Dextrans: A group of glucose polymers made by certain bacteria. Dextrans are used therapeutically as plasma volume expanders and anticoagulants. They are also commonly used in biological experimentation and in industry for a wide variety of purposes.Dextran Sulfate: Long-chain polymer of glucose containing 17-20% sulfur. It has been used as an anticoagulant and also has been shown to inhibit the binding of HIV-1 to CD4-POSITIVE T-LYMPHOCYTES. It is commonly used as both an experimental and clinical laboratory reagent and has been investigated for use as an antiviral agent, in the treatment of hypolipidemia, and for the prevention of free radical damage, among other applications.Iron-Dextran Complex: A complex of ferric oxyhydroxide with dextrans of 5000 to 7000 daltons in a viscous solution containing 50 mg/ml of iron. It is supplied as a parenteral preparation and is used as a hematinic. (Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed, p1292)Colitis: Inflammation of the COLON section of the large intestine (INTESTINE, LARGE), usually with symptoms such as DIARRHEA (often with blood and mucus), ABDOMINAL PAIN, and FEVER.DextranaseFluorescein-5-isothiocyanate: Fluorescent probe capable of being conjugated to tissue and proteins. It is used as a label in fluorescent antibody staining procedures as well as protein- and amino acid-binding techniques.DEAE-Dextran: Used as a support for ion-exchange chromatography.Colon: The segment of LARGE INTESTINE between the CECUM and the RECTUM. It includes the ASCENDING COLON; the TRANSVERSE COLON; the DESCENDING COLON; and the SIGMOID COLON.Leuconostoc: A genus of gram-positive, facultatively anaerobic bacteria whose growth is dependent on the presence of a fermentable carbohydrate. It is nonpathogenic to plants and animals, including humans.Intestinal Mucosa: Lining of the INTESTINES, consisting of an inner EPITHELIUM, a middle LAMINA PROPRIA, and an outer MUSCULARIS MUCOSAE. In the SMALL INTESTINE, the mucosa is characterized by a series of folds and abundance of absorptive cells (ENTEROCYTES) with MICROVILLI.Capillary Permeability: The property of blood capillary ENDOTHELIUM that allows for the selective exchange of substances between the blood and surrounding tissues and through membranous barriers such as the BLOOD-AIR BARRIER; BLOOD-AQUEOUS BARRIER; BLOOD-BRAIN BARRIER; BLOOD-NERVE BARRIER; BLOOD-RETINAL BARRIER; and BLOOD-TESTIS BARRIER. Small lipid-soluble molecules such as carbon dioxide and oxygen move freely by diffusion. Water and water-soluble molecules cannot pass through the endothelial walls and are dependent on microscopic pores. These pores show narrow areas (TIGHT JUNCTIONS) which may limit large molecule movement.Plasma Substitutes: Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.Laryngeal Edema: Abnormal accumulation of fluid in tissues of any part of the LARYNX, commonly associated with laryngeal injuries and allergic reactions.Permeability: Property of membranes and other structures to permit passage of light, heat, gases, liquids, metabolites, and mineral ions.Laryngismus: A disorder in which the adductor muscles of the VOCAL CORDS exhibit increased activity leading to laryngeal spasm. Laryngismus causes closure of the VOCAL FOLDS and airflow obstruction during inspiration.Hemodilution: Reduction of blood viscosity usually by the addition of cell free solutions. Used clinically (1) in states of impaired microcirculation, (2) for replacement of intraoperative blood loss without homologous blood transfusion, and (3) in cardiopulmonary bypass and hypothermia.Erythrocyte Aggregation: The formation of clumps of RED BLOOD CELLS under low or non-flow conditions, resulting from the attraction forces between the red blood cells. The cells adhere to each other in rouleaux aggregates. Slight mechanical force, such as occurs in the circulation, is enough to disperse these aggregates. Stronger or weaker than normal aggregation may result from a variety of effects in the ERYTHROCYTE MEMBRANE or in BLOOD PLASMA. The degree of aggregation is affected by ERYTHROCYTE DEFORMABILITY, erythrocyte membrane sialylation, masking of negative surface charge by plasma proteins, etc. BLOOD VISCOSITY and the ERYTHROCYTE SEDIMENTATION RATE are affected by the amount of erythrocyte aggregation and are parameters used to measure the aggregation.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Ficoll: A sucrose polymer of high molecular weight.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Mice, Inbred C57BLMolecular Weight: The sum of the weight of all the atoms in a molecule.Fluoresceins: A family of spiro(isobenzofuran-1(3H),9'-(9H)xanthen)-3-one derivatives. These are used as dyes, as indicators for various metals, and as fluorescent labels in immunoassays.Heparin: A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.AIDS-Related Complex: A prodromal phase of infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Laboratory criteria separating AIDS-related complex (ARC) from AIDS include elevated or hyperactive B-cell humoral immune responses, compared to depressed or normal antibody reactivity in AIDS; follicular or mixed hyperplasia in ARC lymph nodes, leading to lymphocyte degeneration and depletion more typical of AIDS; evolving succession of histopathological lesions such as localization of Kaposi's sarcoma, signaling the transition to the full-blown AIDS.Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.Homosexuality: The sexual attraction or relationship between members of the same SEX.HIV Infections: Includes the spectrum of human immunodeficiency virus infections that range from asymptomatic seropositivity, thru AIDS-related complex (ARC), to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS).Zidovudine: A dideoxynucleoside compound in which the 3'-hydroxy group on the sugar moiety has been replaced by an azido group. This modification prevents the formation of phosphodiester linkages which are needed for the completion of nucleic acid chains. The compound is a potent inhibitor of HIV replication, acting as a chain-terminator of viral DNA during reverse transcription. It improves immunologic function, partially reverses the HIV-induced neurological dysfunction, and improves certain other clinical abnormalities associated with AIDS. Its principal toxic effect is dose-dependent suppression of bone marrow, resulting in anemia and leukopenia.Allergy and Immunology: A medical specialty concerned with the hypersensitivity of the individual to foreign substances and protection from the resultant infection or disorder.Access to Information: Individual's rights to obtain and use information collected or generated by others.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Journal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Immune System Diseases: Disorders caused by abnormal or absent immunologic mechanisms, whether humoral, cell-mediated, or both.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Peer Review, Research: The evaluation by experts of the quality and pertinence of research or research proposals of other experts in the same field. Peer review is used by editors in deciding which submissions warrant publication, by granting agencies to determine which proposals should be funded, and by academic institutions in tenure decisions.Oxazepam: A benzodiazepine used in the treatment of anxiety, alcohol withdrawal, and insomnia.Blood Specimen Collection: The taking of a blood sample to determine its character as a whole, to identify levels of its component cells, chemicals, gases, or other constituents, to perform pathological examination, etc.Administration, Oral: The giving of drugs, chemicals, or other substances by mouth.Half-Life: The time it takes for a substance (drug, radioactive nuclide, or other) to lose half of its pharmacologic, physiologic, or radiologic activity.Area Under Curve: A statistical means of summarizing information from a series of measurements on one individual. It is frequently used in clinical pharmacology where the AUC from serum levels can be interpreted as the total uptake of whatever has been administered. As a plot of the concentration of a drug against time, after a single dose of medicine, producing a standard shape curve, it is a means of comparing the bioavailability of the same drug made by different companies. (From Winslade, Dictionary of Clinical Research, 1992)Dendritic Cells: Specialized cells of the hematopoietic system that have branch-like extensions. They are found throughout the lymphatic system, and in non-lymphoid tissues such as SKIN and the epithelia of the intestinal, respiratory, and reproductive tracts. They trap and process ANTIGENS, and present them to T-CELLS, thereby stimulating CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNITY. They are different from the non-hematopoietic FOLLICULAR DENDRITIC CELLS, which have a similar morphology and immune system function, but with respect to humoral immunity (ANTIBODY PRODUCTION).Antigen Presentation: The process by which antigen is presented to lymphocytes in a form they can recognize. This is performed by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Some antigens require processing before they can be recognized. Antigen processing consists of ingestion and partial digestion of the antigen by the APC, followed by presentation of fragments on the cell surface. (From Rosen et al., Dictionary of Immunology, 1989)Cell Differentiation: Progressive restriction of the developmental potential and increasing specialization of function that leads to the formation of specialized cells, tissues, and organs.Histocompatibility Antigens Class II: Large, transmembrane, non-covalently linked glycoproteins (alpha and beta). Both chains can be polymorphic although there is more structural variation in the beta chains. The class II antigens in humans are called HLA-D ANTIGENS and are coded by a gene on chromosome 6. In mice, two genes named IA and IE on chromosome 17 code for the H-2 antigens. The antigens are found on B-lymphocytes, macrophages, epidermal cells, and sperm and are thought to mediate the competence of and cellular cooperation in the immune response. The term IA antigens used to refer only to the proteins encoded by the IA genes in the mouse, but is now used as a generic term for any class II histocompatibility antigen.Monocytes: Large, phagocytic mononuclear leukocytes produced in the vertebrate BONE MARROW and released into the BLOOD; contain a large, oval or somewhat indented nucleus surrounded by voluminous cytoplasm and numerous organelles.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.Islets of Langerhans Transplantation: The transference of pancreatic islets within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Click Chemistry: Organic chemistry methodology that mimics the modular nature of various biosynthetic processes. It uses highly reliable and selective reactions designed to "click" i.e., rapidly join small modular units together in high yield, without offensive byproducts. In combination with COMBINATORIAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES, it is used for the synthesis of new compounds and combinatorial libraries.Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight: Heparin fractions with a molecular weight usually between 4000 and 6000 kD. These low-molecular-weight fractions are effective antithrombotic agents. Their administration reduces the risk of hemorrhage, they have a longer half-life, and their platelet interactions are reduced in comparison to unfractionated heparin. They also provide an effective prophylaxis against postoperative major pulmonary embolism.BrazilRegional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.PeriodicalsBlood Flow Velocity: A value equal to the total volume flow divided by the cross-sectional area of the vascular bed.Constriction: The act of constricting.
Injectable forms include iron dextran and iron sucrose. They work by providing the iron needed for making red blood cells. Iron ... For parenteral irons it is recommended that there be a period of 4 weeks before repeating blood test to allow the body to ... In many cases, use of intravenous iron such as ferric carboxymaltose has lower risks of adverse events than a blood transfusion ... This has included dextrans, sucrose, carboxymaltose and more recently Isomaltoside 1000.[citation needed] One formulation of ...
He helped to develop bacterial polyglucose dextran as a blood plasma substitute. Stacey was awarded the Meldola Medal of the ...
High-viscous Dextran also has potential complications which can be physiological and mechanical. It may crystallize on ... However, CO2 gas does not allow the clearing of blood and endometrial debris during the procedure, which could make the imaging ... Glycine metabolizes into ammonia and can cross the blood brain barrier, causing agitation, vomiting and coma. Mannitol 5% ... These solutions include glucose, glycine, dextran (Hyskon), mannitol, sorbitol and a mannitol/sorbital mixture (Purisol). Water ...
1984 Oct;62(10):1333-7. Myocardial blood flow and O2-supply following dextran-haemodilution and methaemoglobinaemia in the dog ... Biro GP, Beresford-Kroeger D, Hendry P. Am Heart J. 1982 May;103(5):870-8. The effect of propranolol on blood viscosity changes ...
... is a blood product made from the liquid portion of whole blood. It is used to treat conditions in which there are low blood ... Crystalloid, colloid solutions containing human serum albumin or plasma protein fraction, hydroxyethyl starch, and dextran are ... The potential viral infectivity of FFP probably is similar to that of whole blood and red blood cells. The rate of ... In the United States it refers to the fluid portion of one unit of human blood that has been centrifuged, separated, and frozen ...
... he discovered that dextran could be used as a replacement for blood plasma in blood transfusions, for which there could be a ... The product Macrodex, a dextran solution, was launched four years later. Dextran-based products were to play a significant role ... These were also based on dextran and discoveries in Tiselius' department, this time by Jerker Porath and Per Flodin. In 1967 ... researched various uses for the polysaccharide dextran. Together with the medical researcher Anders Grönwall, ...
The polymer dextran is one prominent example of a very useful polymer. It is produced at commercial scale for uses in ... cholesterol-lowering agent or blood plasma expander, and more. Alternansucrase Ito, K; Ito, S; Shimamura, T; Weyand, S; ... "Dextransucrase and the mechanism for dextran biosynthesis". Carbohydrate Research. 343: 3039-3048. doi:10.1016/j.carres.2008.09 ...
This discovery was the basis for development of a mass production process for dextran, and its use in a dextran-based blood ... and dextran. Jeanes was able to isolate dextrose-producing bacteria from samples of bacteria-contaminated root beer supplied by ... whose studies focused mainly on carbohydrates and the development of Dextran, a substance that replaced plasma in the Korean ...
Dextran-Haemoglobin was developed by Dextro-Sang Corp as a veterinary product, and was a conjugate of the polymer dextran with ... This blood will also serve as a blood donor to all blood types. Pharmed blood may be used in human trials in 2013. Artificial ... Blood transfusion Bloodless surgery Theatrical blood Blood plasma substitute (disambiguation) Induced Blood stem cells ... A blood substitute (also called artificial blood or blood surrogate) is a substance used to mimic and fulfill some functions of ...
... such as dextrans, human serum albumin, or fresh frozen plasma. In these emergency situations, a plasma expander is a more ... royal blood, mixed-blood and blood relative. Autotransfusion Blood as food Blood donation Blood pressure Blood substitutes (" ... of blood is blood plasma, a fluid that is the blood's liquid medium, which by itself is straw-yellow in color. The blood plasma ... "artificial blood") Blood test Hemophobia List of human blood components Luminol, a visual test for blood left at crime scenes. ...
... works by leading venous blood through a column containing beads coated with antibodies to apolipoprotein B (the ... main protein of LDL particles), dextran sulfate cellulose beads, modified polyacrylate beads, or by precipitating LDL with ...
R. Ballerstädt; R. Ehwald (1994). "Suitability of aqueous dispersions of dextran and Concanavalin A for glucose sensing in ... A blood glucose meter is an electronic device for measuring the blood glucose level. A relatively small drop of blood is placed ... For example, a patient using CGM with a blood glucose of 100 mg/dl on their CGM system might take no action if their blood ... Blood glucose monitoring is a way of testing the concentration of glucose in the blood (glycemia). Particularly important in ...
C with a mixture of dextran and diluted blood prior to storage. In 1960 Lapchinsky confirmed that similar storage periods were ... Prior to this, kidneys had been stored at normal body temperatures using blood or diluted blood perfusates, but no successful ... Oxygen consumption and blood flow in the hypothermic, perfused kidney. Am J Physiol 1959;197:1111-1114. Martin DR, Scott DF, ... Joyce and Proctor reported the successful use of a simple dextran based perfusate for 72-hour storage of dog kidneys. 10 out of ...
B05AA01 Serum albumin B05AA02 Other plasma protein fractions B05AA03 Fluorocarbon blood substitutes B05AA05 Dextran B05AA06 ... Subgroup B05 is part of the anatomical group B Blood and blood forming organs. Codes for veterinary use (ATCvet codes) can be ... B05AX01 Erythrocytes B05AX02 Thrombocytes B05AX03 Blood plasma B05AX04 Stem cells from umbilical cord blood B05BA01 Amino acids ... ATC code B05 Blood substitutes and perfusion solutions is a therapeutic subgroup of the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical ...
Fresh frozen plasma Platelet concentrates Packed red blood cells Whole blood Rho(D) immune globulin Anti-rabies immunoglobulin ... Anti-tetanus immunoglobulin Human normal immunoglobulinα Coagulation factor VIIIα Coagulation factor IXα Dextran 70 Bisoprolol ... included in this list for prevention of low blood pressure associated with spinal anaesthesia during caesarean section) ...
Fresh frozen plasma Platelet concentrates Packed red blood cells Whole blood Anti-rabies immunoglobulin Anti-tetanus ... immunoglobulin Human normal immunoglobulinα Coagulation factor VIIIα Coagulation factor IXα Dextran 70 No listings in this ...
The larger dextrans (>60,000 Da) are excreted poorly from the kidney, so remain in the blood for as long as weeks until they ... Resource on dextran properties and structure of dextran polymers Dextrans at the US National Library of Medicine Medical ... It also increases blood sugar levels. Dextran is used in the osmotic stress technique for applying osmotic pressure to ... Dental plaque is rich in dextrans. Medicinally it is used as an antithrombotic (antiplatelet), to reduce blood viscosity, and ...
... blood group B branched chain alpha-1,3-galactosidase EC 3.2.1.167: blood group B linear chain alpha-1,3-galactosidase EC 3.2. ... branched-dextran exo-1,2-a-glucosidase EC 3.2.1.116: glucan 1,4-a-maltotriohydrolase EC 3.2.1.117: amygdalin b-glucosidase EC ... blood-group-substance endo-1,4-b-galactosidase EC 3.2.1.103: keratan-sulfate endo-1,4-b-galactosidase EC 3.2.1.104: steryl-b- ... dextran 1,6-a-isomaltotriosidase EC 3.2.1.96: mannosyl-glycoprotein endo-b-N-acetylglucosaminidase EC 3.2.1.97: glycopeptide a- ...
... is a type of fluid given by injection into a vein to expand blood volume. Specifically it is used for shock such as ... It works by pulling fluid from the extravascular space into the blood vessels. Dextran 70 was approved for medical use in 1947 ... "Dextran 70". The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. Archived from the original on 3 January 2017. Retrieved 8 ... "Dextran 70 6% in Sod. chloride 0.9%". International Drug Price Indicator Guide. Retrieved 8 December 2016. Hamilton, Richart ( ...
The name "viridans" is somewhat of a misnomer, as many species do not produce any hemolysis on blood agar. From a ... Viridans streptococci have the unique ability to synthesize dextrans from glucose, which allows them to adhere to fibrin- ... Isolates from the S. bovis group are most frequently encountered in blood cultures from patients with colon cancer. However, S ... producing a green coloration on blood agar plates (hence the name "viridans", from Latin "vĭrĭdis", green), or nonhemolytic. ...
Blood doping is the injection of red blood cells, related blood products that contain red blood cells, or artificial oxygen ... Desmopressin, plasma expanders (such as glycerol; intravenous administration of albumin, dextran, hydroxyethyl starch and ... and subsequently injecting the stored blood immediately before competition. The resulting unnatural level of red blood cells ... This is done by extracting and storing one's own blood prior to an athletic competition, well in advance of the competition so ...
If a blood clot has already formed in a blood vessel, treatment will differ significantly from clot prevention. Hemolytic ... dextran and regional anaesthesia as thromboprophylaxis". Health Technology Assessment (Winchester, England). 9 (49): iii-iv, ix ... One of the goals of blood clot prevention is to limit venous stasis as this is a significant risk factor for forming blood ... "Venous Thromboembolism (Blood Clots) Facts". Division of Blood Disorders National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental ...
Blood. 115 (1): 97-106. doi:10.1182/blood-2009-04-217240. PMID 19855083. Pratt CW, Church FC (May 1992). "Heparin binding to ... dextran sulfate-agarose chromatography, gel filtration on ACA-44, and DEAE-Sephacel chromatography. The structure (primary ... Hayashi S (December 1993). "Urinary protein C inhibitor binding region in the B beta-chain of human fibrinogen". Blood ... Blood. 74 (2): 722-8. PMID 2752144. Zheng X, Geiger M, Ecke S, Bielek E, Donner P, Eberspächer U, Schleuning WD, Binder BR ( ...
The human BLT2 receptor is expressed in a wide range of tissues including spleen, blood leukocytes, liver, ovary, pancreas, ... Furthermore, BLT2 receptor knock-out mice mount of more severe intestinal inflammation response to dextran sodium sulfate than ... In response to the oral administration of the inflammation-inducer dextran sodium sulfate, Blt2 receptor knockout mice, ... is proposed to occur in a subset of cells in various cancer tissues to promote their movement from a tumor site into blood and ...
Blood. 100 (4): 1354-61. doi:10.1182/blood-2001-11-0017. PMID 12149218. This article incorporates text from the United States ... this receptor or treated with a selective EP4 antagonist proved to be far more susceptible to the development of dextran sodium ... The ductus must close at birth to allow blood flow into the lungs. In mice, this is accomplished by turning off the mechanism ... The ductus operates in the fetus to shunt blood from the pulmonary artery to the proximal descending aorta thereby allowing ...
Effects of heparin on polymerase chain reaction for blood white cells»։ J. Clin. Lab. Anal. 13 (3): 133-40։ 1999։ PMID 10323479 ... Mechanism of inhibitory effect of dextran sulfate and heparin on replication of human immunodeficiency virus in vitro»։ Proc. ... Higgins, C. (October 2007)։ «The use of heparin in preparing samples for blood-gas analysis»։ Medical Laboratory Observer ... CBS News, Blood-thinning drug under suspicion Archived 2012-10-23 at the Wayback Machine. ...
Dextran from Leuconostoc mesenteroides for your research needs. Find product specific information including CAS, MSDS, ... Dextran (48,000-90,000) may be used to induce blood aggregation and as a viscosity plasma expander (HVPE). ... Dextrans of less than 60,000Da are generally considered low molecular weight dextrans. Low molecular weight dextrans are often ... Dextran Dextran is a polymer of anhydroglucose. It is composed of approximately 95% alpha-D-(1-6) linkages. The remaining a(1-3 ...
Fresh and cryopreserved hepatocytes were tested in an in vitro whole-blood model using ABO-compatible blood. The ability to ... The instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) is a plausible underlying cause for this cell loss. The present study ... Control of IBMIR Induced by Fresh and Cryopreserved Hepatocytes by Low Molecular Weight Dextran Sulfate Versus Heparin. ... Therefore, LMW-DS inhibits the cascade systems and maintains the cell counts in blood triggered by both fresh and cryopreserved ...
There was a slight increase in the measured blood volume in both groups, which was probably artifactual and related to the ... after the arterial occlusion of sham operation and was accomplished by phlebotomy and infusions of low molecular weight dextran ... There was a slight increase in the measured blood volume in both groups, which was probably artifactual and related to the ... There was a slight increase in the measured blood volume in both groups, which was probably artifactual and related to the ...
Public Health Blood Loss Dextran Adrenal Function Acute Blood Loss Laboratory of Standardization and Control of Endocrine ... V. B. Koziner, The Mechanism of the Physiological Action of Dextran when Used in the Treatment of Acute Blood Loss. Authors ... Effect of pituitary somatotropic hormone on adrenal function in rabbits transfused with dextran after acute blood loss. ...
Wallace MCTator CH: Successful improvement of blood pressure, cardiac output, and spinal cord blood flow after experimental ... Wallace MCTator CH: Successful improvement of blood pressure, cardiac output, and spinal cord blood flow after experimental ... Guha ATator CHPiper I: Effect of a calcium channel blocker on posttraumatic spinal cord blood flow. J Neurosurg 66:423-4301987J ... Guha ATator CHPiper I: Effect of a calcium channel blocker on posttraumatic spinal cord blood flow. J Neurosurg 66:423-4301987J ...
The blood‐brain barrier (BBB) is formed in part by vascular endothelial cells that constitute the capillaries and microvessels ... Development of blood‐brain barrier endothelial cells. Springer 46:1‐7.. Sandoval, K.E. and Witt, K.A. 2008. Blood‐brain barrier ... Fluorescein Isothiocyanate (FITC)‐Dextran Extravasation as a Measure of Blood‐Brain Barrier Permeability. ... High and low molecular weight fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-dextrans to assess blood‐brain barrier disruption: Technical ...
S4 (n = 4). We found that by day 7, dextran hydrogels induced more blood flow to the burn wound area than did the control ... 6A, i). For example, the blood flow with hydrogel was 481 perfusion units, whereas the blood flow was only 385 perfusion units ... Dextran hydrogel as a therapeutic modality. (A) Dextran-based hydrogel promotes neovascularization: Precise structure ... high-ratio dextran hydrogel scaffolds are significantly softer than low-ratio dextran hydrogels (Fig. 2A; Fig. S2A). From our ...
Iron Dextran Injection: learn about side effects, dosage, special precautions, and more on MedlinePlus ... Iron dextran injection is used to treat iron-deficiency anemia (a lower than normal number of red blood cells due to too little ... blood in the urine. Iron dextran injection may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems ... Your doctor will check your blood pressure and order certain lab tests to check your bodys response to iron dextran injection. ...
Although zidovudine (AZT) has shown promise in prolonging life in patients with AIDS and severe ARC, it has significant blood ... A Study of Dextran Sulfate in HIV-Infected Patients and in Patients With AIDS or AIDS Related Complex (ARC). The safety and ... A phase I/II dose ranging trial of oral dextran sulfate in HIV p24 antigen positive individuals (ACTG 060): results of a safety ... Dextran Sulfate. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Evaluation. Drug Therapy, Combination. Acquired Immunodeficiency ...
Figure 3: Dextran and Ficoll do not directly activate neutrophils. Blood was subjected to the dextran equivalent of 1-step high ... dextran w/v in 0.9% NaCl) and/or ratio of dextran volume to that of blood (1 : 10 to 1 : 1) [4, 5, 23-25]. Including our ... Blood Reconstitution. For the reconstitution of blood with reconfiguration of various components, blood was subjected to high- ... dextran w/v in a 1 : 1.5 dextran to blood ratio) results in a final concentration of 2%, we examined the effect of diluting the ...
Changes in Blood Markers [ Time Frame: Day 35 ]. Changes in blood markers of phosphate ... Iron-Dextran Complex. Dextrans. Trace Elements. Micronutrients. Growth Substances. Physiological Effects of Drugs. Hematinics. ... Drug Information available for: Iron, elemental Dextran 70 Iron dextran Ferric carboxymaltose ... Iron Dextran in Iron Deficiency Secondary to Heavy Uterine Bleeding. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the ...
18 blood samples are obtained. Blood is withdrawn before the infusion, at the end of the infusion, and 30 and 60 minutes after ... Single Dose Pharmacokinetics of Oral Dextran Sulfate (UA001) and Intravenous Dextran Sulfate in Healthy Volunteers. This study ... Single Dose Pharmacokinetics of Oral Dextran Sulfate (UA001) and Intravenous Dextran Sulfate in Healthy Volunteers. ... To evaluate its effect on blood coagulation.. DS has been reported to have anti-HIV activity. However, it is not known how much ...
Learn about the potential side effects of iron dextran. Includes common and rare side effects information for consumers and ... blood in the urine. *bluish color of the fingernails, lips, skin, palms, or nail beds ... Applies to iron dextran: injection solution. Along with its needed effects, iron dextran may cause some unwanted effects. ... Applies to iron dextran: injectable solution. Hypersensitivity. Uncommon (0.1% to 1%): Anaphylactoid reactions (including ...
... dextran 70 in normal saline as a volume expander was studied in eleven subjects after removal of 500 ml blood. Changes in blood ... dextran 70 in normal saline as a volume expander was studied in eleven subjects after removal of 500 ml blood. Changes in blood ... Dextran Blood Volume Volume Effect Massive Transfusion Autologous Plasma The experiments were carried out in the Department of ... Williams, J. A., andJ. Fine: Measurement of blood volume with a new apparatus. New Engl. J. Med.264, 842 (1961).PubMedCrossRef ...
Q. Eichbaum, S. Foran, and S. Dzik, "Is iron gluconate really safer than iron dextran?" Blood, vol. 101, no. 9, pp. 3756-3757, ... Data for iron dextrans was combined because reporting databases did not distinguish between the different iron dextran ... the iron dextrans can be administered as TDI [14, 34-36]. The accelerated TDI of iron dextran was also recently reported safe ... IV iron dextran was more effective than oral iron sulfate in increasing Hb and in improving iron parameters. Van Wyck et al. [ ...
We also Provide Trading Suppliers & Manufacture for 9004-54-0 Dextran. ... Blood Cell Separation: Dextran can be applied in the reversible aggregation of human red blood cells, yet the mechanistic ... Dextran Structure. Dextran is an α-D-1,6-glucose-linked glucan with side-chains 1-3 linked to the backbone units of the Dextran ... Derivatives of dextran in particular DEAE-dextran are often also used.. *Eye Drops or Similar Solutions: Dextran is often used ...
The aim of our work was to analyze the hemocompatibility and immuno-safety of a new type of dextran-coated SPIONs (SPIONdex) ... Non-immunogenic dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles: a biocompatible, size-tunable contrast agent for ... Blood stability ex vivo. The blood stability of SPIONdex was evaluated using EDTA-anticoagulated rabbit whole blood (Figure S3 ... Notes: (A) Investigation on the blood stability of USPIOdex in EDTA-anticoagulated rabbit whole blood. Blood sample was mixed ...
The larger dextrans (>60,000 Da) are excreted poorly from the kidney, so remain in the blood for as long as weeks until they ... Resource on dextran properties and structure of dextran polymers Dextrans at the US National Library of Medicine Medical ... It also increases blood sugar levels. Dextran is used in the osmotic stress technique for applying osmotic pressure to ... Dental plaque is rich in dextrans. Medicinally it is used as an antithrombotic (antiplatelet), to reduce blood viscosity, and ...
Iron dextran is used to treat iron deficiencies and iron deficiency anemia (low red blood cells). Iron dextran may also be used ... Iron is important for many functions in the body, especially for the transport of oxygen in the blood. ... Iron dextran is a form of the mineral iron. ... iron dextran. Skip to the navigation Pronunciation: EYE urn DEX ... How is iron dextran given?. Iron dextran is injected into a vein through an IV. You may be shown how to use an IV at home. Do ...
... iron dextran explanation free. What is iron dextran? Meaning of iron dextran medical term. What does iron dextran mean? ... Looking for online definition of iron dextran in the Medical Dictionary? ... Red blood cells in the circulation contain 60 percent to 80 percent of body iron. Old red blood cels are destroyed in the ... iron dextran. Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.. Related to iron dextran: iron sucrose, iron dextran ...
Fam96a deficiency in mice resulted in increased susceptibility to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. Importantly, ... Fam96a deficiency in mice results in increased susceptibility to dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis. Importantly, ... Body weight, stool softness, and blood in the rectum or fur were recorded daily. Disease Activity Index (DAI) was calculated as ... Mice were gavaged with 4 kDa FITC-dextran and, 4 h later, the concentration of serum FITC-dextran was measured as an indicator ...
It works by restoring blood plasma lost through severe bleeding. Severe blood loss can decrease oxygen levels, which can lead ... High-molecular weight dextran is a plasma volume expander derived from natural sources of sugar (glucose). ... Dextran is used to treat hypovolemia (a decrease in the volume of circulating blood plasma), that can result from severe blood ... If possible before you receive dextran, tell your doctor if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder, a blood cell ...
It works by restoring blood plasma lost through severe bleeding. Severe blood loss can decrease oxygen levels and can lead to ... High-molecular weight dextran is a plasma volume expander made from natural sources of sugar (glucose). ... Dextran is used to treat hypovolemia (decreased volume of circulating blood plasma), that can result from surgery, trauma or ... and other vital signs will be watched closely while you are receiving high-molecular weight dextran. Your blood will also need ...
It works by restoring blood plasma lost through severe bleeding. Severe blood loss can decrease oxygen levels and can lead to ... High-molecular weight dextran is a plasma volume expander made from natural sources of sugar (glucose). ... Dextran is used to treat hypovolemia (decreased volume of circulating blood plasma), that can result from surgery, trauma or ... What is high-molecular weight dextran?. High-molecular weight dextran is a plasma volume expander made from natural sources of ...
... iron dextran powder online Wholesalers - choose iron dextran powder from 162 list of China iron dextran powder Manufacturers. ... to treat animals blood system. Commodity Name: Multi - Vitamins Veterinary Products Other Names: Iron dextran complex, ferric ... Iron dextran Product name: iron dextran Alias: ferric hydroxide dextran complex; Ferric dextran; iron-dextran; Iron dextran CAS ... 54-0 Dextran 20 Dextran 40 Product Description Dextran Synonyms: Dextran 20; Dextran 40; Dextran 70 CAS: 9004-54-0 EINECS: 232- ...
  • In each group the animals were about equally divided into 1) an acute protocol with regional cerebral blood flow measurements by a radioactive microsphere technique and sacrifice at the end of the acute experiment, and 2) a chronic protocol with survival for 1 week to permit daily neurological assessment and final histopathological examination but without blood flow measurements. (elsevier.com)
  • There was a slight increase in the measured blood volume in both groups, which was probably artifactual and related to the method of calcultion. (elsevier.com)
  • The results of cerebral blood flow measurements, assessment of neurological condition, and measurement of infarct size are given in Part 2 of this report. (elsevier.com)
  • Fam96a deficiency in mice resulted in increased susceptibility to dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis. (frontiersin.org)
  • Among these, dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) administration is a commonly used method, which can induce reproducible acute colitis characterized by bloody diarrhea, ulcerations, and leukocyte infiltration ( Perše and Cerar, 2012 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Furthermore, intestinal epithelial cell (IEC)-specific loss of CD47 does not induce spontaneous immune-mediated intestinal barrier disruption but results in defective mucosal repair after biopsy-induced colonic wounding or Dextran Sulfate Sodium (DSS)-induced mucosal damage. (nature.com)
  • Hepatic cytochrome P450 (P450)-dependent drug-metabolizing enzyme activities and susceptibility to a hepatotoxin, d -galactosamine, were determined in rats with dextran sulfate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis to assess whether liver function is affected in the model of inflammatory bowel disease. (aspetjournals.org)
  • 3. Normal values for red blood cell parameters in adults RBC parameter Men Women Hemoglobin, g/dL 15.7 (14.0 to 17.5) 13.8 (12.3 to 15.3) Hematocrit, percent 46 (42 to 50) 40 (36 to 45) RBC count, million/microL 5.2 (4.5 to 5.9) 4.6 (4.1 to 5.1) Reticulocyte count, cells/microL 20,000 to 110,000 20,000 to 110,000 Reticulocyte percentage 1.6 ± 0.5 1.4 ± 0.5 (Schrier, 2018). (mindmeister.com)
  • Underappreciated menstrual blood loss (Schrier, 2018). (mindmeister.com)
  • In addition, the attached polymers may be selected from the group consisting of acrylamide polymers, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol, and dextran. (google.es)
  • 4. A material according to claim 1, wherein said polymers are selected from the group consisting of polyacrylamide, polydimethylacrylamide, polymethacrylamide, polyvinylpyrrolidone, polyvinyl alcohol, polyethylene glycol and dextran. (google.es)
  • 150793/1975 and 24651/1976, blood-compatible materials which are prepared from hydrogel obtained by crosslinking hydrophilic polymers such as poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) and polyvinyl alcohol are disclosed. (google.es)
  • However, the blood compatibility thereof is similar to those of the hydrophilic polymers. (google.es)
  • Labeled dextrans are hydrophilic polysaccharides most commonly used in microscopy studies to monitor cell division, track the movement of live cells, and to report the hydrodynamic properties of the cytoplasmic matrix. (thermofisher.com)
  • Use of dextrans as long and hydrophilic spacer arms improves the performance of immobilized proteins acting on macromolecules. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • 125493/1974 and 125978/1976 disclose processes for improving blood compatibility by graft polymerizing the above mentioned hydrophilic polymer(s) onto the surface of a base material. (google.es)
  • The aim of the study was to examine the individual and combined effects of 7.5% NaCl, 6% dextran-70 or 10% hetastarch on ventricular arrhythmias, QRS amplitudes and hemodynamics following 60 min of hemorrhagic shock. (ahajournals.org)
  • Conclusion: Small volumes of 7.5% NaCl/6% Dextran-70 in the rat model of hemorrhagic shock led to increased QRS amplitude and ventricular arrhythmias, and 7.5% NaCl/10% hetastarch led to a 63% mortality and severe arrhythmias. (ahajournals.org)
  • Dextran fractions do not appear to be included in the lists of permitted additives (ingredients) for pharmaceutical formulations such as ointments and creams for topical use and tablets and capsules for oral use. (lookchem.com)
  • Conclusion HF or HE dialysis membranes do not remove clinically significant amounts of iron sucrose or dextran formulations over a 4-hour HD session. (umsystem.edu)
  • Dextrans have major use in food formulations as stabilizing, emulsifying, texturizing and gelling agent. (ispub.com)
  • Eventually, she found a way to mass produce dextran, a type of polymer, so that it could be used as a blood volume "expander" to sustain accident and trauma victims who have lost massive amounts of blood and need to get to a hospital for a transfusion. (federallabs.org)
  • Meanwhile, researchers in Sweden and England had been investigating the use of dextran as a potential blood volume expander. (federallabs.org)
  • When the Korean War broke out in 1950, Jeanes and her colleagues were able to make a dextran-based blood volume expander that the Army put to use. (federallabs.org)
  • The blood volume expander had many advantages: it could be kept longer than blood plasma without refrigeration, it could be sterilized to prevent infections, it was one-third the cost of plasma and it remained viable in the blood long enough to keep patients alive until they could get a transfusion. (federallabs.org)
  • If possible before you receive dextran, tell your doctor if you have a bleeding or blood clotting disorder, a blood cell disorder, heart disease or congestive heart failure, kidney disease, a stomach or intestinal disorder, pulmonary edema (fluid in the lungs), urination problems, a food or drug allergy, or if you are on a low-salt diet. (cardiosmart.org)
  • Iron-dextran therapy rescues both alopecia and hematologic alterations of Tmprss6 −/− mice, providing causal evidence that the anemic phenotype of these mutant mice results from the blockade of intestinal iron export into plasma after dietary absorption. (bloodjournal.org)
  • used in ferrokinetics tests to determine the rate at which iron is cleared from the plasma and incorporated in red blood cells. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It works by restoring blood plasma lost through severe bleeding. (cardiosmart.org)
  • Plasma is needed to circulate red blood cells that deliver oxygen throughout the body. (cardiosmart.org)
  • Dextran is used to treat hypovolemia (a decrease in the volume of circulating blood plasma), that can result from severe blood loss after surgery, injury, or other causes of bleeding. (cardiosmart.org)
  • We examined blood flow and plasma antioxidant status, spinal cord and skeletal muscle above and below the cross-clamp, as well as in the liver and the kidney. (medicalexpress.net.br)
  • Blood products (ie, red blood cells, plasma [clotting factors], and platelets) should be given in equivalent amounts - in other words, in a 1:1:1 ratio. (mindmeister.com)
  • 5. Pathophysiology: Within 24 hours of blood loss, lost plasma is replaced by mobilizing water and electrolytes from tissues and interstitial spaces into the vascular system. (mindmeister.com)
  • What colour is blood plasma? (proprofs.com)
  • Each patient had 12 dextran-sulfate plasma adsorption lipoprotein apheresis sessions over a period of 9 weeks. (frontiersin.org)
  • Dextrans are employed as blood plasma substitutes, plasminogen activators, antithrombogenic agents and in treatment of iron deficiency anaemia [9, (ispub.com)
  • It lists the following condition: 'Plasma and platelet components prepared from Whole Blood collections or collected during apheresis procedures from these donors should NOT be distributed for transfusion. (aabb.org)
  • If other blood centers either don't have the alternative procedure approval or don't specifically ask them about testosterone therapy they are most likely routinely collecting and distributing plasma and platelet products from these donors. (aabb.org)
  • Although zidovudine (AZT) has shown promise in prolonging life in patients with AIDS and severe ARC, it has significant blood toxicities. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Severe blood loss can decrease oxygen levels, which can lead to organ failure, brain damage, coma, and possibly death. (cardiosmart.org)
  • Equivalent small stab injuries in transgenic mice given GCV to ablate reactive astrocytes caused failure of blood-brain barrier repair, leukocyte infiltration, local tissue disruption, severe demyelination, neuronal and oligodendrocyte death, and pronounced motor deficits. (jneurosci.org)
  • Endothelial cells homed into the hydrogel scaffolds to enable neovascularization by day 7, resulting in an increased blood flow significantly greater than treated and untreated controls. (pnas.org)
  • Collectively, our evidence shows that customized dextran-based hydrogel alone, with no additional growth factors, cytokines, or cells, promoted remarkable neovascularization and skin regeneration and may lead to novel treatments for dermal wounds. (pnas.org)
  • It works by replenishing iron stores so that the body can make more red blood cells. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Red blood cells in the circulation contain 60 percent to 80 percent of body iron. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Human DCs originating from pluripotent hemopoietic stem cells can be divided into at least three subpopulations: interstitial DCs residing in the skin and lymphoid organs and two subsets of blood DCs, the CD11c + myeloid and CD11c − plasmacytoid DC ( 9 ). (jimmunol.org)
  • The labeled dextran is commonly introduced into the cells via microinjection. (thermofisher.com)
  • While it can't carry oxygen to vital organs as healthy blood cells do, it might, thought the researchers, temporarily help accident and trauma victims suffering massive blood loss by restoring lost electrolytes and maintaining blood pressure. (federallabs.org)
  • The mouse blood-brain barrier transcriptome: a new resource for understanding the development and function of brain endothelial cells. (nature.com)
  • Hematopoietic progenitor cells, cord blood is used for blood cell transplantation procedures in patients with disorders that affect blood production. (drugs.com)
  • Hematopoietic progenitor cells, cord blood is derived from human blood that is collected from the umbilical cord and placenta. (drugs.com)
  • The hematopoietic progenitor cells go to the bone marrow where they become red blood cells, white blood cells, or platelets. (drugs.com)
  • These cells enter the blood stream and help restore low blood counts in patients with blood disorders. (drugs.com)
  • Hematopoietic progenitor cells, cord blood is to be given only by or under the immediate supervision of your doctor. (drugs.com)
  • Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of hematopoietic progenitor cells, cord blood in children. (drugs.com)
  • Although appropriate studies on the relationship of age to the effects of hematopoietic progenitor cells, cord blood have not been performed in the geriatric population, no geriatric-specific problems have been documented to date. (drugs.com)
  • However, elderly patients are more likely to have age-related liver, kidney, or heart problems, which may require caution in patients receiving hematopoietic progenitor cells, cord blood. (drugs.com)
  • The presence of other medical problems may affect the use of hematopoietic progenitor cells, cord blood. (drugs.com)
  • In this study, we compared maternal serum urate levels with those of umbilical cord blood and investigated urate transport mechanisms in BeWo cells, a trophoblast-derived cell line. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Erythroid precursor cells incorporate the iron into hemoglobin as the cell matures into a red blood cell. (researchandmarkets.com)
  • PLGA-dextran by itself did not affect cell viability of cancer cells indicating its excellent biocompatibility. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Red blood cells (RBCs) in normal human blood tend to form linear and branched aggregates. (spiedigitallibrary.org)
  • Journal Article] Dextran induces differentiation of circulating endothelial progenitor cells. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Question 1: Our blood collection facility has an alternative procedure approval to 21 CFR 640.3(d) to distribute ONLY the Red Blood Cells collected from individuals on prescription testosterone. (aabb.org)
  • The response from the FDA was: 'The alternative procedure approval requires you collect ONLY red blood cells from any donor who provides the information that they are on prescription testosterone. (aabb.org)
  • Resuscitation was commenced with small bolus's (0.3 ml or ~3% of shed blood) injected into the femoral vein and Lead II ECG, MAP and heart rate (HR) were monitored. (ahajournals.org)
  • There were no significant differences in serum urate levels between maternal blood and umbilical cord blood, and between umbilical cord vein and arterial blood, suggesting that urate is freely movable at the placenta and that fetus is not a major source of urate production. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Functional effectiveness of the blood‐brain barrier to small water‐soluble molecules in developing and adult opossum (Monodelphis domestica). (currentprotocols.com)
  • A highly blood-compatible material comprising a polymeric base material and water-soluble and substantially nonionic polymer(s) directly attached to the surface of the base material in an amount of 1 to 100 μg/cm2. (google.es)
  • This instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR) activates the coagulation and complement cascades and leads to the destruction of 25% of all transplanted islets within minutes, contributing to the need, in most patients, for islets from more than 1 donor. (nih.gov)
  • Iron is important for many functions in the body, especially for the transport of oxygen in the blood. (cigna.com)
  • Your breathing, blood pressure, oxygen levels, and other vital signs will be watched closely while you are receiving this medication. (cardiosmart.org)
  • The results show that for a rat model the dominant source of signal variation upon changing breathing gas from 100% oxygen to 10% oxygen/90% nitrogen is the change in blood magnetic susceptibility associated with the BOLD effect. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Circulatory system is the portion of the cardiovascular system that pumps out oxygen depleted blood from the heart and pump. (proprofs.com)
  • The role of structure and molecular weight in fermentation selectivity in linear α-1,6 dextrans and dextrans with α-1,2 branching was investigated. (asm.org)
  • A considerable increase in short-chain fatty acid concentration was measured following the fermentation of all dextrans and inulin. (asm.org)
  • It is important to garner sufficient information about the characteristics of the EPS producing strains, as the optimal growth conditions, carbohydrate fermentation ability, antibiotic sensitivity studies have practical implications in maximizing the dextran production on large scale. (ispub.com)