information on the incidence of a disease or condition in different populations, which can be used to inform public health policy and interventions. However, cohort studies can be expensive and time-consuming to conduct, and they may be subject to bias if participants are not representative of the population or if there is loss to follow-up.

The perioperative period is a term used to describe the time frame surrounding a surgical procedure, encompassing the preoperative (before surgery), intraoperative (during surgery), and postoperative (after surgery) phases. This period begins with the initial decision for surgery, continues through the surgical intervention itself, and extends until the patient has fully recovered from the effects of the surgery and anesthesia. The perioperative period involves a multidisciplinary approach to patient care, involving surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, and other healthcare professionals working together to optimize patient outcomes, minimize complications, and ensure a smooth transition back to normal daily activities.

A Trauma Center is a hospital that has specialized resources and capabilities to provide comprehensive care for severely injured patients. It is a designated facility that has met strict criteria established by the American College of Surgeons (ACS) and/or state or regional trauma systems. These criteria include having a dedicated trauma team, available 24/7, with specially trained healthcare professionals who can promptly assess, resuscitate, operate, and provide critical care to patients suffering from traumatic injuries.

Trauma centers are categorized into levels (I-V), based on the resources and capabilities they offer. Level I trauma centers have the highest level of resources and are capable of providing comprehensive care for all types of traumatic injuries, including conducting research and offering education in trauma care. In contrast, lower-level trauma centers may not have the same extent of resources but still provide essential trauma care services to their communities.

The primary goal of a trauma center is to ensure that severely injured patients receive prompt, high-quality care to minimize the risk of complications, reduce long-term disability, and improve overall outcomes.

Antisickling agents are medications or substances that help prevent or reduce the sickling of red blood cells in individuals with sickle cell disease. Sickling is a pathological process where the normally disc-shaped red blood cells become crescent-shaped due to abnormal hemoglobin (HbS). This change in shape can lead to blockages in small blood vessels, causing tissue damage and various complications such as pain crises, acute chest syndrome, and stroke.

Antisickling agents work by either inhibiting the polymerization of HbS or improving the oxygen-carrying capacity of red blood cells. The most commonly used antisickling agent is hydroxyurea, which increases the production of fetal hemoglobin (HbF) in red blood cells. HbF has a higher affinity for oxygen than HbS and can prevent the polymerization of HbS, thereby reducing sickling. Other antisickling agents include:

1. L-glutamine: An amino acid that helps maintain the structural integrity of red blood cells and reduces oxidative stress.
2. Arginate: A salt of arginine, an amino acid that helps improve nitric oxide production and vasodilation, reducing sickling.
3. Senicapoc: A drug that inhibits the formation of HbS polymers by blocking the interaction between HbS molecules.
4. Voxelotor (Oxbryta): A medication that binds to HbS and stabilizes it in its oxygenated state, reducing sickling.

These antisickling agents can help alleviate symptoms, decrease the frequency of pain crises, and improve the quality of life for individuals with sickle cell disease. However, they should be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as each has its benefits, risks, and potential side effects.

In the context of medical terminology, "vacuum" is not typically used as a standalone term with a specific medical definition. However, it can be used in certain medical procedures or conditions in relation to creating a partial vacuum or absence of pressure. For example:

1. In surgical procedures, such as a vacuum-assisted closure, a vacuum is applied to help promote wound healing by removing fluids and infectious materials from the wound site.
2. In some cases, a therapeutic vacuum may be used to treat soft tissue injuries or conditions like lymphedema, where controlled negative pressure is applied to improve circulation, reduce swelling, and promote healing.
3. A rare medical condition called "spontaneous intracranial hypotension" can occur when there is a leak in the dura mater (the protective membrane surrounding the brain and spinal cord), causing cerebrospinal fluid to escape and creating a negative pressure or vacuum-like effect within the skull, which may result in headaches, neck pain, or other neurological symptoms.

In general, "vacuum" is not a commonly used medical term with a specific definition but can be found in relation to certain procedures or conditions where a partial vacuum or absence of pressure is involved.

A "Blood Cell Count" is a medical laboratory test that measures the number of red blood cells (RBCs), white blood cells (WBCs), and platelets in a sample of blood. This test is often used as a part of a routine check-up or to help diagnose various medical conditions, such as anemia, infection, inflammation, and many others.

The RBC count measures the number of oxygen-carrying cells in the blood, while the WBC count measures the number of immune cells that help fight infections. The platelet count measures the number of cells involved in clotting. Abnormal results in any of these counts may indicate an underlying medical condition and further testing may be required for diagnosis and treatment.

Hemoglobinometry is a method used to measure the amount or concentration of hemoglobin (Hb) in blood. Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout the body. Hemoglobinometry is typically performed on a sample of whole blood and can be done using various methods, including spectrophotometry, colorimetry, or automated analyzers.

The results of hemoglobinometry are reported in units of grams per deciliter (g/dL) or grams per liter (g/L). Normal values for hemoglobin concentration vary depending on factors such as age, sex, and altitude, but in general, a healthy adult male should have a hemoglobin level between 13.5 and 17.5 g/dL, while a healthy adult female should have a level between 12.0 and 15.5 g/dL.

Hemoglobinometry is an important diagnostic tool in the evaluation of various medical conditions, including anemia, polycythemia, and respiratory disorders. It can help identify the cause of symptoms such as fatigue, shortness of breath, or dizziness and guide treatment decisions.

A Patient Identification System is a type of healthcare software that is designed to accurately and reliably identify patients across various encounters, locations, and care settings within a healthcare organization or system. The primary goal of these systems is to ensure that each patient's health information is linked to the correct medical record, thereby reducing the risk of errors due to misidentification.

Patient Identification Systems typically use a variety of methods to identify patients, such as demographic data (e.g., name, date of birth, gender, address), biometric data (e.g., fingerprints, iris scans), and other unique identifiers (e.g., medical record numbers, health insurance numbers). These systems may also include features for matching patient records across different healthcare organizations or systems, as well as tools for reconciling discrepancies in patient information.

The use of Patient Identification Systems can help to improve the quality and safety of healthcare by reducing the risk of medical errors due to misidentification, enhancing the accuracy of clinical decision-making, and facilitating more effective communication and coordination of care among healthcare providers.

A fibrin tissue adhesive is a type of surgical glue that is used to approximate and secure together cut or wounded tissues in the body during surgical procedures. It is made from fibrin, a protein involved in blood clotting, and is often combined with other substances like thrombin and calcium chloride to promote clot formation and enhance adhesion.

Fibrin tissue adhesives work by mimicking the body's natural clotting process. When applied to the wound site, the fibrinogen component of the adhesive is converted into fibrin by the thrombin component, creating a stable fibrin clot that holds the edges of the wound together. This helps to promote healing and reduce the risk of complications such as bleeding or infection.

Fibrin tissue adhesives are commonly used in various surgical procedures, including dermatologic, ophthalmic, orthopedic, and neurologic surgeries. They offer several advantages over traditional suturing methods, such as reduced operation time, less trauma to the tissues, and improved cosmetic outcomes. However, they may not be suitable for all types of wounds or surgical sites, and their use should be determined by a qualified healthcare professional based on individual patient needs and circumstances.

Laparoscopy is a surgical procedure that involves the insertion of a laparoscope, which is a thin tube with a light and camera attached to it, through small incisions in the abdomen. This allows the surgeon to view the internal organs without making large incisions. It's commonly used to diagnose and treat various conditions such as endometriosis, ovarian cysts, infertility, and appendicitis. The advantages of laparoscopy over traditional open surgery include smaller incisions, less pain, shorter hospital stays, and quicker recovery times.

Hemorrhagic shock is a type of shock that occurs when there is significant blood loss leading to inadequate perfusion of tissues and organs. It is characterized by hypovolemia (low blood volume), hypotension (low blood pressure), tachycardia (rapid heart rate), and decreased urine output. Hemorrhagic shock can be classified into four stages based on the amount of blood loss and hemodynamic changes. In severe cases, it can lead to multi-organ dysfunction and death if not treated promptly and effectively.

A medical audit is a systematic review and evaluation of the quality of medical care against established standards to see if it is being delivered efficiently, effectively, and equitably. It is a quality improvement process that aims to improve patient care and outcomes by identifying gaps between actual and desired practice, and implementing changes to close those gaps. Medical audits can focus on various aspects of healthcare delivery, including diagnosis, treatment, medication use, and follow-up care. The ultimate goal of medical audits is to ensure that patients receive the best possible care based on current evidence and best practices.

Prevalence, in medical terms, refers to the total number of people in a given population who have a particular disease or condition at a specific point in time, or over a specified period. It is typically expressed as a percentage or a ratio of the number of cases to the size of the population. Prevalence differs from incidence, which measures the number of new cases that develop during a certain period.

Deferoxamine is a medication used to treat iron overload, which can occur due to various reasons such as frequent blood transfusions or excessive iron intake. It works by binding to excess iron in the body and promoting its excretion through urine. This helps to prevent damage to organs such as the heart and liver that can be caused by high levels of iron.

Deferoxamine is an injectable medication that is typically administered intravenously or subcutaneously, depending on the specific regimen prescribed by a healthcare professional. It may also be used in combination with other medications to manage iron overload more effectively.

It's important to note that deferoxamine should only be used under the guidance of a medical professional, as improper use or dosing can lead to serious side effects or complications.

A splenectomy is a surgical procedure in which the spleen is removed from the body. The spleen is an organ located in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen, near the stomach and behind the ribs. It plays several important roles in the body, including fighting certain types of infections, removing old or damaged red blood cells from the circulation, and storing platelets and white blood cells.

There are several reasons why a splenectomy may be necessary, including:

* Trauma to the spleen that cannot be repaired
* Certain types of cancer, such as Hodgkin's lymphoma or non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
* Sickle cell disease, which can cause the spleen to enlarge and become damaged
* A ruptured spleen, which can be life-threatening if not treated promptly
* Certain blood disorders, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) or hemolytic anemia

A splenectomy is typically performed under general anesthesia and may be done using open surgery or laparoscopically. After the spleen is removed, the incision(s) are closed with sutures or staples. Recovery time varies depending on the individual and the type of surgery performed, but most people are able to return to their normal activities within a few weeks.

It's important to note that following a splenectomy, individuals may be at increased risk for certain types of infections, so it's recommended that they receive vaccinations to help protect against these infections. They should also seek medical attention promptly if they develop fever, chills, or other signs of infection.

Neonatal jaundice is a medical condition characterized by the yellowing of a newborn baby's skin and eyes due to an excess of bilirubin in the blood. Bilirubin is a yellowish substance produced by the normal breakdown of red blood cells, which are then processed by the liver and excreted through the bile. In neonatal jaundice, the liver is not yet fully developed and cannot process bilirubin quickly enough, leading to its accumulation in the body.

Neonatal jaundice typically appears within the first 2-4 days of life and can range from mild to severe. Mild cases may resolve on their own without treatment, while more severe cases may require medical intervention such as phototherapy or a blood transfusion. Risk factors for neonatal jaundice include prematurity, bruising during birth, blood type incompatibility between mother and baby, and certain genetic disorders.

It is important to monitor newborns closely for signs of jaundice and seek medical attention if concerned, as untreated neonatal jaundice can lead to serious complications such as brain damage or hearing loss.

Inverted papilloma is a specific type of benign (non-cancerous) growth that occurs in the mucosal lining of the nasal cavity or paranasal sinuses. It is also known as schneiderian papilloma or cylindrical cell papilloma.

This condition is characterized by the growth of finger-like projections (papillae) that invert or grow inward into the underlying tissue, hence the name "inverted." The lesions are usually composed of an outer layer of stratified squamous epithelium and an inner core of connective tissue.

Inverted papillomas can cause symptoms such as nasal congestion, nosebleeds, sinus pressure, and difficulty breathing through the nose. In some cases, they may also lead to more serious complications, including recurrence after removal and a small risk of malignant transformation into squamous cell carcinoma.

It is important to note that while inverted papillomas are benign, they can still cause significant problems due to their location and tendency to recur. Therefore, they typically require surgical removal and close follow-up with an otolaryngologist (ear, nose, and throat specialist).

Aplastic anemia is a medical condition characterized by pancytopenia (a decrease in all three types of blood cells: red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets) due to the failure of bone marrow to produce new cells. It is called "aplastic" because the bone marrow becomes hypocellular or "aplastic," meaning it contains few or no blood-forming stem cells.

The condition can be acquired or inherited, with acquired aplastic anemia being more common. Acquired aplastic anemia can result from exposure to toxic chemicals, radiation, drugs, viral infections, or autoimmune disorders. Inherited forms of the disease include Fanconi anemia and dyskeratosis congenita.

Symptoms of aplastic anemia may include fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, pale skin, easy bruising or bleeding, frequent infections, and fever. Treatment options for aplastic anemia depend on the severity of the condition and its underlying cause. They may include blood transfusions, immunosuppressive therapy, and stem cell transplantation.

Blood specimen collection is the process of obtaining a sample of blood from a patient for laboratory testing and analysis. This procedure is performed by trained healthcare professionals, such as nurses or phlebotomists, using sterile equipment to minimize the risk of infection and ensure accurate test results. The collected blood sample may be used to diagnose and monitor various medical conditions, assess overall health and organ function, and check for the presence of drugs, alcohol, or other substances. Proper handling, storage, and transportation of the specimen are crucial to maintain its integrity and prevent contamination.

In epidemiology, the incidence of a disease is defined as the number of new cases of that disease within a specific population over a certain period of time. It is typically expressed as a rate, with the number of new cases in the numerator and the size of the population at risk in the denominator. Incidence provides information about the risk of developing a disease during a given time period and can be used to compare disease rates between different populations or to monitor trends in disease occurrence over time.

Angiodysplasia is a vascular disorder characterized by the dilation and abnormal formation of blood vessels, particularly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These abnormal blood vessels are prone to leakage or rupture, which can lead to bleeding. Angiodysplasia is most commonly found in the colon but can occur in other parts of the GI tract as well. It is more common in older adults and can cause symptoms such as anemia, fatigue, and bloody stools. The exact cause of angiodysplasia is not known, but it may be associated with chronic low-grade inflammation or increased pressure in the blood vessels. Treatment options include endoscopic therapies to stop bleeding, medications to reduce acid production in the stomach, and surgery in severe cases.

'Babesia microti' is a species of intracellular parasites that infect red blood cells and can cause babesiosis, a type of tick-borne disease. The transmission of this parasite to humans usually occurs through the bite of infected black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis).

The life cycle of 'Babesia microti' involves two hosts: the tick and the mammalian host (such as a mouse or human). In the tick, the parasite undergoes development in the midgut, salivary glands, and ovaries. When an infected tick bites a mammalian host, it injects sporozoites into the skin, which then enter the bloodstream and invade red blood cells. Inside the red blood cells, the parasites multiply asexually, leading to their rupture and release of merozoites that infect other red blood cells.

The symptoms of babesiosis can range from mild to severe, depending on the patient's age, immune status, and the presence of other medical conditions. Mild cases may present with flu-like symptoms such as fever, chills, headache, fatigue, and muscle aches. Severe cases can lead to complications such as hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, jaundice, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and even death in immunocompromised individuals or those with underlying medical conditions.

Diagnosis of babesiosis typically involves microscopic examination of blood smears for the presence of parasites, as well as serological tests such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and indirect fluorescent antibody (IFA) tests. Molecular methods such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can also be used to detect the genetic material of 'Babesia microti' in blood samples.

Treatment of babesiosis usually involves a combination of antiparasitic drugs such as atovaquone and azithromycin or clindamycin and quinine, along with supportive care to manage symptoms and complications. Preventive measures include avoiding tick-infested areas, using insect repellents, wearing protective clothing, and performing regular tick checks after outdoor activities.

Blood volume refers to the total amount of blood present in an individual's circulatory system at any given time. It is the combined volume of both the plasma (the liquid component of blood) and the formed elements (such as red and white blood cells and platelets) in the blood. In a healthy adult human, the average blood volume is approximately 5 liters (or about 1 gallon). However, blood volume can vary depending on several factors, including age, sex, body weight, and overall health status.

Blood volume plays a critical role in maintaining proper cardiovascular function, as it affects blood pressure, heart rate, and the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissues throughout the body. Changes in blood volume can have significant impacts on an individual's health and may be associated with various medical conditions, such as dehydration, hemorrhage, heart failure, and liver disease. Accurate measurement of blood volume is essential for diagnosing and managing these conditions, as well as for guiding treatment decisions in clinical settings.

A critical illness is a serious condition that has the potential to cause long-term or permanent disability, or even death. It often requires intensive care and life support from medical professionals. Critical illnesses can include conditions such as:

1. Heart attack
2. Stroke
3. Organ failure (such as kidney, liver, or lung)
4. Severe infections (such as sepsis)
5. Coma or brain injury
6. Major trauma
7. Cancer that has spread to other parts of the body

These conditions can cause significant physical and emotional stress on patients and their families, and often require extensive medical treatment, rehabilitation, and long-term care. Critical illness insurance is a type of insurance policy that provides financial benefits to help cover the costs associated with treating these serious medical conditions.

Iron compounds refer to chemical substances that contain iron (Fe) combined with other elements. Iron is an essential mineral for the human body, playing a crucial role in various bodily functions such as oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and energy production.

There are several types of iron compounds, including:

1. Inorganic iron salts: These are commonly used in dietary supplements and fortified foods to treat or prevent iron deficiency anemia. Examples include ferrous sulfate, ferrous gluconate, and ferric iron.
2. Heme iron: This is the form of iron found in animal products such as meat, poultry, and fish. It is more easily absorbed by the body compared to non-heme iron from plant sources.
3. Non-heme iron: This is the form of iron found in plant-based foods such as grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables. It is not as well-absorbed as heme iron but can be enhanced by consuming it with vitamin C or other organic acids.

It's important to note that excessive intake of iron compounds can lead to iron toxicity, which can cause serious health problems. Therefore, it's essential to follow recommended dosages and consult a healthcare professional before taking any iron supplements.

Filtration in the medical context refers to a process used in various medical treatments and procedures, where a substance is passed through a filter with the purpose of removing impurities or unwanted components. The filter can be made up of different materials such as paper, cloth, or synthetic membranes, and it works by trapping particles or molecules based on their size, shape, or charge.

For example, filtration is commonly used in kidney dialysis to remove waste products and excess fluids from the blood. In this case, the patient's blood is pumped through a special filter called a dialyzer, which separates waste products and excess fluids from the blood based on size differences between these substances and the blood cells. The clean blood is then returned to the patient's body.

Filtration is also used in other medical applications such as water purification, air filtration, and tissue engineering. In each case, the goal is to remove unwanted components or impurities from a substance, making it safer or more effective for use in medical treatments and procedures.

Resuscitation is a medical term that refers to the process of reversing cardiopulmonary arrest or preventing further deterioration of someone in cardiac or respiratory arrest. It involves a series of interventions aimed at restoring spontaneous blood circulation and breathing, thereby preventing or minimizing tissue damage due to lack of oxygen.

The most common form of resuscitation is cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), which combines chest compressions to manually pump blood through the body with rescue breaths to provide oxygen to the lungs. In a hospital setting, more advanced techniques such as defibrillation, medication administration, and intubation may also be used as part of the resuscitation process.

The goal of resuscitation is to stabilize the patient's condition and prevent further harm while treating the underlying cause of the arrest. Successful resuscitation can lead to a full recovery or, in some cases, result in varying degrees of neurological impairment depending on the severity and duration of the cardiac or respiratory arrest.

In the context of medicine, iron is an essential micromineral and key component of various proteins and enzymes. It plays a crucial role in oxygen transport, DNA synthesis, and energy production within the body. Iron exists in two main forms: heme and non-heme. Heme iron is derived from hemoglobin and myoglobin in animal products, while non-heme iron comes from plant sources and supplements.

The recommended daily allowance (RDA) for iron varies depending on age, sex, and life stage:

* For men aged 19-50 years, the RDA is 8 mg/day
* For women aged 19-50 years, the RDA is 18 mg/day
* During pregnancy, the RDA increases to 27 mg/day
* During lactation, the RDA for breastfeeding mothers is 9 mg/day

Iron deficiency can lead to anemia, characterized by fatigue, weakness, and shortness of breath. Excessive iron intake may result in iron overload, causing damage to organs such as the liver and heart. Balanced iron levels are essential for maintaining optimal health.

Graft survival, in medical terms, refers to the success of a transplanted tissue or organ in continuing to function and integrate with the recipient's body over time. It is the opposite of graft rejection, which occurs when the recipient's immune system recognizes the transplanted tissue as foreign and attacks it, leading to its failure.

Graft survival depends on various factors, including the compatibility between the donor and recipient, the type and location of the graft, the use of immunosuppressive drugs to prevent rejection, and the overall health of the recipient. A successful graft survival implies that the transplanted tissue or organ has been accepted by the recipient's body and is functioning properly, providing the necessary physiological support for the recipient's survival and improved quality of life.

Otorhinolaryngologic surgical procedures are surgeries that are performed on the head and neck region, specifically involving the ear, nose, and throat (ENT) regions. This field is also known as otolaryngology-head and neck surgery. The procedures can range from relatively minor ones, such as removing a small nasal polyp or inserting ear tubes, to more complex surgeries like cochlear implantation, endoscopic sinus surgery, or removal of tumors in the head and neck region. These surgical procedures are typically performed by specialized physicians called otorhinolaryngologists (also known as ENT surgeons) who have completed extensive training in this area.

Melena is a medical term that refers to the passage of black, tarry stools. It's not a specific disease but rather a symptom caused by the presence of digested blood in the gastrointestinal tract. The dark color results from the breakdown of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells, by gut bacteria and stomach acids.

Melena stools are often associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, which can occur due to various reasons such as gastric ulcers, esophageal varices (dilated veins in the esophagus), Mallory-Weiss tears (tears in the lining of the esophagus or stomach), or tumors.

It is essential to differentiate melena from hematochezia, which refers to the passage of bright red blood in the stool, typically indicating lower gastrointestinal bleeding. A healthcare professional should evaluate any concerns related to changes in bowel movements, including the presence of melena or hematochezia.

Infectious disease transmission refers to the spread of an infectious agent or pathogen from an infected person, animal, or contaminated object to another susceptible host. This can occur through various routes, including:

1. Contact transmission: Direct contact with an infected person or animal, such as through touching, kissing, or sexual contact.
2. Droplet transmission: Inhalation of respiratory droplets containing the pathogen, which are generated when an infected person coughs, sneezes, talks, or breathes heavily.
3. Airborne transmission: Inhalation of smaller particles called aerosols that can remain suspended in the air for longer periods and travel farther distances than droplets.
4. Fecal-oral transmission: Consuming food or water contaminated with fecal matter containing the pathogen, often through poor hygiene practices.
5. Vector-borne transmission: Transmission via an intermediate vector, such as a mosquito or tick, that becomes infected after feeding on an infected host and then transmits the pathogen to another host during a subsequent blood meal.
6. Vehicle-borne transmission: Consuming food or water contaminated with the pathogen through vehicles like soil, water, or fomites (inanimate objects).

Preventing infectious disease transmission is crucial in controlling outbreaks and epidemics. Measures include good personal hygiene, vaccination, use of personal protective equipment (PPE), safe food handling practices, and environmental disinfection.

Renal dialysis is a medical procedure that is used to artificially remove waste products, toxins, and excess fluids from the blood when the kidneys are no longer able to perform these functions effectively. This process is also known as hemodialysis.

During renal dialysis, the patient's blood is circulated through a special machine called a dialyzer or an artificial kidney, which contains a semi-permeable membrane that filters out waste products and excess fluids from the blood. The cleaned blood is then returned to the patient's body.

Renal dialysis is typically recommended for patients with advanced kidney disease or kidney failure, such as those with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). It is a life-sustaining treatment that helps to maintain the balance of fluids and electrolytes in the body, prevent the buildup of waste products and toxins, and control blood pressure.

There are two main types of renal dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. Hemodialysis is the most common type and involves using a dialyzer to filter the blood outside the body. Peritoneal dialysis, on the other hand, involves placing a catheter in the abdomen and using the lining of the abdomen (peritoneum) as a natural filter to remove waste products and excess fluids from the body.

Overall, renal dialysis is an essential treatment option for patients with kidney failure, helping them to maintain their quality of life and prolong their survival.

Blood coagulation tests, also known as coagulation studies or clotting tests, are a series of medical tests used to evaluate the blood's ability to clot. These tests measure the functioning of various clotting factors and regulatory proteins involved in the coagulation cascade, which is a complex process that leads to the formation of a blood clot to prevent excessive bleeding.

The most commonly performed coagulation tests include:

1. Prothrombin Time (PT): Measures the time it takes for a sample of plasma to clot after the addition of calcium and tissue factor, which activates the extrinsic pathway of coagulation. The PT is reported in seconds and can be converted to an International Normalized Ratio (INR) to monitor anticoagulant therapy.
2. Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (aPTT): Measures the time it takes for a sample of plasma to clot after the addition of calcium, phospholipid, and a contact activator, which activates the intrinsic pathway of coagulation. The aPTT is reported in seconds and is used to monitor heparin therapy.
3. Thrombin Time (TT): Measures the time it takes for a sample of plasma to clot after the addition of thrombin, which directly converts fibrinogen to fibrin. The TT is reported in seconds and can be used to detect the presence of fibrin degradation products or abnormalities in fibrinogen function.
4. Fibrinogen Level: Measures the amount of fibrinogen, a protein involved in clot formation, present in the blood. The level is reported in grams per liter (g/L) and can be used to assess bleeding risk or the effectiveness of fibrinogen replacement therapy.
5. D-dimer Level: Measures the amount of D-dimer, a protein fragment produced during the breakdown of a blood clot, present in the blood. The level is reported in micrograms per milliliter (µg/mL) and can be used to diagnose or exclude venous thromboembolism (VTE), such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE).

These tests are important for the diagnosis, management, and monitoring of various bleeding and clotting disorders. They can help identify the underlying cause of abnormal bleeding or clotting, guide appropriate treatment decisions, and monitor the effectiveness of therapy. It is essential to interpret these test results in conjunction with a patient's clinical presentation and medical history.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Nigeria" is not a medical term. It is a country located in West Africa, and it is the most populous country in Africa. If you have any questions about medical conditions or terms, I would be happy to help clarify those for you.

"Military medicine" is a specific branch of medical practice that deals with the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of diseases and injuries in military populations. It encompasses the provision of healthcare services to military personnel, both in peacetime and during times of conflict or emergency situations. This may include providing care in combat zones, managing mass casualties, delivering preventive medicine programs, conducting medical research, and providing medical support during peacekeeping missions and humanitarian assistance efforts. Military medicine also places a strong emphasis on the development and use of specialized equipment, techniques, and protocols to ensure the best possible medical care for military personnel in challenging environments.

Flaviviridae is a family of viruses that includes many important human pathogens. According to the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV), Flaviviridae is divided into four genera: Flavivirus, Hepacivirus, Pegivirus, and Pestivirus. These viruses are enveloped and have a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome.

1. Flavivirus genus includes several medically important viruses, such as dengue virus, yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, West Nile virus, Zika virus, and tick-borne encephalitis virus. These viruses are primarily transmitted by arthropod vectors (mosquitoes or ticks) and can cause a wide range of symptoms, from mild febrile illness to severe hemorrhagic fever and neuroinvasive disease.
2. Hepacivirus genus contains hepatitis C virus (HCV), which is a major causative agent of viral hepatitis and liver diseases, such as cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV is primarily transmitted through percutaneous exposure to infected blood or blood products, sexual contact, and mother-to-child transmission during childbirth.
3. Pegivirus genus includes pegiviruses (formerly known as GB viruses) that are associated with persistent infection in humans and other animals. While pegiviruses can cause acute illness, they are mostly linked to asymptomatic or mild infections.
4. Pestivirus genus contains several animal pathogens, such as bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV), Classical swine fever virus (CSFV), and border disease virus (BDV). These viruses can cause significant economic losses in the livestock industry due to reproductive failure, growth retardation, and immunosuppression.

In summary, Flaviviridae is a family of enveloped, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA viruses that includes several important human and animal pathogens. The family is divided into four genera: Flavivirus, Hepacivirus, Pegivirus, and Pestivirus.

Hemostatic techniques refer to various methods used in medicine to stop bleeding or hemorrhage. The goal of these techniques is to promote the body's natural clotting process and prevent excessive blood loss. Some common hemostatic techniques include:

1. Mechanical compression: Applying pressure directly to the wound to physically compress blood vessels and stop the flow of blood. This can be done manually or with the use of medical devices such as clamps, tourniquets, or compression bandages.
2. Suturing or stapling: Closing a wound with stitches or staples to bring the edges of the wound together and allow the body's natural clotting process to occur.
3. Electrocautery: Using heat generated by an electrical current to seal off blood vessels and stop bleeding.
4. Hemostatic agents: Applying topical substances that promote clotting, such as fibrin glue, collagen, or gelatin sponges, to the wound site.
5. Vascular embolization: Inserting a catheter into a blood vessel and injecting a substance that blocks the flow of blood to a specific area, such as a bleeding tumor or aneurysm.
6. Surgical ligation: Tying off a bleeding blood vessel with suture material during surgery.
7. Arterial or venous repair: Repairing damaged blood vessels through surgical intervention to restore normal blood flow and prevent further bleeding.

A reoperation is a surgical procedure that is performed again on a patient who has already undergone a previous operation for the same or related condition. Reoperations may be required due to various reasons, such as inadequate initial treatment, disease recurrence, infection, or complications from the first surgery. The nature and complexity of a reoperation can vary widely depending on the specific circumstances, but it often carries higher risks and potential complications compared to the original operation.

Medical survival rate is a statistical measure used to determine the percentage of patients who are still alive for a specific period of time after their diagnosis or treatment for a certain condition or disease. It is often expressed as a five-year survival rate, which refers to the proportion of people who are alive five years after their diagnosis. Survival rates can be affected by many factors, including the stage of the disease at diagnosis, the patient's age and overall health, the effectiveness of treatment, and other health conditions that the patient may have. It is important to note that survival rates are statistical estimates and do not necessarily predict an individual patient's prognosis.

Recombinant proteins are artificially created proteins produced through the use of recombinant DNA technology. This process involves combining DNA molecules from different sources to create a new set of genes that encode for a specific protein. The resulting recombinant protein can then be expressed, purified, and used for various applications in research, medicine, and industry.

Recombinant proteins are widely used in biomedical research to study protein function, structure, and interactions. They are also used in the development of diagnostic tests, vaccines, and therapeutic drugs. For example, recombinant insulin is a common treatment for diabetes, while recombinant human growth hormone is used to treat growth disorders.

The production of recombinant proteins typically involves the use of host cells, such as bacteria, yeast, or mammalian cells, which are engineered to express the desired protein. The host cells are transformed with a plasmid vector containing the gene of interest, along with regulatory elements that control its expression. Once the host cells are cultured and the protein is expressed, it can be purified using various chromatography techniques.

Overall, recombinant proteins have revolutionized many areas of biology and medicine, enabling researchers to study and manipulate proteins in ways that were previously impossible.

Hemolytic anemia is a type of anemia that occurs when red blood cells are destroyed (hemolysis) faster than they can be produced. Red blood cells are essential for carrying oxygen throughout the body. When they are destroyed, hemoglobin and other cellular components are released into the bloodstream, which can lead to complications such as kidney damage and gallstones.

Hemolytic anemia can be inherited or acquired. Inherited forms of the condition may result from genetic defects that affect the structure or function of red blood cells. Acquired forms of hemolytic anemia can be caused by various factors, including infections, medications, autoimmune disorders, and certain medical conditions such as cancer or blood disorders.

Symptoms of hemolytic anemia may include fatigue, weakness, shortness of breath, pale skin, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes), dark urine, and a rapid heartbeat. Treatment for hemolytic anemia depends on the underlying cause and may include medications, blood transfusions, or surgery.

Hepacivirus is a genus of viruses in the family Flaviviridae. The most well-known member of this genus is Hepatitis C virus (HCV), which is a major cause of liver disease worldwide. HCV infection can lead to chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and liver cancer.

Hepaciviruses are enveloped viruses with a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome. They have a small icosahedral capsid and infect a variety of hosts, including humans, non-human primates, horses, and birds. The virus enters the host cell by binding to specific receptors on the cell surface and is then internalized through endocytosis.

HCV has a high degree of genetic diversity and is classified into seven major genotypes and numerous subtypes based on differences in its RNA sequence. This genetic variability can affect the virus's ability to evade the host immune response, making treatment more challenging.

In addition to HCV, other hepaciviruses have been identified in various animal species, including equine hepacivirus (EHCV), rodent hepacivirus (RHV), and bat hepacivirus (BtHepCV). These viruses are being studied to better understand the biology of hepaciviruses and their potential impact on human health.

The Kell blood-group system is one of the human blood group systems, which is a set of red blood cell antigens (proteins or carbohydrates) found on the surface of red blood cells. The Kell system consists of more than 30 antigens, but the two most important ones are K and k.

The Kell antigen is inherited in an autosomal dominant manner, meaning that if an individual inherits one Kell antigen from either parent, they will express the Kell antigen on their red blood cells. The k antigen is a weaker form of the Kell antigen and is also inherited in an autosomal dominant manner.

Individuals who are Kell positive (K+) can produce antibodies against the Kell antigen if they are exposed to it through blood transfusion or pregnancy. These antibodies can cause hemolytic transfusion reactions or hemolytic disease of the newborn in subsequent pregnancies with a Kell-negative (K-) fetus.

Therefore, it is important to determine the Kell status of both donors and recipients in blood transfusions and pregnant women to prevent complications.

Micropore filters are medical devices used to filter or sterilize fluids and gases. They are made of materials like cellulose, mixed cellulose ester, or polyvinylidene fluoride with precise pore sizes, typically ranging from 0.1 to 10 micrometers in diameter. These filters are used to remove bacteria, fungi, and other particles from solutions in laboratory and medical settings, such as during the preparation of injectable drugs, tissue culture media, or sterile fluids for medical procedures. They come in various forms, including syringe filters, vacuum filters, and bottle-top filters, and are often used with the assistance of a vacuum or positive pressure to force the fluid through the filter material.

Clinical protocols, also known as clinical practice guidelines or care paths, are systematically developed statements that assist healthcare professionals and patients in making decisions about the appropriate healthcare for specific clinical circumstances. They are based on a thorough evaluation of the available scientific evidence and consist of a set of recommendations that are designed to optimize patient outcomes, improve the quality of care, and reduce unnecessary variations in practice. Clinical protocols may cover a wide range of topics, including diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and disease prevention, and are developed by professional organizations, government agencies, and other groups with expertise in the relevant field.

A "premature infant" is a newborn delivered before 37 weeks of gestation. They are at greater risk for various health complications and medical conditions compared to full-term infants, due to their immature organ systems and lower birth weight. Some common diseases and health issues that premature infants may face include:

1. Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS): A lung disorder caused by the lack of surfactant, a substance that helps keep the lungs inflated. Premature infants, especially those born before 34 weeks, are at higher risk for RDS.
2. Intraventricular Hemorrhage (IVH): Bleeding in the brain's ventricles, which can lead to developmental delays or neurological issues. The risk of IVH is inversely proportional to gestational age, meaning that the earlier the infant is born, the higher the risk.
3. Necrotizing Enterocolitis (NEC): A gastrointestinal disease where the intestinal tissue becomes inflamed and can die. Premature infants are at greater risk for NEC due to their immature digestive systems.
4. Jaundice: A yellowing of the skin and eyes caused by an accumulation of bilirubin, a waste product from broken-down red blood cells. Premature infants may have higher rates of jaundice due to their liver's immaturity.
5. Infections: Premature infants are more susceptible to infections because of their underdeveloped immune systems. Common sources of infection include the mother's genital tract, bloodstream, or hospital environment.
6. Anemia: A condition characterized by a low red blood cell count or insufficient hemoglobin. Premature infants may develop anemia due to frequent blood sampling, rapid growth, or inadequate erythropoietin production.
7. Retinopathy of Prematurity (ROP): An eye disorder affecting premature infants, where abnormal blood vessel growth occurs in the retina. Severe ROP can lead to vision loss or blindness if not treated promptly.
8. Developmental Delays: Premature infants are at risk for developmental delays due to their immature nervous systems and environmental factors such as sensory deprivation or separation from parents.
9. Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA): A congenital heart defect where the ductus arteriosus, a blood vessel that connects two major arteries in the fetal heart, fails to close after birth. Premature infants are at higher risk for PDA due to their immature cardiovascular systems.
10. Hypothermia: Premature infants have difficulty maintaining body temperature and are at risk for hypothermia, which can lead to increased metabolic demands, poor feeding, and infection.

Nonparametric statistics is a branch of statistics that does not rely on assumptions about the distribution of variables in the population from which the sample is drawn. In contrast to parametric methods, nonparametric techniques make fewer assumptions about the data and are therefore more flexible in their application. Nonparametric tests are often used when the data do not meet the assumptions required for parametric tests, such as normality or equal variances.

Nonparametric statistical methods include tests such as the Wilcoxon rank-sum test (also known as the Mann-Whitney U test) for comparing two independent groups, the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for comparing two related groups, and the Kruskal-Wallis test for comparing more than two independent groups. These tests use the ranks of the data rather than the actual values to make comparisons, which allows them to be used with ordinal or continuous data that do not meet the assumptions of parametric tests.

Overall, nonparametric statistics provide a useful set of tools for analyzing data in situations where the assumptions of parametric methods are not met, and can help researchers draw valid conclusions from their data even when the data are not normally distributed or have other characteristics that violate the assumptions of parametric tests.

Blood platelets, also known as thrombocytes, are small, colorless cell fragments in our blood that play an essential role in normal blood clotting. They are formed in the bone marrow from large cells called megakaryocytes and circulate in the blood in an inactive state until they are needed to help stop bleeding. When a blood vessel is damaged, platelets become activated and change shape, releasing chemicals that attract more platelets to the site of injury. These activated platelets then stick together to form a plug, or clot, that seals the wound and prevents further blood loss. In addition to their role in clotting, platelets also help to promote healing by releasing growth factors that stimulate the growth of new tissue.

Kidney transplantation is a surgical procedure where a healthy kidney from a deceased or living donor is implanted into a patient with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) or permanent kidney failure. The new kidney takes over the functions of filtering waste and excess fluids from the blood, producing urine, and maintaining the body's electrolyte balance.

The transplanted kidney is typically placed in the lower abdomen, with its blood vessels connected to the recipient's iliac artery and vein. The ureter of the new kidney is then attached to the recipient's bladder to ensure proper urine flow. Following the surgery, the patient will require lifelong immunosuppressive therapy to prevent rejection of the transplanted organ by their immune system.

The Injury Severity Score (ISS) is a medical scoring system used to assess the severity of trauma in patients with multiple injuries. It's based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), which classifies each injury by body region on a scale from 1 (minor) to 6 (maximum severity).

The ISS is calculated by summing the squares of the highest AIS score in each of the three most severely injured body regions. The possible ISS ranges from 0 to 75, with higher scores indicating more severe injuries. An ISS over 15 is generally considered a significant injury, and an ISS over 25 is associated with a high risk of mortality. It's important to note that the ISS has limitations, as it doesn't consider the number or type of injuries within each body region, only the most severe one.

Hepatitis B Surface Antigens (HBsAg) are proteins found on the surface of the Hepatitis B virus. They are present in the blood of individuals infected with the Hepatitis B virus and are used as a marker for the presence of a current Hepatitis B infection. The detection of HBsAg in the blood indicates that an individual is infectious and can transmit the virus to others. It is typically used in diagnostic tests to detect and diagnose Hepatitis B infections, monitor treatment response, and assess the risk of transmission.

Isoantigens are antigens that are present on the cells or tissues of one individual of a species, but are absent or different in another individual of the same species. They are also known as "alloantigens." Isoantigens are most commonly found on the surface of red blood cells and other tissues, and they can stimulate an immune response when transplanted into a different individual. This is because the recipient's immune system recognizes the isoantigens as foreign and mounts a defense against them. Isoantigens are important in the field of transplantation medicine, as they must be carefully matched between donor and recipient to reduce the risk of rejection.

Coronary artery bypass surgery, also known as coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG), is a surgical procedure used to improve blood flow to the heart in patients with severe coronary artery disease. This condition occurs when the coronary arteries, which supply oxygen-rich blood to the heart muscle, become narrowed or blocked due to the buildup of fatty deposits, called plaques.

During CABG surgery, a healthy blood vessel from another part of the body is grafted, or attached, to the coronary artery, creating a new pathway for oxygen-rich blood to flow around the blocked or narrowed portion of the artery and reach the heart muscle. This bypass helps to restore normal blood flow and reduce the risk of angina (chest pain), shortness of breath, and other symptoms associated with coronary artery disease.

There are different types of CABG surgery, including traditional on-pump CABG, off-pump CABG, and minimally invasive CABG. The choice of procedure depends on various factors, such as the patient's overall health, the number and location of blocked arteries, and the presence of other medical conditions.

It is important to note that while CABG surgery can significantly improve symptoms and quality of life in patients with severe coronary artery disease, it does not cure the underlying condition. Lifestyle modifications, such as regular exercise, a healthy diet, smoking cessation, and medication therapy, are essential for long-term management and prevention of further progression of the disease.

Hepatitis antibodies are proteins produced by the immune system in response to an infection caused by a hepatitis virus. There are several types of hepatitis viruses, including A, B, C, D, and E, each with their own specific antibodies.

The presence of hepatitis antibodies in the blood can indicate a current or past infection with the corresponding hepatitis virus. For example, the detection of anti-HAV (hepatitis A virus) antibodies indicates a past infection or immunization against hepatitis A, while the detection of anti-HBs (hepatitis B surface antigen) antibodies indicates immunity due to vaccination or recovery from a hepatitis B infection.

It's important to note that some hepatitis antibodies may not provide immunity to future infections, and individuals can still be infected with the virus even if they have previously produced antibodies against it. Therefore, regular testing and vaccination are essential for preventing the spread of hepatitis viruses and protecting public health.

A fatal outcome is a term used in medical context to describe a situation where a disease, injury, or illness results in the death of an individual. It is the most severe and unfortunate possible outcome of any medical condition, and is often used as a measure of the severity and prognosis of various diseases and injuries. In clinical trials and research, fatal outcome may be used as an endpoint to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of different treatments or interventions.

Intensive care is a specialized level of medical care that is provided to critically ill patients. It's usually given in a dedicated unit of a hospital called the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) or Critical Care Unit (CCU). The goal of intensive care is to closely monitor and manage life-threatening conditions, stabilize vital functions, and support organs until they recover or the patient can be moved to a less acute level of care.

Intensive care involves advanced medical equipment and technologies, such as ventilators to assist with breathing, dialysis machines for kidney support, intravenous lines for medication administration, and continuous monitoring devices for heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and other vital signs.

The ICU team typically includes intensive care specialists (intensivists), critical care nurses, respiratory therapists, and other healthcare professionals who work together to provide comprehensive, round-the-clock care for critically ill patients.

'Abbreviations as Topic' in medical terms refers to the use and interpretation of abbreviated words or phrases that are commonly used in the field of medicine. These abbreviations can represent various concepts, such as medical conditions, treatments, procedures, diagnostic tests, and more.

Medical abbreviations are often used in clinical documentation, including patient records, progress notes, orders, and medication administration records. They help healthcare professionals communicate efficiently and effectively, reducing the need for lengthy descriptions and improving clarity in written communication.

However, medical abbreviations can also be a source of confusion and error if they are misinterpreted or used incorrectly. Therefore, it is essential to use standardized abbreviations that are widely recognized and accepted within the medical community. Additionally, healthcare professionals should always ensure that their use of abbreviations does not compromise patient safety or lead to misunderstandings in patient care.

Examples of commonly used medical abbreviations include:

* PT: Physical Therapy
* BP: Blood Pressure
* HR: Heart Rate
* Rx: Prescription
* NPO: Nothing by Mouth
* IV: Intravenous
* IM: Intramuscular
* COPD: Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
* MI: Myocardial Infarction (Heart Attack)
* Dx: Diagnosis

It is important to note that some medical abbreviations can have multiple meanings, and their interpretation may depend on the context in which they are used. Therefore, it is essential to use caution when interpreting medical abbreviations and seek clarification if necessary to ensure accurate communication and patient care.

Nonpenetrating wounds are a type of trauma or injury to the body that do not involve a break in the skin or underlying tissues. These wounds can result from blunt force trauma, such as being struck by an object or falling onto a hard surface. They can also result from crushing injuries, where significant force is applied to a body part, causing damage to internal structures without breaking the skin.

Nonpenetrating wounds can cause a range of injuries, including bruising, swelling, and damage to internal organs, muscles, bones, and other tissues. The severity of the injury depends on the force of the trauma, the location of the impact, and the individual's overall health and age.

While nonpenetrating wounds may not involve a break in the skin, they can still be serious and require medical attention. If you have experienced blunt force trauma or suspect a nonpenetrating wound, it is important to seek medical care to assess the extent of the injury and receive appropriate treatment.

Priapism is defined as a persistent and painful erection of the penis that lasts for more than four hours and occurs without sexual stimulation. It's a serious medical condition that requires immediate attention, as it can lead to permanent damage to the penis if left untreated.

Priapism can be classified into two types: ischemic (or low-flow) priapism and nonischemic (or high-flow) priapism. Ischemic priapism is the more common form, and it occurs when blood flow to the penis is obstructed, leading to the accumulation of deoxygenated blood in the corpora cavernosa. Nonischemic priapism, on the other hand, is usually caused by unregulated arterial blood flow into the corpora cavernosa, often as a result of trauma or surgery.

The causes of priapism can vary, but some common underlying conditions include sickle cell disease, leukemia, spinal cord injuries, and certain medications such as antidepressants and drugs used to treat erectile dysfunction. Treatment for priapism depends on the type and cause of the condition, and may involve medication, aspiration of blood from the penis, or surgical intervention.

Multiple trauma, also known as polytrauma, is a medical term used to describe severe injuries to the body that are sustained in more than one place or region. It often involves damage to multiple organ systems and can be caused by various incidents such as traffic accidents, falls from significant heights, high-energy collisions, or violent acts.

The injuries sustained in multiple trauma may include fractures, head injuries, internal bleeding, chest and abdominal injuries, and soft tissue injuries. These injuries can lead to a complex medical situation requiring immediate and ongoing care from a multidisciplinary team of healthcare professionals, including emergency physicians, trauma surgeons, critical care specialists, nurses, rehabilitation therapists, and mental health providers.

Multiple trauma is a serious condition that can result in long-term disability or even death if not treated promptly and effectively.

Multiple Organ Failure (MOF) is a severe condition characterized by the dysfunction or failure of more than one organ system in the body. It often occurs as a result of serious illness, trauma, or infection, such as sepsis. The organs that commonly fail include the lungs, kidneys, liver, and heart. This condition can lead to significant morbidity and mortality if not promptly diagnosed and treated.

The definition of MOF has evolved over time, but a widely accepted one is the "Sequential Organ Failure Assessment" (SOFA) score, which evaluates six organ systems: respiratory, coagulation, liver, cardiovascular, renal, and neurologic. A SOFA score of 10 or more indicates MOF, and a higher score is associated with worse outcomes.

MOF can be classified as primary or secondary. Primary MOF occurs when the initial insult directly causes organ dysfunction, such as in severe trauma or septic shock. Secondary MOF occurs when the initial injury or illness has been controlled, but organ dysfunction develops later due to ongoing inflammation and other factors.

Early recognition and aggressive management of MOF are crucial for improving outcomes. Treatment typically involves supportive care, such as mechanical ventilation, dialysis, and medication to support cardiovascular function. In some cases, surgery or other interventions may be necessary to address the underlying cause of organ dysfunction.

Ferritin is a protein in iron-metabolizing cells that stores iron in a water-soluble form. It is found inside the cells (intracellular) and is released into the bloodstream when the cells break down or die. Measuring the level of ferritin in the blood can help determine the amount of iron stored in the body. High levels of ferritin may indicate hemochromatosis, inflammation, liver disease, or other conditions. Low levels of ferritin may indicate anemia, iron deficiency, or other conditions.

A "University Hospital" is a type of hospital that is often affiliated with a medical school or university. These hospitals serve as major teaching institutions where medical students, residents, and fellows receive their training and education. They are equipped with advanced medical technology and resources to provide specialized and tertiary care services. University hospitals also conduct research and clinical trials to advance medical knowledge and practices. Additionally, they often treat complex and rare cases and provide a wide range of medical services to the community.

A Severity of Illness Index is a measurement tool used in healthcare to assess the severity of a patient's condition and the risk of mortality or other adverse outcomes. These indices typically take into account various physiological and clinical variables, such as vital signs, laboratory values, and co-morbidities, to generate a score that reflects the patient's overall illness severity.

Examples of Severity of Illness Indices include the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) system, the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS), and the Mortality Probability Model (MPM). These indices are often used in critical care settings to guide clinical decision-making, inform prognosis, and compare outcomes across different patient populations.

It is important to note that while these indices can provide valuable information about a patient's condition, they should not be used as the sole basis for clinical decision-making. Rather, they should be considered in conjunction with other factors, such as the patient's overall clinical presentation, treatment preferences, and goals of care.

Babesiosis is a disease caused by microscopic parasites of the genus Babesia that infect red blood cells. It is typically transmitted to humans through the bite of infected black-legged ticks (Ixodes scapularis). The incubation period for babesiosis can range from one to several weeks, and symptoms may include fever, chills, headache, body aches, fatigue, and nausea or vomiting. In severe cases, babesiosis can cause hemolytic anemia, jaundice, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Babesiosis is most common in the northeastern and midwestern United States, but it has been reported in other parts of the world as well. It is treated with antibiotics and, in severe cases, may require hospitalization and supportive care.

Histocompatibility testing, also known as tissue typing, is a medical procedure that determines the compatibility of tissues between two individuals, usually a potential donor and a recipient for organ or bone marrow transplantation. The test identifies specific antigens, called human leukocyte antigens (HLAs), found on the surface of most cells in the body. These antigens help the immune system distinguish between "self" and "non-self" cells.

The goal of histocompatibility testing is to find a donor whose HLA markers closely match those of the recipient, reducing the risk of rejection of the transplanted organ or tissue. The test involves taking blood samples from both the donor and the recipient and analyzing them for the presence of specific HLA antigens using various laboratory techniques such as molecular typing or serological testing.

A high degree of histocompatibility between the donor and recipient is crucial to ensure the success of the transplantation procedure, minimize complications, and improve long-term outcomes.

Critical care, also known as intensive care, is a medical specialty that deals with the diagnosis and management of life-threatening conditions that require close monitoring and organ support. Critical care medicine is practiced in critical care units (ICUs) or intensive care units of hospitals. The goal of critical care is to prevent further deterioration of the patient's condition, to support failing organs, and to treat any underlying conditions that may have caused the patient to become critically ill.

Critical care involves a multidisciplinary team approach, including intensivists (specialist doctors trained in critical care), nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, and other healthcare professionals. The care provided in the ICU is highly specialized and often involves advanced medical technology such as mechanical ventilation, dialysis, and continuous renal replacement therapy.

Patients who require critical care may have a wide range of conditions, including severe infections, respiratory failure, cardiovascular instability, neurological emergencies, and multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Critical care is an essential component of modern healthcare and has significantly improved the outcomes of critically ill patients.

Liver neoplasms refer to abnormal growths in the liver that can be benign or malignant. Benign liver neoplasms are non-cancerous tumors that do not spread to other parts of the body, while malignant liver neoplasms are cancerous tumors that can invade and destroy surrounding tissue and spread to other organs.

Liver neoplasms can be primary, meaning they originate in the liver, or secondary, meaning they have metastasized (spread) to the liver from another part of the body. Primary liver neoplasms can be further classified into different types based on their cell of origin and behavior, including hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, and hepatic hemangioma.

The diagnosis of liver neoplasms typically involves a combination of imaging studies, such as ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI, and biopsy to confirm the type and stage of the tumor. Treatment options depend on the type and extent of the neoplasm and may include surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, or liver transplantation.

HLA (Human Leukocyte Antigen) antigens are a group of proteins found on the surface of cells in our body. They play a crucial role in the immune system's ability to differentiate between "self" and "non-self." HLA antigens are encoded by a group of genes located on chromosome 6, known as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC).

There are three types of HLA antigens: HLA class I, HLA class II, and HLA class III. HLA class I antigens are found on the surface of almost all cells in the body and help the immune system recognize and destroy virus-infected or cancerous cells. They consist of three components: HLA-A, HLA-B, and HLA-C.

HLA class II antigens are primarily found on the surface of immune cells, such as macrophages, B cells, and dendritic cells. They assist in the presentation of foreign particles (like bacteria and viruses) to CD4+ T cells, which then activate other parts of the immune system. HLA class II antigens include HLA-DP, HLA-DQ, and HLA-DR.

HLA class III antigens consist of various molecules involved in immune responses, such as cytokines and complement components. They are not directly related to antigen presentation.

The genetic diversity of HLA antigens is extensive, with thousands of variations or alleles. This diversity allows for a better ability to recognize and respond to a wide range of pathogens. However, this variation can also lead to compatibility issues in organ transplantation, as the recipient's immune system may recognize the donor's HLA antigens as foreign and attack the transplanted organ.

Hydroxyethyl starch derivatives are modified starches that are used as plasma expanders in medicine. They are created by chemically treating corn, potato, or wheat starch with hydroxylethyl groups, which makes the starch more soluble and less likely to be broken down by enzymes in the body. This results in a large molecule that can remain in the bloodstream for an extended period, increasing intravascular volume and improving circulation.

These derivatives are available in different molecular weights and substitution patterns, which affect their pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. They are used to treat or prevent hypovolemia (low blood volume) due to various causes such as bleeding, burns, or dehydration. Common brand names include Hetastarch, Pentastarch, and Voluven.

It's important to note that the use of hydroxyethyl starch derivatives has been associated with adverse effects, including kidney injury, coagulopathy, and pruritus (severe itching). Therefore, their use should be carefully monitored and restricted to specific clinical situations.

Hemoperitoneum is a medical condition characterized by the presence of blood in the peritoneal cavity, which is the space between the lining of the abdominal wall and the organs within it. This can occur due to various reasons such as trauma, rupture of an abdominal aortic aneurysm, ectopic pregnancy, or other conditions that cause bleeding into the abdomen.

The accumulation of blood in the peritoneal cavity can lead to symptoms such as abdominal pain, tenderness, distension, and hypovolemic shock due to blood loss. Hemoperitoneum is a serious medical condition that requires prompt diagnosis and treatment to prevent further complications.

The postoperative period is the time following a surgical procedure during which the patient's response to the surgery and anesthesia is monitored, and any complications or adverse effects are managed. This period can vary in length depending on the type of surgery and the individual patient's needs, but it typically includes the immediate recovery phase in the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU) or recovery room, as well as any additional time spent in the hospital for monitoring and management of pain, wound healing, and other aspects of postoperative care.

The goals of postoperative care are to ensure the patient's safety and comfort, promote optimal healing and rehabilitation, and minimize the risk of complications such as infection, bleeding, or other postoperative issues. The specific interventions and treatments provided during this period will depend on a variety of factors, including the type and extent of surgery performed, the patient's overall health and medical history, and any individualized care plans developed in consultation with the patient and their healthcare team.

... Leaflets (NHS Blood and Transplant) Blood Transfusion Leaflets (Welsh Blood Service) Blood Transfusion ... Anemia Arnault Tzanck Blood transfusion in Sri Lanka Blood type (non-human) Xenotransfusion Young blood transfusion, a ... American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) British Blood Transfusion Society (BBTS) International Society of Blood Transfusion ... Early transfusions used whole blood, but modern medical practice commonly uses only components of the blood, such as red blood ...
... is the transfusion of blood from a dead body to a living person. In 1929, surgeon Vladimir Shamov ... Blood transfusion from cadaver, Trudi Ukrain. Suezda. Khir. 1929;18:184. Shamov WN. The transfusion of stored cadaver blood ... Transfusion of Human Corps Blood without Additives.Transfusion. 1964;4:112-7. (Transfusion medicine, Russian inventions, Soviet ... Transfusion of cadaver blood. JAMA 1936;106:997-9. Swan H, Schechter D. The transfusion of blood from cadavers. A historical ...
... refers to transfusing blood specifically from a young person into an older one with the intention of ... A review of studies on donor age for whole blood transfusions reported that blood from donors under the age of 20 years, when ... Research on blood transfusion outcomes has been complicated by the lack of careful characterization of the transfusion products ... "young blood transfusions" for $8,000 since 2016 under the guise of running a clinical trial, to see if such transfusions lead ...
In 1978, in addition to Tehran, blood transfusion centers were established by the "Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization" in 3 ... to Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization and Blood Safety in Iran The Scientific Journal of Iranian Blood Transfusion ... "Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization" and it can be said that he is the most experienced employee of the Blood Transfusion ... "Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization" was announced as the sole custodian of blood supply and blood products in Iran. After ...
"Irish Blood Transfusion Service - Irish Blood Group Type Frequency Distribution". Irish Blood Transfusion Service. Archived ... The Service provides blood and blood products for humans. The service is the successor to the National Blood Transfusion ... In 1975 the Cork Blood Transfusion Service was amalgamated with the board, and in 1991 the Limerick Blood Transfusion Service ... was established in Ireland as the Blood Transfusion Service Board (BTSB) by the Blood Transfusion Service Board (Establishment ...
The Scottish National Blood Transfusion Service (SNBTS) is the national blood, blood product and tissue provider. It makes up a ... Blood donation Blood transfusion James Blundell (physician) Emergency Hospital Service NHS Blood and Transplant - the ... The Edinburgh Blood Transfusion Service (EBTS) was established in 1936 with Jack Copland as Organiser and Helen White as ... p. 99.{{cite book}}: CS1 maint: location missing publisher (link) "Blood transfusion service to build new HQ in Capital". ...
... which promotes the study of blood transfusion and provides information about the ways in which blood transfusion medicine and ... Blood banks were created, voluntary blood donations came in great numbers in the allied nations, plasma-transfusion became a ... Blood transfusion was a rather new therapeutic option, and therefore, it was decided that transfusion-specific congresses ... The formation of the International Society of Blood Transfusion, or Societé International de Transfusion Sanguine, as it was ...
An emergency Blood Transfusion Service was established at the Royal Victoria Hospital in 1941 as a result of the Second World ... The Northern Ireland Blood Transfusion Service (NIBTS) is an independent, special agency of the Department of Health in ... "History of the service". Northern Ireland Blood Transfusion Service. 2014. Retrieved 30 December 2014. Official website v t e ( ... responsible for the collection testing and issuing of blood and blood products to hospitals throughout Northern Ireland. ...
"Safe Blood for Saving Mothers". "History of Blood Transfusion Service in Sri Lanka". National Blood Transfusion Service of Sri ... Mobile blood donation programs were initiated with two mobile blood collection teams. In 1981, the NHSL's blood bank (then ... Blood transfusion was first performed in Sri Lanka in late 1950. It became more widely known to the public in 1959 after the ... blood was collected into glass bottles and collected blood was screened only for malaria and syphilis. Hospital-based blood ...
Blood introduced directly into the veins circulates and functions as blood, not as nutrition. Hence, blood transfusion is a ... In 1945, the application of the doctrine on blood was expanded to prohibit blood transfusions of whole blood, whether ... This includes the use of red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and blood plasma. Other fractions derived from blood are ... means not accepting blood transfusions and not donating or storing their own blood for transfusion." The belief is based on an ...
... (TA-GvHD) is a rare complication of blood transfusion, in which the ... "Transfusion associated graft versus host disease following whole blood transfusion from an unrelated donor in an ... Irradiated blood components should be issued in the following situations: Intrauterine transfusions Prematurity, low ... The incidence of TA-GvHD in immunocompromised patients receiving blood transfusions is estimated to be 0.1-1.0%, and mortality ...
Transfusion medicine. First of two parts--blood transfusion. N Engl J Med. 1999 Feb 11;340(6):438-47. Review. doi:10.1056/ ... Some research studies have shown that, because of this immune depression, blood transfusions increase the risk of infections ... The Blood Products Advisory Committee of the Food and Drug Administration recommends that all transfused blood products undergo ... Transfusion-related immunomodulation (TRIM) refers to the transient depression of the immune system following transfusion of ...
Preventing the spread of these diseases by blood transfusion is addressed in several ways. In many cases, the blood is tested ... Sex with a person who has had a positive test or was at high risk for a disease that can be spread in blood transfusions. The ... Only relevant for red blood cell transfusions. Babesia microti is transmitted by ixodes ticks and causes babesiosis. ... or through a blood transfusion or transplant. Other vectors exist.[citation needed] Whether a donor is considered to be at "too ...
... (PTP) is a delayed adverse reaction to a blood transfusion or platelet transfusion that occurs when ... Blood transfusion Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia Washington University School of Medicine; Cooper, Daniel E.; J Krainik, ... PTP usually presents 5-12 days after transfusion, and is a potentially fatal condition in rare cases. Approximately 85% of ... ISBN 978-1-4051-3649-5. v t e (CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list, Transfusion medicine, All stub articles, Medical ...
The low blood pressure quickly resolves when the transfusion is stopped. HTRs are caused by the production of bradykinin ... A Hypotensive transfusion reaction or HTR is a rare condition that presents with low blood pressure associated with ... Bruno, Debora Santos; Herman, Jay H. (2006). "Acute Hypotensive Transfusion Reactions". Laboratory Medicine. 37 (9): 542-545. ... but can be inhibited by administration of blood pressure medications called ACE inhibitors. Polymorphisms in ACE or ...
Erythrocytapheresis filters red blood cells from the blood. Chelation therapy removes iron from the blood. This involves ... Therefore, with frequent blood transfusions, iron builds up in the body over time. This can enter the liver, heart, pancreas, ... Frequent blood transfusions may be given to many patients, such as those with thalassemia, sickle cell disease, leukemia, ... Transfusional hemosiderosis is a potential side effect of frequent blood transfusions. These may be given for a number of ...
... hospital.blood.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-12-28. "transfusion.com.au". transfusion.com.au. Retrieved 2018-12-28. Hod, Eldad; ... Platelet transfusion refractoriness is the repeated failure to achieve the desired level of blood platelets in a patient ... At 24 hours post transfusion a CCI less than 5000 suggests platelet refractoriness. Some blood banks maintain records of the ... PI = post-transfusion platelet count - pre-transfusion platelet count However, it is affected by the number of platelets given ...
The journal publishes articles on the subjects of blood transfusion and immunohematology. The journal is indexed with Abstracts ... of Transfusion Science is a peer-reviewed open-access medical journal published on behalf of the Indian Society of Blood ...
... to 1 in 11,000 transfusions. Hemolytic transfusion reactions are a possible complication from red blood cell transfusions. ... A delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) is a type of adverse reaction to a blood transfusion. DHTR is the later-onset ... Delayed blood transfusion reaction occurs more frequently (1 in 20,569 blood components transfused in the USA in 2011) when ... in a red blood cell transfusion and forms an alloantibody (anti-Jka); upon subsequent transfusion with Jka-antigen positive red ...
"Patient Blood Management Guidelines , National Blood Authority". www.blood.gov.au. Archived from the original on 2016-01-15. ... Unlike other blood products demand for platelet transfusions appears to be increasing in several countries around the world. An ... Despite prophylactic platelet transfusions, people with blood cancers often bleed, and other risk factors for bleeding such as ... "Blood transfusion , Guidance and guidelines , NICE". www.nice.org.uk. 18 November 2015. Archived from the original on 2016-01- ...
... own blood is collected and washed to produce concentrated red blood cells (this blood product is also called packed red blood ... An allergic transfusion reaction is when a blood transfusion results in allergic reaction. It is among the most common ... Allergic reactions from blood transfusion may occur from the presence of allergy-causing antigens within the donor's blood, or ... Anaphylaxis To prevent allergic transfusion reaction it is possible to use patients own blood for transfusion, this is referred ...
The "Better Blood Transfusion" strategy by the UK's Department of Health was based on evidence collected by SHOT. Bolton-Maggs ... It collects and analyses anonymized information on adverse events and blood transfusion reactions. When SHOT has identified ... During the first two years of voluntary reports, about half of these errors involved giving the wrong type of blood or blood ... Official website (Use dmy dates from September 2017, Transfusion medicine, Transfusion reactions, 1996 establishments in the ...
It covers the entire blood transfusion chain, from blood donation and processing of blood and its components, through to their ... Department of Health, H. S. (2007, November 01). Better Blood Transfusion, Safe and Appropraite Use of Blood. London, SE1 6XH, ... Transfusion Practitioners, I. (2023, June 14). Transfusion Practitioner Tools. Retrieved from International Society of Blood ... Dalrymple, Kirsty; Watson, Douglas (2014). "Ten years of transfusion practitioners and better blood transfusion in Scotland". ...
... the blood is delivered into the fetus's umbilical cord blood vessel. Following the transfusion, an additional blood sample is ... Prior to the transfusion, percutaneous umbilical cord blood sampling (PUBS) is conducted. The fetal blood sample is drawn and ... An Intrauterine transfusion (IUT) is a procedure that provides blood to a fetus, most commonly through the umbilical cord. It ... "Intrauterine Fetal Blood Transfusion for Rh Disease , Michigan Medicine". www.uofmhealth.org. Retrieved 2019-04-07. Pasman, S.A ...
Generally, blood with serum ferritin level that exceed 1000 ug/L and a transfusion of 20 units of red blood cells will require ... Transfusion-dependent anemia is a form of anemia characterized by the need for continuous blood transfusion. It is a condition ... The use of blood transfusions can ease some of these symptoms by replenishing the blood cells and maintain sufficient ... "Transfusion thresholds and other strategies for guiding allogeneic red blood cell transfusion". The Cochrane Database of ...
Blood Transfusion. StatPearls Publishing. PMID 29762999. Blundell (13 June 1829). "Observations on Transfusion of Blood". The ... During his life he also devised many instruments for the transfusion of blood, many of which are still in use today. He became ... In 1829, he reported this transfusion in an article in the medical journal Lancet. Dr. Blundell extracted four ounces of blood ... Over the course of five years, he conducted ten documented blood transfusions, five of which were beneficial to the patients, ...
Ling, Dave (February 2005). "Blood Transfusion". Classic Rock. Vol. 76. London, UK: Future Publishing Ltd. p. 110. "Slayer's ... Guitarist Jeff Hanneman came up with the idea of the blood two years after Reign in Blood's release, but the band lacked the ... Following the two large drops, stage blood mixed with water was used so it looked like it was "raining blood". Andy Patrizio of ... On the final song, "Raining Blood" the lights were turned off and Slayer members were deluged by two buckets of stage blood. ...
For example, blood for blood transfusion was not imported from the US. People with haemophilia were principally infected via ... Its recommendation was to offer blood tests to anyone in Scotland who had a blood transfusion before 1991 and who had not ... The cause of death was registered as hepatocellular cancer in a transplanted liver, Hepatitis C, transfusion of blood products ... The Scottish Government accepted Lord Penrose's solitary recommendation to test patients who had a blood transfusion before ...
Transfusion transmitted infection from blood transfusions that are given as treatment. Adverse reactions to clotting factor ... Blood Transfusion. Blood Transfus. 16 (6): 535-544. doi:10.2450/2017.0150-17. PMC 6214819. PMID 29328905. Hemophilia Overview ... Blood from the umbilical cord can be tested at birth if there's a family history of haemophilia. A blood test will also be able ... Blood Transfusion. 15 (4): 365-368. doi:10.2450/2016.0030-16. ISSN 1723-2007. PMC 5490733. PMID 27483484. Witmer, Char; Young, ...
... s may be given as part of a blood transfusion. Blood may be donated from another person, or stored by the ... Blood can be given as a whole product or the red blood cells separated as packed red blood cells. Blood is often transfused ... Packed red blood cells (pRBC) are red blood cells that have been donated, processed, and stored in a blood bank for blood ... Several blood tests involve red blood cells. These include a RBC count (the number of red blood cells per volume of blood), ...
... to show that only HIV negative blood was transfused. ... Got HIV after blood transfusion at TN govt hospital, claims ... "The blood transfusion happened at the Government Kilpauk Medical College and Hospital (GKMCH) only. That is where the mistake ... a woman has claimed that she contracted HIV following blood transfusion at a government hospital where she underwent treatment ... "As far as we are concerned, we gave only 100 per cent HIV free blood. There is no chance of her contracting the virus here," ...
Blood Transfusion Leaflets (NHS Blood and Transplant) Blood Transfusion Leaflets (Welsh Blood Service) Blood Transfusion ... Anemia Arnault Tzanck Blood transfusion in Sri Lanka Blood type (non-human) Xenotransfusion Young blood transfusion, a ... American Association of Blood Banks (AABB) British Blood Transfusion Society (BBTS) International Society of Blood Transfusion ... Early transfusions used whole blood, but modern medical practice commonly uses only components of the blood, such as red blood ...
Blood Transfusion. Blood transfusion is the taking of blood or blood-based products from one individual and inserting them into ... Blood transfusions may treat medical conditions, such as massive blood loss due to trauma, surgery, shock and where the red ... information and picture of a blood transfusion ...
You cannot get West Nile virus by donating blood.. Can I get infected with West Nile virus by receiving a blood transfusion?. ... Is donated blood tested for West Nile virus?. Yes. All donated blood is tested for West Nile virus. Any blood product found to ... A small number of West Nile virus infections have been reported from blood transfusions. However, blood collection agencies ... Can I get infected with West Nile virus by donating blood?. *Can I get infected with West Nile virus by receiving a blood ...
There are many reasons you may need a blood transfusion: ... There are many reasons you may need a blood transfusion: ... Blood and blood products. www.fda.gov/vaccines-blood-biologics/blood-blood-products. Updated March 7, 2023. Accessed September ... or other viruses after a blood transfusion. Blood transfusions are not 100% safe. But the current blood supply is thought to be ... When your body cannot make enough blood A blood transfusion is a safe and common procedure during which you receive blood ...
Our aim is to optimise the use of donated blood and blood component wastage along the whole chain. ... Blood Supply Management. Our aim is to optimise the use of donated blood and blood component wastage along the whole chain. ... The blood supply chain starts with the blood donor and ends with the patient, but ultimately it is the requirement for blood by ... The April issue of Transfusion Today is now live 🩸 The 139th issue of Transfusion Today is now live! Read In Focus articles ...
MAXIMUM 150 WORDS: Remember: front load your paragraphs! This content should include a strong opening sentence describing the health topic in the Eastern Mediterranean (include key words "Eastern Mediterranean" and health topic name for search engine optimization). You should focus on the issue as it relates to the Region and the magnitude of problem in the region, as well as a brief mention of current situation/problem.. ...
Are transfusions safe?. Almost always, yes. The main risk from a transfusion is being given blood of the wrong blood group. A ... Alternatives to blood transfusion. It is important that a blood transfusion is given only when there is no alternative. For ... Receiving a blood transfusion is like all medical treatments, a blood transfusion should only be used when really necessary. ... British Blood Transfusion Society - www.bbts.org.uk. This leaflet is based on one designed by The National Blood Service. The ...
asked the Secretary of State for Social Services how many units of blood the National Blood Transfusion Service provides ... The cost of the National Blood Transfusion Service in England and Wales, including the central blood products laboratories, was ... the National Blood Transfusion Service in England and Wales collected 1,768,838 donations of blood. Most of this was supplied ... Where a regional transfusion centre supplies blood direct to a private hospital or nursing home no charge for the services ...
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Effect of a Patient Blood Management system on perioperative transfusion practice and short-term outcomes of colorectal cancer ... Understanding transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and its complex pathophysiology. Stefan F. van Wonderen, Robert B. ... Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): a retrospective review of reported cases in Queensland, Australia over 20 years ... Prevalence of ABO and RhD blood group phenotypes in the Croatian population and in patients with severe COVID-19 in Croatia. ...
2.7 Blood Transfusion Add 450 to 600 USP units of heparin sodium per 100 mL of whole blood to prevent coagulation. Usually, ... 2.7 Blood Transfusion 2.8 Converting to Warfarin 2.9 Converting to Oral Anticoagulants other than Warfarin 2.10 Extracorporeal ... In whom suitable blood coagulation tests, e.g., the whole blood clotting time, partial thromboplastin time, etc., cannot be ... When suitable blood coagulation tests, e.g., the whole blood clotting time, partial thromboplastin time, etc., cannot be ...
Australian and New Zealand Society of Blood Transfusion. The Australian and New Zealand Society of Blood Transfusion comprises ... Boshier et al, Effect of perioperative blood transfusion on the long-term survival of patients undergoing esophagectomy for ... Dent et al, Competing risks analysis of the association between perioperative blood transfusion and long-term outcomes after ... Connor et al, Peri-operative allogeneic blood transfusion is associated with poor overall survival in advanced epithelial ...
Saudi Society of Blood Transfusion Medicine & ...
... good reasons to avoid transfusions in cardiac surgery only to keep hemoglobin levels high. ... Blood is expensive and blood is toxic, points out an observer of the largest-yet trial looking at the issue: ... ANAHEIM, CA - No advantages, clinical or otherwise, were seen from liberal use of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions to keep ... "Blood is expensive and blood is toxic," he said. "You dont want to give more than necessary, and theres more and more ...
Open the PDF for Congratulation, Appraisal, and Comment on the 25 Years Anniversary of Serious Hazards of Blood Transfusion in ... 2023 Hemovigilance Human errors Critical incidents Transfusion risks Blood safety One of the best error reporting systems for ... View article titled, Congratulation, Appraisal, and Comment on the 25 Years Anniversary of Serious Hazards of Blood Transfusion ... Congratulation, Appraisal, and Comment on the 25 Years Anniversary of Serious Hazards of Blood Transfusion ...
RBC transfusion within the first two days was associated with higher day 7 (20.5 vs. 13.3%, p = 0.02), in-ICU (39 vs ... We assessed RBC transfusion during the first two days as part of initial resuscitation. Among the 1011 patients of the primary ... RBC transfusion is commonly used in the early resuscitation of septic patients with hematological malignancies. Although it was ... We addressed the practices and the prognostic impact of RBC transfusion in the early resuscitation of severe sepsis and septic ...
In conclusion, this report describes a patient infected with HEV through a blood transfusion after LDLT, who progressed to ... Retrospective assessments of stored blood samples showed that this patient became positive for HEV RNA on POD 3. The liver ... Subsequent transfusions included four units of fresh frozen plasma on POD 2, two units of red blood cell concentrate on POD 9, ... Patients receiving transfusion include many immunocompromised patients, so screening of blood donors for HEV in other areas in ...
Transfusions are given to increase the bloods ability to carry oxygen, restore the amount of blood in the body (blood volume ... A blood transfusion is the transfer of blood or a blood component from one healthy person (a donor) to a sick person (a ... Blood Donation Process * Testing Donated Blood for Infections * Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) ...
Allogeneic blood transfusion is a form of temporary transplantation. This procedure introduces a multitude of foreign antigens ... Blood collection and transfusion in the United States in 2001. Transfusion. 2007 Mar. 47 (3):385-94. [QxMD MEDLINE Link]. [Full ... Allogeneic blood transfusion is an essential component of medical care. It is estimated that nearly 24 million units of blood ... Alloimmunization after blood transfusion in patients with hematologic and oncologic diseases. Transfusion. 1999 Jul. 39 (7):763 ...
HCQ190 - T/F: HepC from blood transfusion. Variable Name: HCQ190. SAS Label: T/F: HepC from blood transfusion. English Text: ... You donated blood?. 3. 3. 2. You had other blood tests done for a routine physical that showed you might have liver disease?. 9 ... You can get hepatitis C by getting a blood transfusion from an infected donor.. Target: Both males and females 6 YEARS - 150 ... You were exposed to blood while on the job?. 0. 15. 5. You or your doctor thought you were at risk of having hepatitis C?. 2. ...
... book.coe.int/en/82-blood-transfusion-and-organ-transplantation [name] => Blood transfusion and organ transplantation [desc ...
Let the doctor know if your child has had a blood transfusion. This can affect the ferritin test. ... What Is a Blood Test?. By taking and testing a small sample of a persons blood, doctors can check for many kinds of diseases ... Iron is needed to make red blood cells, so when ferritin levels are low, the body makes fewer red blood cells. Ferritin levels ... To help your child get ready for a blood test, find out if they need to fast (not eat or drink) or should stop taking medicines ...
Reducing adverse events in blood transfusion. October 5, 2005. Racial and ethnic differences in emergency department diagnostic ... Serious hazards of transfusion (SHOT) haemovigilance and progress is improving transfusion safety. ...
International Society of Blood Transfusion , Italian Society of Immunohaematology and Blood Transfusion. ... Survey of blood transfusion services of central and eastern European countries and their co-operation with western transfusion ... Blood transfusion / by Elmer L. De Gowin, Robert C. Hardin and John B. Alsever. by De Gowin, Elmer L , Hardin, Robert C , ... Blood and plasma transfusions / by Max M. Strumia and John J. McGraw. by Strumia, Max M , McGraw, John J. ...
Blood Transfusion. Patients with aplastic anemia require transfusion support until the diagnosis is established and specific ... Transfusions of packed red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets are administered on an outpatient basis. ... Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation. Umbilical cord blood transplantation (CBT) is not yet recommended as first- or second- ... If using blood-bank support, attempt to minimize the risk of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. The blood products should, if ...
Haematology (incl blood transfusion) (55). *. Health economics (364). *. Health economics (217). *. Health informatics (213) ...
  • Two liver transplant recipients were diagnosed with HEV infection after living donor liver transplantation via blood transfusion. (springeropen.com)
  • The source of blood to be transfused can either be the potential recipient (autologous transfusion), or someone else (allogeneic or homologous transfusion). (wikipedia.org)
  • Nakanishi et al, 'Long-lasting discussion: Adverse effects of intraoperative blood loss and allogeneic transfusion on prognosis of patients with gastric cancer, World Journal of Gastroenterology. (choosingwisely.org.au)
  • Allogeneic blood transfusion is an essential component of medical care. (medscape.com)
  • In third-world countries, the donor is sometimes specifically recruited by or for the recipient, typically a family member, and the donation occurs immediately before the transfusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most of the time, you need to arrange with your hospital or local blood bank before your surgery to have directed donor blood. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The blood supply chain starts with the blood donor and ends with the patient, but ultimately it is the requirement for blood by the patient that drives the chain and hence the number of blood donations required. (isbtweb.org)
  • It is the first such model based on epidemiologic data: 1) blood donor become endemic through blood donation alone and to what activities, 2) a case-control study on CJD, 3) age distribu- extent exclusion of potential donors with a history of trans- tion of recipients, and 4) death of recipients of blood trans- fusion would influence the transmission of such an infec- fusions. (cdc.gov)
  • the second index, to the person's sta- a blood transfusion from a donor who subsequently devel- tus as a donor. (cdc.gov)
  • Every donor is tested for certain infections each time they give blood. (heftpathology.com)
  • A recipient who is immunocompetent may mount an immune response to the donor antigens (i.e., alloimmunization), resulting in various clinical consequences, depending on the blood cells and specific antigens involved. (medscape.com)
  • Leukocyte reduction of transfused blood products virtually eliminates donor APCs, but patients may still develop alloimmunization. (medscape.com)
  • Donor Day, WHA63.12 on Availability, safety and quality of blood products). (who.int)
  • Nucleic acid testing for monkeypox in United States blood donor specimens. (bvsalud.org)
  • In Kenya blood donor selection criteria were reviewed in 2009. (bvsalud.org)
  • Regular review of effectiveness of donor selection criteria can help reduce TTIs prevalence amongst donors and thus make the blood supply safer. (bvsalud.org)
  • A blood sample, which was taken after the donor had received a large number of blood transfusions, had been negative for HIV antibody. (cdc.gov)
  • Donation centers try to ensure that donors who recently had West Nile virus do not give blood for 120 days. (cdc.gov)
  • This risk may be higher during the summer when West Nile virus is most likely to infect blood donors. (cdc.gov)
  • Unlike blood donors, not all organ donors are tested for West Nile virus. (cdc.gov)
  • Also, blood centers keep a list of unsafe donors. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Blood from these donors must be collected at least a few days before it is needed. (medlineplus.gov)
  • the number of donors who are willing to donate regularly, seasonal factors affecting donation e.g. public holidays, the blood services ability to adequately predict the number of units of blood required throughout the year and to ensure that they do not overstock and therefore increase wastage, the clinicians' awareness of appropriate blood ordering and transfusion and the hospital laboratories ability to ensure sufficient stock yet have minimal wastage. (isbtweb.org)
  • Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) may be ding donors had not received any blood transfusion. (cdc.gov)
  • Diagnostic tools to detect prions in blood are under devel- through blood components, several countries have started opment ( 3 ), but no routine test for the presence of the to exclude as donors persons who have received a blood infectious agents of vCJD is available. (cdc.gov)
  • The third index indicates whether a per- tial donors who had received a transfusion would not have son with a transfusion history can actually be identified prevented at least the first 2 cases because the correspon- and excluded from donating blood (deferred) (index 1) or not (index 0). (cdc.gov)
  • Freeman Hospital, active donors who receive a blood transfusion. (cdc.gov)
  • All blood donors are unpaid volunteers whose health is carefully checked. (heftpathology.com)
  • Avoiding transfusions from family members is important because of possible sensitization against non-HLA (human leukocyte antigen) tissue antigens of potential donors. (medscape.com)
  • The assay was developed to detect MPXV DNA in plasma and serum specimens from human blood donors . (bvsalud.org)
  • Specificity was determined using fresh plasma samples collected from blood donors during the outbreak. (bvsalud.org)
  • Additionally, this assay demonstrated high specificity for screening blood donors . (bvsalud.org)
  • a cross sectional study was conducted between November 2011 to January 2012 among 594 blood donors in the Regional Blood Transfusion Center Nakuru and Tenwek Mission Hospital . (bvsalud.org)
  • Blood donors who were married (P=0.0057), had non-formal or just primary education (P=0.0262), had multiple sexual partners (P=0.0144) and in informal occupation (P=0.0176) were at higher risk of HIV positivity. (bvsalud.org)
  • The safety of blood transfusion as it relates to frequency of blood donation and malaria occurrence on the part of donors is an aspect that has not been properly investigated hence this study. (who.int)
  • This study was conducted to assess the frequency of blood donation and occurrence of malaria among blood donors at OAUTHC, Ile-Ife. (who.int)
  • One hundred and thirty-three consenting blood donors aged between 18-50 years were recruited for the study. (who.int)
  • Malaria is highly prevalent among blood donors and occurs more in recurring blood donors than first time donors. (who.int)
  • The commercial blood donors have malaria burden in Africa, while 97 % of the total continued to increase in Nigeria due to the financial population (approximately 173 million) is at risk of 8 gratification and the deficit in blood supply. (who.int)
  • Using another's blood must first start with donation of blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • In first-world countries, donations are usually anonymous to the recipient, but products in a blood bank are always individually traceable through the whole cycle of donation, testing, separation into components, storage, and administration to the recipient. (wikipedia.org)
  • This kind of donation is also called homologous blood donation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Although blood donated by the general public and used for most people is thought to be very safe, some people choose a method called autologous blood donation. (medlineplus.gov)
  • 1% of cases would be avoided by logic data and realistic and epidemiologically justified excluding from blood donation those persons who have assumptions. (cdc.gov)
  • The RUO MPXV Assay was developed as a potential blood donation screening assay in response to the outbreak. (bvsalud.org)
  • Title : Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on blood donation and transfusions in the United States in 2020 Personal Author(s) : Basavaraju, Sridhar V.;Free, Rebecca J.;Chavez Ortiz, Joel L.;Stewart, Phylicia;Berger, James;Sapiano, Mathew R. P. (cdc.gov)
  • Frequency of Blood Donation and Malaria Occurrence. (who.int)
  • Anopheles arabiensis, and Anopheles moucheti are especially as it relates to frequency of blood the major vectors that result in all year donation and malaria occurrence on the part of 6 transmission. (who.int)
  • White blood cells are not commonly used during transfusion, but they are part of the immune system, and also fight infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that all donated blood be tested for transfusion-transmissible infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • These include HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, Treponema pallidum (syphilis) and, where relevant, other infections that pose a risk to the safety of the blood supply, such as Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas disease) and Plasmodium species (malaria). (wikipedia.org)
  • However the prevalence of transfusion-transmitted infections is much higher in low income countries compared to middle and high income countries. (wikipedia.org)
  • A small number of West Nile virus infections have been reported from blood transfusions. (cdc.gov)
  • Donated blood is tested for many different infections. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Questions include risk factors for infections that can be passed on through their blood, such as sexual habits, drug use, and current and past travel history. (medlineplus.gov)
  • unsafe transfusion practices can put millions of people at risk of Transfusion Transmissible Infections (TTIs). (bvsalud.org)
  • transmissible by blood. (cdc.gov)
  • Recent studies of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) indicate that this disease is transmissible by Model Structure blood. (cdc.gov)
  • While mpox virus (MPXV) is not known to be transfusion transmissible, there have been several studies demonstrating the detection of MPXV in blood . (bvsalud.org)
  • Blood transfusion is the process of transferring blood products into a person's circulation intravenously. (wikipedia.org)
  • By taking and testing a small sample of a person's blood, doctors can check for many kinds of diseases and conditions. (kidshealth.org)
  • To ensure you receive the right blood, the clinical staff make careful identification checks before any transfusion. (heftpathology.com)
  • There is some new evidence that these negative associations are due to the clinical circumstances requiring transfusions rather than the transfusions themselves, but this still suggests that it is preferable to identify and manage anaemia prior to surgery. (choosingwisely.org.au)
  • ANAHEIM, CA - No advantages, clinical or otherwise, were seen from liberal use of red blood cell (RBC) transfusions to keep hemoglobin levels up in patients undergoing on-pump cardiac surgery, in a randomized noninferiority trial with more than 4800 patients [ 1 ] . (medscape.com)
  • Blood derivatives and substitutes : preparation, storage, administration and clinical results including a discussion of shock , etiology, physiology, pathology and management / by Charles Stanley White and Jacob Joseph Weinstein. (who.int)
  • Blood transfusion in clinical medicine / P. L. Mollison, C. P. Engelfriet, Marcela Contreras. (who.int)
  • Clinical use and quality control of human blood products : from international meeting held in Rome, Istituto superiore di sanità on 3-5 May 1979. (who.int)
  • [ 5 ] However, it is important that transfusions be guided by the patient's clinical status and not by numbers alone. (medscape.com)
  • With the goal of ensuring universal access to safe blood and blood products and their appropriate clinical use, WHO has been at the forefront of the movement to improve blood safety and availability as mandated by successive World Health Assembly and Regional Committee resolutions. (who.int)
  • However, countries in the Eastern Mediterranean Region still face major challenges in ensuring the availability, safety, quality, accessibility, affordability and clinical efficacy of blood and blood products. (who.int)
  • The findings showed gaps, in all areas, of the key elements of a national blood system, including leadership and governance, coordination and collaboration of national blood systems, provision of safe blood and blood components, patient blood management and clinical transfusion, and quality system and management. (who.int)
  • The ministries of health are responsible for meeting the increasing clinical needs of patients for blood and blood products and for ensuring the quality and safety of these products. (who.int)
  • However, despite the availability of effective measures to ensure the quality and safety of blood and blood products, there is still significant risk associated with their clinical use, including adverse reactions and transfusion transmitted infection (TTI). (who.int)
  • In very rare cases, though, blood from family members can cause a condition called graft-versus-host disease. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The blood products should, if possible, undergo leukocyte reduction to prevent alloimmunization and CMV transmission and should be irradiated to prevent transfusion-associated graft versus host disease (GVHD) in HCT candidates. (medscape.com)
  • Can I donate blood if I was diagnosed with West Nile virus infection? (cdc.gov)
  • If you recently had a transfusion, you should be aware of the very small risk for West Nile virus infection. (cdc.gov)
  • A) States and transitions for the model of blood transfusion in the absence of an infection. (cdc.gov)
  • The risk of catching hepatitis from a transfusion is very low - about 1 in 900,000 for hepatitis B (in fact you are more likely to be struck by lightning), and less than 1 in 30 million for hepatitis C. The chance of HIV infection is less than 1 in several million. (heftpathology.com)
  • If using blood-bank support, attempt to minimize the risk of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. (medscape.com)
  • After blood typing was discovered and the problems of clotting and infection were solved, transfusions became routine. (skepdoc.info)
  • Fortunately, severe reactions to blood transfusions are extremely rare. (heftpathology.com)
  • Hemolytic transfusion reactions, posttransfusion purpura, febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions, and transfusion-related acute lung injury are discussed in Transfusion Reactions . (medscape.com)
  • Evidence shows that RT storage increases the risk of septic transfusion reactions associated with bacterial contamination. (karger.com)
  • The 0.7% prevalence of malaria , poses a serious health risk to non-immune recipients of transfusion. (bvsalud.org)
  • Early transfusions used whole blood, but modern medical practice commonly uses only components of the blood, such as red blood cells, white blood cells, plasma, platelets, and other clotting factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Platelets are involved in blood clotting, preventing the body from bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transfusions of packed red blood cells (RBCs) and platelets are administered on an outpatient basis. (medscape.com)
  • Transfusion of platelets is a life-saving medical strategy used worldwide to treat patients with thrombocytopenia as well as platelet function disorders. (karger.com)
  • Platelets are small anucleated blood cell fragments (2-4 µm), produced from polyploid cells, called megakaryocytes, which reside in the bone marrow [ 1 ]. (karger.com)
  • The primary role of platelets is maintaining the hemostasis in order to stop blood loss [ 4 ]. (karger.com)
  • In fact, under physiological conditions, platelets remain in a quiescent status, while after vessel damage cell activation is triggered by several blood and vessel components. (karger.com)
  • Approximately 11 hours after admission, he had received a total of 56 units of blood and blood components (1 unit of whole blood, 28 units of packed red blood cells, 7 units of fresh frozen plasma, and 20 units of platelets). (cdc.gov)
  • Refractoriness to platelet transfusion (an increase in the platelet count after platelet transfusion that is significantly lower than expected [e.g. (medscape.com)
  • DHTRs and refractoriness to platelet transfusions are discussed in this article. (medscape.com)
  • Refractoriness to granulocyte transfusion involves either HLA or granulocyte-specific antibodies and is similar to platelet refractoriness, except that refractoriness to granulocyte transfusion results in the patient failing to respond clinically to the infused granulocytes. (medscape.com)
  • Autologous blood is blood donated by you , which you later receive if you need a transfusion during or after surgery. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Blood is most commonly donated as whole blood obtained intravenously and mixed with an anticoagulant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because each unit of blood given carries risks, a trigger level lower than that, at 70 to 80g/L, is now usually used, as it has been shown to have better patient outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The advisory caution to use blood transfusion only with more severe anemia is in part due to evidence that outcomes are worsened if larger amounts are given. (wikipedia.org)
  • potential impact of patient blood management on cancer outcomes', Gynecologic Oncology. (choosingwisely.org.au)
  • Dent et al, 'Competing risks analysis of the association between perioperative blood transfusion and long-term outcomes after resection of colon cancer', Colorectal Disease. (choosingwisely.org.au)
  • Iwata et al, 'Perioperative blood transfusion affects oncologic outcomes after nephrectomy for renal cell carcinoma: A systematic review and meta-analysis, Urologic Oncology. (choosingwisely.org.au)
  • For patients in whom hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) may be attempted, transfusions should be used judiciously because minimally transfused subjects have achieved superior therapeutic outcomes. (medscape.com)
  • Red blood cells (RBC) contain hemoglobin, and supply the cells of the body with oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • The administration of a single unit of blood is the standard for hospitalized people who are not bleeding, with this treatment followed with re-assessment and consideration of symptoms and hemoglobin concentration. (wikipedia.org)
  • The restrictive transfusion strategy called for transfusion if hemoglobin dropped to less than 7.5 g/dL during the procedure or postoperatively. (medscape.com)
  • Blood transfusion is most commonly used in caring for women suffering from bleeding associated with pregnancy and childbirth, children suffering from severe anaemia due to malaria and malnutrition, and victims of trauma, emergencies, disasters and accidents. (who.int)
  • Malaria is also a blood -borne disease which is not currently screened for. (bvsalud.org)
  • Transfusion transmitted malaria contributes significantly to the burden of malaria in SSA. (who.int)
  • However, screening of blood for malaria is cases in 2021 in 84 malaria endemic countries with not routinely carried out in most blood banks in SSA most of this increase coming from countries in the 8 despite the recommendation by WHO. (who.int)
  • The greatest malaria burden globally however a major risk for acquiring transfusion occurs in Nigeria, with approximately 51 million transmitted malaria. (who.int)
  • The 2022 multi-country outbreak of monkeypox (mpox) resulted in blood collection and public health agencies closely monitoring for changes in transmission dynamics that could pose a threat to the blood supply . (bvsalud.org)
  • This blood is then tested for infectious diseases before it is allowed to be used. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Infectious disease testing for blood transfusions. (who.int)
  • Glance et al, 'Association between intraoperative blood transfusion and mortality and morbidity in patients undergoing noncardiac surgery', Anesthesiology. (choosingwisely.org.au)
  • Frequent outpatient follow-up for patients with aplastic anemia is needed to monitor blood counts and any adverse effects of various drugs. (medscape.com)
  • This method involves a family member or friend donating blood before a planned surgery. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In Kenya the current blood transfusion scheme involves screening of blood for HIV , Hepatitis B virus (HBV), Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis . (bvsalud.org)
  • As yet, we don't know the level of risk of variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (vCJD) being transmitted by blood. (heftpathology.com)
  • Having a low number of red blood cells is called anemia . (kidshealth.org)
  • Patients with aplastic anemia require transfusion support until the diagnosis is established and specific therapy can be instituted. (medscape.com)
  • This enables management and investigation of any suspected transfusion related disease transmission or transfusion reaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is unclear whether applying alcohol swab alone or alcohol swab followed by antiseptic is able to reduce contamination of donor's blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Samples of the donor's blood, which were collected when the organs were removed, were sent with each organ. (cdc.gov)
  • Results of search for 'su:{Blood transfusion. (who.int)
  • Blood transfusions are used to treat anaemia (lack of red blood cells). (heftpathology.com)
  • Blood tests may be done a few weeks before you operation to identify if you have anaemia which can be treated in advance. (heftpathology.com)
  • Do not use peri-operative transfusion for otherwise reversible anaemia prior to elective surgery. (choosingwisely.org.au)
  • Peri-operative transfusions as a means of addressing untreated preoperative anaemia is associated with decreased overall survival rates but not with recurrence free survival. (choosingwisely.org.au)
  • When testing was repeated, the serum collected after the blood transfusions was again seronegative by EIA at the hospital and by both EIA and Western blot methods at the state laboratory. (cdc.gov)
  • One may consider transfusion for people with symptoms of cardiovascular disease such as chest pain or shortness of breath. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, if larger amounts are lost, a blood transfusion is the best way of replacing the blood rapidly. (heftpathology.com)
  • The serum collected at the time of admission, before any transfusions were administered, was highly reactive on the Abbott EIAs performed at the hospital (optical density ratios = .766/.126, .556/.126) and at the North Carolina State Laboratory of Public Health (optical density ratios =.842/108, 698/.137) and was also positive by Western blot assay at the state laboratory. (cdc.gov)
  • He did better for about a year, until there were more transfusions, visits to the E.R., stays in the hospital, and endless procedures. (aboutibs.org)
  • According to the WHO, 10 countries are not able to screen all donated blood for one or more of: HIV, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or syphilis. (wikipedia.org)
  • You may have read about the danger of becoming infected with hepatitis, HIV, or other viruses after a blood transfusion. (medlineplus.gov)
  • In conclusion, this report describes a patient infected with HEV through a blood transfusion after LDLT, who progressed to chronic hepatitis probably due to his immunosuppressed state and was treated well with ribavirin therapy. (springeropen.com)
  • I am having inquiries made into the amounts of blood and blood components supplied to private hospitals and nursing homes, to see whether the introduction of a charge involving the apportionment of all relevant overheads would be justified. (parliament.uk)
  • Do you have expertise in transfusion medicine/science? (isbtweb.org)
  • Teaching and education in transfusion medicine : proceedings of the main session of the 3rd ISBT Regional (2nd European Congress, Prague, 15th October 1991 / edited by U. Rossi, J. D. Cash. (who.int)
  • This blood is then set aside and held only for you if you need a blood transfusion after surgery. (medlineplus.gov)
  • You can have blood taken from 6 weeks to 5 days before your surgery. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If your blood is not used during or after surgery, it will be thrown away. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Blood transfusions are given to replace blood lost in surgery, and after accidents. (heftpathology.com)
  • For example, blood transfusion is only needed for the minority of patients having surgery. (heftpathology.com)
  • The international third Transfusion Requirements in Cardiac Surgery (TRICS-3) trial is noteworthy for "the remarkable consistency of the results through various subgroup and sensitivity analyses," Mazer said. (medscape.com)
  • The trial enrolled 5243 adult patients slated for any form of cardiac surgery with planned cardiopulmonary-bypass support (CPB) support, who were randomized to one of the two transfusion strategies and followed through day 28. (medscape.com)
  • A blood transfusion is a safe and common procedure during which you receive blood through an intravenous (IV) line placed in one of your veins. (medlineplus.gov)
  • DeSimone RA, Ness PM, Cushing MM. Principles of red blood cell transfusion. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Blood transfusion is the taking of blood or blood-based products from one individual and inserting them into the circulatory system of another. (health-pictures.com)
  • Other blood products are given where appropriate, e.g., to treat clotting deficiencies. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Before a blood transfusion is given, there are many steps taken to ensure quality of the blood products, compatibility, and safety to the recipient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood and blood products. (medlineplus.gov)
  • The cost of the National Blood Transfusion Service in England and Wales, including the central blood products laboratories, was £15,759,427 in 1975-76. (parliament.uk)
  • Alloimmunization from leukocyte-reduced cellular blood products requires recognition of the alloantigen by recipient APCs and activation of recipient CD4+ T cells. (medscape.com)
  • The British Committee for Standards in Haematology also recommends irradiated blood products for all patients receiving antithymocyte globulin (ATG) therapy. (medscape.com)
  • Blood and blood products are essential in the treatment of blood and bone marrow disorders, as well as immune deficiency conditions. (who.int)
  • The demand for blood and blood products continues to grow as a result of several factors, including the growth and aging of the population and the availability of and access to increasingly sophisticated medical and surgical procedures. (who.int)
  • Since that time blood transfusion services in the Region have made progress towards ensuring universal access to safe blood and blood products. (who.int)
  • The regional strategic framework for blood safety and availability (2016-2025) is intended to address the gaps in national blood transfusion services in the Region and improve the safety and availability of blood and blood products. (who.int)
  • History of blood transfusion / blood products (P=0.0055), being married (P=0.0053) were high risk factors associated with positive syphilis . (bvsalud.org)
  • Most of this was supplied to hospitals as whole blood, but a substantial proportion was fractionated to provide individual blood components. (parliament.uk)
  • The total operating time was 819 min, and total blood loss was 3450 mL. (springeropen.com)
  • At this time, another blood sample was collected and tested for HIV antibody. (cdc.gov)
  • If you have a card saying you need to have special blood, please show it to your doctor and ask them to tell the hospital blood bank. (heftpathology.com)
  • When blood is supplied by a NHS hospital to a private hospital or nursing home the hospital is expected to levy a charge for the pathological services involved, including a contribution to overheads. (parliament.uk)
  • Where a regional transfusion centre supplies blood direct to a private hospital or nursing home no charge for the services involved is made at present. (parliament.uk)
  • Then, in the 1980s, Ryan White, a boy with hemophilia, developed AIDS from a blood transfusion and died. (skepdoc.info)
  • Patients with poor oxygen saturation may need more blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • It takes 1 to 4 hours to receive the blood, depending on how much you need. (medlineplus.gov)
  • They will then check the details on your wristband to ensure that you receive the right blood. (heftpathology.com)
  • Her best chance of recovery would be to receive a blood transfusion from her five-year old brother. (selfgrowth.com)
  • As Offit describes the second case: a drunken, middle-aged butcher was paid to receive blood from a lamb. (skepdoc.info)
  • In making that decision your doctor will balance the risk of you having a blood transfusion against the risk of you not having one. (heftpathology.com)
  • The main risk from a transfusion is being given blood of the wrong blood group. (heftpathology.com)
  • Today, blood transfusions are handled with better safety precautions and better screening, and the risk is minimal but not zero. (skepdoc.info)
  • Socio-demographic characteristics and associated risk factors were collected using a standard blood transfusion service questionnaire . (bvsalud.org)
  • Over the next few weeks your body will make new red blood cells to replace those lost. (heftpathology.com)
  • But, because your red blood cells carry over 100 different blood groups, an exact match is not possible. (heftpathology.com)
  • Ferritin is the protein inside of red blood cells that stores iron. (kidshealth.org)
  • Iron is needed to make red blood cells, so when ferritin levels are low, the body makes fewer red blood cells. (kidshealth.org)
  • Any blood product found to be infected is removed from the blood supply. (cdc.gov)
  • But the current blood supply is thought to be safer now than ever. (medlineplus.gov)
  • It is essential that all staff working in each area of the blood supply chain is aware of their responsibilities to ensure minimal wastage of this freely given resource. (isbtweb.org)
  • Most people cope well with losing a moderate amount of blood (for example, two to three pints from a total of around eight to ten pints). (heftpathology.com)
  • Most people feel no different at all during their transfusion. (heftpathology.com)
  • When TRICS-3 began, "there was overall equipoise, but transfusion is an emotional issue for people, and many people felt they knew the right answer, even though the evidence wasn't there. (medscape.com)
  • Transfusions are used for various medical conditions to replace lost components of the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • About 1 in every 15-20 patients develops an antibody to the donated blood, and will need to have specially matched blood. (heftpathology.com)
  • A blood specimen collected 10 weeks after transplantation was positive for HIV antibody by EIA, and a specimen collected 1 week later was positive by both EIA and Western blot assay. (cdc.gov)
  • In 2012, a national blood policy was in place in 70% of countries and 69% of countries had specific legislation that covers the safety and quality of blood transfusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Receiving a blood transfusion is like all medical treatments, a blood transfusion should only be used when really necessary. (heftpathology.com)
  • Ask your doctor to explain why you need a transfusion, as there may be alternative treatments available. (heftpathology.com)
  • Some medical treatments or operations cannot be safely carried out without using blood. (heftpathology.com)
  • Blood tests help doctors check how the body's organs are working and see if medical treatments are helpful. (kidshealth.org)
  • It is important to note that there is no evidence that receiving blood from family members or friends is any safer than receiving blood from the general public. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Thanks to these key measures and others, blood is now safer than ever before. (heftpathology.com)
  • asked the Secretary of State for Social Services what is the annual overall cost of the National Blood Transfusion Service. (parliament.uk)
  • WHO undertook a comprehensive situation analysis of national blood transfusion services, in the Region, using data collected from 18 countries which was verified by the directors of the national blood transfusion services. (who.int)
  • In 1987, at its 34th session the Regional Committee endorsed resolution EM/RC34/R.9 on the development of national blood transfusion services in the countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region. (who.int)