Physiological processes and properties of the BLOOD.
Physiological processes and properties of the DENTITION.
Properties and processes of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM and DENTITION as a whole or of any of its parts.
Physiology of the human and animal body, male or female, in the processes and characteristics of REPRODUCTION and the URINARY TRACT.
Properties, and processes of the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM and the NERVOUS SYSTEM or their parts.
Functional processes and properties characteristic of the BLOOD; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; and RESPIRATORY SYSTEM.
The properties and relationships and biological processes that characterize the nature and function of the SKIN and its appendages.
Nutritional physiology related to EXERCISE or ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE.
Physiological processes, factors, properties and characteristics pertaining to REPRODUCTION.
The functions and properties of living organisms, including both the physical and chemical factors and processes, supporting life in single- or multi-cell organisms from their origin through the progression of life.
Nutritional physiology of adults aged 65 years of age and older.
Properties, functions, and processes of the URINARY TRACT as a whole or of any of its parts.
Processes and properties of the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.
Biological properties, processes, and activities of VIRUSES.
Properties and processes of the DIGESTIVE SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.
Nutritional physiology of children aged 13-18 years.
Processes and properties of the EYE as a whole or of any of its parts.
Characteristic properties and processes of the NERVOUS SYSTEM as a whole or with reference to the peripheral or the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.
Cellular processes, properties, and characteristics.
Physiological processes and properties of the RESPIRATORY SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.
The functions of the skin in the human and animal body. It includes the pigmentation of the skin.
Nutrition of FEMALE during PREGNANCY.
The physiological processes, properties, and states characteristic of plants.
Physiological processes and properties of BACTERIA.
Processes and properties of the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM as a whole or of any of its parts.
Nutrition of a mother which affects the health of the FETUS and INFANT as well as herself.
Nutritional physiology of children aged 2-12 years.
The processes and properties of living organisms by which they take in and balance the use of nutritive materials for energy, heat production, or building material for the growth, maintenance, or repair of tissues and the nutritive properties of FOOD.
Controlled physical activity which is performed in order to allow assessment of physiological functions, particularly cardiovascular and pulmonary, but also aerobic capacity. Maximal (most intense) exercise is usually required but submaximal exercise is also used.
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
Physical activity which is usually regular and done with the intention of improving or maintaining PHYSICAL FITNESS or HEALTH. Contrast with PHYSICAL EXERTION which is concerned largely with the physiologic and metabolic response to energy expenditure.
Time period from 1801 through 1900 of the common era.
The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
A purely physical condition which exists within any material because of strain or deformation by external forces or by non-uniform thermal expansion; expressed quantitatively in units of force per unit area.
Cell surface glycoproteins on lymphocytes and other leukocytes that mediate adhesion to specialized blood vessels called high endothelial venules. Several different classes of lymphocyte homing receptors have been identified, and they appear to target different surface molecules (addressins) on high endothelial venules in different tissues. The adhesion plays a crucial role in the trafficking of lymphocytes.
Adherence of cells to surfaces or to other cells.
White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS; EOSINOPHILS; and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).
Transmembrane proteins consisting of a lectin-like domain, an epidermal growth factor-like domain, and a variable number of domains that are homologous to complement regulatory proteins. They are important cell adhesion molecules which help LEUKOCYTES attach to VASCULAR ENDOTHELIUM.
Cell adhesion molecule and CD antigen that serves as a homing receptor for lymphocytes to lymph node high endothelial venules.
A response by the BARORECEPTORS to increased BLOOD PRESSURE. Increased pressure stretches BLOOD VESSELS which activates the baroreceptors in the vessel walls. The net response of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM is a reduction of central sympathetic outflow. This reduces blood pressure both by decreasing peripheral VASCULAR RESISTANCE and by lowering CARDIAC OUTPUT. Because the baroreceptors are tonically active, the baroreflex can compensate rapidly for both increases and decreases in blood pressure.
The ENTERIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; PARASYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM; and SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM taken together. Generally speaking, the autonomic nervous system regulates the internal environment during both peaceful activity and physical or emotional stress. Autonomic activity is controlled and integrated by the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, especially the HYPOTHALAMUS and the SOLITARY NUCLEUS, which receive information relayed from VISCERAL AFFERENTS.
The position or attitude of the body.
Exclusive legal rights or privileges applied to inventions, plants, etc.
Unexpected rapid natural death due to cardiovascular collapse within one hour of initial symptoms. It is usually caused by the worsening of existing heart diseases. The sudden onset of symptoms, such as CHEST PAIN and CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS, particularly VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA, can lead to the loss of consciousness and cardiac arrest followed by biological death. (from Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine, 7th ed., 2005)
PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.
Cells with high proliferative and self renewal capacities derived from adults.
Relatively undifferentiated cells that retain the ability to divide and proliferate throughout postnatal life to provide progenitor cells that can differentiate into specialized cells.
Bone-marrow-derived, non-hematopoietic cells that support HEMATOPOETIC STEM CELLS. They have also been isolated from other organs and tissues such as UMBILICAL CORD BLOOD, umbilical vein subendothelium, and WHARTON JELLY. These cells are considered to be a source of multipotent stem cells because they include subpopulations of mesenchymal stem cells.
Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.
Transfer of MESENCHYMAL STEM CELLS between individuals within the same species (TRANSPLANTATION, HOMOLOGOUS) or transfer within the same individual (TRANSPLANTATION, AUTOLOGOUS).
Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).

Mechanical stimulation regulates voltage-gated potassium currents in cardiac microvascular endothelial cells. (1/429)

Vascular endothelial cells are constantly exposed to mechanical forces resulting from blood flow and transmural pressure. The goal of this study was to determine whether mechanical stimulation alters the properties of endothelial voltage-gated K+ channels. Cardiac microvascular endothelial cells (CMECs) were isolated from rat ventricular muscle and cultured on thin sheets of silastic membranes. Membrane currents were measured with the use of the whole-cell arrangement of the patch-clamp technique in endothelial cells subjected to static stretch for 24 hours and compared with measurements from control, nonstretched cells. Voltage steps positive to -30 mV resulted in the activation of a time-dependent, delayed rectifier K+current (IK) in the endothelial cells. Mechanically induced increases of 97%, 355%, and 106% at +30 mV were measured in the peak amplitude of IK in cells stretched for 24 hours by 5%, 10%, and 15%, respectively. In addition, the half-maximal voltage required for IK activation was shifted from +34 mV in the nonstretched cells to -5 mV in the stretched cells. Although IK in both groups of CMECs was blocked to a similar extent by tetraethylammonium, currents in the stretched endothelial cells displayed an enhanced sensitivity to inhibition by charybdotoxin. Preincubation of the CMECs with either pertussis toxin or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate during the 24 hours of cell stretch did not prevent the increase in IK. The application of phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate and static stretch stimulated the proliferation of CMECs. Stretch-induced regulation of K+ channels may be important to control the resting potential of the endothelium and may contribute to capillary growth during periods of mechanical perturbation.  (+info)

Validation of haemodialysis recirculation and access blood flow measured by thermodilution. (2/429)

BACKGROUND: Recirculation (R) and access blood flow (Qac) measurements are considered useful indicators of adequate delivery of haemodialysis. It was the purpose of this study to compare measurements of R and Qac obtained by two different techniques which are based on the same principle of indicator dilution, but which differ because of the characteristics of the injection and detection of the different indicators used. METHODS: Recirculation measured by a thermal dilution technique using temperature sensors (BTM, Fresenius Medical Care) was compared with recirculation measured by a validated saline dilution technique using ultrasonic transducers placed on arterial and venous segments of the extracorporeal circulation (HDM, Transonic Systems, Inc.). Calculated access flows were compared by Bland Altman analysis. Data are given as mean +/- SD. RESULTS: A total of 104 measurements obtained in 52 treatments (17 patients, 18 accesses) were compared. Recirculation measured with correct placement of blood lines and corrected for the effect of cardiopulmonary recirculation using the 'double recirculation technique' was -0.02 +/- 0.14% by the BTM technique and not different from the 0% measured by the HDM technique. Recirculation measured with reversed placement of blood lines and corrected for the effect of cardiopulmonary recirculation was 19.66 +/- 10.77% measured by the BTM technique compared with 20.87 +/- 11.64% measured by the HDM technique. The difference between techniques was small (-1.21 +/- 2.44%) albeit significant. Access flow calculated from BTM recirculation was 1328 +/- 627 ml/min compared with 1390 +/- 657 ml/min calculated by the HDM technique. There was no bias between techniques. CONCLUSION: BTM thermodilution yields results which are consistent with the HDM ultrasound dilution technique with regard to both recirculation and access flow measurement.  (+info)

Surfactant protein A enhances the binding and deacylation of E. coli LPS by alveolar macrophages. (3/429)

Surfactant protein (SP) A and SP-D are involved in multiple immunomodulatory functions of innate host defense partly via their interaction with alveolar macrophages (AMs). In addition, both SP-A and SP-D bind to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). To investigate the functional significance of this interaction, we first tested the ability of SP-A and SP-D to enhance the binding of tritium-labeled Escherichia coli LPS to AMs. In contrast to SP-D, SP-A enhanced the binding of LPS by AMs in a time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependent manner. Coincubation with surfactant-like lipids did not affect the SP-A-mediated enhancement of LPS binding. At SP-A-to-LPS molar ratios of 1:2-1:3, the LPS binding by AMs reached 270% of control values. Second, we investigated the role of SP-A in regulating the degradation of LPS by AMs. In the presence of SP-A, deacylation of LPS by AMs increased by approximately 2.3-fold. Pretreatment of AMs with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C had no effect on the SP-A-enhanced LPS binding but did reduce the amount of serum-enhanced LPS binding by 50%, suggesting that a cell surface molecule distinct from CD14 mediates the effect of SP-A. Together the results for the first time provide direct evidence that SP-A enhances LPS binding and degradation by AMs.  (+info)

Long-term culture of human CD34(+) progenitors with FLT3-ligand, thrombopoietin, and stem cell factor induces extensive amplification of a CD34(-)CD14(-) and a CD34(-)CD14(+) dendritic cell precursor. (4/429)

Current in vitro culture systems allow the generation of human dendritic cells (DCs), but the output of mature cells remains modest. This contrasts with the extensive amplification of hematopoietic progenitors achieved when culturing CD34(+) cells with FLT3-ligand and thrombopoietin. To test whether such cultures contained DC precursors, CD34(+) cord blood cells were incubated with the above cytokines, inducing on the mean a 250-fold and a 16,600-fold increase in total cell number after 4 and 8 weeks, respectively. The addition of stem cell factor induced a further fivefold increase in proliferation. The majority of the cells produced were CD34(-)CD1a- CD14(+) (p14(+)) and CD34(-)CD1a-CD14(-) (p14(-)) and did not display the morphology, surface markers, or allostimulatory capacity of DC. When cultured with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), both subsets differentiated without further proliferation into immature (CD1a+, CD14(-), CD83(-)) macropinocytic DC. Mature (CD1a+, CD14(-), CD83(+)) DCs with high allostimulatory activity were generated if such cultures were supplemented with tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF). In addition, p14(-) cells generated CD14(+) cells with GM-CSF and TNF, which in turn, differentiated into DC when exposed to GM-CSF and IL-4. Similar results were obtained with frozen DC precursors and also when using pooled human serum AB+ instead of bovine serum, emphasizing that this system using CD34(+) cells may improve future prospects for immunotherapy.  (+info)

Low-molecular weight heparin restores in-vitro trophoblast invasiveness and differentiation in presence of immunoglobulin G fractions obtained from patients with antiphospholipid syndrome. (5/429)

The present study was designed to investigate the effects of immunoglobulin G obtained from patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) on in-vitro models of trophoblast invasiveness and differentiation. We tested the binding of affinity-purified immunoglobulin G to human primary trophoblast cells. These antibodies affected the invasiveness and differentiation of cytotrophoblast cells after binding to the cell surface. In addition, we determined whether the drugs used to treat APS might be able to restore the trophoblast functions. Low-molecular weight heparin, in a dose-dependent manner, significantly reduced the immunoglobulin G binding to trophoblast cells and restored in-vitro placental invasiveness and differentiation. No effect was observed in the presence of acetylsalicylic acid. These observations may help in understanding the role of these treatments in women with APS.  (+info)

Partial characterization of apoptotic factor in Alzheimer plasma. (6/429)

We have previously demonstrated that a plasma natriuretic factor is present in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but not in multi-infarct dementia (MID) or normal controls (C). We postulated that the natriuretic factor might induce the increased cytosolic calcium reported in AD by inhibiting the sodium-calcium antiporter, thereby activating the apoptotic pathway. To test for a factor in AD plasma that induces apoptosis, we exposed nonconfluent cultured LLC-PK1 cells to plasma from AD, MID, and C for 2 h and performed a terminal transferase-dUTP-nick-end labeling (TUNEL) assay. The plasma from AD increased apoptosis nearly fourfold compared with MID and C. The effect was dose dependent and the peak effect was attained after a 2-h exposure. Additionally, apoptotic morphology was detected by electron microscopy, and internucleosomal DNA cleavage was found. We inhibited apoptosis by removing calcium from the medium, inhibiting protein synthesis with cycloheximide, alternately boiling or freezing and thawing the plasma, and digesting a partially purified fraction with trypsin. Heating AD plasma to 56 degrees C did not deactivate the apoptotic factor. These results demonstrate the presence of an apoptotic factor in the plasma of patients with AD.  (+info)

Delayed ischemic preconditioning is mediated by opening of ATP-sensitive potassium channels in the rabbit heart. (7/429)

Cardioprotection from preconditioning reappears 24 h after the initial stimulus. This phenomenon is called the second window of protection (SWOP). We hypothesized that opening of the ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channel mediates the protective effect of SWOP. Rabbits were preconditioned (PC) with four cycles of 5-min regional ischemia each followed by 10 min of reperfusion. Twenty-four hours later, the animals were subjected to sustained ischemia for 30 min followed by 180 min of reperfusion (I/R). Glibenclamide (Glib, 0.3 mg/kg ip) or 5-hydroxydecanoate (5-HD, 5 mg/kg iv) was used to block the KATP channel function. Infarct size was reduced from 41.2 +/- 2. 6% in sham-operated rabbits to 11.6 +/- 1.0% in PC rabbits, a 71% reduction (n = 11, P < 0.01). Treatment with Glib or 5-HD before I/R increased the infarct size to 43.4 +/- 2.6 and 37.8 +/- 1.9%, respectively (P < 0.01 vs. PC group, n = 12/group). Sham animals treated with either Glib or 5-HD had an infarct size of 39.0 +/- 3.4 and 37.8 +/- 1.5%, respectively, which was not different from control (40.0 +/- 3.8%) or sham (41.2 +/- 2.6%) I/R hearts. Monophasic action potential duration (APD) at 50% repolarization significantly shortened by 28.7, 26.6, and 23.3% in sham animals during 10, 20, and 30 min of ischemia. However, no further augmentation in the shortening of APD was observed in PC hearts. Glib and 5-HD significantly suppressed ischemia-induced epicardial APD shortening, suggesting that 5-HD may not be a selective blocker of the mitochondrial KATP channel in vivo. We conclude that SWOP is mediated by a KATP channel-sensitive mechanism that may have occurred because of the opening of the sarcolemmal KATP channel in vivo.  (+info)

Evidence of splanchnic-brain signaling in inhibition of ingestive behavior by middle molecules. (8/429)

Anorexia, nausea, and vomiting are common symptoms of uremic intoxication. Fractions in the middle molecule weight range, isolated from normal urine and uremic plasma ultrafiltrate, inhibit ingestive behavior in the rat. To investigate their site of action and specificity, male rats were injected intraperitoneally, intravenously, or intracerebroventricularly with concentrated fractions of uremic plasma ultrafiltrate or normal urine (molecular weight range: 1.0 to 5.0 kD) and tested for ingestive and sexual behavior. An intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 ml of urine fraction (10:1) or 2.0 ml of uremic plasma ultrafiltrate fraction (25:1) inhibited carbohydrate intake by 76.3 and 45.9%, respectively, but an intravenous injection had no effect. However, intravenous injection of higher doses inhibited carbohydrate ingestion. An intracerebroventricular injection of 5 or 10 microl of urine (20:1) middle molecule fraction inhibited carbohydrate intake by 13.4 and 41.6%, respectively. An injection of 5 or 10 microl of uremic plasma ultrafiltrate (125:1) middle molecule fraction inhibited carbohydrate intake by 22.6 and 49.5%, respectively. Injections of the corresponding fraction from normal plasma ultrafiltrate had no effect. Injection of urine or uremic plasma ultrafiltrate middle molecule fractions did not affect the display of sexual behavior. These results suggest that middle molecule fractions from uremic plasma ultrafiltrate or normal urine act in the splanchnic region and/or brain to inhibit food intake and that the effect is specific for ingestive behavior.  (+info)

Exergen Global: When supplying blood to patients it is essential that the bloods temperature is carefully warmed to 37°C to ensure patient safety and wellbeing.. Blood must be warmed to this temperature prior to infusion, because, depending on its source, the blood can be at room temperature, refrigerated or any temperature in between. If the infused temperature is too low or too high, the risk of hypothermia or hyperthermia increases, presenting possible complications or even patient shock.. To ensure that the correct blood temperature is maintained from start to finish, the amount of heat applied to the blood must be tightly controlled, and be adjusted to the flow and inlet temperature of the donor blood. The foundation of efficient and effective blood temperature management is a well-controlled heat exchange and a reliable temperature measurement mechanism.. The Optimal Solution. For a variety of reasons, its preferable to measure blood temperature non-invasively. Non-contact temperature ...
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I used Baking Soda / Black strap Molasses Protocol. Mixed 1 Tea SP BS with 1 tea SP Molasses in 125ml water at 110 F or 43C for 5 minutes, added water to 300ml and drink 7AM and 7 PM you can t go mote than a week like that. After I used 1 BC 1 Molasses per day for one more week. After a 4 week break, using one lemon in a glass of water, I started BS again. Now my saliva/urine pH is 7.5. I have a BS in chemistry and know how to play the dangerous game with baking soda. You may consult your doctor ...
Phoronix: KDE Neon Makes It Easier To Now Try Plasma On Wayland The Ubuntu-based KDE Neon distribution for its "dev unstable" image now comes pre
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An exercise responsive cardiac pacemaker (1) has a stimulation electrode (3) for introduction into the atrium or ventricle of the heart, a temperature sensor (4) situated in proximity to the electrode (3) for detecting the blood temperature, and a control circuit (8, 9, 10, 11) connected to the electrode (3) and the temperature sensor (4) by which the stimulation rate of the pacemaker is adaptively adjusted depending on the blood temperature. To ensure that the cardiac pacemaker works reliably in all physiological conditions of a patient, the stimulation rate is determined with reference to a field of characteristic curves (K1, K2), the individual characteristic curves constituting distinct algorithms relating heart rate to blood temperature for different physiological conditions of the pacemaker patient. A basic characteristic curve (K2) relates distinct heart rates to absolute blood temperatures under conditions without physical stress on the pacemaker patient. A set of parallel characteristic curves
Homeostatic adaptation In the 1950s British cybernetician W. Ross Ashby introduced the concept of an ultrastable system in his book Design for a Brain. If an organism needs to keep certain essential variables within bounds (e.g., blood temperature, pH) then a system that triggered internal parametrical changes whenever such variables approach or cross a boundary…
Serum stimulation promotes p65 translocation into the nucleus as well as IκBα degradation. (A) p65-dsRed (red staining) and IκBα-EGFP (green staining) were
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TY - JOUR. T1 - Related effects of calcium and serum on the G1 phase of the human WI38 fibroblast. AU - Tupper, Joseph T.. AU - Kaufman, Lydia. AU - Bodine, Peter V.. PY - 1980/7. Y1 - 1980/7. N2 - Deprivation of extracellular Ca or serum inhibits the proliferation of WI38 human diploid fibroblasts. Under these conditions, the cells become quiescent at a point in the cell cycle typical of early G1 or Go phase‐arrested cells. Exit of the cells from this point in the cycle appears to require both the presence of serum and Ca simulataneously. If quiescent cells are serum‐stimulated in low Ca medium (0.01 mM), they do not progress through G1 to the S phase, which normally requires 14-18 hr. However, they remain competent to do so. Addition of Ca for up to 48 hr after serum stimulation results in an equal fraction of the cells progressing G1 phase as compared to the presence of Ca at the time of serum addition. In contrast, if quiescent cells are serum‐stimulated in the presence of Ca, which is ...
blood temperature is monitored by a centre in your brain called the hypothalamus.. in hot conditions, blood vessels in the skin dilate, allowing more bloody to flow through the skin capilleries. this means that more heat is lost from the surface of the skin by radiation. this is called vasodilation.. in cold conditions, blood vessels in the skin constrict, reducing the amount of blood that flows through the skin capilleries. this means that less heat is lost from the surface of the skin by radiation. this is called vasoconstriction.. ...
There will be a kickoff meeting to discuss plans for Plasma 5.9 in #plasma on Freenode on Monday at 11:00UTC / 12:00midday BST / 13:00CEST. All welcome. Jonathan ...
iwlearn.net is a content management system that supports knowledge sharing in the GEF International Waters portfolio. Digital outputs from GEF IW Conferences, guidance materials and products of GEF IW:LEARN or water-related learning are freely available. Real time GPS tracking app ...
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The inhibiting action of homologous serum on the proliferation of fibroblasts in vitro was increased after the serum had been heated at 56° and 70°C. This action decreased after the serum had been heated at 100°C.. ...
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Sports dogs have to sustain extreme pressure on their joints due to enduring strain on it. Learn how to preserve healthy joints in sports dogs.
Constitutive centripetal transport of the actin-based cytoskeleton has been detected in cells spreading on a substrate, locomoting fibroblasts and keratocytes, and non-locomoting serum-deprived fibroblasts. These results suggest a gradient of actin assembly, highest in the cortex at the cytoplasm-membrane interface and lowest in the non-cortical perinuclear cytoplasm. We predicted that such a gradient would be maintained in part by phosphoinositide-regulated actin binding proteins because the intracellular free Ca2+ and pH are low and spatially constant in serum-deprived cells. The cytoplasm-membrane interface presents one surface where the assembly of actin is differentially regulated relative to the non-cortical cytoplasm. Several models, based on in vitro biochemistry, propose that phosphoinositide-regulated actin binding proteins are involved in local actin assembly. To test these models in living cells using imaging techniques, we prepared a new fluorescent analog of actin that bound ...
The wee chick who has clung to deaths door for the last few weeks also seems to be turning a corner. I have sat on the fence when it comes to this chick. I am still undecided if I am battling a case of infectious sinusitis - also known as Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) - or if she simply had Infectious Bronchitis (IB). Regardless, I just didnt have the heart to cull her. She was still eating and drinking, and seemed to be fighting whatever it was. I separated her from the others, and gave her Superbooster (an antibiotic, vitamin treatment). It seems to help, and she does seem to be recovering ...
Although there is no specific treatment for any of the mitochondrial myopathies, physical therapy along with vitamin treatment may extend the range of movement of muscles and improve dexterity.
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Sciatica is a common back complaint amongst young people and can be treated I believe with short walks and plenty of rest. Alot of folks have had bad deals with them but I know some folks who swear by them if they are good I can see where they could help maybe get the pressure sciatica treatment in homeopathy the nerve for awhile bringing some relief but again get your tests done and see whats happening before going back that way. Those who are overweight, smoke, dont exercise or even wear high heels can make the pain worse. Common medical treatments for sciatica include pills, physical therapy, injections, and in severe cases, surgery.
PubMed journal article: Effect of omega-3 fatty acid concentrations in plasma on symptoms of asthma at 18 months of age. Download Prime PubMed App to iPhone, iPad, or Android
Meet Your Body: An introduction to how wood smoke hurts your health.. The body needs internal stability in all functions. It operates best with in a narrow range of acidity, blood pressure, blood temperature and hormone concentrations. It has complex negative feedback systems to achieve this stability. Stability is called homeostasis. We will be examining how and where wood smoke exposure can upset this balance, particularly in the 50 percent of the population that is vulnerable.. We will look at studies linking fine particulate to mortality and illness. We will look at tables to help understand what wood smoke chemicals and micro particulate can do to the body. We will look briefly at some of the functions the body must perform to remain alive, and mechanisms of disease, emphasizing research findings.. The body is truly micro managed. Even our cells have smaller divisions: mitochondria are round to rod shaped objects with a double membrane inside the cell. They are the principal sites of energy ...
Title:[Comparison of intracellular actin of thymosin alpha-1 and thymic serum factor].,Author:Deschaux P,Doublet A,Fontanges R,Journal:C R Seances Acad Sci III,1982/1/25;294(4):207-10.,Publication typ...
doi:10.1182/blood-2004-04-1559. ISSN 0006-4971. PMID 15494428.. *^ Augello, Andrea; Tasso, Roberta; Negrini, Simone Maria; ... There is yet no consensus among biologists on the prevalence and physiological and therapeutic relevance of stem cell ... This phenomenon is referred to as stem cell transdifferentiation or plasticity. It can be induced by modifying the growth ... MSCs have been isolated from placenta, adipose tissue, lung, bone marrow and blood, Wharton's jelly from the umbilical cord,[23 ...
... a strange phenomenon was observed. Binding interactions between the white blood cells and the vessel walls were observed to ... This topic was finally able to be studied thoroughly under physiological shear stress conditions using a typical flow chamber.[ ... Leukocytes use the blood as a transport medium to reach the tissues of the body. Here is a brief summary of each of the four ... IL-1, TNFα and C5a[1] cause the endothelial cells of blood vessels near the site of infection to express cellular adhesion ...
It is a physiological phenomenon that requires no treatment. Marshall-White syndrome List of cutaneous conditions Freedberg, et ... The spots appear when the blood is congested with a bandage on the upper arm, e.g. with a blood pressure cuff. The spots also ...
However, the physiological implications of this phenomenon remain unclear. Allosteric regulation Haldane Effect Root effect ... However, when their blood was examined, this was not the case. Humpback whales weighing 41,000 kilograms had an observed Δ log ... Since carbon dioxide reacts with water to form carbonic acid, an increase in CO2 results in a decrease in blood pH, resulting ... This increases the acidity of the blood far more than CO2 alone, which reflects the cells' even greater need for oxygen. In ...
Examples of physiological regeneration in mammals include epithelial renewal (e.g., skin and intestinal tract), red blood cell ... While reparative regeneration is a rare phenomenon in mammals, it does occur. A well-documented example is regeneration of the ... This type of regeneration is common in physiological situations. Examples of physiological regeneration are the continual ... Similar to the physiological regeneration of hair in mammals, birds can regenerate their feathers in order to repair damaged ...
He also worked extensively on developing accurate methods to measure blood pressure and other physiological phenomena (e.g. ... This law states that "Within physiological limits, the force of contraction is directly proportional to the initial length of ... Gelehrtenkalender 6 (1940/41) 378 A. P. Fishman, D. W. Richards (eds.): Circulation of the blood. New York 1964, pp. 110-113 A ... from 1894 Frank worked as an assistant in Carl von Voit's Physiological Institute in München where he studied cardiac function ...
... is a physiological phenomenon which appears in extreme flight conditions. Symptoms include insufficient blood flow to the brain ...
This phenomenon occurs due to dilation of the blood vessels, probably as a result of withdrawal of sympathetic nervous system ... One account for these physiological responses is the Bezold-Jarisch reflex. Vasovagal syncope may be part of an evolved ... When heart rate slows or blood pressure drops, the resulting lack of blood to the brain causes fainting. Typical triggers ... The underlying mechanism involves the nervous system slowing the heart rate and dilating blood vessels, resulting in low blood ...
... is a physiological phenomenon that takes places in normal blood under low-flow conditions or at stasis ... blood film syllectometry intravital microscopy high-frequency ultrasound Optical coherence tomography Chien S, Sung LA (1987 ... Erythrocyte aggregation is the reversible clumping of red blood cells (RBCs) under low shear forces or at stasis. Erythrocytes ... Cabel M, Meiselman HJ, Popel AS, Johnson PC (1997). "Contribution of red blood cell aggregation to venous vascular resistance ...
Blood. 105 (4): 1815-1822. doi:10.1182/blood-2004-04-1559. ISSN 0006-4971. PMID 15494428. Augello, Andrea; Tasso, Roberta; ... This phenomenon is referred to as stem cell transdifferentiation or plasticity. It can be induced by modifying the growth ... There is yet no consensus among biologists on the prevalence and physiological and therapeutic relevance of stem cell ... More recent findings suggest that pluripotent stem cells may reside in blood and adult tissues in a dormant state. These cells ...
According to him, the plethora is a vein full of blood, which flows into the arteries and mechanically expels the pneuma there ... Under the influence of the Democritus of atomistics and the peripatetic school, he sought to interpret all life phenomena in a ... He was the first to correctly describe the physiological functions of ventricular heart valves. ... He described the heart and its valves, blood vessels and nerves, the brain and its chambers and eddies, brain nerve outputs, ...
Variation in the beat-to-beat interval is a physiological phenomenon. The SA node receives several different inputs and the ... This heart rate variation is associated with Mayer waves (Traube-Hering-Mayer waves) of blood pressure and is usually at a ... Heart rate variability (HRV) is the physiological phenomenon of variation in the time interval between heartbeats. It is ... Less is known about the physiological inputs of the low frequency (LF) activity (0.04 to 0.15 Hz). Though previously thought to ...
Examples of physiological regeneration in mammals include epithelial renewal (e.g., skin and intestinal tract), red blood cell ... In order to prevent starvation a planarian will use their own cells for energy, this phenomenon is known as de-growth. Limb ... This type of regeneration is common in physiological situations. Examples of physiological regeneration are the continual ... Similar to the physiological regeneration of hair in mammals, birds can regenerate their feathers in order to repair damaged ...
An erection (clinically: penile erection or penile tumescence) is a physiological phenomenon in which the penis becomes firmer ... become engorged with venous blood. This may result from any of various physiological stimuli, also known as sexual stimulation ... This may also become slightly engorged with blood, but less so than the corpora cavernosa. The scrotum may, but not always, ... Erectile dysfunction can occur due to both physiological and psychological reasons, most of which are amenable to treatment. ...
... describes the physiological phenomenon by which psychosocial stress experienced by a mother ... leading to physiological manifestations of stress such as increased maternal blood pressure (MBP) and maternal heart rate (MHR ... Because of a link in blood supply between a mother and fetus, it has been found that stress can leave lasting effects on a ... Psychosocial stress (or simply social stress) describes the brain's physiological response to perceived social threat. ...
THAD is thought to be a physiological phenomenon resulting from regional variation in the blood supply by the portal vein and/ ...
The time in the "W" position will allow the pooled blood from the legs to be slowly re-introduced back into the body. By ... The most recent comprehensive study of this phenomenon was performed in 2016 by James Marc Beverly. The study, titled "Harness ... Suspension Stress Physiological and Safety Assessment", found no evidence to support medical intervention beyond ACLS for ... On the one hand, exercising the leg muscles will keep the blood returning to the torso, but on the other hand, as the movements ...
415 Influence of cobra poison in the clotting of blood and the action of Calmette's antivenomous serum on the phenomenon. Myers ... Proceedings of Physiological Society, Journal of Physiology;xxiii On immunity against proteids. Lancet, 1900;ii:98 Myers ... Lancet, 1898;ii:23 The action of cobra poison on the blood: a contribution to the study of passive immunity. In collaboration ... work on blood and its diseases, and on the theory of immunity. Under the scholarship Myers studied in three leading ...
... may be attributed to incorrect stimuli is because many stimuli have similar physiological symptoms such as increased blood ... 1981) investigated this phenomenon and found that those in an unrelated aroused state will rate an attractive confederate more ... One of the initial studies looking into this phenomenon conducted by Schachter and Singer (1962) was based on the idea that the ... Epinephrine activated the sympathetic nervous system and produced systems such as an elevated heart rate and blood pressure. ...
... crosses the blood-brain barrier and has been implicated in a wide array of physiological phenomena including inhibitory ... Huxtable RJ (January 1992). "Physiological actions of taurine". Physiological Reviews. 72 (1): 101-63. doi:10.1152/physrev. ... Huxtable RJ (January 1992). "Physiological actions of taurine". Physiological Reviews. 72 (1): 101-63. doi:10.1152/physrev. ... Schaffer SW, Jong CJ, Ramila KC, Azuma J (August 2010). "Physiological roles of taurine in heart and muscle". Journal of ...
His main interest was physiological research on such subjects as the electrical phenomena accompanying secretion, the action of ... drugs on the circulation and secretion of the kidney, and the innervation of various blood vessels. In 1894 he was elected a ...
An unknown proportion of people may consciously initiate the sensation and physiological signs of piloerection. The phenomenon ... As the body prepares itself for either fighting or running, the sympathetic nervous system floods the blood with adrenaline ( ... Goose bumps are accompanied by a specific physiological response pattern that is thought to indicate the emotional state of ... Medications and herbal supplements that affect body temperature and blood flow may cause piloerection. For example, one of the ...
In humans, the blood carbon dioxide contents is shown in the adjacent table. CO2 is carried in blood in three different ways. ( ... He used this phenomenon to illustrate that carbon dioxide is produced by animal respiration and microbial fermentation. In 1772 ... The physiological effects of acute carbon dioxide exposure are grouped together under the term hypercapnia, a subset of ... Bicarbonate ions are crucial for regulating blood pH. A person's breathing rate influences the level of CO2 in their blood. ...
... is a physiological phenomenon where the clitoris becomes enlarged and firm. Clitoral erection is the result ... This may result from any of various physiological stimuli, including sexual arousal. During sexual arousal, arterial blood flow ... Any type of motion can increase blood flow to this organ and this results in increased secretions which lubricate the vagina. ... During sexual arousal, arterial blood flow to the clitoris is increased, and within the clitoris, the arteries further branch ...
In other words, psychophysiological research can consist of the study of social, psychological, and/or behavioral phenomena as ... A great deal of psychophysiological research has focused on the physiological instantiation of emotion, but with increased ... blood pressure, plethysmography) Oculomotor and pupilometric measures Electromyographic activity Respiration Gastrointestinal ... covering research on the interrelationships between the physiological and psychological aspects of brain and behavior. The ...
... he was one of the first to identify the phenomenon of "white coat hypertension", in which patients exhibit poor blood pressure ... Program Project that began in 1993 and has investigated several phenomena related to the behavioral causes and physiological ... Recommendations for blood pressure measurement in humans and experimental animals: part 1: blood pressure measurement in humans ... An international database of prospective ambulatory blood pressure monitoring studies. Blood Press Monit 2003;8(4):147-149. ...
... (HPV), also known as the Euler-Liljestrand mechanism, is a physiological phenomenon in which ... Von Euler US, Liljestrand G (1946). "Observations on the pulmonary arterial blood pressure in the cat". Acta Physiol. Scand. 12 ... The process might initially seem counterintuitive, as low oxygen levels might theoretically stimulate increased blood flow to ... Physiological Reviews. 92 (1): 367-520. doi:10.1152/physrev.00041.2010. ISSN 1522-1210. PMID 22298659. Post, J. M.; Hume, J. R ...
... pharmacology and pathology of blood pressure control and many other phenomena related to the contraction of smooth muscles. ... "The discovery of bradykinin has led to a new understanding of many physiological and pathological phenomena including ... which increases powerfully both the duration and magnitude of its effects on vasodilation and the consequent fall in blood ...
It was from these studies that he outlined the phenomenon of human physiological adaptation to environmental changes as a ... such as how it affects blood pressure. He spent a couple of months at 9,500 feet (3,000 m.), and then five weeks at elevations ... where he founded the Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene. His earlier research on human physiology eventually led to an ... MD became director of the Laboratory of Physiological Hygiene. Blackburn continued research on the role of lifestyle including ...
A natural physiological reaction to these threshold shifts is vasoconstriction, which will reduce the amount of blood reaching ... Listener fatigue (also known as listening fatigue or ear fatigue) is a phenomenon that occurs after prolonged exposure to an ... eds.). Cochlear Blood Flow Changes With Short Sound Stimulation. Scientific basis of noise-induced hearing loss. New York ... Common groups at risk of becoming victim to this phenomenon include avid listeners of music and others who listen or work with ...
"Blood chemicals link' to eczema". Health. BBC NEWS. 2007-08-26. Retrieved 2008-11-01.. ... With the exception of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting, the patho-physiological basis of many of the disease groups ... "Elevated CSF levels of substance P and high incidence of Raynaud phenomenon in patients with fibromyalgia: new features for ... growth of new blood vessels .,[39] and "leg-like pods" on cells (including cancer cells) bestowing upon them mobility.[40] and ...
"Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. 30 (4): 263-69. doi:10.1016/j.jmpt.2007.03.004. PMID 17509435.. ... high blood pressure, and vision conditions.[123] Other reviews have found no evidence of significant benefit for asthma,[124][ ... "Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics. 38 (8): 533-44. doi:10.1016/j.jmpt.2015.08.001. PMID 26362263.. ... A subluxation is a health concern that manifests in the skeletal joints, and, through complex anatomical and physiological ...
... blood pressure, osmotic equilibrium and pH; the minimum physiological requirement for sodium is 500 milligrams per day.[225] ... and electron correlative contributing phenomena.[161] While analogous lithium bonds are also known, they are mostly ... which was known partly for its high abundance in animal blood. He named the metal inside the material "lithium".[20][15][18] ... "The Physiological Behavior of Rubidium and Cesium in Relation to That of Potassium". The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine ...
The infants' average blood pressure typically decreases after the music therapy sessions, as well. Although there are ... For example, a patient with chronic pain may decrease the physiological result of stress and draw attention away from the pain ... Sacks had a genuine interest in trying to help people affected with neurological disorders and other phenomena associated with ... Live music also reduces the physiological responses in parents. Studies have shown that by combining live music, such as harp ...
The principles behind the equation are considered useful for explaining physiological phenomena happening at the capillary such ... by the blood vessels is determined by this osmotic pressure of the serum proteins." (1896) ...
They found that as these chills increase, many changes in cerebral blood flow are seen in brain regions such as the amygdala, ... Johnson, P. B.; Ferraina, S.; Bianchi, L.; Caminiti, R. (1996). "Cortical networks for visual reaching: physiological and ... An example is the phenomenon of tapping to the beat, where the listener anticipates the rhythmic accents in a piece of music. ... Blood, A. J.; Zatorre, R. J. (2001). "Intensely pleasurable responses to music correlate with activity in brain regions ...
"for his discovery of human blood groups"[۴۲] ۱۹۳۱ اتو واربورگ[۱] آلمان "for his discovery of the nature and mode of action of ... "for his method of reproducing colours photographically based on the phenomenon of interference"[۸۳] ... "for their discoveries concerning the primary physiological and chemical visual processes in the eye"[۵۶] ... "for his theoretical predictions of the properties of a supercurrent through a tunnel barrier, in particular those phenomena ...
Diseases of the blood and blood-forming organs and certain disorders involving the immune mechanism ... F50-F59) Behavioural syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors[edit]. *(F50) Eating disorders * ... F59) Unspecified behavioural syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors. (F60-F69) Disorders of ... 1.6 (F50-F59) Behavioural syndromes associated with physiological disturbances and physical factors ...
"Blood chemicals link' to eczema". BBC News. 26 August 2007.. *^ Shu XQ, Mendell LM (July 1999). "Neurotrophins and hyperalgesia ... Heinonen I, Kalliokoski KK, Hannukainen JC, Duncker DJ, Nuutila P, Knuuti J (November 2014). "Organ-specific physiological ... a phenomenon which is partly responsible for exercise-induced neurogenesis and improvements in cognitive function.[14][21][22][ ... "A physiological role for the dopamine D5 receptor as a regulator of BDNF and Akt signalling in rodent prefrontal cortex". The ...
Several structures and phenomena in anatomy and physiology are named for him, including the Golgi apparatus, the Golgi tendon ... Crile is now formally recognized as the first surgeon to have succeeded in a direct blood transfusion.[85] ... Hermann Joseph Muller (1890-1967): American geneticist and educator, best known for his work on the physiological and genetic ... "for their discoveries regarding tunnelling phenomena in solids". Giaever is an institute professor emeritus at the Rensselaer ...
Planque S, Nishiyama Y, Taguchi H, Salas M, Hanson C, Paul S (June 2008). "Catalytic antibodies to HIV: Physiological role and ... 1990). "Infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) among recipients of antibody-positive blood donations". Ann ... "The Duesberg Phenomenon: A Berkeley virologist and his supporters continue to argue that HIV is not the cause of AIDS. A 3- ... "Blood safety....for too few". WHO (2001). பார்த்த நாள் 2006-01-17. ...
In blood vessels Endothelium-Derived Hyperpolarizing Factor or EDHF is proposed to be a substance and/or electrical signal that ... Although the phenomenon of EDHF has been observed and reported in scientific literature, to date the chemical identity of the ... It implies a reasonable physiological sense, although to some extent and when EDHF acts as backup mechanism for endothelium- ... In female mice, the deletion of eNOS and COX-1 did not affect mean arterial blood pressure, while males become hypertensive[1] ...
"The discovery of bradykinin has led to a new understanding of many physiological and pathological phenomena including ... It is a peptide that causes blood vessels to dilate (enlarge), and therefore causes blood pressure to fall. A class of drugs ... Physiological role (function)[edit]. Effects[edit]. Bradykinin is a potent endothelium-dependent vasodilator, leading to a drop ... further lowering blood pressure. Bradykinin dilates blood vessels via the release of prostacyclin, nitric oxide, and ...
Lowering the temperature may prolong the lifespan of cold blooded animals. Mice, which are warm blooded, have been engineered ... See also: Insulin § Physiological effects. Lowering of the concentration of insulin and substances related to insulin, such as ... Caloric restriction lowers the core body temperature, a phenomenon believed to be an adaptive response to reduce energy ... blood pressure, improved lipid profile, low serum T3 concentration, and decreased resting heart rate and whole-body resting ...
Bibliophobia - fear or hatred of books, as a cultural phenomenon[16]. *Lipophobia - avoidance of fats in food[17][18][19] (see ... Blood-injection-injury type phobia - a DSM-IV subtype of specific phobias ...
However, they will be smaller than male hemipenes and have no visible blood vessels, though a red tip may be visible.[8] ... Consequently, females can store sperm internally[13] for as long as five years, or possibly longer.[14] This phenomenon is ... It is thought that the physiological differences between species prevent hybridization. The genital lock-and-key mechanism can ... known as cryptic female choice, as the physiological mechanisms making this possible are hidden within the body, and the female ...
"Blood chemicals link' to eczema". BBC News. 26 August 2007.. *^ Shu XQ, Mendell LM (July 1999). "Neurotrophins and hyperalgesia ... Heinonen I, Kalliokoski KK, Hannukainen JC, Duncker DJ, Nuutila P, Knuuti J (November 2014). "Organ-specific physiological ... a phenomenon which is partly responsible for exercise-induced neurogenesis and improvements in cognitive function.[18][19][20][ ... "Blood levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor correlate with several psychopathological symptoms in anorexia nervosa ...
The Cerepress™ measures blood pressure in the eye's central retinal vein (CRV) and blood velocity in the ophthalmic artery, ... A measurable acoustic phenomenon that originates in the inner ear would, at least in theory, allow for more precise assessment ... The transfer function of this complex mechanical system under physiological conditions is modulated by the action of two small ... Direct comparison of arterial blood pressure (ABP) and externally applied pressure is the basic arterial blood pressure ...
Such effects on cellular and physiological phenotypic traits may result from external or environmental factors, or be part of ... Historically, some phenomena not necessarily heritable have also been described as epigenetic. For example, the term epigenetic ... endothelium of blood vessels, etc., by activating some genes while inhibiting the expression of others.[7] ... Some human disorders are associated with genomic imprinting, a phenomenon in mammals where the father and mother contribute ...
... can have physiological consequences such as cold and clammy hands, dehydration, and skin infections secondary to ... Eisenach JH, Atkinson JL, Fealey RD (May 2005). "Hyperhidrosis: evolving therapies for a well-established phenomenon". Mayo ... Certain endocrine conditions are also known to cause secondary hyperhidrosis including diabetes mellitus (especially when blood ...
Low blood pressure with or without orthostatic hypotension (blood pressure that decreases with standing) ... Autoimmune destruction of the adrenal cortex is caused by an immune reaction against the enzyme 21-hydroxylase (a phenomenon ... or prednisone tablets in a dosing regimen that mimics the physiological concentrations of cortisol. Alternatively, one-quarter ... Hyponatremia (low blood sodium levels), due to loss of production of the hormone aldosterone, to the kidney's inability to ...
A display of "strength" (e.g. lifting a weight) is a result of three factors that overlap: physiological strength (muscle size ... Besides surrounding each fascicle, the perimysium is a pathway for nerves and the flow of blood within the muscle. The ... This phenomenon is called cross education.[citation needed]. Atrophy. Main article: Muscle atrophy ... The heart, liver and red blood cells will also consume lactic acid produced and excreted by skeletal muscles during exercise. ...
By contrast, in vivo experiments can provide information about the physiological role of a protein in the context of a cell or ... Lectins typically play a role in biological recognition phenomena involving cells and proteins.[39] Receptors and hormones are ... Hence, early studies focused on proteins that could be purified in large quantities, e.g., those of blood, egg white, various ... blood serum albumin, fibrin, and wheat gluten. ...
As blood travels through the venules to the veins a funneling occurs called vasodilation bringing blood back to the heart.[84] ... "Phenomena: Not Exactly Rocket Science How Chickens Lost Their Penises (And Ducks Kept Theirs)". Phenomena.nationalgeographic. ... Water is needed by many birds although their mode of excretion and lack of sweat glands reduces the physiological demands.[128] ... In the capillary beds blood flow is slowed to allow maximum diffusion of oxygen into the tissues. Once the blood has become ...
... is formed during physiological respiration when oxygen binds to the heme component of the protein hemoglobin in red blood cells ... This phenomenon, where molecule Y affects the binding of molecule X to a transport molecule Z, is called a heterotropic ... Because the reaction is slow, the Hb A1c proportion represents glucose level in blood averaged over the half-life of red blood ... Increased levels of this chemical are detected in the blood if red blood cells are being destroyed more rapidly than usual. ...
The rebound phenomenon, also known as the loss of the check reflex, is also sometimes seen in patients with cerebellar ataxia, ... It may also show other treatable findings, such as a blood clot or benign tumour, that could be pressing on the cerebellum. ... The term "ataxia" is sometimes used in a broader sense to indicate lack of coordination in some physiological process. Examples ... "Immune-Mediated Cerebellar Ataxias: Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment Based on Immunological and Physiological Mechanisms" ...
1 - Internal gills where the blood is reoxygenated. 2 - Point where the blood is depleted of oxygen and returns to the heart ... The progeny feed on a skin layer that is specially developed by the adult in a phenomenon known as maternal dermatophagy. The ... vertebrates that do not maintain their body temperature through internal physiological processes. Their metabolic rate is low ... Their job is to filter the blood of metabolic waste and transport the urine via ureters to the urinary bladder where it is ...
Blood supply[edit]. This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. (Learn ... This is known as the blue field entoptic phenomenon (or Scheerer's phenomenon). ... Tight junctions that form the blood retinal barrier separate the subretinal space from the blood supply, thus protecting it ... The white blood cells in the capillaries in front of the photoreceptors can be perceived as tiny bright moving dots when ...
Omega-3 may inhibit production of interferon gamma and other cytokines which cause the physiological symptoms of depression. ... Finally, IgA deficiency is also sometimes associated with the development of autoimmune and atopic phenomena. ... the attack on cells may be the consequence of cycling metabolic processes necessary to keep the blood chemistry in homeostasis. ... While major depression is not necessarily an autoimmune disease, some of its physiological symptoms are inflammatory and ...
Nutritional Physiological Phenomena * Uric Acid / blood * Young Adult Substances * Insulin * Uric Acid ...
Insulin / blood* * Insulin-Like Growth Factor I / analysis* * Nutritional Physiological Phenomena * Risk Factors ... Hyperinsulinemia and an increased IGF-I bioactivity could thus be an important physiological link between a western lifestyle, ...
Blood, Muscle and Exercise Responses to Sodium Bicarbonate Supplementation. *Sports Nutritional Physiological Phenomena ... Modulation of Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) of Brain Activation ... Blood pressure; Change in Mean Arterial Pressure from low salt diet to high salt diet ... Percent Change in Voxel-wise Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) Including Outliers Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging ...
Blood, Muscle and Exercise Responses to Sodium Bicarbonate Supplementation. *Sports Nutritional Physiological Phenomena ... Office or 24h blood pressure measurements. 20. All. 18 Years to 75 Years (Adult, Older Adult). NCT03036748. ENaC activation. ... Improved blood lipids. 400. All. 18 Years and older (Adult, Older Adult). NCT02796313. 1R01HL126578. NOSH. September 25, 2017. ... Modulation of Blood Oxygen Level Dependent (BOLD) Using Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) of Brain Activation ...
Blood Pressure / physiology*. Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena. Decerebrate State / physiopathology*. Electric ...
Blood Pressure / physiology. Brain / physiopathology*. Cardiovascular Physiological Phenomena*. Electrophysiology. Exercise / ... Anticipation of exercise resulted in increases in heart rate, blood pressure and ventilation. The greatest neural changes were ... since stimulation of this structure is known to alter blood pressure in awake humans.. ...
Circulatory And Respiratory Physiological Phenomena. Functional processes and properties characteristic of the BLOOD; ...
Circulatory and Respiratory Physiological Phenomena [G09]. *Blood Physiological Phenomena [G09.188]. *Hemorheology [G09.188.370 ... The internal resistance of the BLOOD to shear forces. The in vitro measure of whole blood viscosity is of limited clinical ... Shape oscillations of single blood drops: applications to human blood and sickle cell disease. Sci Rep. 2018 11 14; 8(1):16794. ... "Blood Viscosity" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject ...
... complications from unusual physiological variations in patients, including foreign body rejection phenomena; pneumonia, seizure ... sudden blood vessel obstruction); aborted procedures (air embolism, unable to find target, surgical complication, etc.); ...
... a strange phenomenon was observed. Binding interactions between the white blood cells and the vessel walls were observed to ... This topic was finally able to be studied thoroughly under physiological shear stress conditions using a typical flow chamber.[ ... Leukocytes use the blood as a transport medium to reach the tissues of the body. Here is a brief summary of each of the four ... IL-1, TNFα and C5a[1] cause the endothelial cells of blood vessels near the site of infection to express cellular adhesion ...
... which implied that stenosis led to a reduction in blood supply to the myocardium. This was the most important physiological ... Similar phenomenon is named as "branch steal" by Gould et al. [29] to describe the situation when a nonstenotic branch between ... Hence less blood was distributed to the regions downstream the stenosis. However, there was a slight increase of blood flow to ... Numerical Simulation and Clinical Implications of Stenosis in Coronary Blood Flow. Jun-Mei Zhang,1 Liang Zhong,1,2 Tong Luo,3 ...
From a physiological standpoint, this phenomenon makes perfect sense. The body adapts well to repeated training stress, with ... After many thousands of miles, the delivery system of blood to the muscles has expanded and increased. ...
doi:10.1182/blood-2004-04-1559. ISSN 0006-4971. PMID 15494428.. *^ Augello, Andrea; Tasso, Roberta; Negrini, Simone Maria; ... There is yet no consensus among biologists on the prevalence and physiological and therapeutic relevance of stem cell ... This phenomenon is referred to as stem cell transdifferentiation or plasticity. It can be induced by modifying the growth ... MSCs have been isolated from placenta, adipose tissue, lung, bone marrow and blood, Whartons jelly from the umbilical cord,[23 ...
A fibrin biofilm covers blood clots and protects from microbial invasion. J Clin Invest. 2018 08 01; 128(8):3356-3368. ... "Bacterial Physiological Phenomena" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Bacterial Physiological ... "Bacterial Physiological Phenomena" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Bacterial Physiological Phenomena" by people in Profiles. ...
Changes in glucose levels will be seen more quickly in capillary blood (blood glucose, or BG). This phenomenon is often called ... Capillary blood and ISF have different physiological characteristics. ... A blood glucose meter can give a somewhat different result if you check your blood glucose again a few moments later. This is ... Arent all blood glucose meters accurate though?. Its a surprise to most people, including doctors and nurses, that a blood ...
Physiological phenomena e.g. blood flow • Physics limitations e.g. Gibbs and susceptibility ... Entry slice (Inflow) artifact • Unsaturated spins in blood or CSF entering the initial slices results in greater signal than ... Entry Slice Phenomenon • Field inhomogeneity • Slice-overlap Artifact ...
Perfusion in the human placenta is an important physiological phenomenon which shows the placental conditions. The magnitude of ... Perfusion in the human placenta is an important physiological phenomenon which shows the placental conditions. The magnitude of ... The villous tree in the human placenta has the blood vessels for the fetal blood circulation while the maternal blood flows ... Villous tree model with active contractions for estimating blood flow conditions This research article by Dr. Yoko Kato et al ...
This phenomenon has been documented on other rare occasions among persons undergoing extreme psychological or physiological ... Blood atonement reoccurred as the theme through the temple worship. And now in Jesus we have the profuse loss of blood as the ... This results in a bloody secretion--blood mixed with sweat--exuding through the pores of the skin. The loss of this bloody, ... We need to keep considering Calvary, and the blood that was spilled as payment in full for our sins. We need also to remember ...
... other factors in blood vessel formation; parallel patterning in blood vessels and nerves; physiological and pathological ... Kasabach-Merritt phenomenon; Sturge-Weber syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and Parkes Weber syndrome; diagnostic and ... neovascularization; the role of VEGF receptors in metastasis; anti-angiogenic therapy for tumors; association of blood vessels ...
Homocysteine/blood. *Insulin/analysis. *Liver/enzymology. *Male. *Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena. *Models, Animal ...
... and probably nerves that innervate blood vessels. An... ... Blood flow in the central and peripheral nervous systems is ... 2: The cardiovascular system, vol IV, part 1. Bethesda, MD: American Physiological Society, pp 411-466.Google Scholar ... Resistance (conductance) and capacitance phenomena in terminal vascular beds. In: Handbook of Physiology, sect. 2: Circulation ... Cerebral Blood Flow Sciatic Nerve Circle ofWillis Nerve Blood Flow Normal Cerebral Blood Flow These keywords were added by ...
However, the physiological implications of this phenomenon remain unclear. Allosteric regulation Haldane Effect Root effect ... However, when their blood was examined, this was not the case. Humpback whales weighing 41,000 kilograms had an observed Δ log ... Since carbon dioxide reacts with water to form carbonic acid, an increase in CO2 results in a decrease in blood pH, resulting ... This increases the acidity of the blood far more than CO2 alone, which reflects the cells even greater need for oxygen. In ...
exp "circulatory and respiratory physiological phenomena"/. *("systolic blood pressure" or SBP or "mean arterial pressure" or " ... exp "circulatory and respiratory physiological phenomena"/. *("systolic blood pressure" or SBP or "mean arterial pressure" or " ... The initial triage criteria in the current guidelines are physiological (blood pressure, respiration status) and level of ... Physiological measures upon the arrival of EMS personnel to the scene of injury, during treatment in the field, and during ...
Clarifying the physiological basis and the possible clinical value of this phenomenon needs further studies. ... Increase of Short-Term Heart Rate Variability Induced by Blood Pressure Measurements during Ambulatory Blood Pressure ... for any variation). Conclusion. In the setting of combined ABPM and HM, the blood pressure measurement itself produces an ... For every blood pressure measurement, 2-minute ECG segments (before, during, and after measurement) were analyzed to obtain ...
One of these physiological responses is the measurement of blood pressure. Example sensors that may be used for measuring blood ... illustrates neural mechanisms that control the baroreflex phenomena described above. FIG. 1A. generally illustrates afferent ... typically results in a pool of blood in the lower limbs and less blood flow to the heart, and thus arterial blood pressure ... Activation of baroreflex is a major afferent limb of moment-to-moment blood pressure response to physiological or ...
3. Mild hypoxaemia, ventilation-blood-flow inequality and impairment of gas transfer also occurred after urea administration. ... The response could not be related to any of the clinical or other physiological variables examined. ... This response was a relatively constant phenomenon in the same subject. Urea appears to possess the unusual property of being ...
Blood viscosity. Poiseuilles Law. Physiological effects of hydrostatic pressure. Thermal phenomena and gases Temperatue, heat ... Measurement of arterial blood pressure. Perfect fluid. Continuity equation for flow and its application to blood circulation. ... Electrical phenomena Electric charge. Coloumbs law. Electic field, potential energy and electric potential. Electric current. ... Genetics of AB0 and Rh blood groups.. - Hereditary and genetic diseases. Examples. Somatic mutations and cancer.. - Genomic in ...
It is a physiological phenomenon that requires no treatment. Marshall-White syndrome List of cutaneous conditions Freedberg, et ... The spots appear when the blood is congested with a bandage on the upper arm, e.g. with a blood pressure cuff. The spots also ...
Bacterial Physiological Phenomena; *Virus Physiological Phenomena; Axonal Transport; Bacterial Toxins/*metabolism; Blood-Brain ... pathogens have to circumvent the wall of tightly sealed endothelial cells that compose the blood-brain barrier. Neuronal ...
2005 Numerical simulation of fluid mechanical phenomena in idealised physiological geometries: stenosis and double bend. PhD ... 1989 The effects of prolonged ketamine-xylazine intravenous infusion on arterial blood pH. blood gases, mean arterial blood ... 1926 The physiological principle of minimum work. I. The vascular system and the cost of blood volume. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. ... 2009 A numerical study on the flow of blood and the transport of LDL in the human aorta: the physiological significance of the ...
  • Blood-brain barrier in physiology and medicine. (springer.com)
  • Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation , a peer-reviewed international scientific journal, serves as an aid to understanding the flow properties of blood and the relationship to normal and abnormal physiology. (iospress.com)
  • These effects of thrombin are seen in a variety of physiological as well as pathological phenomena, including vascular development and physiology, tumor progression and metastasis, neuronal functions, inflammation, angiogenesis. (powells.com)
  • Mosso [1] and Warner [2] showed that there are physiological and mechanical limitations to the influence of selection and the medium, or that there are internal necessities independent of exterior utility, and assumed that the explanation of the phenomena belongs to physiology. (wikisource.org)
  • Neutrophils extravasate from blood vessels to the site of tissue injury or infection during the innate immune response. (wikipedia.org)
  • IL-1, TNFα and C5a [1] cause the endothelial cells of blood vessels near the site of infection to express cellular adhesion molecules , including selectins . (wikipedia.org)
  • This causes the immobilization of the leukocytes, which varies in vessels that contain different shear forces of the ongoing blood flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • The villous tree in the human placenta has the blood vessels for the fetal blood circulation while the maternal blood flows into the intervillous space, the surroundings of the villous tree. (eurekalert.org)
  • Blood flow in the central and peripheral nervous systems is regulated by local tissue metabolism, carbon dioxide, circulating vasogenic agents, and probably nerves that innervate blood vessels. (springer.com)
  • Meninges and blood vessels of the central nervous system. (springer.com)
  • The circulation of blood through the vessels of the BRAIN. (umassmed.edu)
  • Take lukewarm showers or baths: hot water dilates blood vessels, while cool water constricts them. (uniprix.com)
  • Smoking is bad for blood vessels, among other things. (uniprix.com)
  • Rhythmical contraction known as vasomotion occurs in blood vessels. (physoc.org)
  • The development of new blood vessels, or angiogenesis, begins with the activation of parent vessel endothelial cells. (ahajournals.org)
  • 12. Arrest of Menstrual bleeding  # mechanisms--- 1 Haemostasis by plate let plug and clot formation - starts soon the bleeding starts and open BV are plugged .once Blood vessels are plugged , fibrin deposition occurs --- Fibrinolysis also go hand in hand to balance and keep the blood loss fluid. (slideshare.net)
  • 13. Arrest of Menstrual bleeding -- 3.Tissue Repair --- starts from the mouths of open endometrial glands in the denuded areas , endothelium out grows and covers the raw area under the influence of Epithelial Growth Factor ( EGF) and blood vessels regrow due toVascular endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF).Thus the raw area of remaining basal endometrium is completely epithelized under Estrogen effect. (slideshare.net)
  • 3-5 The sympathetic nervous system constricts cerebral blood vessels via cervical sympathetic nerves, 3 and the parasympathetic nervous system dilates the cerebral vasculature through the action of the facial nerve via the sphenopalatine ganglion. (bmj.com)
  • 4 The afferents of the trigeminal nerve input synapse onto the trigemino-cervical complex of the upper cervical cord, which activates the parasympathetic reflex through the sphenopalatine ganglion via the superior salivatory nucleus, dilating blood vessels. (bmj.com)
  • Across all species of mammals, vital life-giving nutrients are transported around the body by complex networks of blood vessels. (brightsurf.com)
  • Then, we increase the level of detail and focus on isolated tissues and vessels, considering more accurate one-dimensional models for blood flow and mass transport, as well as coupled 1D-3D models of tissue perfusion. (epfl.ch)
  • Furthermore, the new model is expected to play a significant role in researching how to reproduce and regenerate new blood vessels. (useoul.edu)
  • Angiogenesis, the process of generating new blood vessels from pre-existing blood vessels, is involved in endochondral bone formation and bone fracture repair. (useoul.edu)
  • But in blood vessels there can be both alpha receptors , which cause vasoconstriction, and beta-2 receptors , which cause vasodilation. (washington.edu)
  • The rapidly expanding science of hemorheology concerns blood, its components and the blood vessels with which blood interacts. (iospress.com)
  • When we are out swimming in colder waters, the blood vessels in our arms and legs are constricted. (nxtri.com)
  • When we come back to warmer environments, the blood vessels in our arms and legs dilate again, and the colder blood will circulate back to the core. (nxtri.com)
  • In recent years many experimental investigations have been carried out on vasculogenesis and angiogenesis, the mechanisms of blood vessels formation. (zcu.cz)
  • The proposed methodology works on phase contrast microscopy snap photographs of cultured endothelial cell plates, and extracts a detailed graph-based representation of the blood vessels network thus supporting accurate angiogenesis parameters measurement. (zcu.cz)
  • It happens when persistently high blood sugar damages blood vessels in the retina, the thin piece of tissue at the back of the eye that processes light. (uweightloss.com)
  • It is likely to be due to some as yet unknown autonomic dysregulation of the blood vessels. (news-medical.net)
  • Bacterial Physiological Phenomena" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (harvard.edu)
  • This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Bacterial Physiological Phenomena" by people in Harvard Catalyst Profiles by year, and whether "Bacterial Physiological Phenomena" was a major or minor topic of these publication. (harvard.edu)
  • Below are the most recent publications written about "Bacterial Physiological Phenomena" by people in Profiles. (harvard.edu)
  • 1987. Cerebral blood flow variations with perfusion pressure and metabolism. (springer.com)
  • 1952. Factors influencing cerebral blood flow and metabolism. (springer.com)
  • Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) refers to short fragments of acellular nucleic acids detectable in almost all body fluids, including blood, and is involved in various physiological and pathological phenomena such as immunity, coagulation, aging, and cancer. (rsc.org)
  • Instead, most of the blood flow serves specific physiological functions in the organs. (washington.edu)
  • The specific physiological rationale for this phenomena is not fully recognised. (nxtri.com)
  • Taken together, these observations lead to the hypothesis that breast cancer risk may be increased in women with elevated plasma insulin levels, and/or with elevated levels of bioactive IGF-I. Hyperinsulinemia and an increased IGF-I bioactivity could thus be an important physiological link between a western lifestyle, overnutrition, a hyperandrogenic sex steroid profile, and increased breast cancer risk. (nih.gov)
  • Perfusion in the human placenta is an important physiological phenomenon which shows the placental conditions. (eurekalert.org)
  • A three-variable model of the blood glucose regulatory system is developed and conformed to glucose and insulin measurements from oral glucose tolerance tests. (rice.edu)
  • Your blood glucose will rise if you didn't take enough to keep your insulin level up through the night. (healthcentral.com)
  • The problems of long-acting insulin formulations such as isophane and lente have taken longer to improve: they produce "hill-like" blood concentration and action profiles, resulting in a peak of over-insulinization in the middle of the night with a consequent risk of hypoglycemia, and a waning in insulinization before breakfast, resulting in fasting hyperglycemia ( 1 , 2 , 4 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Moreover, these delayed-action insulin suspensions also have huge variability of subcutaneous absorption ( 1 ), contributing to much of the unpredictability in within- and between-day blood glucose control. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • The constancy of the basal delivery allows for a near-flat blood insulin profile, adjustable at preset times to suit the changing needs of the patient throughout the day. (diabetesjournals.org)
  • these are soluble in the insulin vial rather than being suspensions, have more predictable absorption, achieve more constant blood levels, and have at least the potential for significantly improved control ( 8 , 9 ). (diabetesjournals.org)
  • Primary" Raynaud's phenomenon, originally described by Dr. Maurice Raynaud, occurs spontaneously in less than 15% of the general population. (cdc.gov)
  • Some medical conditions, particularly fractures, lacerations, costoclavicular syndrome, connective tissue diseases, vascular disorders such as Buerger's disease, generalized atherosclerosis, or a long history of high blood pressure, may result in the same signs and symptoms as primary Raynaud's phenomenon. (cdc.gov)
  • Primary Raynaud's phenomenon is also called Raynaud's disease. (news-medical.net)
  • When pins and needles are due to primary Raynaud's phenomenon, warming the extremities is of help in relieving the symptoms if triggered by cold. (news-medical.net)
  • Anticipation of exercise resulted in increases in heart rate, blood pressure and ventilation. (biomedsearch.com)
  • We provide direct electrophysiological evidence highlighting the PAG as an important subcortical area in the neural circuitry of the cardiorespiratory response to exercise, since stimulation of this structure is known to alter blood pressure in awake humans. (biomedsearch.com)
  • SKELETAL MUSCLE: As a skeletal muscle makes the transition from relaxed to maximum exercise, the blood flow can increase by up to approximately 20 times. (washington.edu)
  • Does regular swimming exercise decrease arterial blood pressure (BP) and improve vascular function? (acc.org)
  • One problem in understanding and interpreting the available literature about discontinuity in the blood lactate response to exercise is the plethora of terms used to describe similar phenomena. (humankinetics.com)
  • 1983), or is the highest exercise intensity that elicits a blood lactate concentration of 2.5 mmol · L -1 after 10 min of steady-state exercise (Allen et al. (humankinetics.com)
  • A number of researchers have independently suggested that there are at least two apparent discontinuities or thresholds in the blood lactate response to incremental exercise that may serve as general concepts for many of the terms proposed by other researchers (Beaver et al. (humankinetics.com)
  • Regular exercise also improves factors linked to cardiovascular health, resulting in lower blood pressure, healthier cholesterol levels, and better blood sugar regulation. (harvard.edu)
  • And that's not all: Exercise also promotes positive physiological changes, such as encouraging the heart's arteries to dilate more readily. (harvard.edu)
  • Although physiological and performance changes normally occur in concert with exercise stimulation, it does not necessarily follow that physiological changes from a non-exercise stimulus (i.e., altitude) will promote exercise performance changes in an unrelated environment (i.e., sea-level) (Wolski, McKenzie, & Wenger, 1996). (sdsu.edu)
  • Regular exercise also helps in controlling the most common risk factors linked to a heart attack, like blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes. (indiatimes.com)
  • Moreover, exercise causes the heart arteries to dilate, reduces the resting heart rate and improves the physiological conditioning of the heart, thus making the heart better prepared to withstand any stress or insult. (indiatimes.com)
  • 3 . The method of claim 2 , wherein determining baroreflex responses to the posture changes further comprises measuring the patient's blood pressure during the time periods corresponding to the changes in posture. (google.com)
  • 4. The method of claim 1 wherein determining the expected level interest by a first party for a second party based, at least in part, on a plurality of behaviors corresponding to a plurality of usage behavior categories comprises: evaluating a behavior corresponding to a physiological responses usage behavior category. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Specifically, the new microchip will offer a new approach for the investigation of complex biological phenomena as well as for the analysis of drug responses and toxicities in bone tissues. (useoul.edu)
  • Red blood cells tend to migrate toward the center of a blood vessel, leaving a cell-free layer at the vessel wall, while white blood cells and platelets are preferentially found near the walls, a phenomenon called margination that is critical for the physiological responses of inflammation and hemostasis. (imperial.ac.uk)
  • Human acclimatization to passive stresses serves as the basis for understanding physiological responses to altitude exposure. (sdsu.edu)
  • To reach the central nervous system (CNS), pathogens have to circumvent the wall of tightly sealed endothelial cells that compose the blood-brain barrier. (cnrs.fr)
  • I myself focused on physiological phenomena such as migration of endothelial cells, lack of oxygen, inflammation and inadequate lymphatic vessel function," Mr Jensen said. (liu.se)
  • 1967. Fine structural localization of a blood-brain barrier to exogenous peroxidase. (springer.com)
  • The concept of a blood-brain barrier. (springer.com)
  • Arterial behavior and blood circulation in the brain. (springer.com)
  • Mathew says that the happy little chemicals are released in response to a range of phenomena -- distress, injury, running long distances, chocolate -- and have the knack for acting like morphine on the body and brain. (theatlantic.com)
  • Instead, a signal is sent to the brain and a rush of blood flows to the penis, causing it to become firm, engorged and enlarged . (fomdi.com)
  • Blood flows preferentially to the placenta instead of the brain in fetuses of mothers with diabetes, reveals research presented today at EuroEcho-Imaging 2016. (brightsurf.com)
  • It is generally believed that F has no effect on the CNS because it is excluded from brain by the blood-brain barrier (Whitford et al, 1979). (fluoridealert.org)
  • The fact that the pineal is outside the blood-brain barrier suggests that pineal HA could sequester F from the bloodstream if it has the same strong affinity for F as HA in the other mineralizing tissues. (fluoridealert.org)
  • Functional hyperemia (local increases in blood flow triggered by neuronal activation) ensures that local brain activity is always matched by an adequate supply of oxygen and nutrients through blood flow. (harvard.edu)
  • By contrast, such vasoconstriction does does not occur in the brain or heart, where blood flow serves to keep the cells in these vital organs alive and healthy. (washington.edu)
  • There is now growing evidence for the relationship between how the brain regulates its blood supply locally and neurological disorders such as dementia in older brains and cerebral palsy in younger brains. (utoronto.ca)
  • Most of the experimental and theoretical studies to-date have focused on the two major components of brain tissue itself (neurons and glial cells) without taking the effect of cerebral blood flow (CBF) into account. (utoronto.ca)
  • Infatuation is so powerful it can be witnessed in brain scans and in hormonal and neurochemical changes in your blood. (yourtango.com)
  • ILBF can be caused by brain ischemia or anoxia or by any other type of brain disease or injury leading to an elevation of the intracranial pressure above the blood pressure and thereby to an arrest of the cerebral circulation. (aerzteblatt.de)
  • The newly discovered evidence that brain scans show a significant signature for bipolar disorder, cited by Dr. Lawlis in his recent post, is yet another phenomenon which, like biochemical theories, begs the classic question of chicken or egg: Could biochemical imbalances or aberrant blood flow patterns in the brain be additional symptoms rather than causes of depression? (psychologytoday.com)
  • The in vitro measure of whole blood viscosity is of limited clinical utility because it bears little relationship to the actual viscosity within the circulation, but an increase in the viscosity of circulating blood can contribute to morbidity in patients suffering from disorders such as SICKLE CELL ANEMIA and POLYCYTHEMIA. (harvard.edu)
  • It has been speculated that that the contraction would contribute to the blood circulation in the placenta, but the displacement caused by the contraction has been hardly been predicted or measured. (eurekalert.org)
  • The results in the computation showed that the displacement would be helpful for blood circulation in the placenta even if the mechanical properties of the surroundings were changed. (eurekalert.org)
  • Such robustness in the blood circulation agrees with previous reports. (eurekalert.org)
  • Understanding the dynamic relationship between cerebral blood flow (CBF) and the circulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) can facilitate management of cerebral pathologies. (springer.com)
  • Raynaud's phenomenon is a relatively rare medical condition which causes a reduction of blood circulation to the fingers or toes when exposed to cold temperatures or during stressful situations. (news-medical.net)
  • After a variable interval, blood circulation resumes, and the skin turns first red and then the healthy pink color. (news-medical.net)
  • 3 "Secondary" Raynaud's phenomenon has the same signs and symptoms and progresses through the same stages of severity but may be correlated with a specific cause (i.e., other medical conditions, vinyl chloride, or vibrating handtools). (cdc.gov)
  • This CIB is limited to a discussion of Secondary Raynaud's phenomenon resulting from the use of vibrating hand tools, referred to as vibration syndrome. (cdc.gov)
  • Secondary Raynaud's phenomenon requires a different approach. (news-medical.net)
  • The possible effect of blood pressure measurements per se on heart rate variability (HRV) was studied in the setting of concomitant ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) and Holter ECG monitoring (HM). (hindawi.com)
  • In the setting of combined ABPM and HM, the blood pressure measurement itself produces an increase in short-term heart rate variability. (hindawi.com)
  • Physiological processes and properties of BACTERIA. (harvard.edu)
  • A completely different type of plaque - made of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances found in blood - can build up inside arteries. (harvard.edu)
  • Oxygen-dependent flow of sickle trait blood as an in vitro therapeutic benchmark for sickle cell disease treatments. (harvard.edu)
  • One method for measuring local blood flow, laser-Doppler flowmetry (LDF), has become particularly useful in recent years. (springer.com)
  • In this chapter, we briefly review the structure and function of the vasculature in the nervous system, and then examine major techniques used to study blood flow, particularly LDF. (springer.com)
  • In Cerebral Blood Flow. (springer.com)
  • J Cereb Blood Flow Metab 1:7-36. (springer.com)
  • The patchy nature of such lesions has been attributed to local variation in the pattern of blood flow. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • In this study, a high-order continuous Galerkin finite-element method was used to simulate blood flow within a realistic representation of the rabbit aortic arch and descending thoracic aorta. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Since these regions are associated with complex blood flow patterns, it has been postulated that blood flow may play an important role in regulating atherogenesis. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • However, despite numerous experimental studies of disease location in the rabbit vasculature, there have been few computational studies of blood flow in this species and the corresponding flow therefore remains largely uncharacterized. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • 3. Mild hypoxaemia, ventilation-blood-flow inequality and impairment of gas transfer also occurred after urea administration. (portlandpress.com)
  • If you stimulate the periphery with acupuncture needles," explains Mathew, "you can change the blood flow pattern to the stomach and abdomen, which could explain the effect on nausea and vomiting. (theatlantic.com)
  • When people are being "treated" with placebo, you can actually see the change in blood flow patterns in the cortices of their brains in fMRI. (theatlantic.com)
  • It occurs when blood flow from the legs to the heart is impaired, causing the heaviness. (uniprix.com)
  • Move your toes to stimulate blood flow in your feet. (uniprix.com)
  • 2003). Particular attention has been focused on cyclic variations of the aorta diameter in immature rats, in part because it may contribute to the regulation of blood flow (Haddock et al. (physoc.org)
  • 3.  Volume of blood flow is assessed by number of pads / tampons used whether the pads are fully/ partially soaked , presence of clots. (slideshare.net)
  • The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of 100 Hz electroacupuncture (EA) to the trigeminal nerve area on cerebral blood flow and autonomic nervous system function. (bmj.com)
  • We measured cerebral blood flow using a two-channel near-infrared spectroscope. (bmj.com)
  • Compared with the control group, cerebral blood flow was significantly greater in the left (p=0.048) and right (p=0.016) prefrontal cortex in the EA group. (bmj.com)
  • Conclusions Delivery of 100 Hz EA to the trigeminal nerve area reduces HR and increases parasympathetic nervous activity and cerebral blood flow. (bmj.com)
  • Earlier studies have demonstrated that cerebral blood flow is lower in subjects with depression compared with healthy controls due to functional deterioration of the prefrontal cortex. (bmj.com)
  • 1 2 This suggests that cerebral blood flow in the prefrontal cortex may be used to evaluate depression severity. (bmj.com)
  • Effects of decreasing cerebral perfusion pressure on pulsatility of cerebral blood flow velocity-a modelling study. (springer.com)
  • Ursino M. Computer analysis of the main parameters extrapolated from the human intracranial basal artery blood flow. (springer.com)
  • said housing further containing a reagent in said capillary pathway comprising a member selected from the group consisting of compounds affecting blood clotting and antibodies capable of causing a change in flow rate of said fluid sample in said pathway. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • Also, the exact cellular and molecular sequence of events by which glutamatergic synaptic transmission causes changes in blood flow have remained unclear. (harvard.edu)
  • We simultaneously monitored glutamate release and local blood flow in olfactory glomeruli, and found that presynaptic transmitter release and functional hyperemia are highly correlated. (harvard.edu)
  • Our study is one of the first to visualize simultaneously many of the major steps between neural activity and blood flow under normal physiological conditions in vivo and in real time. (harvard.edu)
  • Second, our study places astrocytes unequivocally in the middle of the coupling between neural activity and blood flow. (harvard.edu)
  • Third, we discovered a novel signaling mechanism in astrocytes, involving glutamate transport, which couples glutamate release to blood flow changes. (harvard.edu)
  • Finally, our approach allows for repeated, minimally-invasive intravital imaging of neuronal activity and blood flow over long periods of time. (harvard.edu)
  • The cover of Neuron, courtesy of the Murthy lab: Neuronal activity is tightly coupled to local changes in blood flow. (harvard.edu)
  • LOCAL CHEMICAL FACTORS: In general, as these factors are added to the intersitital fluid in tissues, they cause vasodilation to help match the local blood flow to the local metabolic requirments. (washington.edu)
  • In each case, increasing levels leads to increased blood flow in the local tissue. (washington.edu)
  • In these organs, normal blood flow greatly surpasses that required to keep the tissues alive. (washington.edu)
  • Now let us see how the above factors control the distribution of blood flow in physiological situations. (washington.edu)
  • The structures that normally have the largest changes in blood flow are the skin , the digestive tract and skeletal muscle . (washington.edu)
  • SKIN: Blood flow to the skin is almost entirely for the purposes of thermoregulation. (washington.edu)
  • DIGESTIVE TRACT: As with the skin, most of the blood flow to the digestive tract is not for the purpose of supporting the cells of the digestive tract, but rather, of course, to pick up nutrients absorbed in digestion. (washington.edu)
  • The endeavour of the Editors-in-Chief and publishers of Clinical Hemorheology and Microcirculation is to bring together contributions from those working in various fields related to blood flow all over the world. (iospress.com)
  • All of these pathologies start with an altered relationship between neural activity and the cerebral blood flow (CBF). (utoronto.ca)
  • Blood is a suspension of objects of various shapes, sizes and mechanical properties, whose distribution during flow is important in many contexts. (imperial.ac.uk)
  • A provision of improving the flow of blood through a region of increased impedance is disclosed. (google.es)
  • The provision comprises assisting blood flow is said region by means of a pump placed in or around a blood vessel supplying blood to said area, and acting to pump blood in the required direction. (google.es)
  • actuating said pump to improve blood flow through said hepatic portal vein or hepatic pedicle and thereby improve blood flow through the liver. (google.es)
  • 11. A method as claimed in claim 1, wherein a section of said blood vessel is removed and replaced by a jacket, sheath or collar, and blood is caused to flow by the combination of inflation of said jacket, sheath or collar and one-way valves at both ends of the jacket. (google.es)
  • Thus, the contraction of the eyebrows in struggle and in pain, which is explained by Darwin as a survival of a movement originally advantageous in combat, is shown by M. Mosso to be a result of the flow of blood to supply the waste of nervous force, and to be physiologically connected with movements of attention and of effort. (wikisource.org)
  • The strange thing is that blood flow in every other part of the body is unaffected. (news-medical.net)
  • While the reduction in blood flow does not cause permanent damage, the phenomenon should be investigated to make sure that it does not indicate any serious associated illness (most commonly certain autoimmune disorders). (news-medical.net)
  • For every blood pressure measurement, 2-minute ECG segments (before, during, and after measurement) were analyzed to obtain time domain parameters of HRV: SDNN and rMSSD. (hindawi.com)
  • Parameter variations related to blood pressure measurements were analyzed using one-way ANOVA with multiple comparisons. (hindawi.com)
  • 4 . The method of claim 3 , wherein measuring the blood pressure of the patient's body comprises measuring the blood pressure via a force transducer sensitive to displacement of a blood vessel. (google.com)
  • 5 . The method of claim 4 , wherein measuring the blood pressure of the patient's body via a force transducer comprises measuring the blood pressure via at least one of a blood-vessel-implantable stent-like transducer and a cuff transducer placed around a blood vessel. (google.com)
  • 6 . The method of claim 5 , wherein measuring the blood pressure of the patient's body via the stent-like transducer comprises measuring the blood pressure from the stent-like transducer implanted in a vein that is paralleled by an artery. (google.com)
  • 9 . The method of claim 1 , wherein determining the autonomic imbalance of the patient comprises performing a baroreflex sensitivity analysis (BSA) based on blood pressure and cardiac signals measured during a time period corresponding to the posture change. (google.com)
  • 12 . The method of claim 10 , wherein performing the BSA comprises determining a rate of change of between systolic blood pressure relative to the intervals during the time period corresponding to the posture change. (google.com)
  • In 1847 he invented the kymograph, a cylindrical drum used to record muscular motion, changes in blood pressure, and other physiological phenomena. (britannica.com)
  • These biochemical compounds influence such physiological phenomena in mammals as blood pressure, body temperature and allergic reactions. (todayinsci.com)
  • The spots appear when the blood is congested with a bandage on the upper arm, e.g. with a blood pressure cuff. (wikipedia.org)
  • Septic shock is a medical emergency which requires a supportive treatment with vasoactive agents to restore adequate blood pressure and tissue perfusion. (actapress.com)
  • A descriptive study of blood pressure readings and selected parameter relationships was conducted on an elderly ambulatory population in an urban midwestern community. (healio.com)
  • From a total population of 3,000 elderly citizens who frequented the blood pressure screening clinics sponsored by a local health department, a convenience sample of 526 male and female subjects was stuthed. (healio.com)
  • Findings of this study reflect the need for further research on the norms of blood pressure readings of elderly persons, their ability to adapt to their own environment, and the importance of health education for self-care. (healio.com)
  • However, the following study was conducted by professional nurses with assistance from a non -professional volunteer staff in a county health department located in a large metropolitan city in an attempt to evaluate factors that may influence blood pressure readings of ambulatory elderly seen in health screening clinics. (healio.com)
  • The literature provides a wide variation in norms of blood pressure (BP) levels established for the diagnosis of hypertension.1"3 In the elderly population, cardiovascular disease contributes to increasing morbidity that may be related to underlying aging processes, pathology, and/or environmental factors. (healio.com)
  • It has been shown that blood pressure is modifiable by such factors as change in life style, decrease in salt intake, control of obesity, and lessening of stress.5,6 While this generally may be the case, a question remains about the association of these factors to blood pressure readings of the ambulatory elderly. (healio.com)
  • Lack of knowledge of the normal range of blood pressure readings in the ambulatory elderly may lead to unnecessary treatment with drugs of high potency to relieve symptoms attributed to high blood pressure. (healio.com)
  • Thus, further study of the normal range of blood pressure in the ambulatory elderly is essential. (healio.com)
  • DHA lowers blood pressure in anesthetized wild-type but not in Slo1 knockout mice. (pnas.org)
  • Slo1 BK channels are thus receptors for long-chain omega-3 fatty acids, and these fatty acids-unlike their ethyl ester derivatives-activate the channels and lower blood pressure. (pnas.org)
  • It also helps your sympathetic nervous system (which controls your heart rate and blood pressure) to be less reactive. (harvard.edu)
  • It recharges the immune system, aids in babies' growth, reduces stress, stimulates oxytocin and dopamine, and lowers blood pressure and heart rate. (sott.net)
  • Although renin cells are crucial for blood pressure homeostasis, little is known about their nature. (ahajournals.org)
  • The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) is crucial in the regulation of blood pressure and fluid-electrolyte homeostasis. (ahajournals.org)
  • It should be noted that for the system to operate properly, it needs to respond accurately and rapidly to changes in the composition and volume of the extracellular fluid and to variations in systemic blood pressure. (ahajournals.org)
  • Whether the outcome of interest is pain, blood pressure, cholesterol, or other, persons are classically selected for treatment if they are at one end of the distribution - say, the high end. (edge.org)
  • Understanding biological phenomena regulating angiogenesis is therefore essential for clinical treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis-dependent diseases. (zcu.cz)
  • This paper presents a comprehensive physiological and pharmacological model of the cardiovascular system that can simulate the hemodynamic response to vasoactive drugs with differing pharmacologic profiles. (actapress.com)
  • Correlation between cerebral blood volume values and outcomes in endovascular therapy for acute ischemic stroke. (umassmed.edu)
  • This review presents model-derived indices that describe cerebrovascular phenomena, the nature of which is both physiological (carbon dioxide reactivity and arterial hypotension) and pathological (cerebral artery stenosis, intracranial hypertension, and cerebral vasospasm). (springer.com)
  • The cerebral vasculature has a number of mechanisms that allow for a constant supply of blood with nutrients and oxygen to the cerebral tissue under varying conditions. (utoronto.ca)
  • In this histological tissue, three types of cells are present: erythrocytes (red blood cells, RBCs), leukocytes (white blood cells, WBCs) and thrombocytes (platelets, in mammals). (angelfire.com)
  • Changes in glucose levels will be seen more quickly in capillary blood (blood glucose, or BG). (jdrf.org.uk)
  • The result is an increase in blood glucose levels, ensuring a supply of fuel in anticipation of the wakening body's needs. (healthcentral.com)
  • This makes sense, because several studies in the professional literature clearly show that vinegar can reduce our blood glucose levels. (healthcentral.com)
  • [3] The entire process of blood vessel escape is known as diapedesis . (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in 2013, the SNU research group created a microfluidic device that could produce a perfusable and functional blood vessel. (useoul.edu)
  • The pump (1) comprises, in one embodiment, a housing (2) annularly surrounding a compressible conduit (3), said housing (2) containing a plurality of flexible inflatable containers (4) mounted for contact with said conduit (3) (e.g. a blood vessel) and means for effecting sequential inflation and deflation of said containers (4) so as to create a peristaltic pumping effect. (google.es)
  • 13. A method as claimed in claim 12, wherein said microprocessor is located at skin level close to the site of the blood vessel. (google.es)
  • The team - in which Charlotta Dabrosin, professor of oncology at LiU, also participated - reviewed around 500 works focusing on blood vessel growth. (liu.se)
  • We lined up ten things that influence the blood vessel growth and pathological function of the tumour. (liu.se)
  • There is yet no consensus among biologists on the prevalence and physiological and therapeutic relevance of stem cell plasticity. (wikipedia.org)
  • A computer model provides a means of quantifying the key phenomena involved and identifying the potential therapeutic targets. (actapress.com)
  • Keeping the blood cells in a medium with acidic pH in a range of 5.4 to 5.8 for only 30 minutes changed them so profoundly that they adopted characteristics of embryonic stem cells and could be used to construct an entire mouse embryo . (bionews.org.uk)
  • This may be an attendant phenomenon of a regular physiological process, the hormonal downregulation of the vascular barrier during pregnancy. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • In addition to its central role in blood coagulation, it has become increasingly apparent that thrombin and thrombin receptors are involved in many other physiological processes and can contribute to a variety of disease states such as tumor progression and metastasis, inflammation, neurological disorders and cardiovascular complications. (powells.com)
  • It has become increasingly evident in recent years that, apart from the key role that thrombin plays in the blood coagulation cascade, thrombin also elicits cellular actions via the activation of proteinase-activated receptors, which are present in many cell types. (powells.com)
  • Hypoglycemia and its severity can be prevented by early recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, self-monitoring of blood glucose, selection of appropriate treatment regimens, appropriate educational programs for healthcare professionals. (intechopen.com)
  • Clarifying the physiological basis and the possible clinical value of this phenomenon needs further studies. (hindawi.com)
  • The response could not be related to any of the clinical or other physiological variables examined. (portlandpress.com)
  • Pharmacologists, clinical laboratories, blood transfusion centres, manufacturing firms producing diagnostic instruments, and the pharmaceutical industry will also benefit. (iospress.com)
  • The medical model is the paradigm on which the practice of clinical medicine is founded: Symptoms are seen as manifestations of pathological physiological processes (disease) which are diagnosed and then treated with whatever methods available. (psychologytoday.com)
  • In particular, the problem of local blood perfusion and supply of substrates to tissues is studied in detail. (epfl.ch)
  • Blood Viscosity" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicine's controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) . (harvard.edu)
  • These reactions are strictly dependent on chemical exchanges between blood and tissues, by several physiological auto-regulation mechanisms. (epfl.ch)
  • Scientific investigations report two classes of response to altitude: (a) physiological mechanisms (e.g. (sdsu.edu)
  • However, DS cannot characterize hemodynamic functional significance of coronary stenosis on myocardial blood supply. (hindawi.com)
  • Recent technological and physiological discoveries have stirred new interest in functional hyperemia. (harvard.edu)
  • After exposure to lead, red blood corpuscles are more like hard inelastic brittle rubber balls, than like the soft, elastic, resilient cells characteristic of normal blood. (rupress.org)
  • Apnea of prematurity is a recognized phenomenon characteristic of preterm babies. (frontiersin.org)
  • This article covers the main factors that can affect blood glucose monitoring system accuracy and gives tips for ensuring you're getting the best quality information to inform your diabetes treatment decisions. (jdrf.org.uk)
  • In 2015, the Diabetes Technology Society, based in the USA, independently tested 18 popular blood glucose monitoring systems. (jdrf.org.uk)
  • It is a paradigm, a lens through which physicians and others perceive certain abnormal or aberrant phenomena like leukemia, diabetes, and now, depression and many other mental disorders. (psychologytoday.com)
  • As the most common type of cardiovascular disease, coronary artery disease (CAD) is caused by the build-up of plaques on the endothelial walls of coronary arteries, which leads to a reduction in arteries cross-sectional area and blood supply to the myocardium [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Peripheral artery disease (PAD) happens when fatty deposits clog the arteries that supply blood to the legs. (harvard.edu)
  • Its physiological relevance to fibrinolysis is questionable. (tudelft.nl)
  • H+ + HCO3^-}}} Although this reaction usually proceeds very slowly, the enzyme carbonic anhydrase (which is present in red blood cells) drastically speeds up the conversion to bicarbonate and protons. (wikipedia.org)
  • The physiological changes following the reaction of lead upon red blood cells are numerous and show the marked effects of a change in the cell surface. (rupress.org)
  • For this reason, we consider coupled problems in which the reaction phenomena are influenced by transport in blood. (epfl.ch)
  • While this is a normal physiological reaction, it is exaggerated in this condition. (news-medical.net)
  • These opposing protonation and deprotonation reactions occur in equilibrium resulting in little overall change in blood pH. (wikipedia.org)
  • In relation, the developed microchip predicts and reproduces physiological phenomenon that occur in human and animal bone tissues. (useoul.edu)
  • IgG ELISA blood tests show delayed reactivity (sensitivity reactions, some call them intolerances), but again, they can miss a lot or can have false positives. (healingwell.com)
  • The term emotion or affect is used to refer to a broad class of behaviors that include facial and vocal expressions as well as neurological and physiological patterns. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In this workshop, we will bring together a group of researchers from the areas of mathematical modeling and experimentalists in neuroscience to address some of the fundamental issues related to neurovascular coupling and cortical spreading depression (CSD) and related neurological phenomenon. (utoronto.ca)
  • Alterations to the supply of oxygen during early life presents a profound stressor to physiological systems with aberrant remodeling that is often long-lasting. (frontiersin.org)
  • To define the mechanism responsible for this in vivo antibody response, antibody production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from the patient was tested in vitro after in vivo booster. (jci.org)
  • In this study, we show that Tregs display significant variability in the suppressive activity ex vivo as 54% of healthy blood donors examined had fully suppressive Tregs spontaneously, whereas in the remaining donors, anti-CD3/CD2/CD28 stimulation was required for Treg suppressive activity. (jimmunol.org)
  • Cases tend to be underreported by physicians because most have not been informed of how to distinguish the symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon from other medical conditions where blanching or sensory loss occurs. (cdc.gov)
  • Based on these signals, physiological parameters like cerebrovascular resistance, compliances of cerebrovascular bed, and CSF space could then be estimated. (springer.com)
  • This phenomenon has been documented on other rare occasions among persons undergoing extreme psychological or physiological stress. (angelfire.com)
  • We should not, then, as the old psychologists did, place the psychological changes and the physiological movements in which they are realized, or prolonged, or expressed, in different worlds. (wikisource.org)
  • Physiological manifestations of underlying psychological conditions? (psychologytoday.com)
  • However, the mechanism underlying this phenomenon and the physiological and pathological roles extracellular α-syn may play in this process are not understood. (jneurosci.org)
  • Shape oscillations of single blood drops: applications to human blood and sickle cell disease. (harvard.edu)
  • Thrombin and thrombin receptors are involved in many physiological processes and can contribute to a variety of disease states. (powells.com)
  • in a phenomenon known as diabetic eye disease. (uweightloss.com)
  • In this talk a mechanistic theory is developed to describe segregation in blood and other confined multicomponent suspensions. (imperial.ac.uk)
  • For this reason, various hydrodynamic models have been introduced in order to simulate the phenomena governing the interaction between CBF and CSF. (springer.com)
  • They called the phenomenon 'stimulus triggered acquisition of pluripotency' (STAP). (bionews.org.uk)
  • White blood cells (leukocytes) perform most of their functions in tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Leukocytes use the blood as a transport medium to reach the tissues of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • This causes the pH of the blood to decrease, which promotes the dissociation of oxygen from haemoglobin, and allows the surrounding tissues to obtain enough oxygen to meet their demands. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has a high metabolic activity coupled with a very profuse blood supply: two factors favouring the deposition of F in mineralizing tissues. (fluoridealert.org)
  • It is in the very tissues of the organism, in the inmost properties of the living substance, that we should first seek for the mechanical and physiological reasons for the phenomena of expression. (wikisource.org)
  • Given her history of the skin rash, DM and the pancreatic mass, the patient's blood glucagon concentration was measured, and her fasting glucagon level was noted to be elevated, at 1132.20 pg/ml (normal, 0-80 pg/ml). (spandidos-publications.com)
  • 2. Normal Menstrual Cycle  Menstration is a cyclic physiological phenomena  starting at the age of Menarche (10-12years) till establishment of Menopause (45-55 yrs). (slideshare.net)
  • For example, when a laboratory test would say 6.0 mmol/L, a blood glucose meter that meets the ISO standard could show anywhere between 5.1 mmol/L and 7.0 mmols/L and still be called accurate. (jdrf.org.uk)
  • Laboratory tests indicated elevated blood glucose (maximum 18 mmol/l), anemia (87 g/l) and hypoproteinemia (24.6 g/l). (spandidos-publications.com)
  • The result was that when they took the vinegar, they cut their fasting blood glucose by about 5 mg/dl (0.26 mmol/l). (healthcentral.com)
  • And when Dr. Johnston and her associate took a closer look at the data, they found that the vinegar treatment was particularly effective for those people who had a typical fasting blood glucose level of more than 130 mg/dl (7.2 mmol/l). (healthcentral.com)
  • Vinegar helped this group reduce their fasting blood glucose by 6 percent compared with a reduction of 0.7 percent in those people who had a typical fasting blood glucose of less than 130 mg/dl (7.2 mmol/l). (healthcentral.com)
  • Vertebrate blood (i.e., ' blood ' sensu stricto ) is a cell suspension into a fluid medium (the plasma). (angelfire.com)