Blood Group Incompatibility: An antigenic mismatch between donor and recipient blood. Antibodies present in the recipient's serum may be directed against antigens in the donor product. Such a mismatch may result in a transfusion reaction in which, for example, donor blood is hemolyzed. (From Saunders Dictionary & Encyclopedia of Laboratory Medicine and Technology, 1984).ABO Blood-Group System: The major human blood type system which depends on the presence or absence of two antigens A and B. Type O occurs when neither A nor B is present and AB when both are present. A and B are genetic factors that determine the presence of enzymes for the synthesis of certain glycoproteins mainly in the red cell membrane.Coombs Test: A test to detect non-agglutinating ANTIBODIES against ERYTHROCYTES by use of anti-antibodies (the Coombs' reagent.) The direct test is applied to freshly drawn blood to detect antibody bound to circulating red cells. The indirect test is applied to serum to detect the presence of antibodies that can bind to red blood cells.Jaundice, Neonatal: Yellow discoloration of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA in the NEWBORN. It is a sign of NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA. Most cases are transient self-limiting (PHYSIOLOGICAL NEONATAL JAUNDICE) occurring in the first week of life, but some can be a sign of pathological disorders, particularly LIVER DISEASES.Blood Group Antigens: Sets of cell surface antigens located on BLOOD CELLS. They are usually membrane GLYCOPROTEINS or GLYCOLIPIDS that are antigenically distinguished by their carbohydrate moieties.Rh-Hr Blood-Group System: Erythrocyte isoantigens of the Rh (Rhesus) blood group system, the most complex of all human blood groups. The major antigen Rh or D is the most common cause of erythroblastosis fetalis.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.BooksErythroblastosis, Fetal: A condition characterized by the abnormal presence of ERYTHROBLASTS in the circulation of the FETUS or NEWBORNS. It is a disorder due to BLOOD GROUP INCOMPATIBILITY, such as the maternal alloimmunization by fetal antigen RH FACTORS leading to HEMOLYSIS of ERYTHROCYTES, hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC), general edema (HYDROPS FETALIS), and SEVERE JAUNDICE IN NEWBORN.Jaundice: A clinical manifestation of HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA, characterized by the yellowish staining of the SKIN; MUCOUS MEMBRANE; and SCLERA. Clinical jaundice usually is a sign of LIVER dysfunction.Jaundice, Obstructive: Jaundice, the condition with yellowish staining of the skin and mucous membranes, that is due to impaired BILE flow in the BILIARY TRACT, such as INTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS, or EXTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS.Tooth Discoloration: Any change in the hue, color, or translucency of a tooth due to any cause. Restorative filling materials, drugs (both topical and systemic), pulpal necrosis, or hemorrhage may be responsible. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p253)Malaria: A protozoan disease caused in humans by four species of the PLASMODIUM genus: PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM; PLASMODIUM VIVAX; PLASMODIUM OVALE; and PLASMODIUM MALARIAE; and transmitted by the bite of an infected female mosquito of the genus ANOPHELES. Malaria is endemic in parts of Asia, Africa, Central and South America, Oceania, and certain Caribbean islands. It is characterized by extreme exhaustion associated with paroxysms of high FEVER; SWEATING; shaking CHILLS; and ANEMIA. Malaria in ANIMALS is caused by other species of plasmodia.Cholestasis: Impairment of bile flow due to obstruction in small bile ducts (INTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS) or obstruction in large bile ducts (EXTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS).Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Hematologic Diseases: Disorders of the blood and blood forming tissues.Bone Marrow: The soft tissue filling the cavities of bones. Bone marrow exists in two types, yellow and red. Yellow marrow is found in the large cavities of large bones and consists mostly of fat cells and a few primitive blood cells. Red marrow is a hematopoietic tissue and is the site of production of erythrocytes and granular leukocytes. Bone marrow is made up of a framework of connective tissue containing branching fibers with the frame being filled with marrow cells.Kidney Transplantation: The transference of a kidney from one human or animal to another.Anemia, Sickle Cell: A disease characterized by chronic hemolytic anemia, episodic painful crises, and pathologic involvement of many organs. It is the clinical expression of homozygosity for hemoglobin S.Kidney Diseases: Pathological processes of the KIDNEY or its component tissues.Bone Marrow Transplantation: The transference of BONE MARROW from one human or animal to another for a variety of purposes including HEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION or MESENCHYMAL STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION.Bone Marrow Cells: Cells contained in the bone marrow including fat cells (see ADIPOCYTES); STROMAL CELLS; MEGAKARYOCYTES; and the immediate precursors of most blood cells.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Bilirubin: A bile pigment that is a degradation product of HEME.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Angioscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery performed on the interior of blood vessels.Dictionaries, MedicalHydrops Fetalis: Abnormal accumulation of serous fluid in two or more fetal compartments, such as SKIN; PLEURA; PERICARDIUM; PLACENTA; PERITONEUM; AMNIOTIC FLUID. General fetal EDEMA may be of non-immunologic origin, or of immunologic origin as in the case of ERYTHROBLASTOSIS FETALIS.Endolymphatic Hydrops: An accumulation of ENDOLYMPH in the inner ear (LABYRINTH) leading to buildup of pressure and distortion of intralabyrinthine structures, such as COCHLEA and SEMICIRCULAR CANALS. It is characterized by SENSORINEURAL HEARING LOSS; TINNITUS; and sometimes VERTIGO.Dictionaries as Topic: Lists of words, usually in alphabetical order, giving information about form, pronunciation, etymology, grammar, and meaning.Fetal Diseases: Pathophysiological conditions of the FETUS in the UTERUS. Some fetal diseases may be treated with FETAL THERAPIES.Hydrothorax: A collection of watery fluid in the pleural cavity. (Dorland, 27th ed)Polyhydramnios: A condition of abnormally high AMNIOTIC FLUID volume, such as greater than 2,000 ml in the LAST TRIMESTER and usually diagnosed by ultrasonographic criteria (AMNIOTIC FLUID INDEX). It is associated with maternal DIABETES MELLITUS; MULTIPLE PREGNANCY; CHROMOSOMAL DISORDERS; and congenital abnormalities.International Classification of Diseases: A system of categories to which morbid entries are assigned according to established criteria. Included is the entire range of conditions in a manageable number of categories, grouped to facilitate mortality reporting. It is produced by the World Health Organization (From ICD-10, p1). The Clinical Modifications, produced by the UNITED STATES DEPT. OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, are larger extensions used for morbidity and general epidemiological purposes, primarily in the U.S.Fetal Growth Retardation: The failure of a FETUS to attain its expected FETAL GROWTH at any GESTATIONAL AGE.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Clinical Coding: Process of substituting a symbol or code for a term such as a diagnosis or procedure. (from Slee's Health Care Terms, 3d ed.)Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Insurance Claim Review: Review of claims by insurance companies to determine liability and amount of payment for various services. The review may also include determination of eligibility of the claimant or beneficiary or of the provider of the benefit; determination that the benefit is covered or not payable under another policy; or determination that the service was necessary and of reasonable cost and quality.United StatesWorld War I: Global conflict primarily fought on European continent, that occurred between 1914 and 1918.Famous PersonsVermontNew HampshireJournal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Red-Cell Aplasia, Pure: Suppression of erythropoiesis with little or no abnormality of leukocyte or platelet production.Erythropoiesis: The production of red blood cells (ERYTHROCYTES). In humans, erythrocytes are produced by the YOLK SAC in the first trimester; by the liver in the second trimester; by the BONE MARROW in the third trimester and after birth. In normal individuals, the erythrocyte count in the peripheral blood remains relatively constant implying a balance between the rate of erythrocyte production and rate of destruction.Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Progenitor cells from which all blood cells derive.Colony-Forming Units Assay: A cytologic technique for measuring the functional capacity of stem cells by assaying their activity.Erythropoietin: Glycoprotein hormone, secreted chiefly by the KIDNEY in the adult and the LIVER in the FETUS, that acts on erythroid stem cells of the BONE MARROW to stimulate proliferation and differentiation.

Serious hazards of transfusion (SHOT) initiative: analysis of the first two annual reports. (1/234)

OBJECTIVE: To receive and collate reports of death or major complications of transfusion of blood or components. DESIGN: Haematologists were invited confidentially to report deaths and major complications after blood transfusion during October 1996 to September 1998. SETTING: Hospitals in United Kingdom and Ireland. SUBJECTS: Patients who died or experienced serious complications, as defined below, associated with transfusion of red cells, platelets, fresh frozen plasma, or cryoprecipitate. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Death, "wrong" blood transfused to patient, acute and delayed transfusion reactions, transfusion related acute lung injury, transfusion associated graft versus host disease, post-transfusion purpura, and infection transmitted by transfusion. Circumstances relating to these cases and relative frequency of complications. RESULTS: Over 24 months, 366 cases were reported, of which 191 (52%) were "wrong blood to patient" episodes. Analysis of these revealed multiple errors of identification, often beginning when blood was collected from the blood bank. There were 22 deaths from all causes, including three from ABO incompatibility. There were 12 infections: four bacterial (one fatal), seven viral, and one fatal case of malaria. During the second 12 months, 164/424 hospitals (39%) submitted a "nil to report" return. CONCLUSIONS: Transfusion is now extremely safe, but vigilance is needed to ensure correct identification of blood and patient. Staff education should include awareness of ABO incompatibility and bacterial contamination as causes of life threatening reactions to blood.  (+info)

ABO blood group antigens on human plasma von Willebrand factor after ABO-mismatched bone marrow transplantation. (2/234)

von Willebrand factor (vWF) is synthesized exclusively by endothelial cells and megakaryocytes, and stored in the intracellular granules or constitutively secreted into plasma. ABO blood group antigens are covalently associated with asparagine-linked sugar chains of plasma vWF. The effect of ABO-mismatched bone marrow transplantation (BMT) or blood stem cell transplantation (BSCT) on the expression of ABO blood group antigens on the vWF was examined to obtain information on the origin of these antigens. In ABO-mismatched (HLA-matched) groups, 8 cases of BMT and 4 cases of BSCT were examined. In all cases, the ABO blood groups on red blood cells were gradually converted to the donor's type within 80 to 90 days after the transplantation. The blood group antigens on the vWF were consistent with the recipient's blood group for the period monitored by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). When vWF was isolated from normal platelets and examined for the blood group antigens using ELISA or immunoblotting, it showed few antigens. However, vWF extracted from veins expressed blood group antigens. These findings indicate that platelet (megakaryocyte)-derived vWF does not contain blood group antigens and that these antigens may be specifically associated with vWF synthesized in endothelial cells and secreted into plasma. Furthermore, it is possible that the persistence of the recipient's blood group antigens on plasma glycoproteins such as vWF, independent of the donor-derived erythrocytes, after ABO-mismatched stem cell transplantation, may influence the immunological system in the production of anti-blood group antibodies resulting in the establishment of immunological tolerance in the recipient plasma.  (+info)

Perinatal risk factors for childhood type 1 diabetes in Europe. The EURODIAB Substudy 2 Study Group. (3/234)

OBJECTIVE: To explore whether perinatal factors are associated with the development of childhood type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We studied hospital records from 892 cases of childhood type 1 diabetes compared with 2,291 population-based control subjects in seven study centers in Europe. RESULTS: In a pooled analysis incorporating stratification by center, we confirmed the previous findings that older maternal age, maternal preeclampsia, neonatal respiratory disease, and jaundice caused by blood group incompatibility are significant risk factors for type 1 diabetes, whereas being a firstborn child, having a low birth weight, or having a short birth length were protective. Cesarean section delivery and neonatal infectious diseases were not significantly associated with the risk of type 1 diabetes in this study. The strongest association was found for blood group incompatibility (AB0 and Rh factor) with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.96 (95% CI 1.88-4.65). AB0 incompatibility (OR = 3.92) was a more common and also a stronger risk factor than Rh incompatibility (OR = 1.62). The effect of AB0 blood group incompatibility was independent of treatment effects in logistical regression analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Different perinatal events are associated with an increased risk of type 1 diabetes. The effect of maternal-child blood group incompatibility is strong and indicates a true effect that must be further explored.  (+info)

Noninvasive diagnosis by Doppler ultrasonography of fetal anemia due to maternal red-cell alloimmunization. Collaborative Group for Doppler Assessment of the Blood Velocity in Anemic Fetuses. (4/234)

BACKGROUND: Invasive techniques such as amniocentesis and cordocentesis are used for diagnosis and treatment in fetuses at risk for anemia due to maternal red-cell alloimmunization. The purpose of our study was to determine the value of noninvasive measurements of the velocity of blood flow in the fetal middle cerebral artery for the diagnosis of fetal anemia. METHODS: We measured the hemoglobin concentration in blood obtained by cordocentesis and also the peak velocity of systolic blood flow in the middle cerebral artery in 111 fetuses at risk for anemia due to maternal red-cell alloimmunization. Peak systolic velocity was measured by Doppler velocimetry. To identify the fetuses with anemia, the hemoglobin values of those at risk were compared with the values in 265 normal fetuses. RESULTS: Fetal hemoglobin concentrations increased with increasing gestational age in the 265 normal fetuses. Among the 111 fetuses at risk for anemia, 41 fetuses did not have anemia; 35 had mild anemia; 4 had moderate anemia; and 31, including 12 with hydrops, had severe anemia. The sensitivity of an increased peak velocity of systolic blood flow in the middle cerebral artery for the prediction of moderate or severe anemia was 100 percent either in the presence or in the absence of hydrops (95 percent confidence interval, 86 to 100 percent for the 23 fetuses without hydrops), with a false positive rate of 12 percent. CONCLUSIONS: In fetuses without hydrops that are at risk because of maternal red-cell alloimmunization, moderate and severe anemia can be detected noninvasively by Doppler ultrasonography on the basis of an increase in the peak velocity of systolic blood flow in the middle cerebral artery.  (+info)

Anti-A isoagglutinin as a risk factor for the development of pure red cell aplasia after major ABO-incompatible allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. (5/234)

Delayed erythropoiesis and pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) have been reported after major ABO-incompatible BMT. We attempted to find risk factors for the development of PRCA in 27 patients who underwent major ABO-incompatible BMT. In all patients, the donor marrow was depleted of RBCs before infusion. In 22 patients, isoagglutinins were determined until they disappeared. In eight (29.6%) out of 27 patients, bone marrow examination following BMT showed the findings of PRCA. We analyzed various clinico-pathologic risk factors and isoagglutinin type was the only significant risk factor. Patients with anti-A isoagglutinins against donor RBC developed PRCA more frequently than patients with anti-B (8/17 vs 0/9). Median days to the disappearance of isoagglutinins tended to be longer in patients with PRCA (PRCA vsnon-PRCA, 200 vs 66 days) and in cases with anti-A isoagglutinins (anti-A vsanti-B, 160 vs 51 days). Times to disappearance of isoagglutinins correlated with times to reticulocytes over 1% and initial appearance of donor type RBC (R2 = 0.708 and 0.711). In conclusion, RBC engraftment following major ABO-incompatible BMT was dependent on the disappearance of isoagglutinins against donor RBC, and anti-A isoagglutinin was a risk factor for the development of PRCA after major ABO-incompatible allogeneic BMT. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 179-184.  (+info)

Relative sensitivity of direct antiglobulin test, antibody's elution and flow cytometry in the serologic diagnosis of immune hemolytic transfusion reactions. (6/234)

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Current immunohematology practice dictates that serologic diagnosis of immune hemolytic transfusion reactions (IHTR) is based on the finding of a positive post-transfusion direct antiglobulin test (DAT). However, since DAT may fail to detect antibody-coated cells when they constitute a minor population amid a large number of non-sensitized ones, we investigated whether antibody detection in eluates or by flow cytometry is more sensitive than DAT in this context. DESIGN AND METHODS: Ten samples of red blood cells sensitized with allo- or autoantibodies were diluted in non-sensitized red blood cells to final concentrations ranging from 10% to 0.1%. DAT, antibody detection in eluates, and immunofluorescence by flow cytometry were performed on each mixture. RESULTS: DAT failed to detect sensitized cells in all but two cases in that only the 10% dilution yielded a positive DAT. Antibody detection in eluates and by flow cytometry was able to detect up to 1% sensitized cells in most cases. INTERPRETATION AND CONCLUSIONS: Antibody detection in eluates and by flow cytometry is more sensitive than DAT for detecting minor populations of IgG-coated cells. These techniques should be included in the routine investigation of suspected cases of IHTR.  (+info)

Bone marrow transplantation from alternative donors for thalassemia: HLA-phenotypically identical relative and HLA-nonidentical sibling or parent transplants. (7/234)

Twenty-nine patients with thalassemia and a median age of 6 years (range 1.1-33 years) were given a BMT from an alternative donor. Six of the 29 donors were HLA-phenotypically identical and two were mismatched relatives, 13 were mismatched siblings and eight were mismatched parents. Six patients received no antigen (relatives), 15 patients one antigen, five patients two antigen and three patients three antigen disparate grafts. Twenty-three patients were in class 2 or class 3, whereas six patients were in class 1. Thirteen patients were given BUCY, nine patients BUCY plus ALG, six patients BUCY plus TBI or TLI and one patient BUCY with prior cytoreductive-immunosuppressive treatment as conditioning. As GVHD prophylaxis four patients received MTX, 22 CsA + MTX + methylprednisolone (MP) and three patients CsA + MP. Thirteen of 29 patients (44.8%) had sustained engraftment. The probability of graft failure or rejection was 55%. There were no significant differences between antigen disparities and graft failure. The incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD was 47.3% and chronic GVHD was 37.5%. The incidence of acute GVHD was higher in patients receiving one or two antigen disparate in the GVHD direction grafts (vs no antigen) (P EQ 0.04; odds ratio 10.8; 95% CI 1.5-115). The probability of overall and event-free survival was 65% and 21%, respectively, with median follow-up of 7.5 years (range 0.6-17 years) for surviving patients. The degree of HLA disparity between patient and donor did not have a significant effect on survival. The incidence of nonhematologic toxicity was low. Transplant-related mortality was 34%. GVHD (acute or chronic) was a major contributing cause of death (50%) followed by infections (30%). We conclude that at present, due to high graft failure and GVHD rates, BMT from alternative donors should be restricted to patients who have poor life expectancies because they cannot receive adequate conventional treatment or because of alloimmunization to minor blood antigens.  (+info)

Acceptance of an ABO-incompatible mismatched (AB(+) to O(+)) liver allograft with the use of daclizumab and mycophenolate mofetil. (8/234)

Liver allograft survival rates of 50% to 60% are reported in blood group A, group B, group O (ABO)-incompatible mismatched grafts even when aggressive immunosuppressive protocols, including plasmapheresis, OKT(3), cyclophosphamide, cyclosporine, prostaglandin E(1), and steroids, are used. A 59-year-old woman, blood type O(+), required emergency retransplantation posttransplantation day 2 because of primary nonfunction of the liver allograft. A blood type AB(+) allograft was used. Induction immunosuppressive therapy included tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil, OKT(3) (muromonab-CD(3)), steroids, and prostaglandin E(1). In addition, plasmapheresis was performed daily for 9 days. OKT(3) and prostaglandin E(1) were also discontinued postoperative day 9. Biopsy-proven acute cellular rejection was diagnosed postoperative day 12 and was treated with double-dose OKT(3) (10 mg) for another 6 days. On the day OKT(3) was discontinued, daclizumab, 60 mg, was administered intravenously. This dose was repeated every 2 weeks for a total of 5 doses. At 1-year follow-up, the patient is doing very well with normal liver function. We are unaware of previous reports of the use of daclizumab and mycophenolate mofetil as part of an immunosuppressive protocol aimed to induce acceptance of ABO-incompatible mismatched liver allografts. Based on our experience with this case, it seems that mycophenolate mofetil is an adequate replacement for cyclophosphamide. We also believe daclizumab provided adequate protection at a critical time. Further experience with both these drugs is required to establish their role in ABO-incompatible mismatched liver allografts.  (+info)

*Hemolytic disease of the newborn

However, there is no comparable immunotherapy available for other blood group incompatibilities. Early pregnancy IVIG - IVIG ... ABO blood group system and the D antigen of the Rhesus (Rh) blood group system typing are routine prior to transfusion. ... ISBN 0-86542-881-6. Blood Groups and Red Blood Cell Antigens: Hemolytic disease of the newborn "erythroblastosis fetalis" at ... blood transfusion, and ABO incompatibility. Fetal-maternal hemorrhage, which is the movement of fetal blood cells across the ...

*Acute hemolytic transfusion reaction

It is usually related to ABO blood group incompatibility - the most severe of which often involves group A red cells being ... The most common cause of this reaction is ABO blood groups incompatibility, secondary to human errors. In this process, the ... Macrophages then recognise these IgG antibodies and engulf these red blood cells, removing the red blood cells from the blood ... ISBN 978-0-9558648-7-2. Laura, Dean (2005). Blood Groups and Red Cell Antigens. Bethesda, United States: National Center for ...

*Douglas Dewar

... blood group incompatibilities, and queried evolutionary claims in embryology and vestigial organs. Reviewers pointed out the ...

*Hematologic disease

... newborn Rhesus c hemolytic disease of the newborn Rhesus E hemolytic disease of the newborn Other blood group incompatibility ( ... increase in the number of red blood cells) Leukocytosis (increase in the number of white blood cells) Thrombocytosis (increase ... Hematologic diseases are disorders which primarily affect the blood. Hematology includes the study of these disorders. ... lack of red blood cells or hemoglobin) Iron deficiency anemia Megaloblastic anemia Vitamin B12 deficiency Pernicious anemia ...

*Acquired hemolytic anemia

... newborn Rhesus c hemolytic disease of the newborn Rhesus E hemolytic disease of the newborn Other blood group incompatibility ( ... RhC, Rhe, Kidd, Duffy, MN, P and others) Alloimmune hemolytic blood transfusion reactions (i.e., from a non-compatible blood ... It occurs when drugs actively provoke red blood cell destruction. It can be divided in the following manner: Drug-induced ... rare acquired clonal disorder of red blood cell surface proteins) Liver disease Drug induced hemolysis has large clinical ...

*Laurence H. Snyder

These range over subjects that include blood groups, polydactylism, hemophilia, baldness, sex ratios, Rh incompatibility, and ... the ABO blood group, the MN blood type, eye color, the direction of the whorl of hair at the back of the head, the presence of ... Snyder drew blood from North Carolina Cherokee Indians and quantitatively analyzed blood-group proportions among the various ... This problem of blood group typing appealed to him and he found that Bernstein's theory explained the discrepancies Snyder had ...

*Rh blood group system

The hemolytic condition occurs when there is an incompatibility between the blood types of the mother and the fetus. There is ... It is the second most important blood group system, after the ABO blood group system. The Rh blood group system consists of 50 ... "RHD Rh blood group, D antigen [Homo sapiens] - Gene Result". nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 2010-06-15. "RHCE Rh blood group, CcEe ... The Rh blood group system (including the Rh factor) is one of thirty-five known human blood group systems. ...

*Neonatal intensive care unit

Rhesus incompatibility (a difference in blood groups) between mother and baby is largely preventable, and was the most common ... in addition to administering pulmonary surfactant and stabilizing the blood sugar, blood salts, and blood pressure. Observation ... These include: Blood pressure monitor: The blood pressure monitor is a machine that's connected to a small cuff which wrapped ... sensors to measure blood oxygen levels through the skin, for example; and ways of reducing the amount of blood taken for tests ...

*Luis Agote

... identifying blood groups for the first time and some of their incompatibilities. Direct transfusions were still not practiced ... In 1900, Karl Landsteiner identified some of the blood substances responsible for the agglutination of red blood cells, ... which eliminates calcium ions from blood) prevents its formation. "History of blood transfusion - The Institute of Biomedical ... The first recorded blood transfusion was made between dogs by the English doctor Richard Lower around 1666. In 1667, French ...

*ABO blood group system

ABO blood group incompatibilities between the mother and child does not usually cause hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN) ... The ABO blood group". Blood Groups and Red Cell Antigens. Retrieved 24 March 2007. Farr A (1 April 1979). "Blood group serology ... to histo-blood group A antigen neutralizes HIV produced by lymphocytes from blood group A donors but not from blood group B or ... Inheritance patterns of blood groups. Australian Red Cross Blood Service. Retrieved 30 October 2013. "ABO blood group system". ...

*Screening of potential sperm bank donors

Sperm donation is also used in cases of rhesus incompatibility. This particularly occurs where a woman has a blood type which ... sperm banks may try to ensure that the sperm used in a particular recipient woman comes from a donor whose blood group and ... Blood and urine tests for blood typing and general health indicators: ABO/Rh typing, CBC, liver panel and urinalysis Complete ... particularly those with the O negative blood group who are universal donors. Comprehensive Donor Screening at Sperm Bank of ...

*John G. Gorman

... MD shared the 1980 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for pioneering work on the rhesus blood group ... "Vaccine for preventing Rh incompatibility in newborns". Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation. Retrieved 4 September 2016. Thompson ...

*Coombs test

... of the newborn Rh c hemolytic disease of the newborn Rh E hemolytic disease of the newborn Other blood group incompatibility ( ... Antibody screening A blood sample from the recipient and a blood sample from every unit of donor blood are screened for ... The venous blood is taken to a laboratory (or blood bank), where trained scientific technical staff do the Coombs tests. The ... The indirect Coombs test is used in prenatal testing of pregnant women and in testing blood prior to a blood transfusion. It ...

*Hemolytic disease of the newborn (ABO)

The father will either have blood group A, with genotype AA or AO, or more rarely, have blood group AB, with genotype AB. Blood ... For Caucasian populations about one fifth of all pregnancies have ABO incompatibility between the fetus and the mother, but ... For example, when a mother of genotype OO (blood group O) carries a fetus of genotype AO (blood group A) she may produce IgG ... "Hemolytic disease of the newborn caused by a high titer anti-group B IgG from a group a mother". Pediatric Blood & Cancer. 45 ( ...

*Vincent Freda

... obstetrician who shared the 1980 Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award for pioneering work on the rhesus blood group ... "Vaccine for preventing Rh incompatibility in newborns". Albert and Mary Lasker Foundation. Retrieved 4 September 2016. RETSINAS ...

*Cross-matching

Universal donor blood, which is both type O and Rh negative, can be given if the recipient's blood group is not known, as may ... Presence of agglutination indicates incompatibility. Occasionally a light microscope may be needed. If laboratory services are ... the bedside card method of blood grouping may be used, where a drop of the intended recipients blood is added to dried reagents ... In an emergency, blood grouping can be done easily and quickly in 2 or 3 minutes in the laboratory on glass slides with ...

*James Harrison (blood donor)

... few donations it was discovered that his blood contained unusually strong and persistent antibodies against the D Rh group ... This antigen sensitization and subsequent incompatibility phenomenon causes Rhesus disease, the most common form of HDN. ... As blood plasma, in contrast to blood, can be donated as often as once every 2 weeks, he was able to reach his 1000th donation ... Realizing the blood had saved his life, he made a pledge to start donating blood as soon as he turned 18, the then-required age ...

*Blood type

... and can donate blood to individuals with type B or AB. Blood group O (or blood group zero in some countries) individuals do not ... Table note 1. Assumes absence of atypical antibodies that would cause an incompatibility between donor and recipient blood, as ... and an individual's blood type is one of many possible combinations of blood-group antigens. Across the 35 blood groups, over ... Blood Group 'O' or Blood Group 'NULL'", Infus Ther Transfus Med, 28 (4): 206-8, doi:10.1159/000050239 "Your blood - a textbook ...

*Sialyl-Lewis X

The term Lewis in its name comes from the name of a family of people who suffered from a red blood cell incompatibility. The ... Sialyl Lewis X is also one of the most important blood group antigens and is displayed on the terminus of glycolipids that are ... Leukocytes move through the blood stream and then tether themselves to the endothelial wall and roll along the endothelial ... Sialyl Lewis x is a very important red blood cell antigen present on the glycolipids on the plasma membrane of the cell. ...

*Jan Klein

The class I genes were discovered in 1936 (the year Jan Klein was born) as coding for blood group (red blood cell) antigens, ... The Use of Tissue Incompatibility in the Genetics of the Somatic Cell. Academia, Praha 1966 (in Czech). Klein, J. Molekulární ... Immunogenetics emerged in the 1930s as the study of genes controlling antigens (such as those of the various blood group ... Haplochromines are one of two main groups of cichlid fishes in East Africa; the other group being the tilapiine fishes. Klein ...

*Jadzia Dax

Later that season, Jadzia Dax joins a group of Klingons in a revenge quest ("Blood Oath"). In this episode, it is revealed the ... Their attempts at parenthood (despite the difficulties faced by biological incompatibilities between Klingons and Trills) were ... Jadzia takes up the blood oath, and against Sisko's wishes she travels to the Albino's planet and participates in the revenge ... begins with a scene in which Jadzia Dax plays tongo with a group of Ferengi. She seems surprisingly at home in this setting, ...

*Neuromarketing

In a study from the group of Read Montague published in 2004 in Neuron, 67 people had their brains scanned while being given ... This results in an incompatibility between market research findings and the actual behaviour exhibited by the target market at ... Neuromarketing rather focuses on the MRI and EEG scans which produce brain electrical activity as well as blood flow. Market ... Traditional methods of this research include focus groups or sizeable surveys used to evaluate features of the proposed product ...

*Renegade (Thin Lizzy album)

... blaming Snowy White's incompatibility with the group, Lynott's "flat vocals" and the band's drug problems. Prato named "The ... In the Netherlands, the B-side was "Mexican Blood". In Canada, the B-side was the Phil Lynott solo track, "Girls". Phil Lynott ...

*Causes of schizophrenia

... ethnic group and size of social group have been controlled for. A recent study of 4.4 million men and women in Sweden found a ... Current estimates suggest that between 1.5 - 6.5% of patients have these antibodies in their blood. Preliminary results have ... Maternal-fetal rhesus or genotype incompatibility has also been linked, via increasing the risk of an adverse prenatal ... This group found four gene areas that all overlapped with the five disorders, two of which regulate calcium balance in the ...

*Regular and irregular antibodies

Magnetic immunodiagnostic method for the demonstration of antibody/antigen complexes especially of blood groups Archived 2012- ... although the main use of the term is for non-ABO isoantibodies that may cause incompatibility in blood transfusions. Irregular ... Regular and irregular antibodies are two main groups of antibodies when classified roughly on the timing and triggering event ... JOPC.0000039625.56296.6e Page 357 Subject Group Chemistry and Materials Science Online Date Friday, January 07, 2005. ...

*Christian theology

It is a poorly defined group of early writings in which, generally, none ever achieved acceptance by any widespread group. In ... And he said to them, "This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many. Truly, I say to you, I shall not drink ... Generally, a defense attempts to show that there is no logical incompatibility between the existence of evil and the existence ... For there is one flesh of our Lord Jesus Christ, and one cup unto union with His blood. There is one altar, as there is one ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - ABO-incompatible kidney transplantation is a novel risk factor for BK nephropathy. AU - Bentall, Andrew. AU - Neil, Desley. AU - Sharif, Adnan. AU - Ball, Simon. PY - 2015/2/13. Y1 - 2015/2/13. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84922906964&partnerID=8YFLogxK. UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84922906964&partnerID=8YFLogxK. U2 - 10.1097/TP.0000000000000483. DO - 10.1097/TP.0000000000000483. M3 - Letter. C2 - 25651124. AN - SCOPUS:84922906964. VL - 99. SP - e8-e9. JO - Transplantation. JF - Transplantation. SN - 0041-1337. IS - 2. ER - ...
ABO-incompatible (ABO-i) kidney transplantation (KT) has emerged for overcoming the shortage of organ donors. Although this technique initially achieved only low graft survival due to isoagglutinin, recently developed desensitization protocols have improved survival to levels that are comparable to ABO-compatible KT. However, isoagglutinin is still regarded as a major obstacle to ABO-i KT. In this study, we evaluate the impact of isoagglutinin titer on clinical outcomes as well as factors that may influence isoagglutinin titers. In total, data from 95 patients who underwent ABO-i KT were analyzed. Preoperatively, rituximab administration and plasmapheresis were performed until the titer was reduced to ≤1:4. Retrospective analysis included blood group; timing and dosage of rituximab; isoagglutinin titer; number of plasmapheresis; and clinical outcomes including graft survival and serum creatinine. Graft survival was 95.8% (n = 91) and average serum creatinine at 1- and 1.5-year post-ABOi-KT was ...
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
PubMed comprises more than 30 million citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.
B.J.Orandi, J.M.Garonzik-Wang, A.B.Massie, A.A.Zachary, J.R.Montgomery, K.J.Van Arendonk, M.D.Stegall, S.C.Jordan, J.Oberholzer, T.B.Dunn, L.E.Ratner, S.Kapur,…
A delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction (DHTR) is a type of transfusion reaction. It is defined as fever and other symptoms/ signs of hemolysis more than 24 hours after transfusion; confirmed by one or more of the following: a fall in haemoglobin (Hb) level or failure of Hb level to rise after transfusion rise in bilirubin (jaundice) incompatible crossmatch not detectable pre-transfusion. This can occur up to four weeks after the transfusion. Delayed blood transfusion reaction occurs more frequently (1 in 20,569 blood components transfused in the USA in 2011) when compared to acute haemolytic transfusion reaction. One way this can occur is if a person without a Kidd blood antigen receives a Kidd antigen in a transfusion. Other common blood groups with this reaction are Duffy and Kell. Noizat-Pirenne F, Bachir D, Chadebech P, et al. (December 2007). "Rituximab for prevention of delayed hemolytic transfusion reaction in sickle cell disease". Haematologica. 92 (12): e132-5. ...
New Delhi [India], Jun 21 : In a major breakthrough in kidney transplant, a team of doctors has conducted an ABO incompatible kidney transplant on the youngest child in SAARC region
Incompatible, yet needed: What are incompatible kidney transplants? And why are they done? The human body is primed to identify and destroy invaders like viruses, bacteria and other pathogens that can bring illness or death. Cells of the immune system and the antibodies they make recognize such foreign bodies and act to remove and destroy them. This defense system is a potential problem for kidney transplants. People have different blood groups and different human leukocyte antigens that can provoke an attack if a tissue, such as a kidney, or blood is transferred from one person to another. These two barriers are called blood group incompatibility and tissue (or histo-) incompatibility. A kidney transplant team uses the histocompatibility and blood bank testing laboratories to determine whether the tissues and blood group of a volunteer living kidney donor and the intended recipient match. A match is good, but matches are not always possible.. ...
Incompatible, yet needed: What are incompatible kidney transplants? And why are they done? The human body is primed to identify and destroy invaders like viruses, bacteria and other pathogens that can bring illness or death. Cells of the immune system and the antibodies they make recognize such foreign bodies and act to remove and destroy them. This defense system is a potential problem for kidney transplants. People have different blood groups and different human leukocyte antigens that can provoke an attack if a tissue, such as a kidney, or blood is transferred from one person to another. These two barriers are called blood group incompatibility and tissue (or histo-) incompatibility. A kidney transplant team uses the histocompatibility and blood bank testing laboratories to determine whether the tissues and blood group of a volunteer living kidney donor and the intended recipient match. A match is good, but matches are not always possible.. ...
Introduction: ABO-incompatible heart transplantation, traditionally contraindicated because of the risk of hyperacute rejection, has been used selectively in recent years. Infants have limited production of isohemagglutinins, which may lower the risk of hyperacute rejection. We analyzed the impact of ABO-incompatibility on outcomes after heart transplantation in infants.. Methods: Heart transplant recipients ,1 year of age reported to the United Network for Organ Sharing from 1999-2007 were divided according to donor-recipient ABO-incompatibility or compatibility. Outcomes included Kaplan-Meier survival and hyperacute rejection. Propensity-adjusted Cox regression modeling was used to identify predictors of mortality.. Results: 591 infants underwent heart transplantation: 35 (6%) received allografts from ABO-incompatible donors. ABO-incompatible recipients trended toward more congenital heart disease (71 vs 66%; p=0.06) and were less likely to have dilated cardiomyopathy (11 vs 29%; p=0.02). One ...
Renal transplantation is the preferred option for the treatment of endstage chronic renal failure in patients for whom there are no major medical contraindications. In well-selected recipients, both life expectancy and quality of life are superior to treatment with long-term dialysis. However, as the dialysis population continues to grow, the gap between supply and demand for renal transplantation is widening. Attempts to bridge this gap have included (1) relaxation of the criteria for a suitable deceased donor (expanded/extended criteria or marginal donors); (2) reversion to the procurement of kidneys from donors with cardiac death (DCD donors, previously known as non-heart beating donors); and (3) encouragement of living donation-including techniques for desensitization of recipients, also paired exchanges, both to circumvent blood group incompatibilities or preformed antibodies that would otherwise bar transplantation....
Blood group incompatibility (Rh or ABO problems): if a baby has a different blood type than the mother, the mother might produce antibodies that destroy the infants red blood cells. This creates a sudden buildup of bilirubin in the babys blood. Incompatibility jaundice can begin as early as the first day of life. Rh problems once caused the most severe form of jaundice, but now can be prevented with an injection of Rh immune globulin to the mother within 72 hours after delivery, which prevents her from forming antibodies that might endanger any subsequent babies ...
Blood group incompatibility (Rh or ABO problems): if a baby has a different blood type than the mother, the mother might produce antibodies that destroy the infants red blood cells. This creates a sudden buildup of bilirubin in the babys blood. Incompatibility jaundice can begin as early as the first day of life. Rh problems once caused the most severe form of jaundice, but now can be prevented with an injection of Rh immune globulin to the mother within 72 hours after delivery, which prevents her from forming antibodies that might endanger any subsequent babies ...
The Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore has earned the distinction of recently conducting a successful kidney transplantation across major blood group incompatibility.
This special issue of Stem Cells International focuses on the potential applications of amniotic cells in regenerative therapies to repair tissues and organs that have been damaged by trauma, disease, or aging. Amniotic cell populations have historically included cells in amniotic fluid that have been sloughed from external and internal surfaces of the developing fetus and potentially from the amnion, the innermost extraembryonic membrane of the amniotic sac. Amniotic fluid is recovered by amniocentesis, a technique that was initially used to assess fetal health in cases of Rh blood group incompatibility [1] and to determine the sex of the fetus by the presence or absence of the Barr body in amniotic cells [2, 3]. These pioneering studies [4] provided accessible methods for ex vivo culture of amniotic cells as a source of normal, rather than transformed cancer cells for biomedical research. Fauza and colleagues [5] were among the first to explore use of amniotic cells for tissue engineering and ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Survival benefit with kidney transplants from HLA-incompatible live donors. AU - Orandi, B. J.. AU - Luo, X.. AU - Massie, A. B.. AU - Garonzik-Wang, J. M.. AU - Lonze, B. E.. AU - Ahmed, R.. AU - Van Arendonk, K. J.. AU - Stegall, Mark D. AU - Jordan, S. C.. AU - Oberholzer, J.. AU - Dunn, T. B.. AU - Ratner, L. E.. AU - Kapur, S.. AU - Pelletier, R. P.. AU - Roberts, J. P.. AU - Melcher, M. L.. AU - Singh, P.. AU - Sudan, D. L.. AU - Posner, M. P.. AU - El-Amm, J. M.. AU - Shapiro, R.. AU - Cooper, M.. AU - Lipkowitz, G. S.. AU - Rees, M. A.. AU - Marsh, C. L.. AU - Sankari, B. R.. AU - Gerber, D. A.. AU - Nelson, P. W.. AU - Wellen, J.. AU - Bozorgzadeh, A.. AU - Gaber, A. O.. AU - Montgomery, R. A.. AU - Segev, D. L.. PY - 2016/3/10. Y1 - 2016/3/10. N2 - BACKGROUND A report from a high-volume single center indicated a survival benefit of receiving a kidney transplant from an HLA-incompatible live donor as compared with remaining on the waiting list, whether or not a kidney ...
Next GB Piccoli et al report in NDT about "Pregnancy in dialysis patients in the new millennium: a systematic review and meta-regression analysis correlating dialysis schedules and pregnancy outcomes". Next again, in NDT too, S. Zschiedrich et al report on "One hundred ABO-incompatible kidney transplantations between 2004 and 2014: a single-centre experience". Finally, MR Davids MR et al report in CKJ on "A renal registry for Africa: first steps ...
Journal of Immunology Research is a peer-reviewed, Open Access journal that provides a platform for scientists and clinicians working in different areas of immunology and therapy. The journal publishes research articles, review articles, as well as clinical studies related to classical immunology, molecular immunology, clinical immunology, cancer immunology, transplantation immunology, immune pathology, immunodeficiency, autoimmune diseases, immune disorders, and immunotherapy.
Check out The Kaji Review from WikEM Press, with over 750 emergency medicine study questions to help you ace that next test and keep up with the latest evidence! ...
Because very young children (generally under 12 months, but often as old as 24 months[2]) do not have a well-developed immune system,[3] it is possible for them to receive organs from otherwise incompatible donors. This is known as ABO-incompatible (ABOi) transplantation. Graft survival and patient mortality is approximately the same between ABOi and ABO-compatible (ABOc) recipients.[4] While focus has been on infant heart transplants, the principles generally apply to other forms of solid organ transplantation.[2]. The most important factors are that the recipient have not produced isohemagglutinins, and that they have low levels of T cell-independent antigens.[3][5] UNOS regulations allow for ABOi transplantation in children under two years of age if isohemagglutinin titers are 1:4 or below,[6][7] and if there is no matching ABOc recipient.[6][7][8] Studies have shown that the period under which a recipient may undergo ABOi transplantation may be prolonged by exposure to nonself A and B ...
TRALI most common cause of transfusion related mortality (Miller, 7th ed).. Acute hemolytic reaction. Definition: When antibodies to a particular blood antigen already exist. Can be delayed if there is an amnestic response to a transfused RBC antigen to which the recipient is already sensitized.. Causes: Usually the result of ABO incompatibility and technical errors made during the collection of blood.. Risks: The risk of acute hemolytic transfusion reaction due to incompatible blood is 1:4 per 1 million units transfused and has a high fatality rate.. Most of the transfused cells are destroyed which can activate the coagulation system with DIC and release of anaphylotoxins and other vasoactive amines. Patients might present with back pain, pain at site of transfusion, headache, change in vital signs, pulmonary edema, bleeding, new/worsening renal failure.. ...
Results In total of 58 cases NJ {28 (2015), 30 (2016)}, the 40 were males (69%). They were categorised by the GA in near-term (35-37 w), full-term (,38w) and premature (,35w) newborns (51,5%, 45%, 3,5%, respectively). Comparing the BW,∼2/3 of newborns, who had jaundice were,3000 gr, while the percentage, based on the day of life, where hyperbilirubinemia occured, ranged as follows: 1 st day of life: 6.9%, 2nd day: 12%, 3rd day : 31%,,4 th day: 50%. In 1/3 of cases (∼36%) the cause of NJ was not clarified, while 24% was attributed to ABO group incompatibility and∼14% to perinatal infection (early-onset form: 87.5%). In the percentage of∼26% of NJ, were included more than one risk-factors. They treated with fototherapy (single and/or double), lasting 5-50 hours, good hydration and appropriate antibiotic treatment (in cases of infection). Two newborns were transferred to a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, of the Tertiary Hospital in Thessaly, for further investigation/treatment. ...
What are the common symptoms of delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions? Common symptoms include fever with or without chills unexplained fall in hemo...
What are the common symptoms of delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions? Common symptoms include fever with or without chills unexplained fall in hemo...
Guthrie, C. G. und Huck, J. G., On the existence of more than four isoagglutinin groups in human blood. Bull. Johns Hopkins Hosp. 1923. 34, 37-48; 34, 80 bis 88; 34, 128-135 (zit. nach 20).Google Scholar ...
Blood group incompatibility between Henry VIII and his wives could have driven the Tudor kings reproductive woes, and a genetic condition related to his suspected blood group could also explain Henrys dramatic mid-life transformation into a physically and mentally impaired tyrant who executed two of his wives.. Research conducted by bioarchaeologist Catrina Banks Whitley while she was an SMU graduate student and anthropologist Kyra Kramer shows that the numerous miscarriages suffered by Henrys wives could be explained if the kings blood carried the Kell antigen.. A Kell negative woman who has multiple pregnancies with a Kell positive man can produce a healthy, Kell positive child in a first pregnancy. But the antibodies she produces during that first pregnancy will cross the placenta and attack a Kell positive fetus in subsequent pregnancies.. As published in The Historical Journal (Cambridge University Press), the pattern of Kell blood group incompatibility is consistent with the ...
Blood group incompatibility between Henry VIII and his wives could have driven the Tudor kings reproductive woes, and a genetic condition related to his suspected blood group could also explain Henrys dramatic mid-life transformation into a physically and mentally impaired tyrant who executed two of his wives.. Research conducted by bioarchaeologist Catrina Banks Whitley while she was an SMU graduate student and anthropologist Kyra Kramer shows that the numerous miscarriages suffered by Henrys wives could be explained if the kings blood carried the Kell antigen.. A Kell negative woman who has multiple pregnancies with a Kell positive man can produce a healthy, Kell positive child in a first pregnancy. But the antibodies she produces during that first pregnancy will cross the placenta and attack a Kell positive fetus in subsequent pregnancies.. As published in The Historical Journal (Cambridge University Press), the pattern of Kell blood group incompatibility is consistent with the ...
Background ABO blood group-incompatible (ABOi) kidney transplantation is considered a safe procedure, with non-inferior outcomes in large cohort studies. Its contribution to living kidney transplantation programs is substantial and growing. The objective of this meta-analysis was to systematically investigate outcomes in ABO-incompatible kidney transplant recipients compared to center-matched ABO blood group-compatible (ABOc) control patients.. Methods Comprehensive searches were conducted in Embase, Medline, Cochrane, Web-of-Science and Google Scholar. MOOSE study guidelines for observational studies and Newcastle Ottawa bias scale were implemented to assess studies. Meta-analysis was performed using Review Manager 5.3. A subgroup analysis on antibody removal technique was performed.. Results After identifying 2728 studies addressing ABOi kidney transplantation, 26 studies were included, describing 1346 unique ABOi patients and 4943 ABOc controls. Baseline patient characteristics revealed no ...
Although the mechanism of post-transplant PRCA is not fully understood, it is believed that the persistence of host B lymphocytes or plasma cells producing anti-donor isoagglutinins is responsible for the delayed engraftment.12 In support of this hypothesis, autologous plasma derived from patients with PRCA inhibits donor-type erythropoiesis in vitro.18-20 In contrast, early erythroid progenitors can engraft at the same rate as myeloid progenitors measured by erythroid burst forming unit assays, indicating that ABO antigens are acquired at a later stage of erythroid commitment.21 Moreover, mixed chimerism analyses of hematopoietic cells after HSCT demonstrated temporal differences in the post-transplant eradication of recipient cells with a persistence of plasma cells for up to 9 months.12. In the present study the overall incidence of post-transplant PRCA was 8% and this complication occurred after major but not bidirectional ABO incompatible HSCT. The only two risk factors identified were a ...
The impact of ABO incompatibility on hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) outcome is controversial. As ABH substances are expressed on tissues and secreted in body fluids, they could drive an immune response in minor ABO-incompatible HSCT. The aim of the study was to investigate the prognostic role of the recipients ABH secretor status.; Patients who underwent minor ABO-incompatible HSCT were included. Secretor status was determined either serologically or by molecular genetics.; Between March 1996 and June 2012, a total of 176 patients received minor ABO-incompatible HSCT and 150 (85%) were secretors. Incidence and severity of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and chronic GVHD did not differ between secretors and nonsecretors (cumulative incidences ± standard errors: acute GVHD on Day 100, 41 ± 11 and 46 ± 5%, p = 0.59; chronic GVHD at 2 years, 52 ± 13 and 56 ± 5%, p = 0.62, for secretors and nonsecretors, respectively). Additionally, nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and overall ...
ABO incompatibility is the most common cause of donor rejection during the initial screening of adult patients with end-stage liver disease for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). A paired donor exchange program was initiated to cope with this problem without ABO-incompatible LDLT. We present our results from the first 6 years of this exchange adult LDLT program. Between July 2003 and June 2009, 1351 adult LDLT procedures, including 16 donor exchanges and 7 ABO-incompatible LDLT procedures, were performed at our institution. Initial donor-recipient ABO incompatibilities included 6 A to B incompatibilities, 6 B to A incompatibilities, 1 A to O incompatibility, 1 A+O (dual graft) to B incompatibility, 1 O to AB incompatibility, and 1 O to A incompatibility. Fourteen matches (87.5%) were ABO incompatible, but 2 (12.5%) were initially ABO-compatible. All ABO-incompatible donors were directly related to their recipients, but 2 compatible donors were each undirected and unrelated directed. ...
ABO incompatibility is the most common cause of donor rejection during the initial screening of adult patients with end-stage liver disease for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). A paired donor exchange program was initiated to cope with this problem without ABO-incompatible LDLT. We present our results from the first 6 years of this exchange adult LDLT program. Between July 2003 and June 2009, 1351 adult LDLT procedures, including 16 donor exchanges and 7 ABO-incompatible LDLT procedures, were performed at our institution. Initial donor-recipient ABO incompatibilities included 6 A to B incompatibilities, 6 B to A incompatibilities, 1 A to O incompatibility, 1 A+O (dual graft) to B incompatibility, 1 O to AB incompatibility, and 1 O to A incompatibility. Fourteen matches (87.5%) were ABO incompatible, but 2 (12.5%) were initially ABO-compatible. All ABO-incompatible donors were directly related to their recipients, but 2 compatible donors were each undirected and unrelated directed. ...
ABO incompatibility is the most common cause of donor rejection during the initial screening of adult patients with end-stage liver disease for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). A paired donor exchange program was initiated to cope with this problem without ABO-incompatible LDLT. We present our results from the first 6 years of this exchange adult LDLT program. Between July 2003 and June 2009, 1351 adult LDLT procedures, including 16 donor exchanges and 7 ABO-incompatible LDLT procedures, were performed at our institution. Initial donor-recipient ABO incompatibilities included 6 A to B incompatibilities, 6 B to A incompatibilities, 1 A to O incompatibility, 1 A+O (dual graft) to B incompatibility, 1 O to AB incompatibility, and 1 O to A incompatibility. Fourteen matches (87.5%) were ABO incompatible, but 2 (12.5%) were initially ABO-compatible. All ABO-incompatible donors were directly related to their recipients, but 2 compatible donors were each undirected and unrelated directed. ...
ABO incompatibility is the most common cause of donor rejection during the initial screening of adult patients with end-stage liver disease for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). A paired donor exchange program was initiated to cope with this problem without ABO-incompatible LDLT. We present our results from the first 6 years of this exchange adult LDLT program. Between July 2003 and June 2009, 1351 adult LDLT procedures, including 16 donor exchanges and 7 ABO-incompatible LDLT procedures, were performed at our institution. Initial donor-recipient ABO incompatibilities included 6 A to B incompatibilities, 6 B to A incompatibilities, 1 A to O incompatibility, 1 A+O (dual graft) to B incompatibility, 1 O to AB incompatibility, and 1 O to A incompatibility. Fourteen matches (87.5%) were ABO incompatible, but 2 (12.5%) were initially ABO-compatible. All ABO-incompatible donors were directly related to their recipients, but 2 compatible donors were each undirected and unrelated directed. ...
ABO incompatibility is the most common cause of donor rejection during the initial screening of adult patients with end-stage liver disease for living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). A paired donor exchange program was initiated to cope with this problem without ABO-incompatible LDLT. We present our results from the first 6 years of this exchange adult LDLT program. Between July 2003 and June 2009, 1351 adult LDLT procedures, including 16 donor exchanges and 7 ABO-incompatible LDLT procedures, were performed at our institution. Initial donor-recipient ABO incompatibilities included 6 A to B incompatibilities, 6 B to A incompatibilities, 1 A to O incompatibility, 1 A+O (dual graft) to B incompatibility, 1 O to AB incompatibility, and 1 O to A incompatibility. Fourteen matches (87.5%) were ABO incompatible, but 2 (12.5%) were initially ABO-compatible. All ABO-incompatible donors were directly related to their recipients, but 2 compatible donors were each undirected and unrelated directed. ...
To further define the molecules that may mediate spontaneous abortion due to maternal-fetal blood group incompatibility within the P blood group system, we have examined the fine specificities of maternal antibodies and the glycolipid antigens from the placenta of a P infant born to a P...read more ...
A study was made of A-B-O blood group incompatibility in a series of non-White infants with haemolytic disease of the newborn over a 1-year period.
Question - Took AKT 2 during pregnancy. Baby and mother has ABO incompatibility. Why elevated blood test report?. Ask a Doctor about Hemolytic disease of the newborn, Ask a Radiologist
TY - JOUR. T1 - ABO-incompatible heart transplantation in early childhood. T2 - An international multicenter study of clinical experiences and limits. AU - Urschel, Simon. AU - Larsen, Ingrid M.. AU - Kirk, Richard. AU - Flett, Julie. AU - Burch, Michael. AU - Shaw, Nadine. AU - Birnbaum, Julia. AU - Netz, Heinrich. AU - Pahl, Elfriede. AU - Matthews, Kathleen L.. AU - Chinnock, Richard. AU - Johnston, Joyce K.. AU - Derkatz, Kim. AU - West, Lori J.. PY - 2013/3/1. Y1 - 2013/3/1. N2 - Background: Intentional blood group (BG)-incompatible (ABOi) heart transplantation in childhood is emerging in many centers. Safety limits remain undetermined. In this multicenter study we have compiled experience on clinical and immunologic boundaries. Methods: Data from six centers in Europe and North America on ABOi transplantation were collected in a standardized survey. Results: Fifty-eight ABOi transplants were performed in 57 patients. Median age at transplant was 6.8 months (0.03 to 90 months); ...
Michael Breimer started his research in the Department of Medical and Physiological Chemistry isolating and structurally characterising blood group AB(O)H and related carbohydrate antigens. After his PhD examination, his biochemical studies relating to ABO-incompatible organ transplantation continued in the Department of Surgery. Studies of human kidneys/urinary tract revealed that human kidney contained a new type of blood group A structure. Blood group phenotypes relating to expression of ABO antigens in individual kidneys were identified. Based on A antigen expression, a hypothesis explaining why blood group A2 kidneys could be successfully transplanted to O recipients was postulated. Patients receiving ABO-incompatible kidney grafts were shown to elicit an individual specific response regarding antibody class and subclass. He was responsible for the clinical evalutation of a new blood group A/B saccharide-based immunoadsorption column. These results have been applied in clinical practice to ...
Looking for the definition of isoagglutinin? Find out what is the full meaning of isoagglutinin on Abbreviations.com! The Webs largest and most authoritative acronyms and abbreviations resource.
Transfusion therapy involves regular blood transfusions to treat conditions such as hemophilia or cancer. Learn what to expect from this procedure ...
If negative for the Rh antigen, the mother will develop antibodies against it if exposed to the babys Rh antigen.. The fetus has an immature immune system, so would not pass antibodies to the mother. Recall that babies rely on maternal antibodies FOR THE FIRST 6 MONTHS OF LIFE. Thus, if they are B-cell deficient (i.e. btk deficiency) immunodeficient, IT WILL OFTEN PRESENT AROUND 6 MONTHS OF AGE (this is a key Step 1 fact). ...
Definition of Blood transfusion reaction with photos and pictures, translations, sample usage, and additional links for more information.
The ABO system is regarded as the most important blood-group system in transfusion medicine because of severe hemolytic transfusion reactions and, to a lesser degree, hemolytic disease of the newborn. ABO grouping is a test performed to determine an individuals blood type.
Care guide for Blood Transfusion Reactions. Includes: possible causes, signs and symptoms, standard treatment options and means of care and support.
... Magazines Jaypee Med Review - Vol. 9 (April -19 June-19) Is Metastatic Breast Cancer Curable? ABO Incompatible Third Kidney Transplant with Nephrectomy of Previous Allograft with Double Ureteric Reimplantation
Blood transfusions are inherently dangerous (Table 3.10). In addition to the frequent non-hemolytic reactions, ABO incompatibility threatens the poten
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plasmapheresis machines market revenue key players, pmwo, plasmapheresis, alternative treatment for dialysis patients kidney, global apheresis machine for plasmapheresis industry 2016
... (SI) is a genetically controlled cell-cell recognition system that acts as a barrier to self pollination in a wide range of flowering plant species
It is well known that ABO blood group system incompatible kidney transplantation (ABOi-KT) is an effective strategy for end-stage renal disease. The main barrier for ABOi-KT is how to keep host B cell activation and blood group antibody titer in low levels. Moreover, the mechanism of B cell activation induced by blood group antigen was unclear in ABOi-KT. In this study, HK2 cells were identified to express blood group B antigen when cocultured with lymphocytes of blood group A. Optical microscope observation demonstrated that HK2 cells in coculture group gradually decreased. Furthermore, flow cytometer assay identified that T cell phenotypes (CD3+, CD3+CD4+ and CD3+CD8+) had no significant change and B cell phenotypes (CD19+ and CD138+) were all significantly enhanced (3.07 and 3.02 folds) at day 4. In addition, immunoturbidimetry analysis demonstrated that blood group B antibody was significantly increased to 2.35 fold at day 4, IgG was significantly increased to 3.60 and 2.81 folds at days 4 and 8
Purpose: Plasmapheresis in combination with immunoglobulin and rituximab is often used to induce accommodation in ABO-incompatible (ABOi) living-donor transplantation; however, this regimen cannot be applied to cases of ABOi deceased-donor transplantation. Here, we investigated whether an anti-complement component 5 (C5) antibody-based regimen can induce accommodation in ABOi heart transplantation.. *Methods: Sensitization using human blood type A antigen, induced both IgM and IgG anti-A antibodies in wild-type mice. Heterotrophic ABOi heart transplantation was performed from human blood type A-transgenic C57BL/6J mice to sensitized syngeneic wild-type C57BL/6J or allogeneic DBA/2 mice.. *Results: Both anti-C5 antibody and triple immunosuppressants (corticosteroid, tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil) suppressed antibody-mediated rejection, immune cell infiltration, and deposition of IgG and C4d in ABOi heart syngrafts. Allogeneic ABOi heart transplantation induced ABMR to greater degree than ...
While DHTR can be life-threatening, unawareness of their frequency and lack of severity of these transfusion reactions have likely resulted in too little attention regarding their potential impact on overall SCD morbidity and mortality. For years, the overall incidence of DHTR per transfusion in SCD was estimated to be around 1:1000.22-24 making it a relatively uncommon transfusion reaction in this population of patients. However, newer reports suggest that these data may be misleading. As mentioned previously, given the similarities between the clinical presentation of DHTR and the more common complications of vaso-occlusive crises, DHTR can be easily missed.6,7,25 Unless an alloantibody screen is performed, an amnestic alloantibody response will not be detected and a diagnosis of DHTR may not be entertained. Furthermore, as some reports suggest that as many as 30% of DHTR can be alloantibody-negative,14,26 clinicians must rely on HbA measurements obtained within 48 h of the implicated ...
Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multi-potent non-hematopoietic progenitor cells possessing an immune-regulatory function, with suppression of proliferation of activated lymphocytes. In this study, adult living donor kidney transplantation (LDKT) recipients were given MSCs derived from the donor bone marrow to evaluate the safety and the feasibility of immunological changes related to the intra-osseous injection of MSC into the bone marrow. MSCs were derived from negative HLA cross-match donors. Donor bone marrow was harvested 5 weeks prior to KT. At the time of transplantation, 1 x 106 cell/kg of donor MSC was directly injected into the bone marrow of the recipients right iliac bone. Patients clinical outcomes, presence of mixed chimerism by short tandem repeat polymerase chain reaction, analysis of plasma FoxP3 mRNA and cytokine level, and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) were performed. Seven patients enrolled in this study and received donor MSC injections simultaneously with LDKT. The median age
The development of the meeting and workgroups, rationale for the topics, process of creating consensus, and top recommendations are outlined in more detail in an overview meeting report (3). Recommendations included strategies to educate patients with CKD and ESRD, potential living donors, and the public; efficiencies in processes; policy initiatives; and a research agenda. An important and recurring theme was the importance of coordination and communication between providers throughout the continuum of disease to most effectively reach patients and their support systems. This moving points edition will address consensus conference recommendations for a collaborative approach to care, education, and access to improve overall practice in LDKT and LKD.. Five articles address how transplant centers and community nephrology care teams can partner for improved practices. In the first article, "Living Donor Kidney Transplantation: Improving Education Outside of Transplant Centers about Live Donor ...
Abstract:. BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: This audit was conducted as a part of a quality assurance activity to assess the frequency of receiving completely filled out blood transfusion reaction forms which were accompanied by the required samples. Once this information is known, we will elevate the bar each year to achieve 100% compliance. The sub-aim was to evaluate the frequency of the reported transfusion reactions.. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was conducted from 1st April 2010 to 30th April 2011. The information was evaluated and the frequency of receiving completely filled blood transfusion reaction forms was assessed. The variables identified were the type of transfusion reaction, the blood component transfused, the health care personnel filling the form, and whether there was legible handwriting and a completely filled form. Transfusion reactions were reported as a percentage of the total number of units transfused.. RESULTS: During the study period, 17,880 packed red cells, 13,200 ...
In the 2 large, prospective cohorts of the NHS and HPFS, we observed a significantly elevated risk of incident CHD for participants with blood group A or B or AB, compared with those with blood group O. The highest risk was observed for blood group AB, followed by blood groups B and A. The association between ABO blood group and CHD risk was not significantly modified by other known risk factors for CHD, including age, sex, alcohol consumption, smoking, physical activity, or diabetes mellitus history. In total, 6.27% of CHD cases were attributable to a non-O blood group (A, B, or AB blood types). A meta-analysis of 6 prospective studies indicated that non-O blood group was associated with an 11% increased risk of CHD compared with O blood group.. Associations between ABO blood groups and CHD have been investigated for several decades. However, the results have been conflicting, especially for the prospective cohort studies. Recently a meta-analysis reported that individuals with non-O blood ...
Growing incidence of end-stage renal disease, shortage of kidneys from deceased donors and a better outcome for recipients of kidneys from living donor have led many centres worldwide to favour living donor kidney transplantation programmes. Although criteria for living donation have greatly evolved in recent years with acceptance of related and unrelated donors, an immunological incompatibility, either due to ABO incompatibility and/or to positive cross-match, between a living donor and the intended recipient, could impede up to 40% of such procedures. To avoid refusal of willing and healthy living donors, a number of strategies have emerged to overcome immunological incompatibilities. Kidney paired donation is the safest way for such patients to undergo kidney transplantation. Implemented with success in many countries either as national or multiple regional independent programmes, it could include simple exchanges between any number of incompatible pairs, incorporate compatible pairs and ...
Growing incidence of end-stage renal disease, shortage of kidneys from deceased donors and a better outcome for recipients of kidneys from living donor have led many centres worldwide to favour living donor kidney transplantation programmes. Although criteria for living donation have greatly evolved in recent years with acceptance of related and unrelated donors, an immunological incompatibility, either due to ABO incompatibility and/or to positive cross-match, between a living donor and the intended recipient, could impede up to 40% of such procedures. To avoid refusal of willing and healthy living donors, a number of strategies have emerged to overcome immunological incompatibilities. Kidney paired donation is the safest way for such patients to undergo kidney transplantation. Implemented with success in many countries either as national or multiple regional independent programmes, it could include simple exchanges between any number of incompatible pairs, incorporate compatible pairs and ...
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Information on Transfusion Reaction as a medical condition with Transfusion Reaction information including symptoms, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, treatment, prevention, and prognosis.
1. Meier‑ Kriesche HU, Schold JD. The impact of pretransplant dialysis on outcomes in renal transplantation. Semin Dial 2005; 18: 499- 504. 2. Meier‑ Kriesche HU, Port FK, Ojo AO et al. Effect of waiting time on renal transplant outcome. Kidney Int 2000; 58: 1311- 1317. 3. Gill JS, Rose C, Pereira BJ et al. The importance of transitions between dialysis and transplantation in the care of end‑stage renal disease patients. Kidney Int 2007; 71: 442- 447. 4. Delmonico F. A report of the Amsterdam forum on the care of the live kidney donor: data and medical guidelines. Transplantation 2005; 79 (Suppl 6): S53- S66. 5. Genberg H, Kumlien G, Wennberg L et al. Isoagglutinin adsorption in ABO‑ incompatible transplantation. Transfus Apher Sci 2010; 43: 231- 235. 6. Segev DL, Simpkins CE, Warren DS et al. AB0 incompatible high‑titer renal transplantation with-out splenectomy or anti‑CD20 treatment. Am J Transplant 2005; 5: 2570- 2575. 7. Montgomery RA. Renal transplantation across HLA and AB0 ...
Acquired Pure Red Cell Aplasia information including symptoms, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, treatment, causes, patient stories, videos, forums, prevention, and prognosis.
Haemolytic transfusion reactions are the result of antibodies in a recipients plasma directed against antigens on transfused red cells. This results in rapid intravascular haemolysis of the donor red blood cells. ABO incompatibility due to clerical error is the most frequent cause and results in haemoglobinaemia, haemoglobinuria, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), renal failure and complement-mediated cardiovascular collapse.. ...
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Placenta blood flow problems - ABO Incompatibility - Parents Common Sense Encyclopedia. We provides discount BoilX relieves painful Boils fast and naturally.
Ebersbach, G.; Sherratt, D.J.; Gerdes, K., 2005: Partition-associated incompatibility caused by random assortment of pure plasmid clusters
ABO subgroups represent phenotypes that demonstrate weaker or variable reactions when tested with polyclonal antisera, such as anti-A and anti-B. For example, the antisera generally used for A forward typing is polyclonal, containing both anti-A and anti-A1. Therefore, it can detect various subgroups of A, with the most commonly encounter group being A1 ...
Ethics of Living Donor Kidney Transplantation Interviewer: Quentin Cooper Interviewees: Mr Andrew Ready, Trustee and Lead Surgeon of TLC, Dr Shazia Shabir, Consultant Nephrologist at University Hospitals Birmingham and TLC volunteer, and Dr Dwomoa Adu, Consultant Nephrologist at Korle Bu Hospital, Accra, Ghana, and TLC Trustee Welcome to this TLC podcast in which science journalist,…
This project comprises immunological and virological analyses within a prospective clinical study of Rituximab (Rtx)-treated blood group incompatible living donor (LD) renal transplant recipients compared to blood group compatible LD recipients without Rtx induction, and of living donor compared to deceased donor renal transplant recipients treated with tacrolimus (Tacr)/mycophenolate sodium (MPS). Aim of this project is to assess short- and long-term effects of immunosuppressive therapy (Rtx induction) and of living donation on immunological and histological parameters of graft outcome and on viral replication (BK, JC, CMV, EBV) with the potential to improve long-term graft outcome and to enable risk estimation of virus disease ...
This site allows the access to the slide presentation Dr. Fumiichiro Yamamoto made at the IMPPC in September, 2009, on the molecular genetic basis of histo-blood group ABO system. The title of his talk was What You Had Better Know About ABO Blood Groups and a variety of topics relating to the ABO blood groups were discussed, including From History to Modern Genetics, From Red Blood Cell to Kidney, Hair, Seminal Fluid, From Blood Transfusion, Cell/Tissue/Organ Transplantation to Crime Scene Investigation, and From Humans to Animals. All the slides are listed as figures in the jpg format.
This site allows the access to the slide presentation Dr. Fumiichiro Yamamoto made at the IMPPC in September, 2009, on the molecular genetic basis of histo-blood group ABO system. The title of his talk was What You Had Better Know About ABO Blood Groups and a variety of topics relating to the ABO blood groups were discussed, including From History to Modern Genetics, From Red Blood Cell to Kidney, Hair, Seminal Fluid, From Blood Transfusion, Cell/Tissue/Organ Transplantation to Crime Scene Investigation, and From Humans to Animals. All the slides are listed as figures in the jpg format.
Blood group antigens are polymorphic residues of protein or carbohydrate on the red cell surface. They can provoke an antibody response in individuals who lack them, and some antibodies can lead to hemolytic transfusion reaction or hemolytic disease of the fetus/newborn (HDFN). Researchers have identified the molecular basis of many red cell blood group antigens, and an actively maintained database currently lists more than 1,600 alleles of 44 genes. A mini-review, published in the March issue of CLN, describes the major applications of the explosion of knowledge in blood group genetics to the practice of blood banking and transfusion medicine.
The relationship of the ABO blood groups to various diseases has received increasing attention of late. Thus, Aird et al.1 report that "the frequency of blood group A is greater and the frequency of blood group O less in patients suffering from cancer of the stomach than in the general population of the locality in which they live." Blood group O has been reported to be strikingly high, and the other three blood groups increasingly low, in patients suffering from peptic ulcer.2 Studies have revealed an inverse relationship between the frequencies of blood groups O and A in patients with ...
Authors from the Versilia and Manzoni Hospitals in Italy report the case of a patient who developed pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) following subcutaneous
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For ABO blood groups in the humans, the A and B genes are codminant. Both A and B are dominant over O a. Identify the possible blood types in the children of a man with blood type O and a woman with blood type AB. My work: The possible ...
ABO blood groups divide blood into 4 groups: A, B, AB, O. The other main grouping is the Rhesus system, which is either negative or positive.
An individuals blood type may affect their risk of developing type 2 diabetes; people with blood group O are at lowest risk of the condition, according to a new study.
The passenger compartment remained stable in the frontal impact. Dummy readings indicated good protection of the knees and femurs of the driver and passenger. Skoda showed that a similar level of protection would be provided to occupants of different sizes and to those sat in different positions. In the side barrier test and in the more severe side pole impact, protection of the chest and abdomen was rated as adequate and that of the head and pelvis was good. Tests on the front seats and head restraints indicated good protection against whiplash injuries in the event of a rear-end collision. Skoda informed Euro NCAP that the rear centre head restraint was not standard equipment throughout Europe, so the rear row did not qualify for any points for whiplash protection, even though a geometric assessment indicated marginal protection. An autonomous emergency braking system is available as an option. This works at low speeds typical of city driving but as it is not standard equipment it was not ...
TY - JOUR. T1 - Sixth hour transcutaneous bilirubin predicting significant hyperbilirubinemia in ABO incompatible neonates. AU - Bhat, Ramesh Y.. AU - Kumar, Pavan C.G.. PY - 2014/1/1. Y1 - 2014/1/1. N2 - Background: Neonates with ABO hemolytic disease are at greater risk for developing significant hyperbilirubinemia. We aimed to determine whether sixth hour transcutaneous bilirubin (TcB) could predict such a risk. Methods: TcB measurements were obtained at the 6th hour of life in blood group A or B neonates born to blood group O, rhesus factor compatible mothers. Subsequent hyperbilirubinemia was monitored and considered significant if a neonate required phototherapy/exchange transfusion. The predictive role of sixth hour TcB was estimated. Results: Of 144 ABO incompatible neonates, 41(OA, 24; O-B, 17) had significant hyperbilirubinemia. Mean sixth hour TcB was significantly higher among neonates who developed significant hyperbilirubinemia than those who did not (5.83±1.35 mg/dL vs. ...
Pure Red Cell Aplasia in Major ABO-Mismatched Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Is Associated with Severe Pancytopenia.
In the process of ABO-incompatible (ABOi) organ transplantation, removal of anti-A and/or B antibodies from blood plasma is a promising method to overcome hyperacute rejection and allograft loss caused by the immune response between anti-A and/or B antibodies and the A and/or B antigens in the recipient. Although there are commercial columns to do this work, the application is still limited because of the high production cost. In this study, the PglB glycosylation pathway from Campylobacter jejuni was exploited to produce glycoprotein conjugated with Escherichia coli O86:B7 O-antigen, which bears the blood group B antigen epitope to absorb blood group B antibody in blood. The titers of blood group B antibody were reduced to a safe level without changing the clotting function of plasma after glycoprotein absorption of B antibodies in the plasma. We developed a feasible strategy for the specific adsorption/removal of blood group antibodies. This method will be useful in ABOi organ transplantation and
Clinically severe jaundice due to ABO incompatibility can occur when infants with blood type A or B are born to mothers with type O blood. An estimated 20 percent of pregnancies are ABO incompatible, but only a very small proportion of blood type A or B babies born to O type mothers develop overt ABO hemolytic disease. Despite the relative rarity of ABO hemolytic disease, it is common practice among pediatricians and family practice physicians to perform routine blood typing and antibody screening on all newborns born to type O mothers.. A very accurate and reliable laboratory measure of red blood cell destruction is the plasma carboxyhemoglobin level (COHb). COHb levels can be determined using a minute amount of blood, obtained at the same time the newborns heel is pierced to obtain blood for the mandatory newborn screen (performed on all newborns prior to discharge) in order to avoid an additional invasive procedure.. Our hope is to determine whether routine blood typing and anti-globulin ...
Between March 1996 and June 2012, a total of 176 patients received minor ABO-incompatible HSCT and 150 (85%) were secretors. Incidence and severity of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and chronic GVHD did not differ between secretors and nonsecretors (cumulative incidences ± standard errors: acute GVHD on Day 100, 41 ± 11 and 46 ± 5%, p = 0.59; chronic GVHD at 2 years, 52 ± 13 and 56 ± 5%, p = 0.62, for secretors and nonsecretors, respectively). Additionally, nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and overall survival (OS) were similar in the two groups (2-year NRM, 27 ± 9 and 23 ± 3%, p = 0.45; 4-year OS, 64 ± 10 and 55 ± 4%, p = 0.28, for secretors and nonsecretors, respectively).. ...
Researchers from the University of Washington and Puget Sound Blood Center have demonstrated that pathogen-reduction may be an effective method to prevent alloimmunization among patients receiving platelet transfusions. The findings were presented at the 54th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology (ASH). Using an immunocompetent dog model, Dr. Sherrill Slichter and colleagues evaluated the impact […]. [Read More] ...
Background Previous studies have examined the association between ABO blood group and the risk of some malignancies. However, no prospective cohort study to date has examined the association between ABO blood group and the risk of skin cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Using two large cohorts in the US, we examined ABO blood type and incidence of skin cancer, including melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We followed up study participants (70,650 female nurses and 24,820 male health professionals) on their diagnosis of incident skin cancer from cohort baseline (1976 in women and 1986 in men) until 2006. Study participants reported their blood type in 1996 in both cohorts. During the follow-up, 685 participants developed melanoma, 1,533 developed SCC and 19,860 developed BCC. We used Cox proportional hazards models to calculate the hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of each type of skin cancer. We observed that non-O blood group (A, AB, and B
Blood transfusions in dogs have become an integral part of advanced medicine. Just like humans, several blood groups have been identified in dogs, which are referred to as Dog Erythrocyte Antigens or DEA. A dog negative for a given blood group can produce antibodies following exposure to that specific blood group, which could lead to life-threatening hemolytic transfusion reactions with subsequent transfusion(s). It has been well documented that such antibodies� production can happen following blood transfusions in dogs. In women, pregnancy may result in sensitization of the mother. However it is unknown if a bitch may also be sensitized by pregnancy. Because of the endotheliochorial-type of placenta dogs have, it is thought to be less likely that pregnancy will sensitize the bitch and result in the production of antibodies. However, bitches with prior pregnancies are excluded from blood donor program and cross-matching is highly recommended prior to even a first blood transfusion, in contrast
Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a condition in which the bone marrow stops making red blood cells, causing anemia as well as reticulocytopenia, which is the absence of young red cells.
Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is a rare congenital disease caused by mutations in ribosomal protein genes and is characterized by pure red cell aplasia. While the prognosis is relatively favorable, quality of life (QOL) among DBA patients is negatively impacted by the adverse effects of long-term prednisolone (PSL) therapy and blood transfusions. We describe a 43-year-old man who was diagnosed with DBA (Hb of 2.18 g/dl) at the age of two months. He was initially treated with PSL and blood transfusions, followed by cyclosporine and low-dose (6 mg/day) PSL, which resulted in a sustained hemoglobin level of 9 g/dl without severe adverse events or loss of QOL ...
The selection and artificial preparation of high-titered test serums, the study of the cause and prevention of hemolytic transfusion reactions, the consideratio
The ABO blood group system is the best known blood typing system, determining blood group type as A, B, AB, or O, and thereby of importance for blood donors and recipients. Wikipedia Three common alleles (A, B and O) of the ABO gene yield the six common combinations that a person can have, each of them resulting in a particular ABO blood type (as determined serologically): ...
This study investigated the relationship between ABO blood groups and Rh antigens and rates of CRC, which involves numerous etiological factors. Our results show that the prevalence of blood groups A and B, as well as Rh antigen positivity were significantly higher among CRC patients. Despite being an archive study, it was of a retrospective design, which is a drawback in terms of the strength of the evidence. ABO blood group antigens were discovered by Karl Landsteiner in 1901 and Rh antigens by Huang et al.2 in 1940. The ABO blood group antigens are encoded on chromosome 9q34. Although these antigens are biochemical components of the erythrocyte membrane, they have also been identified in epithelial cells of the gastrointestinal mucosa.6 There is an intriguing hypothesis regarding the pathophysiological link between ABO blood groups and malignancy. Dysregulation of the enzymatic activities of glycosyltransferase A and glycosyltransferase B, which are responsible for cell membrane-mediated ...
Red blood cell (RBC) antibody identification is used as a follow-up test to a positive RBC antibody screen or a positive direct antiglobulin test (DAT) to help identify the cause of a transfusion reaction, hemolytic disease of the newborn (HDN), or hemolytic anemia.
According to the Japanese Horoscope, your blood type says a lot about your personality and relationship compatibility. It is common for people in Japan to ask what your blood type is to determine how you will act or interact with their type. They even sell personality books in Japan that will teach you all about your particular blood type.. Blood types are based on what type of antigens you have on your red blood cells. Type A blood will have type A antigens, type B blood has B Antigens, AB blood type both types of antigen and type O doesnt have any antigens.. If you have ever given blood or had your blood drawn then your doctor may have told you your unique blood type. This is important information because not all blood types can be mixed safely. If you have type O blood and you receive type AB the blood can coagulate and you can have serious health problems and may even die from it.. Could it be possible that your unique blood type could say something about how you act and interact with other ...
NOTE: This article is based on research that utilizes the sources cited here as well as the collective experience of the Lab Tests Online Editorial Review Board. This article is periodically reviewed by the Editorial Board and may be updated as a result of the review. Any new sources cited will be added to the list and distinguished from the original sources used. To access online sources, copy and paste the URL into your browser.. Sources Used in Current Review. (October 14, 2013) Tholpady A. Antibody Screening, Medscape Reference. Available online at http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/1731232-overview#a1. Accessed September 2016.. Henrys Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 22nd ed. McPherson R, Pincus M, eds. Philadelphia, PA: Saunders Elsevier: 2011, 719-730, 741.. Angela Treml MD, Karen E. King MD. Red blood cell alloimmunization: lessons from sickle cell disease. Transfusion 2013;53:692-695.. (July 20, 2016) Sandler G. Transfusion Reactions. Medscape Reference. ...
Four main conditions resulting from deletion or inactivation (nondeletion mutants) of one, two, three, or all four alpha-globin genes are recognized. Carriers of alpha0-thalassemia (two deleted alpha-globin genes, ie, alpha-thalassemia trait) show microcytosis, hypochromia, and normal percentages of HbA2 and HbF, carriers of alpha+-thalassemia (one deleted or nonfunctional alpha-globin gene, ie, alpha-thalassemia silent carrier) have either a silent hematologic phenotype or present with a moderate thalassemia-like hematologic picture. Two are the alpha-thalassemia clinically significant forms: Hb Bart hydrops fetalis syndrome and HbH disease (four and three deleted or nonfunctional alpha-globin genes, respectively). Hb Bart hydrops fetalis syndrome is the most severe form, characterized by fetal onset of generalized edema, pleural and pericardial effusions, and severe hypochromic anemia, in the absence of ABO or Rh blood group incompatibility. Death usually occurs in the neonatal period. HbH ...
... definition. Explain ABO blood group system. What is ABO blood group system? ABO blood group system meaning. ABO blood group system sense. ABO blood group system FAQ. ABO blood group system synonyms.
Synonyms for ABO blood group system in Free Thesaurus. Antonyms for ABO blood group system. 2 synonyms for ABO blood group system: ABO group, ABO system. What are synonyms for ABO blood group system?
Allergic Reactions Types 1-4 Type 1 IgE Mediated Anaphylactic Reaction Type 1 IgE Mediated Anaphylactic Reaction Examples: Allergic Rhinitis, Urticaria Examples: Allergic Rhinitis, Urticaria Type 2 Mediated by Antibodies Type 2 Mediated by Antibodies Examples: Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia, Rh and ABO Incompatibility Examples: Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia, Rh and ABO Incompatibility Type 3 Immune Complex Type 3 Immune Complex Examples: Serum Sickness, Immune Complex Mediated Renal Diseases Examples: Serum Sickness, Immune Complex Mediated Renal Diseases Type 4 Delayed Hypersensitivity Type 4 Delayed Hypersensitivity Examples: Poison Ivy, PPD Reactions Examples: Poison Ivy, PPD Reactions
Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI) is an important life-threatening complication that is related with blood transfusion. The frequency is reported as 1/5.000. It is generally characterized with hypoxia that appears at the 2-6th hours after the blood transfusion, bilateral infiltration in the chest radiography, and non-cardiogenic pulmonary edema. Acute respiratory distress, hypotension, tachycardia and fever accompany the clinical picture. Past surgery, blood transfusion, and sepsis are among the factors that trigger the disease. In this study, the efficiency of the hemodialysis applied in the right time in the treatment of a heavy TRALI case developed after a blood transfusion has been presented.. Keywords: Acute lung injury, efficiency, hemodialysis, ...

ABO blood group system synonyms, ABO blood group system antonyms - FreeThesaurus.comABO blood group system synonyms, ABO blood group system antonyms - FreeThesaurus.com

Antonyms for ABO blood group system. 2 synonyms for ABO blood group system: ABO group, ABO system. What are synonyms for ABO ... Synonyms for ABO blood group system in Free Thesaurus. ... Abo blood group. *ABO Blood Group Incompatibility. *ABO blood ... ABO blood group system. Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.. Related to ABO blood group system: Rh ... Synonyms for ABO blood group system. a classification system for the antigens of human blood. Synonyms. *ABO group ...
more infohttps://www.freethesaurus.com/ABO+blood+group+system

Blood group incompatibility as risk of corneal rejection  - PubMed - NCBIBlood group incompatibility as risk of corneal rejection - PubMed - NCBI

Blood group incompatibility as risk of corneal rejection. [Article in Spanish; Abstract available in Spanish from the publisher ... The variables that influenced the rejection episode were: preoperative high risk group, graft size, blood incompatibility, ... in post-transplant patients at one year of follow-up and in particular to consider the presence of donor blood incompatibility ... It is advisable to perform routine blood compatibility to reduce the risk of rejection. ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29799709

Blood group incompatibility in kidney transplantation:  definitely time to re-examine! | The Medical Journal of AustraliaBlood group incompatibility in kidney transplantation: definitely time to re-examine! | The Medical Journal of Australia

ABO blood group-compatible) was medically unsuitable. His father was blood group A1, while the patient was blood group O. The ... Blood group incompatibility in kidney transplantation: definitely time to re-examine!. Shlomo J Cohney, Rowan G Walker, Michael ... However, around 30% of potential live donors are thwarted by blood group incompatibility, where there is a high risk of ... Sporadic attempts at blood group incompatible transplantation have occurred with limited success, employing plasma exchange for ...
more infohttps://www.mja.com.au/journal/2007/187/5/blood-group-incompatibility-kidney-transplantation-definitely-time-re-examine

Maternal-child blood group incompatibility and other perinatal events increase the risk for early-onset type 1 (insulin...Maternal-child blood group incompatibility and other perinatal events increase the risk for early-onset type 1 (insulin...

... for blood group incompatibility OR = 3.86 (95% confidence interval 1.54-9.65). Icterus without blood group incompatibility was ... Maternal-child blood group incompatibility and other perinatal events increase the risk for early-onset type 1 (insulin- ... Scrutiny of medical records for cases and control children with a diagnosis of blood group incompatibility verified the ... and maternal-child blood group incompatibility (OR = 1.61). When the analysis was restricted to Type 1 diabetes with an onset ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1644246?dopt=Abstract

Sabinet | A laboratory survey of A-B-O blood-group incompatibility and neonatal jaundiceSabinet | A laboratory survey of A-B-O blood-group incompatibility and neonatal jaundice

A study was made of A-B-O blood group incompatibility in a series of non-White infants with haemolytic disease of the newborn ... oa South African Medical Journal - A laboratory survey of A-B-O blood-group incompatibility and neonatal jaundice * Navigate ... A study was made of A-B-O blood group incompatibility in a series of non-White infants with haemolytic disease of the newborn ... Affiliations : 1 Provincial Blood Grouping Laboratory, Cape Town * Source : South African Medical Journal, Volume 43, Issue 34 ...
more infohttp://journals.co.za/content/m_samj/43/34/AJA20785135_33476

What Is Jaundice in Newborns? Definition, Symptoms, CausesWhat Is Jaundice in Newborns? Definition, Symptoms, Causes

... maternal-fetal blood group incompatibility (Rh, ABO), breast milk and breastfeeding, a collection of blood under the scalp, and ... Blood Transfusion. During a blood transfusion, blood or blood products are transferred from one person to another. There are ... A complete blood count (CBC) is a calculation of the cellular makeup of blood. A CBC measures the concentration of white blood ... Polycythemia (High Red Blood Cell Count). Polycythemia (elevated red blood cell count) is a rare blood disease in which the ...
more infohttps://www.medicinenet.com/newborn_jaundice_neonatal_jaundice/article.htm

Jaundiced NewbornJaundiced Newborn

Rh and ABO Blood Group Incompatibility (Serious, but Rare). *Onset during first 24 hours of life ... Risk factors are: premature baby born at 36 weeks or less, ABO or Rh blood group problem, sib needed bili-lights, bleeding in ... Bilirubin comes from the normal breakdown of old red blood cells.. *The liver normally gets rid of bilirubin. But, at birth, ... The skin turns a yellow color from high bilirubin levels in the blood ...
more infohttps://www.seattlechildrens.org/conditions/a-z/jaundiced-newborn/

General principles of immune response Flashcards by Eleanor Price | BrainscapeGeneral principles of immune response Flashcards by Eleanor Price | Brainscape

Blood group incompatibility. Autoimmune haemolytic anaemias. Affecting neutrophils. Affecting platelets. 47 What is type 3 ... circulate in blood. - present in the interstices of the lung, heart, and kidneys.. Langerhans DCs. - strong producers of IL-12 ...
more infohttps://www.brainscape.com/flashcards/general-principles-of-immune-response-4258090/packs/6300991

Lect. 19 - Developmental Disorders  Flashcards by  | BrainscapeLect. 19 - Developmental Disorders Flashcards by | Brainscape

Blood group incompatibility b/w mother and fetus; fetal RBCs reach the maternal blood stream during last trimester or during ... childbirth; major factor is the D Ag of the Rh group; ABO incompatibility is generally not a problem, b/c maternal Abs remove ...
more infohttps://www.brainscape.com/flashcards/lect-19-developmental-disorders-4932632/packs/7200604

Cornea Donor StudyCornea Donor Study

Blood Group Incompatibility. A mismatch between donor and recipient blood. Antibodies present in the recipients serum are ... Transferases are enzymes transferring a group, for example, the methyl group or a glycosyl group, from one compound (generally ... New blood vessels originating from the corneal veins and extending from the limbus into the adjacent CORNEAL STROMA. ... For the ABO compatibility study, the ABO blood type of both the donor and recipient were determined in order to compare the ...
more infohttps://www.bioportfolio.com/resources/trial/124393/Cornea-Donor-Study.html

Stephanie C Eisenbarth, MD, PhD > Allergy and Clinical Immunology | Internal Medicine | Pediatrics | Yale School of...Stephanie C Eisenbarth, MD, PhD > Allergy and Clinical Immunology | Internal Medicine | Pediatrics | Yale School of...

Allergy and Immunology; Asthma; Blood Group Incompatibility; Food Hypersensitivity; Immune System Diseases ... Hendrickson JE, Eisenbarth SC, Tormey CA: Red blood cell alloimmunization: new findings at the bench and new recommendations ... Type I IFN Is Necessary and Sufficient for Inflammation-Induced Red Blood Cell Alloimmunization in Mice. J Immunol. 2017 Aug 1 ... Bridging channel dendritic cells induce immunity to transfused red blood cells. J Exp Med. 2016 May 30; 2016 May 16. PMID: ...
more infohttps://medicine.yale.edu/intmed/allergy/people/stephanie_eisenbarth-2.profile

Prevention of pure red cell aplasia after major or bidirectional ABO blood group incompatible hematopoietic stem cell...Prevention of pure red cell aplasia after major or bidirectional ABO blood group incompatible hematopoietic stem cell...

1982) Bone marrow transplantation with major ABO blood group incompatibility using erythrocyte depletion of marrow prior to ... All 12 patients with PRCA had blood group O and had received a major ABO incompatible HSCT from a blood group A (n=10), AB (n=1 ... The most frequent blood group constellation was A or AB donor and O group recipient, occurring in 77% of all patients. The ... 2005) ABO blood group barrier in allogeneic bone marrow transplantation revisited. GVHD Working Committee of Center for ...
more infohttp://www.haematologica.org/content/94/2/239

18 Jaundice Symptoms, Causes, Treatments & Prognosis18 Jaundice Symptoms, Causes, Treatments & Prognosis

Maternal-fetal blood group incompatibility (Rh, ABO). This form of jaundice occurs when there is incompatibility between the ... Blood tests. These may initially include a complete blood count (CBC), liver function tests (including a bilirubin level), ... blood clot under the scalp. As this blood is naturally broken down, suddenly elevated levels of bilirubin may overwhelm the ... Will I require any blood tests or imaging studies?. *What is the likely course of this illness? What is the long-term outlook? ...
more infohttps://www.emedicinehealth.com/jaundice/article_em.htm

MEDLINE Data Changes - 2015. NLM Technical Bulletin. 2014 Nov-DecMEDLINE Data Changes - 2015. NLM Technical Bulletin. 2014 Nov-Dec

In 2014 it had been an ET to Blood Group Incompatibility. After Transfusion Reaction was removed as an ET, Blood Group ... Category M - Named Groups. Missionaries. Changes of particular interest include:. *The Publication Type In Vitro was deleted ... The term Morphological and Microscopic Findings was created for the grouping of specific terms for morphologic findings, ... Incompatibility was re-treed. *Two new infant death terms were added in 2015: Infant Death and Perinatal Death. It is important ...
more infohttps://www.nlm.nih.gov/pubs/techbull/nd14/nd14_medline_data_changes_2015.html

Combined Bone Marrow and Renal Transplantation for Hematologic Disorders With End Stage Renal Disease - Full Text View -...Combined Bone Marrow and Renal Transplantation for Hematologic Disorders With End Stage Renal Disease - Full Text View -...

ABO blood group incompatibility in the host-vs-graft direction.. *Diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome ... Blood Protein Disorders. Hemorrhagic Disorders. Lymphoproliferative Disorders. Immunoproliferative Disorders. Immune System ... MedlinePlus related topics: Amyloidosis Blood Disorders Kidney Failure Kidney Transplantation Multiple Myeloma ... of renal recovery of their renal failure over a 90 day period of therapy for their underlying malignancy or other blood ...
more infohttps://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02158052?term=%22bone+marrow%22&recrs=ab&rank=33

Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders - Full Text View -...Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders - Full Text View -...

ABO blood group incompatibility in the host-vs-graft direction. *Active serious infection ... Bone Marrow and Kidney Transplant for Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease and Blood Disorders (BMT). The safety and scientific ... This is a pilot study, you are being asked to participate because you have a blood disorder and kidney disease. The aim of the ... MedlinePlus related topics: Blood Disorders Kidney Diseases Kidney Transplantation Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT01758042?recrs=abc&cond=%22Anemia%22

Combined Bone Marrow and Renal Transplantation for Hematologic Disorders With End Stage Renal Disease - Tabular View -...Combined Bone Marrow and Renal Transplantation for Hematologic Disorders With End Stage Renal Disease - Tabular View -...

ABO blood group incompatibility in the host-vs-graft direction.. *Diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome ... Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment. Masking: None (Open Label). Primary Purpose: Treatment ... of renal recovery of their renal failure over a 90 day period of therapy for their underlying malignancy or other blood ...
more infohttps://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/record/NCT02158052

Successful treatment of isohemagglutinin-mediated pure red cell aplasia after ABO-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic cell...Successful treatment of isohemagglutinin-mediated pure red cell aplasia after ABO-mismatched allogeneic hematopoietic cell...

ODonnell MR . Blood group Incompatibilities and hemolytic complications of hematopoietic cell transplantation. In: Appelbaum ... The blood group remained B (recipients pre-transplant blood group) on both the forward and reverse grouping. ... The recipient was B Rh-positive, whereas the donor was A Rh-positive; other minor blood groups Ags were not tested. The ... donors blood group). He also had a marked reticulocyte response with reticulocyte count increasing from 0.4% pre-bortezomib to ...
more infohttps://www.nature.com/articles/bmt2011176?error=cookies_not_supported&code=1052e857-b6f4-4bc9-a1af-2cc95aa39df4

Jaundice in Healthy NewbornsJaundice in Healthy Newborns

... jaundice refers to the yellow color of the skin and whites of the eyes caused by excess bilirubin in the blood. ... Blood group incompatibility (Rh or ABO problems): If a mother and baby have different blood types, the mothers body might ... This creates a sudden buildup of bilirubin in the babys blood. Incompatibility jaundice can begin as early as the first day of ... The doctor might take a small blood sample to measure your babys bilirubin level. Some offices use a light meter to get an ...
more infohttp://kidshealth.org/ChildrensHealthNetwork/en/parents/jaundice.html?ref=search

Index by author - July 01, 1972, 43 (1) | Clinical ScienceIndex by author - July 01, 1972, 43 (1) | Clinical Science

Blood Group Incompatibility between Mother and Foetus C. A. Clarke. Clinical Science Jul 1972, 43 (1) 1-11; DOI: 10.1042/ ...
more infohttp://www.clinsci.org/content/43/1.index-by-author

Nonimmune fetal hydrops definition | Drugs.comNonimmune fetal hydrops definition | Drugs.com

Definition: fetal edema and ascites unrelated to maternal/fetal blood group incompatibilities; multiple etiologies include ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/dict/nonimmune-fetal-hydrops.html

Immune fetal hydrops definition | Drugs.comImmune fetal hydrops definition | Drugs.com

Definition: fetal edema and ascites secondary to maternal/fetal blood group incompatibility. ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/dict/immune-fetal-hydrops.html

Human Embryonic Stem Cell Bank: Implication of Human Leukocyte Antigens and ABO Blood Group Antigens for Cell Transplantation |...Human Embryonic Stem Cell Bank: Implication of Human Leukocyte Antigens and ABO Blood Group Antigens for Cell Transplantation |...

Stussi G, Halter J, Schanz U, Seebach JD (2006) ABO-histo blood group incompatibility in hematopoietic stem cell and solid ... Mölne J, Björquist P, Andersson K, Diswall M, Jeppsson A, Strokan V, Rydberg L, Breimer ME (2008) Blood group ABO antigen ... Human has two major transplantation antigen systems, the Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and ABO blood group antigen (ABO) system ... Human Embryonic Stem Cell Bank: Implication of Human Leukocyte Antigens and ABO Blood Group Antigens for Cell Transplantation. ...
more infohttps://rd.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-94-007-2993-3_4
  • Maternal-child blood group incompatibility and other perinatal events increase the risk for early-onset type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus. (nih.gov)
  • The following statistically significant risk factors were identified for Type 1 diabetes with an onset before 15 years of age: maternal diabetes (OR = 3.90), maternal age above 35 (OR = 1.36), maternal non-smoking (OR = 1.54), pre-eclamptic toxaemia (OR = 1.19), caesarian section (OR = 1.32), and maternal-child blood group incompatibility (OR = 1.61). (nih.gov)
  • HICs), feto-maternal blood specialized free and effective maternal and incompatibility is more prominent while child health services to the people of Ondo sepsis, asphyxia, prolonged rupture of State and neighbouring states. (who.int)
  • Fetal-maternal hemorrhage, which is the movement of fetal blood cells across the placenta, can occur during abortion, ectopic pregnancy, childbirth, ruptures in the placenta during pregnancy (often caused by trauma), or medical procedures carried out during pregnancy that breach the uterine wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is a major cause of HDN, because 75% of pregnancies result in some contact between fetal and maternal blood, and 15-50% of pregnancies have hemorrhages with the potential for immune sensitization. (wikipedia.org)
  • The amount of fetal blood needed to cause maternal sensitization depends on the individual's immune system and ranges from 0.1 mL to 30 mL. (wikipedia.org)
  • Laboratory assessment is based on a positive Direct Antiglobulin Test (DAT), a decrease in serum haptoglobin, and an increase in blood levels of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and indirect bilirubin levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among these antibodies are some which attack antigens on the red blood cells in the fetal circulation, breaking down and destroying the cells (hemolysis). (wikipedia.org)
  • HDFN can also be caused by antibodies to a variety of other blood group system antigens, but Kell and Rh are the most frequently encountered. (wikipedia.org)
  • The third sensitization model can occur in women of blood type O. The immune response to A and B antigens, that are widespread in the environment, usually leads to the production of IgM or IgG anti-A and anti-B antibodies early in life. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the analysis was restricted to Type 1 diabetes with an onset before the age of 5 years, most odds ratios were increased - for blood group incompatibility OR = 3.86 (95% confidence interval 1.54-9.65). (nih.gov)
  • Risk factors are: premature baby born at 36 weeks or less, ABO or Rh blood group problem, sib needed bili-lights, bleeding in the scalp, Asian race, breastfeeding problems. (seattlechildrens.org)
  • The aim of this article is to analyze the different risk factors of "corneal rejection episode" in post-transplant patients at one year of follow-up and in particular to consider the presence of donor blood incompatibility during the first year of post-surgical follow-up. (nih.gov)
  • It is advisable to perform routine blood compatibility to reduce the risk of rejection. (nih.gov)
  • Red blood cell alloimmunization: new findings at the bench and new recommendations for the bedside. (yale.edu)
  • The term Morphological and Microscopic Findings was created for the grouping of specific terms for morphologic findings, particularly the results of PAP smears reported according to the Bethesda System. (nih.gov)
  • His father was blood group A1, while the patient was blood group O. The patient's anti-A antibody titre, although moderately high at 1 : 256 (measured by conventional tube agglutination testing), was considered potentially amenable to lowering by systematic antibody removal to a preoperative target of between 1 : 8 and 1 : 16. (mja.com.au)
  • Some offices use a light meter to get an approximate measurement, and then if it's high, take a blood sample. (kidshealth.org)
  • After surgery, tacrolimus, an oral calcineurin inhibitor (target trough blood levels, 8-12 ng/mL), and oral prednisolone (25 mg/24 h) were commenced. (mja.com.au)
  • The hemoglobin molecule that is released into the blood by this process is split, with the heme portion undergoing a chemical conversion to bilirubin. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Icterus without blood group incompatibility was not a significant risk factor. (nih.gov)
  • Scrutiny of medical records for cases and control children with a diagnosis of blood group incompatibility verified the diagnosis in close to 90% of children. (nih.gov)
  • Consequently, this study assessed the membranes resulting mainly from break burden of NNJ and its predisposing factors in down of red blood cells. (who.int)