Hip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Clot Retraction: Retraction of a clot resulting from contraction of PLATELET pseudopods attached to FIBRIN strands. The retraction is dependent on the contractile protein thrombosthenin. Clot retraction is used as a measure of platelet function.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Blood Coagulation: The process of the interaction of BLOOD COAGULATION FACTORS that results in an insoluble FIBRIN clot.Fibrin: A protein derived from FIBRINOGEN in the presence of THROMBIN, which forms part of the blood clot.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Osteoarthritis, Hip: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Fibrinolysis: The natural enzymatic dissolution of FIBRIN.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Thrombelastography: Use of a thrombelastograph, which provides a continuous graphic record of the physical shape of a clot during fibrin formation and subsequent lysis.Tissue Plasminogen Activator: A proteolytic enzyme in the serine protease family found in many tissues which converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. It has fibrin-binding activity and is immunologically different from UROKINASE-TYPE PLASMINOGEN ACTIVATOR. The primary sequence, composed of 527 amino acids, is identical in both the naturally occurring and synthetic proteases.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Fibrinogen: Plasma glycoprotein clotted by thrombin, composed of a dimer of three non-identical pairs of polypeptide chains (alpha, beta, gamma) held together by disulfide bonds. Fibrinogen clotting is a sol-gel change involving complex molecular arrangements: whereas fibrinogen is cleaved by thrombin to form polypeptides A and B, the proteolytic action of other enzymes yields different fibrinogen degradation products.Hip Dislocation, Congenital: Congenital dislocation of the hip generally includes subluxation of the femoral head, acetabular dysplasia, and complete dislocation of the femoral head from the true acetabulum. This condition occurs in approximately 1 in 1000 live births and is more common in females than in males.Hip Dislocation: Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.Factor XIIIa: Activated form of FACTOR XIII, a transglutaminase, which stabilizes the formation of the fibrin polymer (clot) culminating the blood coagulation cascade.Blood Coagulation Tests: Laboratory tests for evaluating the individual's clotting mechanism.Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.Ultrasonic Therapy: The use of focused, high-frequency sound waves to produce local hyperthermia in certain diseased or injured parts of the body or to destroy the diseased tissue.Hemostatics: Agents acting to arrest the flow of blood. Absorbable hemostatics arrest bleeding either by the formation of an artificial clot or by providing a mechanical matrix that facilitates clotting when applied directly to the bleeding surface. These agents function more at the capillary level and are not effective at stemming arterial or venous bleeding under any significant intravascular pressure.Fibrinolytic Agents: Fibrinolysin or agents that convert plasminogen to FIBRINOLYSIN.Hemoglobin H: An abnormal hemoglobin composed of four beta chains. It is caused by the reduced synthesis of the alpha chain. This abnormality results in ALPHA-THALASSEMIA.Pulmonary Embolism: Blocking of the PULMONARY ARTERY or one of its branches by an EMBOLUS.Plasminogen: Precursor of plasmin (FIBRINOLYSIN). It is a single-chain beta-globulin of molecular weight 80-90,000 found mostly in association with fibrinogen in plasma; plasminogen activators change it to fibrinolysin. It is used in wound debriding and has been investigated as a thrombolytic agent.High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation: The use of focused, high-frequency sound waves to destroy tissue. It is sometimes used in conjunction with but is distinct from INTERVENTIONAL ULTRASONOGRAPHY.Hemostasis: The process which spontaneously arrests the flow of BLOOD from vessels carrying blood under pressure. It is accomplished by contraction of the vessels, adhesion and aggregation of formed blood elements (eg. ERYTHROCYTE AGGREGATION), and the process of BLOOD COAGULATION.Factor XIII: A fibrin-stabilizing plasma enzyme (TRANSGLUTAMINASES) that is activated by THROMBIN and CALCIUM to form FACTOR XIIIA. It is important for stabilizing the formation of the fibrin polymer (clot) which culminates the coagulation cascade.Fibrinolysin: A product of the lysis of plasminogen (profibrinolysin) by PLASMINOGEN activators. It is composed of two polypeptide chains, light (B) and heavy (A), with a molecular weight of 75,000. It is the major proteolytic enzyme involved in blood clot retraction or the lysis of fibrin and quickly inactivated by antiplasmins.alpha-2-Antiplasmin: A member of the serpin superfamily found in plasma that inhibits the lysis of fibrin clots which are induced by plasminogen activator. It is a glycoprotein, molecular weight approximately 70,000 that migrates in the alpha 2 region in immunoelectrophoresis. It is the principal plasmin inactivator in blood, rapidly forming a very stable complex with plasmin.Blood Coagulation Disorders: Hemorrhagic and thrombotic disorders that occur as a consequence of abnormalities in blood coagulation due to a variety of factors such as COAGULATION PROTEIN DISORDERS; BLOOD PLATELET DISORDERS; BLOOD PROTEIN DISORDERS or nutritional conditions.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee: Replacement of the knee joint.Thrombin: An enzyme formed from PROTHROMBIN that converts FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN.Intracranial Embolism: Blocking of a blood vessel in the SKULL by an EMBOLUS which can be a blood clot (THROMBUS) or other undissolved material in the blood stream. Most emboli are of cardiac origin and are associated with HEART DISEASES. Other non-cardiac sources of emboli are usually associated with VASCULAR DISEASES.Cerebral Hemorrhage: Bleeding into one or both CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES including the BASAL GANGLIA and the CEREBRAL CORTEX. It is often associated with HYPERTENSION and CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA.Streptokinase: Streptococcal fibrinolysin . An enzyme produced by hemolytic streptococci. It hydrolyzes amide linkages and serves as an activator of plasminogen. It is used in thrombolytic therapy and is used also in mixtures with streptodornase (STREPTODORNASE AND STREPTOKINASE). EC 3.4.-.Thrombolytic Therapy: Use of infusions of FIBRINOLYTIC AGENTS to destroy or dissolve thrombi in blood vessels or bypass grafts.Hormone Replacement Therapy: Therapeutic use of hormones to alleviate the effects of hormone deficiency.Estrogen Replacement Therapy: The use of hormonal agents with estrogen-like activity in postmenopausal or other estrogen-deficient women to alleviate effects of hormone deficiency, such as vasomotor symptoms, DYSPAREUNIA, and progressive development of OSTEOPOROSIS. This may also include the use of progestational agents in combination therapy.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Pan paniscus: The pygmy chimpanzee, a species of the genus Pan, family HOMINIDAE. Its common name is Bonobo, which was once considered a separate genus by some; others considered it a subspecies of PAN TROGLODYTES. Its range is confined to the forests of the central Zaire basin. Despite its name, it is often of equal size to P. troglodytes.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: Bleeding into the intracranial or spinal SUBARACHNOID SPACE, most resulting from INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSM rupture. It can occur after traumatic injuries (SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE, TRAUMATIC). Clinical features include HEADACHE; NAUSEA; VOMITING, nuchal rigidity, variable neurological deficits and reduced mental status.Platelet Activation: A series of progressive, overlapping events, triggered by exposure of the PLATELETS to subendothelial tissue. These events include shape change, adhesiveness, aggregation, and release reactions. When carried through to completion, these events lead to the formation of a stable hemostatic plug.Blood Platelets: Non-nucleated disk-shaped cells formed in the megakaryocyte and found in the blood of all mammals. They are mainly involved in blood coagulation.Blood: The body fluid that circulates in the vascular system (BLOOD VESSELS). Whole blood includes PLASMA and BLOOD CELLS.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Plasminogen Activators: A heterogeneous group of proteolytic enzymes that convert PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN. They are concentrated in the lysosomes of most cells and in the vascular endothelium, particularly in the vessels of the microcirculation.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Heparin: A highly acidic mucopolysaccharide formed of equal parts of sulfated D-glucosamine and D-glucuronic acid with sulfaminic bridges. The molecular weight ranges from six to twenty thousand. Heparin occurs in and is obtained from liver, lung, mast cells, etc., of vertebrates. Its function is unknown, but it is used to prevent blood clotting in vivo and vitro, in the form of many different salts.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Nucleus Accumbens: Collection of pleomorphic cells in the caudal part of the anterior horn of the LATERAL VENTRICLE, in the region of the OLFACTORY TUBERCLE, lying between the head of the CAUDATE NUCLEUS and the ANTERIOR PERFORATED SUBSTANCE. It is part of the so-called VENTRAL STRIATUM, a composite structure considered part of the BASAL GANGLIA.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Arthroplasty, Replacement: Partial or total replacement of a joint.Hemorrhage: Bleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Hip Dysplasia, Canine: A hereditary disease of the hip joints in dogs. Signs of the disease may be evident any time after 4 weeks of age.Heart Valve Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of synthetic material to repair injured or diseased heart valves.Heart Valve Prosthesis: A device that substitutes for a heart valve. It may be composed of biological material (BIOPROSTHESIS) and/or synthetic material.Fibrin Clot Lysis Time: A measurement of the time needed for FIBRINOLYSIS to occur.Femur Head Necrosis: Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE.Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Aortic Valve: The valve between the left ventricle and the ascending aorta which prevents backflow into the left ventricle.Enzyme Replacement Therapy: Therapeutic replacement or supplementation of defective or missing enzymes to alleviate the effects of enzyme deficiency (e.g., GLUCOSYLCERAMIDASE replacement for GAUCHER DISEASE).Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Cementation: The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Joint DiseasesJoint Prosthesis: Prostheses used to partially or totally replace a human or animal joint. (from UMDNS, 1999)Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Knee Prosthesis: Replacement for a knee joint.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Prosthesis-Related Infections: Infections resulting from the implantation of prosthetic devices. The infections may be acquired from intraoperative contamination (early) or hematogenously acquired from other sites (late).Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Total Disc Replacement: The replacement of intervertebral discs in the spinal column with artificial devices. The procedure is done in the lumbar or cervical spine to relieve severe pain resulting from INTERVERTEBRAL DISC DEGENERATION.Aortic Valve Stenosis: A pathological constriction that can occur above (supravalvular stenosis), below (subvalvular stenosis), or at the AORTIC VALVE. It is characterized by restricted outflow from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the AORTA.Osteoarthritis, Knee: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the knee joint consisting of three large categories: conditions that block normal synchronous movement, conditions that produce abnormal pathways of motion, and conditions that cause stress concentration resulting in changes to articular cartilage. (Crenshaw, Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics, 8th ed, p2019)Fibrinogens, Abnormal: Fibrinogens which have a functional defect as the result of one or more amino acid substitutions in the amino acid sequence of normal fibrinogen. Abnormalities of the fibrinogen molecule may impair any of the major steps involved in the conversion of fibrinogen into stabilized fibrin, such as cleavage of the fibrinopeptides by thrombin, polymerization and cross-linking of fibrin. The resulting dysfibrinogenemias can be clinically silent or can be associated with bleeding, thrombosis or defective wound healing.Recovery of Function: A partial or complete return to the normal or proper physiologic activity of an organ or part following disease or trauma.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Hip Contracture: Permanent fixation of the hip in primary positions, with limited passive or active motion at the hip joint. Locomotion is difficult and pain is sometimes present when the hip is in motion. It may be caused by trauma, infection, or poliomyelitis. (From Current Medical Information & Technology, 5th ed)Femur Neck: The constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters.Polyethylene: A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.Femoracetabular Impingement: A pathological mechanical process that can lead to hip failure. It is caused by abnormalities of the ACETABULUM and/or FEMUR combined with rigorous hip motion, leading to repetitive collisions that damage the soft tissue structures.Knee Joint: A synovial hinge connection formed between the bones of the FEMUR; TIBIA; and PATELLA.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.Osteoarthritis: A progressive, degenerative joint disease, the most common form of arthritis, especially in older persons. The disease is thought to result not from the aging process but from biochemical changes and biomechanical stresses affecting articular cartilage. In the foreign literature it is often called osteoarthrosis deformans.Bone Density: The amount of mineral per square centimeter of BONE. This is the definition used in clinical practice. Actual bone density would be expressed in grams per milliliter. It is most frequently measured by X-RAY ABSORPTIOMETRY or TOMOGRAPHY, X RAY COMPUTED. Bone density is an important predictor for OSTEOPOROSIS.Carboxypeptidase U: A metallocarboxypeptidase that removes C-terminal lysine and arginine from biologically active peptides and proteins thereby regulating their activity. It is a zinc enzyme with no preference shown for lysine over arginine. Pro-carboxypeptidase U in human plasma is activated by thrombin or plasmin during clotting to form the unstable carboxypeptidase U.Metal-on-Metal Joint Prostheses: Types of prosthetic joints in which both wear surfaces of the joint coupling are metallic.Aortic Valve Insufficiency: Pathological condition characterized by the backflow of blood from the ASCENDING AORTA back into the LEFT VENTRICLE, leading to regurgitation. It is caused by diseases of the AORTIC VALVE or its surrounding tissue (aortic root).Polyethylenes: Synthetic thermoplastics that are tough, flexible, inert, and resistant to chemicals and electrical current. They are often used as biocompatible materials for prostheses and implants.Arthroplasty: Surgical reconstruction of a joint to relieve pain or restore motion.Nephelometry and Turbidimetry: Chemical analysis based on the phenomenon whereby light, passing through a medium with dispersed particles of a different refractive index from that of the medium, is attenuated in intensity by scattering. In turbidimetry, the intensity of light transmitted through the medium, the unscattered light, is measured. In nephelometry, the intensity of the scattered light is measured, usually, but not necessarily, at right angles to the incident light beam.Leg Length Inequality: A condition in which one of a pair of legs fails to grow as long as the other, which could result from injury or surgery.Mitral Valve: The valve between the left atrium and left ventricle of the heart.Fibrinopeptide B: Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the beta chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin. Each peptide chain contains 20 amino acid residues. The removal of fibrinopeptides B is not required for coagulation.Heart Valve Diseases: Pathological conditions involving any of the various HEART VALVES and the associated structures (PAPILLARY MUSCLES and CHORDAE TENDINEAE).Anticoagulants: Agents that prevent clotting.Mutagenesis, Site-Directed: Genetically engineered MUTAGENESIS at a specific site in the DNA molecule that introduces a base substitution, or an insertion or deletion.Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products: Soluble protein fragments formed by the proteolytic action of plasmin on fibrin or fibrinogen. FDP and their complexes profoundly impair the hemostatic process and are a major cause of hemorrhage in intravascular coagulation and fibrinolysis.Intracranial Thrombosis: Formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) in a blood vessel within the SKULL. Intracranial thrombosis can lead to thrombotic occlusions and BRAIN INFARCTION. The majority of the thrombotic occlusions are associated with ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Osteolysis: Dissolution of bone that particularly involves the removal or loss of calcium.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Osteoporosis: Reduction of bone mass without alteration in the composition of bone, leading to fractures. Primary osteoporosis can be of two major types: postmenopausal osteoporosis (OSTEOPOROSIS, POSTMENOPAUSAL) and age-related or senile osteoporosis.Ceramics: Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Bone Diseases, DevelopmentalGait: Manner or style of walking.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Arthralgia: Pain in the joint.Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease: A particular type of FEMUR HEAD NECROSIS occurring in children, mainly male, with a course of four years or so.Amino Acid Substitution: The naturally occurring or experimentally induced replacement of one or more AMINO ACIDS in a protein with another. If a functionally equivalent amino acid is substituted, the protein may retain wild-type activity. Substitution may also diminish, enhance, or eliminate protein function. Experimentally induced substitution is often used to study enzyme activities and binding site properties.Pancreatitis: INFLAMMATION of the PANCREAS. Pancreatitis is classified as acute unless there are computed tomographic or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatographic findings of CHRONIC PANCREATITIS (International Symposium on Acute Pancreatitis, Atlanta, 1992). The two most common forms of acute pancreatitis are ALCOHOLIC PANCREATITIS and gallstone pancreatitis.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Weight-Bearing: The physical state of supporting an applied load. This often refers to the weight-bearing bones or joints that support the body's weight, especially those in the spine, hip, knee, and foot.Thrombin Time: Clotting time of PLASMA mixed with a THROMBIN solution. It is a measure of the conversion of FIBRINOGEN to FIBRIN, which is prolonged by AFIBRINOGENEMIA, abnormal fibrinogen, or the presence of inhibitory substances, e.g., fibrin-fibrinogen degradation products, or HEPARIN. BATROXOBIN, a thrombin-like enzyme unaffected by the presence of heparin, may be used in place of thrombin.Chromium Alloys: Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Venous Thrombosis: The formation or presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) within a vein.Osteonecrosis: Death of a bone or part of a bone, either atraumatic or posttraumatic.Postmenopause: The physiological period following the MENOPAUSE, the permanent cessation of the menstrual life.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Prosthesis Fitting: The fitting and adjusting of artificial parts of the body. (From Stedman's, 26th ed)Ossification, Heterotopic: The development of bony substance in normally soft structures.Palaquium: A plant genus of the family SAPOTACEAE. Latex from bark incisions is processed into GUTTA-PERCHA.Bone Transplantation: The grafting of bone from a donor site to a recipient site.Arthroplasty, Replacement, Ankle: Replacement of the ANKLE JOINT.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Orthopedic Procedures: Procedures used to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM, its articulations, and associated structures.Postoperative Care: The period of care beginning when the patient is removed from surgery and aimed at meeting the patient's psychological and physical needs directly after surgery. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives: Starches that have been chemically modified so that a percentage of OH groups are substituted with 2-hydroxyethyl ether groups.Afibrinogenemia: A deficiency or absence of FIBRINOGEN in the blood.Femoral Fractures: Fractures of the femur.Absorptiometry, Photon: A noninvasive method for assessing BODY COMPOSITION. It is based on the differential absorption of X-RAYS (or GAMMA RAYS) by different tissues such as bone, fat and other soft tissues. The source of (X-ray or gamma-ray) photon beam is generated either from radioisotopes such as GADOLINIUM 153, IODINE 125, or Americanium 241 which emit GAMMA RAYS in the appropriate range; or from an X-ray tube which produces X-RAYS in the desired range. It is primarily used for quantitating BONE MINERAL CONTENT, especially for the diagnosis of OSTEOPOROSIS, and also in measuring BONE MINERALIZATION.Prostheses and Implants: Artificial substitutes for body parts, and materials inserted into tissue for functional, cosmetic, or therapeutic purposes. Prostheses can be functional, as in the case of artificial arms and legs, or cosmetic, as in the case of an artificial eye. Implants, all surgically inserted or grafted into the body, tend to be used therapeutically. IMPLANTS, EXPERIMENTAL is available for those used experimentally.Titanium: A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)Aluminum Oxide: An oxide of aluminum, occurring in nature as various minerals such as bauxite, corundum, etc. It is used as an adsorbent, desiccating agent, and catalyst, and in the manufacture of dental cements and refractories.Hypopituitarism: Diminution or cessation of secretion of one or more hormones from the anterior pituitary gland (including LH; FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE; SOMATOTROPIN; and CORTICOTROPIN). This may result from surgical or radiation ablation, non-secretory PITUITARY NEOPLASMS, metastatic tumors, infarction, PITUITARY APOPLEXY, infiltrative or granulomatous processes, and other conditions.Arthrography: Roentgenography of a joint, usually after injection of either positive or negative contrast medium.Urokinase-Type Plasminogen Activator: A proteolytic enzyme that converts PLASMINOGEN to FIBRINOLYSIN where the preferential cleavage is between ARGININE and VALINE. It was isolated originally from human URINE, but is found in most tissues of most VERTEBRATES.Metals: Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Osteoporosis, Postmenopausal: Metabolic disorder associated with fractures of the femoral neck, vertebrae, and distal forearm. It occurs commonly in women within 15-20 years after menopause, and is caused by factors associated with menopause including estrogen deficiency.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Fibrinopeptide A: Two small peptide chains removed from the N-terminal segment of the alpha chains of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin during the blood coagulation process. Each peptide chain contains 18 amino acid residues. In vivo, fibrinopeptide A is used as a marker to determine the rate of conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin by thrombin.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Batroxobin: A proteolytic enzyme obtained from the venom of fer-de-lance (Bothrops atrox). It is used as a plasma clotting agent for fibrinogen and for the detection of fibrinogen degradation products. The presence of heparin does not interfere with the clotting test. Hemocoagulase is a mixture containing batroxobin and factor X activator. EC 3.4.21.-.Osseointegration: The growth action of bone tissue as it assimilates surgically implanted devices or prostheses to be used as either replacement parts (e.g., hip) or as anchors (e.g., endosseous dental implants).Fractures, Bone: Breaks in bones.Coagulants: Agents that cause clotting.Surgical Procedures, Minimally Invasive: Procedures that avoid use of open, invasive surgery in favor of closed or local surgery. These generally involve use of laparoscopic devices and remote-control manipulation of instruments with indirect observation of the surgical field through an endoscope or similar device.Estrogens: Compounds that interact with ESTROGEN RECEPTORS in target tissues to bring about the effects similar to those of ESTRADIOL. Estrogens stimulate the female reproductive organs, and the development of secondary female SEX CHARACTERISTICS. Estrogenic chemicals include natural, synthetic, steroidal, or non-steroidal compounds.Plasma Substitutes: Any liquid used to replace blood plasma, usually a saline solution, often with serum albumins, dextrans or other preparations. These substances do not enhance the oxygen- carrying capacity of blood, but merely replace the volume. They are also used to treat dehydration.Factor XIII Deficiency: A deficiency of blood coagulation FACTOR XIII or fibrin stabilizing factor (FSF) that prevents blood clot formation and results in a clinical hemorrhagic diathesis.Rotation: Motion of an object in which either one or more points on a line are fixed. It is also the motion of a particle about a fixed point. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Blood Coagulation Factors: Endogenous substances, usually proteins, that are involved in the blood coagulation process.Ovariectomy: The surgical removal of one or both ovaries.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Mechanical Thrombolysis: Procedures to cause the disintegration of THROMBI by physical interventions.Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.alpha-Galactosidase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of terminal, non-reducing alpha-D-galactose residues in alpha-galactosides including galactose oligosaccharides, galactomannans, and galactolipids.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Ankle Joint: The joint that is formed by the inferior articular and malleolar articular surfaces of the TIBIA; the malleolar articular surface of the FIBULA; and the medial malleolar, lateral malleolar, and superior surfaces of the TALUS.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Aortic Aneurysm: An abnormal balloon- or sac-like dilatation in the wall of AORTA.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Thrombophlebitis: Inflammation of a vein associated with a blood clot (THROMBUS).Traction: The pull on a limb or a part thereof. Skin traction (indirect traction) is applied by using a bandage to pull on the skin and fascia where light traction is required. Skeletal traction (direct traction), however, uses pins or wires inserted through bone and is attached to weights, pulleys, and ropes. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed)Vitallium: An alloy of 60% cobalt, 20% chromium, 5% molybdenum, and traces of other substances. It is used in dentures, certain surgical appliances, prostheses, implants, and instruments.Platelet Aggregation: The attachment of PLATELETS to one another. This clumping together can be induced by a number of agents (e.g., THROMBIN; COLLAGEN) and is part of the mechanism leading to the formation of a THROMBUS.Plasma: The residual portion of BLOOD that is left after removal of BLOOD CELLS by CENTRIFUGATION without prior BLOOD COAGULATION.Whole Blood Coagulation Time: The time required by whole blood to produce a visible clot.Orthopedics: A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.Mitral Valve Insufficiency: Backflow of blood from the LEFT VENTRICLE into the LEFT ATRIUM due to imperfect closure of the MITRAL VALVE. This can lead to mitral valve regurgitation.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Blood Loss, Surgical: Loss of blood during a surgical procedure.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Thrombectomy: Surgical removal of an obstructing clot or foreign material from a blood vessel at the point of its formation. Removal of a clot arising from a distant site is called EMBOLECTOMY.Antifibrinolytic Agents: Agents that prevent fibrinolysis or lysis of a blood clot or thrombus. Several endogenous antiplasmins are known. The drugs are used to control massive hemorrhage and in other coagulation disorders.Durapatite: The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.
... for the prevention of blood clots in patients who have undergone total hip or total knee replacement surgery. Approval for ... The National Health Service in Britain authorised the use of dabigatran for use in preventing blood clots in hip and knee ... It is used as an alternative to warfarin, since it does not have to be monitored by blood tests, but offers similar results in ... "Clot drug 'could save thousands'". BBC News Online. 2008-04-20. Retrieved 2008-04-21. Eerenberg, ES; Kamphuisen, PW; Sijpkens, ...
The study concludes that 2 units of batroxobin could reduce the perioperative blood loss in patients getting a hip replacement ... An overdose will lead to excessive blood-clotting, which can result in bleeding due to damage to blood vessels or even ... The fibrinogen conversion ability of batroxobin was evaluated by a fibrinogen clotting assay and a whole blood clotting assay. ... Which leads to a reduction of blood viscosity and blood coagulability. The blood is thinner and there is an increased tendency ...
... blood clots that dislodge and travel in the bloodstream. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is when the blood in the leg veins clots ... a total hip replacement may be indicated. Traction is contraindicated in femoral neck fractures due to it affecting blood flow ... Red blood cell transfusion is common for people undergoing hip fracture surgery due to the blood loss sustained during surgery ... A pulmonary embolism (PE) occurs when clotted blood from a DVT comes loose from the leg veins and passes up to the lungs. ...
"Regis Philbin has hip replacement surgery". The Arizona Republic. Associated Press. December 1, 2009. Retrieved August 26, 2011 ... "Regis Philbin to have blood clot removed from leg". USA Today. Associated Press. May 14, 2010. Retrieved August 26, 2011.. ... "Regis To Return From Hip Replacement Surgery On January 4". The Huffington Post. December 31, 2009. Retrieved August 26, 2011. ... On December 1, 2009, Philbin had hip replacement surgery.[84][85] He returned to his regular hosting duties on January 4, 2010. ...
... administered concurrently with aspirin DVT prophylaxis in knee replacement surgery DVT prophylaxis in hip replacement surgery ... enoxaparin is used to prevent blood clots it is necessary to remember that pregnancy alone can raise a woman's risk of clotting ... In persons undergoing hip or knee replacement: Fever, nausea, anemia, edema, peripheral edema: ≥ 2% In persons with severely ... Enoxaparin sodium, sold under the brand name Lovenox among others, is an anticoagulant medication (blood thinner). It is used ...
This leads to a decrease in blood clot formation in a dose dependent manner. Reducing blood clot formation will decrease blood ... in the prevention of venous thromboembolism in elective primary hip replacement surgery." Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis ... It also promotes the formation of blood clots in the atria. Atrial fibrillation is associated with an increased risk of embolic ... suppressing prothrombin activity at the sites of blood clot (thrombus) formation. ...
Bloodless surgery has been successfully performed in such invasive operations as open-heart surgery and total hip replacements ... Clotting factors, including Factor VIII and Factor IX derived from large quantities of stored blood Wound healing factor ... This includes the use of red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets and blood plasma. Other fractions derived from blood are ... Platelet Gel, blood is withdrawn and put into a solution rich in platelets and white blood cells. Fractions from red blood ...
... blood clots) and so is no longer recommended for such purposes. It works by suppressing testosterone levels, similarly to high- ... Fractures of the spine, wrist, and hips decrease by 50-70% and spinal bone density increases by ~5% in those women treated with ... Hormone replacement therapy has favorable effects on serum cholesterol levels, and when initiated immediately upon menopause ... blood clots, stroke, heart attack), cholestatic hepatotoxicity, gallbladder disease (e.g., gallstones), hyperprolactinemia, ...
... blood clots and other complications. In fact, moving people (like sitting them on the edge of the bed, allowing them to stand ... Early mobilization on continuous renal replacement therapy is safe and may improve filter life. Critical Care 18(4):R161 ... and also to move their hip) might even make the dialysis last longer, which could be more effective. The Physical Function in ...
Patients with mechanical valves must take blood-thinning medications to prevent clotting. The choice of which valve type to use ... Since a valve replacement is a heart surgical procedure, it requires placing the patient on cardiopulmonary bypass. With a ... The formula contains Adonis vernalis, Crataegus, Valerian root, Leonurus cardiaca, Eucalyptus, Peppermint, and Rose hip. For ... "Амосов первым провёл протезирование клапана сердца" [Amosov was the first Soviet surgeon, who held heart valve replacement]. ...
Khay Yong Saw and his team propose that the microdrilling surgery creates a blood clot scaffold on which injected PBPC's can be ... Osteochondral allografting using donor cartilage has been used most historically in knees, but is also emerging in hips, ankles ... knee replacement) surgery. Articular cartilage repair treatments help patients to return to their original lifestyle; regaining ... By doing this, the subchondral bone is perforated to generate a blood clot within the defect. Studies, however, have shown that ...
Major orthopedic surgery-total hip replacement, total knee replacement, or hip fracture surgery-has a high risk of causing VTE ... Pregnancy causes blood to favor clotting, and in the postpartum, placental tearing releases substances that favor clotting. ... Non-O blood type is common in all races, making it an important risk factor. Individuals without O blood type have higher blood ... Platelets and white blood cells are also components. Platelets are not as prominent in venous clots as they are in arterial ...
... in people who have undergone elective total hip replacement or total knee replacement surgery. In the same month, the European ... It is commonly used to prevent blood clots. It was initially developed by Bayer. In the United States, it is marketed by ... "FDA Approves XARELTO® (rivaroxaban tablets) to Help Prevent Deep Vein Thrombosis in Patients Undergoing Knee or Hip Replacement ... in adults undergoing hip and knee replacement surgery. On November 4, 2011, the U.S. FDA approved rivaroxaban for stroke ...
Hip fracture is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in older females, and usually does not occur in the setting of ... After the increased clotting found in the first WHI results was reported in 2002, the number of Prempro prescriptions filled ... HRT appears to slow down the biological/epigenetic aging rate of buccal cells but not that of blood cells . Conversely, the ... "Association between hormone replacement therapy use and breast cancer risk varies by race/ethnicity, body mass index, and ...
Hip replacements are relatively common as the already damaged hip suffers routine wear; this varies by individual, but ... but a deficiency of blood factors with anticoagulant property used to disperse blood clots may lead to blockages in the vessels ... Common symptoms include hip, knee (hip pathology can refer pain to a normal knee), or groin pain, exacerbated by hip or leg ... is a childhood hip disorder initiated by a disruption of blood flow to the head of the femur. Due to the lack of blood flow, ...
... the Flyers suffered a fatal blow when it was learned that Kimmo Timonen was out with a blood clot in his ankle. Coupled with a ... Emery suffered a hip injury in December, played sporadically afterwards and ultimately underwent season-ending surgery. Boucher ... Paul Holmgren was named Keenan's replacement, the first time a former Flyer was named the club's head coach. Despite finishing ... Peter Laviolette was hired as his replacement in order to re institute accountability and restore success to the Flyers, though ...
MRI scans can be used to find blood clots as well. An MRI scan can be used as an extremely accurate method of disease detection ... Some metallic objects may distort the image, like hip, shoulder and knee replacements but the exam can still be done. Cochlear ... MRI scans can be used to study the brain, spinal cord, bones, joints, breasts, the heart and blood vessels.[1] It can also be ...
DVTs may lead to pulmonary embolism (PE) in knee or hip replacement surgery patients. Treatment of both DVT and PE. To reduce ... FDA approves Eliquis to reduce the risk of stroke, blood clots in patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation Neale, Todd ( ... Approved In Europe For Preventing Venous Thromboembolism After Elective Hip Or Knee Replacement" (Press release). Pfizer. April ... use of preventing deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism in people that had recently undergone knee or hip replacement. On ...
When this process is too active due to various problems the risk of blood clots or embolisms increases. As the name indicates ... They prevent VTE in patients undergoing hip- and knee replacement surgery. The advantages of this type of DTIs are that they do ... Kendoff, D. (30 December 2011). "Oral Thromboprophylaxis Following Total Hip or Knee Replacement: Review and Multicentre ... are a class of anticoagulant drugs that can be used to prevent and treat embolisms and blood clots caused by various diseases. ...
Blood clots (also known as deep vein thrombosis) are a common complication after surgery. However, a doctor may prescribe ... June 2007). "Insufficient duration of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis after total hip or knee replacement when compared with ... A partial replacement also causes minimal blood loss during the procedure, and results in considerably less post-operative pain ... "Partial Knee Replacement". Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, NH, USA. 2017. "Partial Knee Replacement". North ...
Hip fracturesEdit. Estrogen prevents the activity of osteoclasts, and improves bone mineral density. Hip fracture is a leading ... Clot in the greater saphenous vein; oral HRT is associated with increased risk of venous clot due to increased hepatic ... HRT appears to slow down the biological/epigenetic aging rate of buccal cells but not that of blood cells.[86] Conversely, the ... a b c d e f g h Ziaei, S., Moghasemi, M., & Faghihzadeh, S. (2010). Comparative effects of conventional hormone replacement ...
Typical postoperative cases are total knee and hip replacements. Autotransfusion is continued and is effective while the ... If the blood is contaminated the entire contents should be discarded. If the patient's life depends upon this blood supply it ... The washed autotransfusion system removes the plasma and platelets to eliminate activated clotting factors and activated ... Blood can be drawn from the patient just prior to surgery and then separated. The separated blood components which have been ...
... and fibrin to form a blood clot to prevent blood loss. Even when a blood vessel is not injured, blood clots may form in the ... Hormone replacement therapy. discontinuation reduces risk. [8] Ovarian hyper-stimulation therapy to treat infertility. [8] ... Falls and hip fracture. related to immobility. [17] Selective estrogen-receptor modulators. [8] ... Thrombosis (from Ancient Greek θρόμβωσις thrómbōsis "clotting") is the formation of a blood clot inside a blood vessel, ...
... and fibrin to form a blood clot to prevent blood loss. Even when a blood vessel is not injured, blood clots may form in the ... Hormone replacement therapy. discontinuation reduces risk. [8]. Ovarian hyper-stimulation therapy to treat infertility. [8]. ... Falls and hip fracture. related to immobility. [17]. Selective estrogen-receptor modulators. [8]. ... Thrombosis is the formation of a blood clot inside a blood vessel, obstructing the flow of blood through the circulatory system ...
In a typical cardiac emergency, thrombolytic drugs can be utilized sometimes in order to dissolve blood clots and as a useful ... The surgeons operating at the facility can perform cemented or uncemented total hip replacement with the conventional metal on ... Francis Joint Replacement Center The Joint Replacement Center offers treatments for over 100 different conditions. The surgeons ... They serve as a helpful tool for evaluating heart and blood vessel abnormalities or as a tool to produce images of the heart ...
Loss of the phallus from either disease or blood supply issues. *Cephalic vein thrombosis (blood clot) ... Example of stage 1 female-to-male sex reassignment prior to glansplasty penis with tissue grafting scar on the left hip ... Erectile) prosthesis explantation (removal of the prosthesis without replacement). There is also a possibility of fat embolism ... The blood supplies from the graft and the vein leading to the femoral artery are joined. ...
The study concludes that 2 units of batroxobin could reduce the perioperative blood loss in patients getting a hip replacement ... An overdose will lead to excessive blood-clotting, which can result in bleeding due to damage to blood vessels or even ... The fibrinogen conversion ability of batroxobin was evaluated by a fibrinogen clotting assay and a whole blood clotting assay. ... Which leads to a reduction of blood viscosity and blood coagulability. The blood is thinner and there is an increased tendency ...
A Study of DU-176b in Preventing Blood Clots After Hip Replacement Surgery. The safety and scientific validity of this study is ... Hip Replacement. Intervention Drug: DU176b - action is the prevention of venous thromboembolism by the use of a Factor Xa ... change in prothrombin time (PT) from baseline to end of treatment end of treatment defined as 6-8 hours after hip replacement ... Assess the efficacy of DU-176b in the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) from 6 to 8 hours after hip replacement ...
The Toolkit for Knee and Hip Replacement Patients was created by the National Blood Clot Alliance as a resource for people ... The Stop the Clot®. Patient Toolkit for Knee and Hip Replacement Patients was created by the National Blood Clot Alliance to ... A fact sheet about the risk of blood clots related to knee or hip joint replacement surgery. ... Important information you need to know about blood clots and knee or hip replacement surgery. ...
New Clinical Treatment Guideline Outlines Recommendations to Reduce Blood Clots After Hip and Knee Replacement. ... The workgroup also made these recommendations for care after hip or knee replacement: *Hip and knee replacement patients should ... Board of Directors recommends how to reduce the likelihood of blood clots after hip or knee replacement surgery, procedures ... Recent studies in Denmark show that only 0.7 percent of hip replacement patients and 0.9 percent of knee replacement patients ...
... a hip replacement procedure is associated with several complications and risks, some of which may even be life threatening. The ... The two main places a blood clot may form include the leg (deep vein thrombosis), or the lung, in which case, the clot is ... Dislocation of the hip joint. The hip joint becomes displaced from its socket in around 3% of cases. After a hip replacement ... i had hip replacement last May 2015 after i went home after 2weeks, my hip popped out of joint. This kept happing every 2-3 ...
Doctors have long known that dangerous blood clots can occur after joint replacement surgery of the knees or hips. Now, a new ... Hip Replacements Carry Blood Clot Risk. Knee, Hip Replacements Carry Blood Clot Risk. Knee, Hip Replacements Carry Blood Clot ... Knee replacement surgery. Orthopaedic Surgery and Blood Clot Risk. Knee replacement surgery and hip replacement surgery are ... ĐTĐ) - Doctors have long known that dangerous blood clots can occur after joint replacement surgery of the knees or hips. Now, ...
... the total hip replacement and the metal-on-metal hip resurfacing. The former is done using metal, plastic... ... there are two major types of hip replacement surgery: ... Is there a risk between blood clots and hormonal contraception? ... there are two major types of hip replacement surgery: the total hip replacement and the metal-on-metal hip resurfacing. The ... What is the average cost of hip replacement surgery?. A: The average cost of hip replacement surgery is $30,124 as of 2015, ...
... to the side of the hip, or from in front of the hip. Total hip replacement with anterior approach refers to surgeries done from ... It replaces your hip joint with an artificial one. It is also called hip arthroplasty. Healthcare providers can do these ... in front of the hip. These surgeries may also be called mini, modified, minimally invasive, or muscle-sparing surgeries. ... A total hip replacement is a type of surgery. ... Blood clots. * Injury to nearby nerves. * Hip joint dislocation ...
A minimally invasive total hip replacement uses a smaller incision than a traditional total hip replacement and involves the ... A healthcare professional will carefully watch your vital signs, like your heart rate and blood pressure, during the surgery. ... What is total hip replacement?. Total hip replacement is a type of surgery to replace a damaged hip joint. A minimally invasive ... Why might I need total hip replacement?. You might need a total hip replacement if you have significant damage to your hip ...
... or hip replacement surgery) involves replacing a damaged hip joint with an artificial one to reduce pain and improve mobility. ... The surgery can also cause blood clots and infections. With a hip replacement, you might need to avoid certain activities, such ... Hip joint replacement (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish * Hip or knee replacement - after - what to ask your doctor ( ... Hip replacement - discharge (Medical Encyclopedia) Also in Spanish * Hip replacement - precautions (Medical Encyclopedia) Also ...
... in which surgeons replace a hip joint with an artificial joint. ... Hip replacement is a procedure for people with severe hip ... Risks of Hip Replacement. Potential risks of hip replacement surgery include:*Infection*Blood clots*Injury to blood vessels or ... Everyday Health » Hip replacement » Hip Replacement. What Is Hip Replacement?. *By Lynn Marks*Medically Reviewed by Sanjai ... Hip replacement; Mayo Clinic.*Hip replacement; MedlinePlus.*Questions and Answers about Hip Replacement; National Institute of ...
Your chances of having a blood clot form are higher during and soon after hip or knee replacement surgery. Sitting or lying ... It is normal to lose blood during and after hip or knee replacement surgery. Some people need a blood transfusion during ... Two types of blood clots are:. *Deep vein thrombosis (DVT). These are blood clots that may form in your leg veins after surgery ... Other problems from hip or knee replacement surgery can occur. Although they are rare, such problems include:. *Not enough pain ...
Hip joint pain in runners can be caused by trochanteric bursitis, says the Cleveland Clinic. This happens when the fluid-filled ... Blood clots, an infection o... Full Answer , Filed Under: * Conditions & Diseases * Q: What Are the Symptoms Related to Hip ... What Could Cause Hip Pain Following an Artificial Joint Replacement?. A: Some conditions that can cause hip pain after an ... A: Symptoms of hip joint arthritis include pain and stiffness in the hips and the region around the hips, having trouble ...
Includes slideshow on hip replacement. Looks at why it is done and how well it works. Discusses what to expect after surgery ... Blood clots. These can be dangerous if they block blood flow from the leg back to the heart, or if they move to the lungs. ... Total Hip Replacement Surgery. Skip to the navigation Surgery Overview. Total hip replacement is a step-by-step surgery to ... Arthritis: Should I Have Hip Replacement Surgery? Complete the surgery information form (PDF) (What is a PDF document?) to help ...
Mako Total Hip Replacement Surgery - With locations throughout Boulder and Broomfield counties, Boulder Community Health is ... Possible complications of total hip replacements include:. *Blood clots. *Infections. *Joint dislocation ... The Mako Total Hip Replacement Procedure. Total hip replacement surgery is the most comprehensive option offered at Boulder ... By reducing hip pain, increasing mobility, and restoring your range of motion, Makos Total Hip Replacement surgery can help ...
Treatment for blood clots depend upon the cause. ... Blood clots are caused by a variety of things and can exhibit ... signs and symptoms depend upon the location of the clot, and may include pain, redness, and swelling in the leg; or chest pain ... Undergoing knee or hip replacement. *Pregnancy is a risk factor for forming blood clots in the legs and pelvis, due to ... What causes blood clots (blood clots in veins or arteries)?. *What causes blood clots (blood clots in the heart and medical ...
hip surgery. Introducing a Toolkit for Knee and Hip Replacement Patients The National Blood Clot Alliance is pleased to ... Helping Women Make Choices About Contraception Following DVT Blood Clots *Is it true that birth control pills cause blood clots ... Helping Women Make Choices About Contraception Following DVT Blood Clots. *Is it true that birth control pills cause blood ... Sylvia experienced multiple blood clots for no identifiable reason. Knowing the signs and symptoms, and having the support of a ...
It helps keep your new hip in the correct position. To help prevent blood clots, you may be wearing compression stockings. And ... Hip Replacement Surgery Hip The hip is one of the largest weight-bearing joints in your body. It is shaped like a ball and ... Total hip replacement is a surgery to replace the ball at the top of the thigh bone (femur) and the hip socket.. Surgeons use ... Hip replacement is sometimes done after a hip fracture.. How well it works. Surgery usually works well. You will probably have ...
Having a new hip allows many people to live with less pain and greater freedom to move. ... the damaged hip joint is removed and replaced with an artificial joint (called a prosthesis). Metal, plastic, and ceramic are ... Most people who have hip replacement surgery receive medications to prevent blood clots. ... www.medbroadcast.com/procedure/getprocedure/Hip-Replacement. A fully-functional hip joint is created in a total hip replacement ...
Beating blood clots: Reducing your risk before hip replacement surgery. Risk factors for venous thromboembolism after total hip ... Joint replacement surgery increases risk of blood clot formation in certain patients. When tennis star Serena Williams ... Study shows fast track total hip replacement surgery is effective and safe. Generally healthy patients who undergo total hip ... New risk score spots patients at high risk of serious blood clots. A new risk prediction tool can identify patients at high ...
A common risk factor associated with clot development is surgery; particularly hip and knee replacement surgery. ... Joint replacement surgery increases risk of blood clot formation in certain patients. July 27, 2011, American Academy of ... Pulmonary emboli, or blood clots in the lungs, occur when a clot that forms within veins elsewhere in the body often in the ... Joint replacement surgery riskier at hospitals with low surgical volume. June 7, 2011 Patients who undergo elective total hip ...
Treatment for prevention of blood clots following hip-replacement surgery. HIV. Aptivus (tipranavir) (by Boehringer Ingelheim ... Hip Replacement. Lovenox (enoxaparin sodium) Injection (by Rhone Poulenc Rorer), Approved February 1998. ... High Blood Pressure (Hypertension - Pediatric). Edarbi (azilsartan medoxomil) (by Takeda), Approved February 2011. For the ... Hormone Replacement Therapy. Activella (Estradiol/Norethindrone Acetate) Tablets (by Novo Nordisk), Approved April 2000. ...
Require hip replacement surgery and live in the Bristol area? Nuffield Health offers expert advice, service and full recovery ... While you are in bed, you may have help with the circulation in your legs, in order to prevent blood clots (DVT) ... Going home after hip replacement. *A physiotherapist will give you some exercises to help get your new hip moving ... Why might I need a hip replacement?. *Over time, the surfaces on the hip joint can start to wear ...
For prevention of blood clots after hip replacement surgery: *Adults-110 milligrams (mg) taken 1 to 4 hours after hip surgery. ... Doing so may increase risk of blood clots and stroke.. Dabigatran may increase your risk of developing spinal or epidural blood ... Dabigatran is used to decrease the risk of stroke and blood clots in patients with a serious heart rhythm problem called ... It is also used to prevent deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism after hip replacement surgery. It works by preventing ...
  • XARELTO® has a proven clinical benefit over one of today's most widely used options in preventing these potentially life-threatening blood clots, and the use of a once-daily pill may play an essential role in helping to simplify clinical practice. (fiercepharma.com)
  • The Xarelto lawsuits claim that Xarelto can cause irreversible internal bleeding, and that a substitute medication was just as effective at reducing blood clots but without the life-threatening danger of excessive blood loss. (levinlaw.com)
  • Currently, there is no known potential cure to reverse the type of blood loss caused by Xarelto, other than possibly emergency dialysis. (levinlaw.com)
  • As of this time, there have been no large mass tort settlements involving Xarelto and the link to uncontrolled blood loss. (levinlaw.com)
  • WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. drug reviewers had mixed opinions about whether Johnson & Johnson blood thinner Xarelto reduced the risk of new heart attacks and strokes in people with heart problems, setting the stage for heated debate by outside experts later this week. (reuters.com)
  • Xarelto is one of three new medicines that offer potential advantages over older drugs to prevent strokes and other dangerous conditions caused by blood clots, in a market worth up to $10 billion in annual sales, according to Wall Street forecasts. (reuters.com)
  • The scientists said that aspirin intake could lower the risk of blood clot. (medindia.net)
  • Rivaroxaban is also given together with aspirin to lower the risk of stroke, heart attack, or other serious heart problems in people with coronary artery disease (decreased blood flow to the heart) or peripheral artery disease (decreased blood flow to the legs). (adventisthealthcare.com)
  • The investigators hope that the 'calf squeezer' in conjunction with 81mg of Aspirin will protect against getting a blood clot as well as, or better than, the medicine without some of the side effects of the medicine used now. (hss.edu)
  • What Are Some Possible Causes of Sudden Hip Pain Without a Previous Injury? (reference.com)
  • Blood clots normally only form to stop bleeding, for instance if you've had an injury. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Traumatic arthritis, arthritis due to injury, may also cause damage to the articular cartilage of the hip. (nyhq.org)
  • In general, severe hip damage that results from arthritis or injury is initially treated with rest, non-weight-bearing exercises such as cycling or water aerobics, anti-inflammatory medications for pain, and lifestyle changes such as losing excess weight. (mbhs.org)
  • Understanding any hip precautions you may have been given to prevent injury and ensure proper healing. (aaos.org)
  • Blood tests may reveal whether a rheumatoid factor-or any other antibody indicative of inflammatory arthritis-is present. (aaos.org)
  • The artificial hip can be metal or ceramic, or a combination of these. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Most artificial hip joints will last for 10 to 20 years or longer. (arthritis.ca)
  • The artificial hip may dislocate or break, or become loose or stiff. (medbroadcast.com)
  • Younger people who have a hip replaced may put extra stress on the artificial hip. (stlukes-stl.com)
  • While an artificial hip typically lasts 10 to 15 years, over time the hip doesn't fit as securely and becomes less effective. (loyolamedicine.org)
  • The initial artificial hip or a component of the hip is replaced by a new hip or component. (healthtap.com)
  • While many different types of designs and materials are used in artificial hip joints, all of them consist of two basic components: the ball component, and the socket component. (mbhs.org)
  • If your artificial hip has worn loose, this may not be too difficult. (bupa.co.uk)
  • You may have other surgical choices, such as total hip resurfacing. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • In some cases, you may have other surgical options, like total hip resurfacing. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • The new drug seemed to reduce clots by nearly half and resulted in slightly fewer problems with bleeding at the surgical site, Stein said. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Worried as you may be, there's little downside to this common operation: Hip replacements are faster and safer than ever with new materials and surgical procedures. (lifescript.com)
  • Like global position systems (GPS) help drivers arrive at exact destinations in the world, the computer-assisted surgical system helps surgeons align the patient's bones and replacement implants with a degree of accuracy not possible with the naked eye or traditional instrumentation. (mbhs.org)
  • Second, when the calf is squeezed, chemicals are sent into the blood, which helps the body keep clots from forming. (hss.edu)
  • NBCA's Stop the Clot® THA/TKA Patient Toolkit was made possible by an educational grant provided by Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (stoptheclot.org)