Anesthesia, Epidural: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected into the epidural space.Anesthesia, General: Procedure in which patients are induced into an unconscious state through use of various medications so that they do not feel pain during surgery.Anesthesia, Obstetrical: A variety of anesthetic methods such as EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA used to control the pain of childbirth.Anesthesia: A state characterized by loss of feeling or sensation. This depression of nerve function is usually the result of pharmacologic action and is induced to allow performance of surgery or other painful procedures.Anesthesia, Spinal: Procedure in which an anesthetic is injected directly into the spinal cord.Anesthesia, Local: A blocking of nerve conduction to a specific area by an injection of an anesthetic agent.Anesthesia, Conduction: Injection of an anesthetic into the nerves to inhibit nerve transmission in a specific part of the body.Anesthetics, Local: Drugs that block nerve conduction when applied locally to nerve tissue in appropriate concentrations. They act on any part of the nervous system and on every type of nerve fiber. In contact with a nerve trunk, these anesthetics can cause both sensory and motor paralysis in the innervated area. Their action is completely reversible. (From Gilman AG, et. al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed) Nearly all local anesthetics act by reducing the tendency of voltage-dependent sodium channels to activate.Spinal Cord: A cylindrical column of tissue that lies within the vertebral canal. It is composed of WHITE MATTER and GRAY MATTER.Lidocaine: A local anesthetic and cardiac depressant used as an antiarrhythmia agent. Its actions are more intense and its effects more prolonged than those of PROCAINE but its duration of action is shorter than that of BUPIVACAINE or PRILOCAINE.Anesthesia, Inhalation: Anesthesia caused by the breathing of anesthetic gases or vapors or by insufflating anesthetic gases or vapors into the respiratory tract.Anesthesia, Intravenous: Process of administering an anesthetic through injection directly into the bloodstream.Bupivacaine: A widely used local anesthetic agent.Anesthetics, Combined: The use of two or more chemicals simultaneously or sequentially to induce anesthesia. The drugs need not be in the same dosage form.Mepivacaine: A local anesthetic that is chemically related to BUPIVACAINE but pharmacologically related to LIDOCAINE. It is indicated for infiltration, nerve block, and epidural anesthesia. Mepivacaine is effective topically only in large doses and therefore should not be used by this route. (From AMA Drug Evaluations, 1994, p168)Anesthesia Recovery Period: The period of emergence from general anesthesia, where different elements of consciousness return at different rates.Anesthesia, Caudal: Epidural anesthesia administered via the sacral canal.Adjuvants, Anesthesia: Agents that are administered in association with anesthetics to increase effectiveness, improve delivery, or decrease required dosage.Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Spinal Cord Injuries: Penetrating and non-penetrating injuries to the spinal cord resulting from traumatic external forces (e.g., WOUNDS, GUNSHOT; WHIPLASH INJURIES; etc.).Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Anesthetics, Inhalation: Gases or volatile liquids that vary in the rate at which they induce anesthesia; potency; the degree of circulation, respiratory, or neuromuscular depression they produce; and analgesic effects. Inhalation anesthetics have advantages over intravenous agents in that the depth of anesthesia can be changed rapidly by altering the inhaled concentration. Because of their rapid elimination, any postoperative respiratory depression is of relatively short duration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p173)Autonomic Nerve Block: Interruption of sympathetic pathways, by local injection of an anesthetic agent, at any of four levels: peripheral nerve block, sympathetic ganglion block, extradural block, and subarachnoid block.Procaine: A local anesthetic of the ester type that has a slow onset and a short duration of action. It is mainly used for infiltration anesthesia, peripheral nerve block, and spinal block. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1016).Monitoring, Intraoperative: The constant checking on the state or condition of a patient during the course of a surgical operation (e.g., checking of vital signs).Analgesia, Epidural: The relief of pain without loss of consciousness through the introduction of an analgesic agent into the epidural space of the vertebral canal. It is differentiated from ANESTHESIA, EPIDURAL which refers to the state of insensitivity to sensation.Methyl Ethers: A group of compounds that contain the general formula R-OCH3.Anesthetics, Intravenous: Ultrashort-acting anesthetics that are used for induction. Loss of consciousness is rapid and induction is pleasant, but there is no muscle relaxation and reflexes frequently are not reduced adequately. Repeated administration results in accumulation and prolongs the recovery time. Since these agents have little if any analgesic activity, they are seldom used alone except in brief minor procedures. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p174)Isoflurane: A stable, non-explosive inhalation anesthetic, relatively free from significant side effects.Fentanyl: A potent narcotic analgesic, abuse of which leads to habituation or addiction. It is primarily a mu-opioid agonist. Fentanyl is also used as an adjunct to general anesthetics, and as an anesthetic for induction and maintenance. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p1078)Propofol: An intravenous anesthetic agent which has the advantage of a very rapid onset after infusion or bolus injection plus a very short recovery period of a couple of minutes. (From Smith and Reynard, Textbook of Pharmacology, 1992, 1st ed, p206). Propofol has been used as ANTICONVULSANTS and ANTIEMETICS.Pain, Postoperative: Pain during the period after surgery.Shivering: Involuntary contraction or twitching of the muscles. It is a physiologic method of heat production in man and other mammals.Anesthesiology: A specialty concerned with the study of anesthetics and anesthesia.Epidural Space: Space between the dura mater and the walls of the vertebral canal.Ephedrine: A phenethylamine found in EPHEDRA SINICA. PSEUDOEPHEDRINE is an isomer. It is an alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonist that may also enhance release of norepinephrine. It has been used for asthma, heart failure, rhinitis, and urinary incontinence, and for its central nervous system stimulatory effects in the treatment of narcolepsy and depression. It has become less extensively used with the advent of more selective agonists.Etilefrine: A phenylephrine-related beta-1 adrenergic and alpha adrenergic agonist used as a cardiotonic and antihypotensive agent.Skin Temperature: The TEMPERATURE at the outer surface of the body.Nitrous Oxide: Nitrogen oxide (N2O). A colorless, odorless gas that is used as an anesthetic and analgesic. High concentrations cause a narcotic effect and may replace oxygen, causing death by asphyxia. It is also used as a food aerosol in the preparation of whipping cream.Anesthetics: Agents that are capable of inducing a total or partial loss of sensation, especially tactile sensation and pain. They may act to induce general ANESTHESIA, in which an unconscious state is achieved, or may act locally to induce numbness or lack of sensation at a targeted site.Lumbosacral Region: Region of the back including the LUMBAR VERTEBRAE, SACRUM, and nearby structures.Thoracic Vertebrae: A group of twelve VERTEBRAE connected to the ribs that support the upper trunk region.Epinephrine: The active sympathomimetic hormone from the ADRENAL MEDULLA. It stimulates both the alpha- and beta- adrenergic systems, causes systemic VASOCONSTRICTION and gastrointestinal relaxation, stimulates the HEART, and dilates BRONCHI and cerebral vessels. It is used in ASTHMA and CARDIAC FAILURE and to delay absorption of local ANESTHETICS.Halothane: A nonflammable, halogenated, hydrocarbon anesthetic that provides relatively rapid induction with little or no excitement. Analgesia may not be adequate. NITROUS OXIDE is often given concomitantly. Because halothane may not produce sufficient muscle relaxation, supplemental neuromuscular blocking agents may be required. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p178)Thorax: The upper part of the trunk between the NECK and the ABDOMEN. It contains the chief organs of the circulatory and respiratory systems. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Horner Syndrome: A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)Amides: Organic compounds containing the -CO-NH2 radical. Amides are derived from acids by replacement of -OH by -NH2 or from ammonia by the replacement of H by an acyl group. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Hemodynamics: The movement and the forces involved in the movement of the blood through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Pain Measurement: Scales, questionnaires, tests, and other methods used to assess pain severity and duration in patients or experimental animals to aid in diagnosis, therapy, and physiological studies.Injections, Spinal: Introduction of therapeutic agents into the spinal region using a needle and syringe.Anesthesia, Closed-Circuit: Inhalation anesthesia where the gases exhaled by the patient are rebreathed as some carbon dioxide is simultaneously removed and anesthetic gas and oxygen are added so that no anesthetic escapes into the room. Closed-circuit anesthesia is used especially with explosive anesthetics to prevent fires where electrical sparking from instruments is possible.Anesthetics, General: Agents that induce various degrees of analgesia; depression of consciousness, circulation, and respiration; relaxation of skeletal muscle; reduction of reflex activity; and amnesia. There are two types of general anesthetics, inhalation and intravenous. With either type, the arterial concentration of drug required to induce anesthesia varies with the condition of the patient, the desired depth of anesthesia, and the concomitant use of other drugs. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p.173)Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Intraoperative Period: The period during a surgical operation.Ketamine: A cyclohexanone derivative used for induction of anesthesia. Its mechanism of action is not well understood, but ketamine can block NMDA receptors (RECEPTORS, N-METHYL-D-ASPARTATE) and may interact with sigma receptors.Ambulatory Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on an outpatient basis. It may be hospital-based or performed in an office or surgicenter.Preanesthetic Medication: Drugs administered before an anesthetic to decrease a patient's anxiety and control the effects of that anesthetic.Dihydroergotamine: A 9,10alpha-dihydro derivative of ERGOTAMINE. It is used as a vasoconstrictor, specifically for the therapy of MIGRAINE DISORDERS.Hypothermia: Lower than normal body temperature, especially in warm-blooded animals.Puerperal Disorders: Disorders or diseases associated with PUERPERIUM, the six-to-eight-week period immediately after PARTURITION in humans.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Body Temperature Regulation: The processes of heating and cooling that an organism uses to control its temperature.Analgesia: Methods of PAIN relief that may be used with or in place of ANALGESICS.Injections, Epidural: The injection of drugs, most often analgesics, into the spinal canal without puncturing the dura mater.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Blood Pressure: PRESSURE of the BLOOD on the ARTERIES and other BLOOD VESSELS.Thiopental: A barbiturate that is administered intravenously for the induction of general anesthesia or for the production of complete anesthesia of short duration.Meperidine: A narcotic analgesic that can be used for the relief of most types of moderate to severe pain, including postoperative pain and the pain of labor. Prolonged use may lead to dependence of the morphine type; withdrawal symptoms appear more rapidly than with morphine and are of shorter duration.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Surgical Procedures, Operative: Operations carried out for the correction of deformities and defects, repair of injuries, and diagnosis and cure of certain diseases. (Taber, 18th ed.)Ritodrine: An adrenergic beta-2 agonist used to control PREMATURE LABOR.Analgesics, Opioid: Compounds with activity like OPIATE ALKALOIDS, acting at OPIOID RECEPTORS. Properties include induction of ANALGESIA or NARCOSIS.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Spinal Nerves: The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord segment. The spinal nerve plexuses and the spinal roots are also included.Labor, Obstetric: The repetitive uterine contraction during childbirth which is associated with the progressive dilation of the uterine cervix (CERVIX UTERI). Successful labor results in the expulsion of the FETUS and PLACENTA. Obstetric labor can be spontaneous or induced (LABOR, INDUCED).Labor Stage, First: Period from the onset of true OBSTETRIC LABOR to the complete dilatation of the CERVIX UTERI.Pentobarbital: A short-acting barbiturate that is effective as a sedative and hypnotic (but not as an anti-anxiety) agent and is usually given orally. It is prescribed more frequently for sleep induction than for sedation but, like similar agents, may lose its effectiveness by the second week of continued administration. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p236)Sensation: The process in which specialized SENSORY RECEPTOR CELLS transduce peripheral stimuli (physical or chemical) into NERVE IMPULSES which are then transmitted to the various sensory centers in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM.Spinal Cord Diseases: Pathologic conditions which feature SPINAL CORD damage or dysfunction, including disorders involving the meninges and perimeningeal spaces surrounding the spinal cord. Traumatic injuries, vascular diseases, infections, and inflammatory/autoimmune processes may affect the spinal cord.Analgesia, Obstetrical: The elimination of PAIN, without the loss of CONSCIOUSNESS, during OBSTETRIC LABOR; OBSTETRIC DELIVERY; or the POSTPARTUM PERIOD, usually through the administration of ANALGESICS.Hypotension: Abnormally low BLOOD PRESSURE that can result in inadequate blood flow to the brain and other vital organs. Common symptom is DIZZINESS but greater negative impacts on the body occur when there is prolonged depravation of oxygen and nutrients.Spinal Nerve Roots: Paired bundles of NERVE FIBERS entering and leaving the SPINAL CORD at each segment. The dorsal and ventral nerve roots join to form the mixed segmental spinal nerves. The dorsal roots are generally afferent, formed by the central projections of the spinal (dorsal root) ganglia sensory cells, and the ventral roots are efferent, comprising the axons of spinal motor and PREGANGLIONIC AUTONOMIC FIBERS.Anesthetics, Dissociative: Intravenous anesthetics that induce a state of sedation, immobility, amnesia, and marked analgesia. Subjects may experience a strong feeling of dissociation from the environment. The condition produced is similar to NEUROLEPTANALGESIA, but is brought about by the administration of a single drug. (From Gilman et al., Goodman and Gilman's The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th ed)Enflurane: An extremely stable inhalation anesthetic that allows rapid adjustments of anesthesia depth with little change in pulse or respiratory rate.Xylazine: An adrenergic alpha-2 agonist used as a sedative, analgesic and centrally acting muscle relaxant in VETERINARY MEDICINE.Intubation, Intratracheal: A procedure involving placement of a tube into the trachea through the mouth or nose in order to provide a patient with oxygen and anesthesia.Anesthesia Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the administration of functions and activities pertaining to the delivery of anesthetics.Intraoperative Complications: Complications that affect patients during surgery. They may or may not be associated with the disease for which the surgery is done, or within the same surgical procedure.Conscious Sedation: A drug-induced depression of consciousness during which patients respond purposefully to verbal commands, either alone or accompanied by light tactile stimulation. No interventions are required to maintain a patent airway. (From: American Society of Anesthesiologists Practice Guidelines)Lumbosacral Plexus: The lumbar and sacral plexuses taken together. The fibers of the lumbosacral plexus originate in the lumbar and upper sacral spinal cord (L1 to S3) and innervate the lower extremities.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Anesthesia, IntratrachealSpinal Cord Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplasms which occur within the substance of the spinal cord (intramedullary neoplasms) or in the space between the dura and spinal cord (intradural extramedullary neoplasms). The majority of intramedullary spinal tumors are primary CNS neoplasms including ASTROCYTOMA; EPENDYMOMA; and LIPOMA. Intramedullary neoplasms are often associated with SYRINGOMYELIA. The most frequent histologic types of intradural-extramedullary tumors are MENINGIOMA and NEUROFIBROMA.Spinal Canal: The cavity within the SPINAL COLUMN through which the SPINAL CORD passes.Spinal DiseasesSpinal Cord Compression: Acute and chronic conditions characterized by external mechanical compression of the SPINAL CORD due to extramedullary neoplasm; EPIDURAL ABSCESS; SPINAL FRACTURES; bony deformities of the vertebral bodies; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations vary with the anatomic site of the lesion and may include localized pain, weakness, sensory loss, incontinence, and impotence.Morphine: The principal alkaloid in opium and the prototype opiate analgesic and narcotic. Morphine has widespread effects in the central nervous system and on smooth muscle.Postoperative Period: The period following a surgical operation.Piroxicam: A cyclooxygenase inhibiting, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agent (NSAID) that is well established in treating rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis and used for musculoskeletal disorders, dysmenorrhea, and postoperative pain. Its long half-life enables it to be administered once daily.Pain: An unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli which are detected by NERVE ENDINGS of NOCICEPTIVE NEURONS.Spinal NeoplasmsDiagnostic Techniques, Neurological: Methods and procedures for the diagnosis of diseases of the nervous system, central and peripheral, or demonstration of neurologic function or dysfunction.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Respiration: The act of breathing with the LUNGS, consisting of INHALATION, or the taking into the lungs of the ambient air, and of EXHALATION, or the expelling of the modified air which contains more CARBON DIOXIDE than the air taken in (Blakiston's Gould Medical Dictionary, 4th ed.). This does not include tissue respiration (= OXYGEN CONSUMPTION) or cell respiration (= CELL RESPIRATION).Prilocaine: A local anesthetic that is similar pharmacologically to LIDOCAINE. Currently, it is used most often for infiltration anesthesia in dentistry.Blood Circulation: The movement of the BLOOD as it is pumped through the CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM.Anesthesia and Analgesia: Medical methods of either relieving pain caused by a particular condition or removing the sensation of pain during a surgery or other medical procedure.Analgesia, Patient-Controlled: Relief of PAIN, without loss of CONSCIOUSNESS, through ANALGESIC AGENTS administered by the patients. It has been used successfully to control POSTOPERATIVE PAIN, during OBSTETRIC LABOR, after BURNS, and in TERMINAL CARE. The choice of agent, dose, and lockout interval greatly influence effectiveness. The potential for overdose can be minimized by combining small bolus doses with a mandatory interval between successive doses (lockout interval).Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain located in the posterior regions of the THORAX; LUMBOSACRAL REGION; or the adjacent regions.Heart Block: Impaired conduction of cardiac impulse that can occur anywhere along the conduction pathway, such as between the SINOATRIAL NODE and the right atrium (SA block) or between atria and ventricles (AV block). Heart blocks can be classified by the duration, frequency, or completeness of conduction block. Reversibility depends on the degree of structural or functional defects.Methohexital: An intravenous anesthetic with a short duration of action that may be used for induction of anesthesia.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Hysterectomy: Excision of the uterus.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Spinal Fusion: Operative immobilization or ankylosis of two or more vertebrae by fusion of the vertebral bodies with a short bone graft or often with diskectomy or laminectomy. (From Blauvelt & Nelson, A Manual of Orthopaedic Terminology, 5th ed, p236; Dorland, 28th ed)Spinal Stenosis: Narrowing of the spinal canal.Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Apgar Score: A method, developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar, to evaluate a newborn's adjustment to extrauterine life. Five items - heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color - are evaluated 60 seconds after birth and again five minutes later on a scale from 0-2, 0 being the lowest, 2 being normal. The five numbers are added for the Apgar score. A score of 0-3 represents severe distress, 4-7 indicates moderate distress, and a score of 7-10 predicts an absence of difficulty in adjusting to extrauterine life.Sympathetic Fibers, Postganglionic: Nerve fibers which project from sympathetic ganglia to synapses on target organs. Sympathetic postganglionic fibers use norepinephrine as transmitter, except for those innervating eccrine sweat glands (and possibly some blood vessels) which use acetylcholine. They may also release peptide cotransmitters.Alfentanil: A short-acting opioid anesthetic and analgesic derivative of FENTANYL. It produces an early peak analgesic effect and fast recovery of consciousness. Alfentanil is effective as an anesthetic during surgery, for supplementation of analgesia during surgical procedures, and as an analgesic for critically ill patients.Hypnotics and Sedatives: Drugs used to induce drowsiness or sleep or to reduce psychological excitement or anxiety.Sympathetic Nervous System: The thoracolumbar division of the autonomic nervous system. Sympathetic preganglionic fibers originate in neurons of the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and project to the paravertebral and prevertebral ganglia, which in turn project to target organs. The sympathetic nervous system mediates the body's response to stressful situations, i.e., the fight or flight reactions. It often acts reciprocally to the parasympathetic system.Consciousness: Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.Regional Blood Flow: The flow of BLOOD through or around an organ or region of the body.Neuromuscular Nondepolarizing Agents: Drugs that interrupt transmission at the skeletal neuromuscular junction without causing depolarization of the motor end plate. They prevent acetylcholine from triggering muscle contraction and are used as muscle relaxants during electroshock treatments, in convulsive states, and as anesthesia adjuvants.Leg: The inferior part of the lower extremity between the KNEE and the ANKLE.Surgical Procedures, Minor: Surgery restricted to the management of minor problems and injuries; surgical procedures of relatively slight extent and not in itself hazardous to life. (Dorland, 28th ed & Stedman, 25th ed)Oxygen: An element with atomic symbol O, atomic number 8, and atomic weight [15.99903; 15.99977]. It is the most abundant element on earth and essential for respiration.Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: Emesis and queasiness occurring after anesthesia.Xenon: A noble gas with the atomic symbol Xe, atomic number 54, and atomic weight 131.30. It is found in the earth's atmosphere and has been used as an anesthetic.Mesenteric Veins: Veins which return blood from the intestines; the inferior mesenteric vein empties into the splenic vein, the superior mesenteric vein joins the splenic vein to form the portal vein.Midazolam: A short-acting hypnotic-sedative drug with anxiolytic and amnestic properties. It is used in dentistry, cardiac surgery, endoscopic procedures, as preanesthetic medication, and as an adjunct to local anesthesia. The short duration and cardiorespiratory stability makes it useful in poor-risk, elderly, and cardiac patients. It is water-soluble at pH less than 4 and lipid-soluble at physiological pH.Acid-Base Equilibrium: The balance between acids and bases in the BODY FLUIDS. The pH (HYDROGEN-ION CONCENTRATION) of the arterial BLOOD provides an index for the total body acid-base balance.Ethers
... peripheral nerve blocks and spinal-epidural anesthesia. It is especially applicable where those techniques are contra-indicated ...
Surgery of skin and peripheral blood vessels (topical anesthesia, field blocks, peripheral nerve blocks, or spinal/epidural ... epidural anesthesia combined with general anesthesia). *Abdominal surgery (epidural anesthesia/spinal anesthesia, often ... spinal/epidural anesthesia). *Bone and joint surgery of the pelvis, hip, and leg (spinal/epidural anesthesia, peripheral nerve ... plexus anesthesia). Spinal anesthesia and epidural anesthesia merge into the central nervous system. ...
... as well as spinal/epidural anesthesia. Due to nisoxetine's sodium channel blocking effect, it is also possible that it may also ... It is 400-fold more potent in blocking the uptake of norepinephrine than that of dopamine. The R-isomer of nisoxetine has 20 ... Nisoxetine is a potent and selective inhibitor of norepinephrine uptake, where it is about 1000-fold more potent in blocking ... At doses capable of blocking the uptake of norepinephrine and tyramine at nerve terminals, nisoxetine did not produce any ...
The techniques of spinal and epidural anesthesia became common practice as they were shown to be safer for the mother and ... anesthesia is now implemented routinely in labor and cesarean section as it provides a rapid onset of sensory motor block and ... by procaine spinal anesthesia)". The study demonstrated that neuraxial anesthesia could be safely used to alleviate the pain of ... While spinal anesthesia would go on to be indispensable in the world of obstetrics, manual cervical dilation would fall out of ...
Subarachnoid block[edit]. Chloroprocaine was developed to meet the need for a short-acting spinal anaesthetic that is reliable ... Fetal acidosis, 2-chloroprocaine, and epidural anesthesia for cesarean section. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 1985 Feb 1;151(3):322-4. ... Drasner K. Chloroprocaine spinal anesthesia: back to the future? Anes analg 2005; 100: 549-52. ... "Chloroprocaine 40 mg produces shorter spinal block than articaine 40 mg in day‐case knee arthroscopy patients." Acta ...
... local anesthetics Dental anesthesia Dibucaine number Epidural Intravenous regional anesthesia Local anesthesia Local anesthetic ... Local anesthetic toxicity Methemoglobin Sodium channel blocker Spinal anesthesia Topical anesthesia Veterinary anesthesia Büchi ... 4-Aminobenzoic acid Amino amide Amino esters Anesthesia Anesthetic Brachial plexus block Cocaine analogues: ...
... and inadvertent spinal/epidural anesthesia could occur and therefore, patients should be carefully monitored during the ... data on combined usage of general anesthesia and interscalene blocks are limited. Some indications for combined anesthesia ... The benefit of the suprascapular nerve block is that it avoids blocking motor function to parts of the upper limb innervated by ... Disadvantages to the suprascapular nerve block include using two separate needlings, blocking not all of nerves of the shoulder ...
... anesthesia, spinal MeSH E03.155.086.711 --- nerve block MeSH E03.155.086.711.299 --- autonomic nerve block MeSH E03.155.141 ... anesthesia, epidural MeSH E03.155.086.131.100 --- anesthesia, caudal MeSH E03.155.086.231 --- anesthesia, local MeSH E03.155. ... anesthesia, inhalation MeSH E03.155.197.197.280 --- anesthesia, closed-circuit MeSH E03.155.197.364 --- anesthesia, rectal MeSH ... E03.155.253 --- anesthesia, intratracheal MeSH E03.155.308 --- anesthesia, intravenous MeSH E03.155.364 --- anesthesia, ...
Epidural anesthesia and delivery also can cause the overflow incontinence. Overflow incontinence occurs when the patient's ... tumors and kidney stones can block the urethra. Spinal cord injuries or nervous system disorders are additional causes of ... Weak bladder muscles, resulting in incomplete emptying of the bladder, or a blocked urethra can cause this type of incontinence ... or spinal cord injury, a catheter may be used to empty the bladder. A catheter is a tube that can be inserted through the ...
General anesthesia Local anesthesia Topical anesthesia (surface) Epidural (extradural) block Spinal anesthesia (subarachnoid ... block) Topical anesthesia (surface) Regional anesthesia Interventional radiology Screening (medicine) Algorithm (medical) ... Neovaginoplasty Radiosurgery Stereotactic surgery Radiosurgery Vaginoplasty Xenotransplantation Dissociative anesthesia[ ...
There is less chances of hypotension after epidural anesthesia as compared to spinal anesthesia ... dense block of a spinal anaesthetic with the post-operative analgesic effects of an epidural. This is called combined spinal ... Combined spinal-epidural techniques[edit]. Main article: Combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia ... Epidural catheter can be continued post operatively to continue analgesia while spinal anesthesia is generally a single shot ...
The procedure can be performed under general, regional (spinal or epidural) or even local anesthesia. Access to the patient's ... so the stent graft can be deployed without blocking these. Failure to achieve this will cause renal failure. With most devices ... As such, major branch arteries to the head, arms, spinal cord, intestines and kidneys may originate from the aneurysm. An ...
Neuraxial (regional) anesthetic and analgesia techniques: (e.g. epidural, spinal, combined spinal-epidural) are used most ... William Halstead completed the first nerve block; August Bier, the first clinical spinal anesthesia; Sicard and Cathlein, the ... Other nerve blocks for labor include paracervical and pudendal blocks which target different nerve distributions. Anesthesia ... regional anesthesia, transplant anesthesia and trauma anesthesia. Obstetric anesthesiologists typically serve as consultants to ...
... and inadvertent spinal/epidural anesthesia could occur and therefore, patients should be carefully monitored during the ... data on combined usage of general anesthesia and interscalene blocks are limited. Some indications for combined anesthesia ... The benefit of the suprascapular nerve block is that it avoids blocking motor function to parts of the upper limb innervated by ... and avoiding the side effects of general anesthesia.[13] In addition, regional anesthesia may be more cost-effective because it ...
For many years however, a controversy centered around whether Corning's injection was a spinal or an epidural block. The dose ... Marx, GF (1994). "The first spinal anesthesia. Who deserves the laurels?". Regional Anesthesia. 19 (6): 429-30. PMID 7848956. ... "Manuel Martinez Curbelo And Continuous Lumbar Epidural Anesthesia" (PDF). Bulletin of Anesthesia History. 22 (4): 1-8. PMID ... "Research and clinical observations on spinal anesthesia: with special reference to the peridural technique" (PDF). Anesthesia ...
Topical anesthesia (surface) Infiltration Plexus block Epidural (extradural) block Spinal anesthesia (subarachnoid block) ... New York School of Regional Anesthesia Anesthesia Books General information and tutorials in peripheral regional anesthesia [1 ... Regional anesthesia is aimed at anesthetizing a larger part of the body such as a leg or arm. Conduction anesthesia encompasses ... The following terms are often used interchangeably: Local anesthesia, in a strict sense, is anesthesia of a small part of the ...
Anesthesia can be described as all of the following: Medical procedure Medical specialty General Spinal Epidural Local (Topical ... Neuroleptanalgesic anesthesia Nerve block History of general anesthesia History of neuraxial anesthesia History of tracheal ... The following outline is provided as an overview of and topical guide to anesthesia: Anesthesia - pharmacologically induced and ... effect Intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring Laryngoscopy Nerve block Agitated emergence Allergic reactions Anesthesia ...
... (or spinal anesthesia), also called spinal block, subarachnoid block, intradural block and intrathecal block ... A spinal gives profound block of all motor and sensory function below the level of injection, whereas an epidural blocks a ' ... An epidural often does not cause as significant a neuromuscular block as a spinal, unless specific local anesthetics are also ... Epidural anesthesia is a technique whereby a local anesthetic drug is injected through a catheter placed into the epidural ...
Nerve blocks are also associated with a lower risk of neurologic complications compared to the more central epidural or spinal ... Spinal and epidural are the most commonly used forms of central neuraxial blockade. Spinal anesthesia is a "one-shot" injection ... discussed in more detail below in Spinal, epidural and caudal anesthesia). Topical anesthesia: local anesthetics that are ... Regional anesthesia and local anesthesia, which block transmission of nerve impulses between a targeted part of the body and ...
There is less chances of hypotension after epidural anesthesia as compared to spinal anesthesia Epidural catheter can be ... dense block of a spinal anaesthetic with the post-operative analgesic effects of an epidural. This is called combined spinal ... In addition to blocking the nerves which carry pain, local anaesthetic drugs in the epidural space will block other types of ... The spinal dose is then given, the spinal needle withdrawn, and the epidural catheter inserted as normal. This method, known as ...
... heart block, cardiac arrest Toxicity can also occur in the setting of subarachnoid injection during high spinal anesthesia. ... Bupivacaine is indicated for local infiltration, peripheral nerve block, sympathetic nerve block, and epidural and caudal ... It is used by injecting it into the area, around a nerve that supplies the area, or into the spinal canal's epidural space. It ... It is the most commonly used local anesthetic in epidural anesthesia during labor, as well as in postoperative pain management ...
... test to confirm catheter location in the epidural space during procedures like combined spinal and epidural anesthesia. " ... "E-Catheter Kit for Continuous Peripheral Nerve Block". Dynacare. Retrieved 6 October 2014. "Usefulness of the Tsui Test in ... "Pediatric Atlas of Ultrasound and Nerve Stimulation-Guided Regional Anesthesia Regional Anesthesia". Furthermore, Dr. Tsui is ... Anesthesiology Anesthesia and Analgesia British Journal of Anesthesia Journal of Pain Journal of Clinical Microbiology and ...
This may include invasive monitoring (TEE, CVP, arterial pressure), neuraxial nerve blocks (spinal or epidural), peripheral ... An anesthesiologist or anaesthetist is a physician trained in anesthesia and perioperative medicine. The title of the role ... Other healthcare professionals like nurses and dentists provide some anesthesia services, but they have other titles such as " ... Anesthesiology at Curlie (based on DMOZ) OpenAnesthesia - the Anesthesiology Wiki (presented by the International Anesthesia ...
The controversy centers around whether Corning's injection was a spinal or an epidural block. The dose of cocaine used by ... Marx, GF (1994). "The first spinal anesthesia. Who deserves the laurels?". Regional Anesthesia. 19 (6): 429-30. PMID 7848956. ... Corning who created the experimental conditions that ultimately led to the development of both spinal and epidural anesthesia. ... Although Bier properly deserves credit for the introduction of spinal anesthesia into the clinical practice of medicine, it was ...
The block provides pain relief during and after the surgery. The advantages of nerve blocks over general anesthesia include ... but bilateral blocks can be performed for abdominal surgeries. Since it is a unilateral block, it may be chosen over epidurals ... spinal cord or vertebral artery puncture) or supraclavicular (pneumothroax) brachial plexus blocks. The femoral nerve block is ... Therapeutic blocks may be used for acute pain patients, diagnostic blocks are used to find pain sources, prognostic blocks are ...
... (from Ancient Greek ἐπί, "on, upon" + dura mater) is a medical route of administration in which a drug or contrast agent is injected into the epidural space of the spinal cord. Techniques such as epidural analgesia and epidural anaesthesia employ this route of administration. The epidural route is frequently employed by certain physicians and nurse anaesthetists to administer diagnostic (e.g. radiocontrast agents) and therapeutic (e.g., glucocorticoids) chemical substances, as well as certain analgesic and local anaesthetic agents. Epidural techniques frequently involve injection of drugs through a catheter placed into the epidural space. The injection can result in a loss of sensation-including the sensation of pain-by blocking the transmission of signals through nerve fibres in or ...
... is a principle in epidural anaesthesia first described by Professor Achille Mario Dogliotti in 1933. It is a method for the identification of the epidural space, a potential space. As a needle is advanced through the ligamentum flavum, to the epidural space, with constant pressure applied to the piston of a syringe, loss of resistance occurs once the needle enters the epidural space due to the change in pressure. The identification of this space, allows subsequent administration of epidural anaesthesia, a technique used primarily for analgesia during childbirth. This technique remains in use at present[update], and is commonly referred to the loss of resistance to saline technique (LORS) or its variation, the loss of resistance to air technique (LORA). These use, respectively, saline or air to identify the ...
... is bleeding into the epidural space in the spine. These may arise spontaneously (e.g. during childbirth), or as a rare complication of epiduralanaesthesia or of surgery (such as laminectomy).[citation needed] Symptoms usually include back pain which radiates to the arms or the legs. They may cause pressure on the spinal cord or cauda equina, which may present as pain, muscle weakness, or dysfunction of the bladder and bowel. The best way to confirm the diagnosis is MRI. Risk factors include anatomical abnormalities and bleeding disorders. Treatment is generally with emergency surgery. The risk following epidural anaesthesia is difficult to quantify; estimates vary from 1 per 10,000 to 1 per 100,000 epidural anaesthetics.[citation needed] The anatomy of the epidural space is such that spinal ...
... was developed to meet the need for a short-acting spinal anaesthetic that is reliable and has a favourable safety profile to support the growing need for day-case surgery. Licensed in Europe for surgical procedures up to 40 minutes, chloroprocaine is an ester-type local anaesthetic with the shortest duration of action of all the established local anaesthetics. It has a significantly shorter duration of action than lidocaine and is significantly less toxic. Chloroprocaine has a motor block lasting for 40 minutes, a rapid onset time of 3-5 minutes (9.6 min ± 7.3 min at 40 mg dose; 7.9 min ± 6.0 min at 50 mg dose) and a time to ambulation of 90 minutes without complications, especially lacking transient neurologic symptomatology.. These data are based upon a retrospective review of 672 patients suitable for spinal anaesthesia in surgical procedures less than 60 minutes' duration using 30-40 mg chloroprocaine. The results showed good surgical anaesthesia, a fast onset time, ...
... (PDPH) is a complication of puncture of the dura mater (one of the membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord).[1] The headache is severe and described as "searing and spreading like hot metal," involving the back and front of the head, and spreading to the neck and shoulders, sometimes involving neck stiffness. It is exacerbated by movement, and sitting or standing, and relieved to some degree by lying down. Nausea, vomiting, pain in arms and legs, hearing loss, tinnitus, vertigo, dizziness and paraesthesia of the scalp are common.[1] It is a common side-effect of spinal anesthesia and lumbar puncture. Leakage of cerebrospinal fluid puncture causes reduced fluid levels in the brain and spinal cord. Onset occurs within two days in 66 percent and within three days in ninety percent of PDPH cases. It occurs so rarely immediately after puncture that other possible causes should be investigated when ...
Procedures involving injection of any substance into the epidural space require the operator to be technically proficient in order to avoid complications.. The subject may be in the seated, lateral or prone positions.[2] The level of the spine at which the catheter is best placed depends mainly on the site and type of an intended operation or the anatomical origin of pain. The iliac crest is a commonly used anatomical landmark for lumbar epidural injections, as this level roughly corresponds with the fourth lumbar vertebra, which is usually well below the termination of the spinal cord. The Tuohy needle is usually inserted in the midline, between the spinous processes. When using a paramedian approach, the tip of the needle passes along a shelf of vertebral bone called the lamina until just before reaching the ligamentum flavum and the epidural space.. Along with a sudden loss of resistance ...
In the practice of medicine (especially surgery and dentistry), anesthesia or anaesthesia is a state of temporary induced loss of sensation or awareness. It may include analgesia (relief from or prevention of pain), paralysis (muscle relaxation), amnesia (loss of memory), or unconsciousness. A patient under the effects of anesthetic drugs is referred to as being anesthetized. Anesthesia enables the painless performance of medical procedures that would cause severe or intolerable pain to an unanesthetized patient. Three broad categories of anaesthesia exist: General anesthesia suppresses central nervous system activity and results in unconsciousness and total lack of sensation. Sedation suppresses the central nervous system to a lesser degree, inhibiting both anxiety and creation of long-term memories without resulting in unconsciousness. Regional anesthesia and local ...
... (1855 - 1923) was an American neurologist, mainly known for his early experiments on neuraxial blockade in New York City. Corning was born in Stamford, Connecticut. When the American Civil War began in 1861, Corning's family moved to Stuttgart, Germany. Corning studied chemistry at the Stuttgart Polytechnic Institute under Hermann von Fehling. He later studied physiology at Heidelberg University under Wilhelm Kühne, and pathology at the University of Würzburg. After receiving his medical degree in 1878, he left Germany and visited Vienna, Paris, and London before finally returning to the United States. In 1884, Karl Koller became the first to describe the anesthetic properties of cocaine. The following year, Corning injected cocaine between the spinous processes of the lower lumbar vertebrae, first in a dog and then in a healthy man. His experiments are the first published descriptions of the principle of neuraxial blockade. On August 16, 1898, German surgeon August Bier ...
... is the systemic response to surgical injury and is characterized by activation of the sympathetic nervous system, endocrine responses as well as immunological and haematological changes. Measurement of surgical stress is used in anaesthesia, physiology and surgery. Analysis of the surgical stress response can be used for evaluation of surgical techniques and comparisons of different anaesthetic protocols. Moreover they can be performed both in the intraoperative or postoperative period. If there is a choice between different techniques for a surgical procedure, one method to evaluate and compare the surgical techniques is to subject one group of patients to one technique, and the other group of patients to another technique, after which the surgical stress responses triggered by the procedures are compared. The technique with the least surgical stress response is considered the best for the patient. Similarly, a group of patients can be subjected to a surgical procedure where one ...
In the practice of medicine (especially surgery and dentistry), anesthesia or anaesthesia is a state of temporary induced loss of sensation or awareness. It may include analgesia (relief from or prevention of pain), paralysis (muscle relaxation), amnesia (loss of memory), or unconsciousness. A patient under the effects of anesthetic drugs is referred to as being anesthetized. Anesthesia enables the painless performance of medical procedures that would cause severe or intolerable pain to an unanesthetized patient. Three broad categories of anaesthesia exist: General anesthesia suppresses central nervous system activity and results in unconsciousness and total lack of sensation. Sedation suppresses the central nervous system to a lesser degree, inhibiting both anxiety and creation of long-term memories without resulting in unconsciousness. Regional anesthesia and local ...
A post-anesthesia care unit, often abbreviated PACU and sometimes referred to as post-anesthesia recovery or PAR, is a vital part of hospitals, ambulatory care centers, and other medical facilities. It is an area, normally attached to operating room suites, designed to provide care for patients recovering from general anesthesia, regional anesthesia, or local anesthesia. The basic responsibilities of PACU staff include: airway management and oxygen administration for patients who have undergone general anesthesia monitoring vital signs (heart rate, blood pressure, temperature, and respiratory rate) managing postoperative pain treating postoperative nausea and vomiting treating postanesthetic shivering monitoring surgical sites for excessive bleeding, mucopurulent discharge, swelling, hematomas, wound ...
Various stimuli including asthma, allergies, exercise, stress, and irritants such as smoke, dust, fumes, liquids, and food can trigger laryngospasm.[2] It is common in drowning, both as a direct response to inhalation of water, and as a complication during rescue and resuscitation due to aspiration of vomit. In some individuals laryngospasm can occur spontaneously or as a result of reflux or impaired swallowing. GERD is a common cause of spontaneous laryngospasm.[2] Treating GERD can lessen the frequency of spasms. The onset of spasms may be caused by a viral infection.[citation needed]. It is also a complication associated with anesthesia. The spasm can happen often without any provocation, but tends to occur after tracheal extubation.[1] In children, the condition can be particularly deadly, leading to cardiac arrest within 30-45 seconds, and is a possible cause of death associated with the induction of general anesthesia in the pediatric ...
Friedrich Sertürner (1783-1841) first isolated morphine from opium in 1804;[61] he named it morphine after Morpheus, the Greek god of dreams.[62][full citation needed][63][full citation needed]. Henry Hill Hickman (1800-1830) experimented with the use of carbon dioxide as an anesthetic in the 1820s. He would make the animal insensible, effectively via almost suffocating it with carbon dioxide, then determine the effects of the gas by amputating one of its limbs. In 1824, Hickman submitted the results of his research to the Royal Society in a short treatise titled Letter on suspended animation: with the view of ascertaining its probable utility in surgical operations on human subjects. The response was an 1826 article in The Lancet titled 'Surgical Humbug' that ruthlessly criticised his work. Hickman died four years later at age 30. Though he was unappreciated at the time of his death, his work has since been positively reappraised and he is now recognised as one of the fathers of ...
Antonyms for caudal anesthesia. 2 synonyms for caudal anesthesia: caudal anaesthesia, caudal block. What are synonyms for ... Chan, "Spinal, epidural, and caudal anesthesia," in Millers Anesthesia, R.. Caudal Epidural Block: An Updated Review of ... Synonyms for caudal anesthesia. regional anesthesia resulting from injection of an anesthetic into the caudal end of the spinal ... Advantages of caudal block over intrarectal local anesthesia plus periprostatic nerve block for transrectal ultrasound guided ...
In response to a CPT, spinal anesthesia blocked the increase in CI, and epidural anesthesia blocked the increase in TPR ... when a motor block is present during spinal or epidural anesthesia, sympathetic nerve transmission is blocked. Thus, epidural ... Does Spinal Anesthesia Result in a More Complete Sympathetic Block Than That from Epidural Anesthesia?. Anesthesiology 4 1995, ... Does Spinal Anesthesia Result in a More Complete Sympathetic Block Than That from Epidural Anesthesia? ...
Havels® Needles, Your Best Choice for Anesthesia. and Pain Management. Havel s® Inc. has been supplying hard-to-find specialty ...
Learn about pregnancy birth pain relief options during childbirth such as spinal and epidural blocks. local anesthesia, ... With a spinal block, the anesthetic is injected into the subarachnoid space surrounding the spinal cord. A spinal block is ... An epidural block can be used for a Cesarean delivery.. With a spinal block, both contractions and the ability to push are ... A spinal block requires less medication and is typically given only one time, while, with an epidural block, a catheter may be ...
This is an effective form of anesthesia; however, there are some benefits, risks, and issues you ... ... Many women decide they want an epidural during childbirth. ... epidural blocks and combined spinal-epidural anesthesia (CSEA). ... Combined Spinal-Epidural Anesthesia. A combined spinal-epidural is sometimes called a walking epidural. The main difference ... Benefits of Epidural and Spinal Anesthesia. Both epidurals and CSEAs give effective pain relief for the majority of women. ...
What are spinal block and epidural anesthesia? These are two techniques used to eliminate pain during a surgical or obstetrical ... A spinal block consists of injecting a medication (local anesthetic) into the cerebrospinal fluid (spine) where the nerve roots ... Read more about What are spinal block and epidural anesthesia? Pages. *1 ...
Epidural and spinal anesthesia. This is a shot of anesthetic near the spinal cord and the nerves that connect to it. It blocks ... After spinal or epidural anesthesia some people get headaches.. Your risk depends on the type of anesthesia you get, your age, ... Types of regional anesthesia include: *Peripheral nerve blocks. This is a shot of anesthetic to block pain around a specific ... Regional anesthesia blocks pain to a larger part of your body. You may also get medicine to help you relax or sleep. ...
What are the risks of spinal block and epidural anesthesia? All medical procedures involve risks, even when they are performed ... Read more about What are the risks of spinal block and epidural anesthesia? ... What are the risks of general anesthesia? All medical procedures involve risks, even when they are performed by experts. The ... What are the risks of peripheral nerve catheter anesthesia? All medical procedures involve risks, even when they are performed ...
Epidural and spinal anesthesia. A local anesthetic is injected near the spinal cord and major nerves that enter the spinal cord ... Regional Anesthesia. Topic Overview. Regional anesthesia is the use of local anesthetics to block sensations of pain from a ... Spinal anesthesia medicine is injected into the fluid that surrounds the spinal cord (cerebrospinal fluid). The most common ... Does not require general anesthesia.. Risks and complications from regional anesthesia. For regional anesthesia, an anesthetic ...
An epidural block is a numbing medicine given by injection (shot) in the back. It numbs or causes a loss of feeling in the ... Spinal, epidural, and caudal anesthesia: anatomy, physiology, and technique. In: Chestnut DH, Wong CA, Tsen LC, et al, eds. ... Combined spinal epidural block. This combines both a spinal and epidural block. It provides pain relief much faster. The ... An epidural block may change or alter labor and delivery.. *If you are very numb from the block, you may have a harder time ...
Epidural block: *Liquid pain medication injected near spinal cord. *Given in small amounts by an anesthesiologist-a doctor who ... Epidural anesthesia. American Pregnancy Association website. Available at: ...(Click grey area to select URL). Updated March 24 ... Spinal block: *Liquid pain medication injected into spinal fluid. *Used for pain relief during delivery, especially if forceps ... Spinal block. American Pregnancy Association website. Available at: ...(Click grey area to select URL). Updated August 8, 2015 ...
Local Anesthetic for Infiltration and Nerve Block Not for Spinal or Epidural Anesthesia ... Local anesthetics rapidly cross the placenta and when used for epidural, paracervical, pudenal, or caudal block anesthesia, can ... should not be used for epidural or spinal anesthesia because the safety of these agents has not been established with regard to ... In one study paracervical block anesthesia was associated with a decrease in the mean duration of first stage labor and ...
General or Spinal anesthesia. Epidural block. Cervical spinal cord injury. meds: barbituates ...
He specializes in clinical regional anesthesia, including brachial plexus block techniques. ... epidurals; combined spinal-epidural anesthesia; and peripheral nerve blocks for analgesia. Dr. Beckman is a member of the ... Beckman teaches clinical regional anesthesia, including brachial plexus block techniques; physiology and complications; spinals ... Regional Anesthesia, Hospital for Special Surgery. Certification. American Board of Anesthesiology - 1997. The National Board ...
... updated to reflect new and rapidly changing areas in anesthesia practice including new chapters on awareness under anesthesia, ... the latest edition of Basic Anesthesia, edited by noted anesthesiologist Ronald D. Miller, MD and Manuel C. Pardo, Jr., MD, ... p>With the most authoritative and complete overview of anesthesia theory and practice, ... Spinal and Epidural Anesthesia. 18. Peripheral Nerve Blocks. 19. Positioning and Associated Risks ...
... thus intensifying spinal block 22 even with no increase in upper sensory block level after epidural bupivacaine administration. ... Stienstra R, Dahan A, Alhadi BZ et al - Mechanism of action of an epidural top-up in combined spinal epidural anesthesia. ... Minimum analgesic concentration of bupivacaine after continuous epidural infusion following spinal anesthesia in the ... Anesthesia was obtained with lumbar spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine. An epidural catheter placed at L4-L5 level was inserted 3 to ...
Anesthesiologist General Anesthesia Epidural Spinal Nerve Blocks Cardiac Adult Expert Witness. EXPERT NUMBER: 1400. STATE: IL. ... Board Certified Anesthesiology, Anesthesiologist, General Anesthesia, Epidural, Spinal, Nerve Blocks, Cardiac, Adult, ... Interventional Pain Medicine, Anesthesiology, Epidural Steriod Injections, Nerve Blocks, Radiofrequency Ablation, Rhizotomy, ... Spinal, Back Pain, Neck Pain, Spinal Cord, EMG, Neurologist, Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, Percutaneous Neuromodulation Therapy, PNT ...
... may be used to: Relax you. Block pain. Make you sleepy or forgetful... ... Anesthesia is a way to control pain during a surgery or procedure by using medicine called anesthetics. It can help control ... Epidural and spinal anesthesia. This is a shot of anesthetic near the spinal cord and the nerves that connect to it. It blocks ... After spinal or epidural anesthesia some people get headaches.. Your risk depends on the type of anesthesia you get, your age, ...
Spinal-epidural anesthesia combines the rapidity of onset and predictability of a spinal block, with the… ... Spinal-epidural anesthesia is a type of anesthesia for almost any patient of any age. It is injected near the spinal cord and ... Combined Spinal-epidural Anesthesia Sets Market Poised for Steady Growth in the … ... Anesthesia is a medical term which means insensitivity to pain. Anesthesia is widely used during surgical procedures to render ...
Epidural anesthesia is regional anesthesia that blocks pain in certain areas. ... Epidural anesthesia is the most popular method of pain relief during labor. ... rather than anesthesia, which leads to a total lack of feeling. Epidurals block the nerve impulses from the lower spinal ... What is epidural anesthesia?. Epidural anesthesia is regional anesthesia that blocks pain in a particular region of the body. ...
Combined spinal-epidural anesthesia with epidural volume extension causes a higher level of block than single-shot spinal ... Combined Spinal-Epidural Anesthesia with Epidural. Volume Extension causes a Higher Level of Block than Single-Shot Spinal ... TRANSABDOMINAL PLANE BLOCK (TAP). EPIDURAL. SPINAL BLOCK. Regional Anaesthesia. PARAVERTEBRAL. What is a Spinal block?. ... A comparative study-efficacy and safety of combined spinal epidural anesthesia versus spinal anesthesia in high-risk geriatric ...
... clinicaltrials.gov To analyze the outcomes of surgical treatment of patients with spinal metastases in spine unit in AUH ... Continuous Spinal Anesthesia Versus Combined Spinal Epidural Block. In major orthopaedic surgery of the lower extremities both ... continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) and combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSE) are safe and reliable anaesthesia methods. Our ... Spinal Nerves. The 31 paired peripheral nerves formed by the union of the dorsal and ventral spinal roots from each spinal cord ...
Spinal Surgery Associates, PA company data, news, contact details and stock information. The spine (or backbone) is a skeletal ... Continuous Spinal Anesthesia Versus Combined Spinal Epidural Block. In major orthopaedic surgery of the lower extremities both ... continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) and combined spinal epidural anesthesia (CSE) are safe and reliable anaesthesia methods. Our ... Neurotoxicity of Spinal Anesthesia With Ropivacaine and Bupivacaine. Consenting patients, scheduled for orthopaedic surgery ...
Avoid methylparaben with spinal or epidural anesthesia. Monitor cardiovascular and respiratory vital signs. Severe shock. Heart ... epidural or caudal anesthesia should not be administered at intervals ,90 minutes. Paracervical block: max 200mg total per 90 ... Local or regional anesthesia for infiltration and nerve block (see literature).. Adult:. See literature for recommended dosages ... Epidural anesthesia: administer test dose first; monitor for CNS or cardiovascular toxicity. For all procedures: Max total dose ...
... anesthesia management for patients with cardiac devices, anesthesia for robotic surgery, anesthesia for transplant surgery and ... Nurse Anesthesia, 6th Edition features both scientific principles and evidence-based material. Inside youll find a solid ... this bestseller prepares you for certification and todays clinical anesthesia practice. ... p>Gain a thorough understanding of nursing anesthesia with the most comprehensive text on the market. Written by leading expert ...
  • Specific patient groups are significantly less likely to receive regional anesthesia, and this disparity may have a negative impact on their outcomes. (asahq.org)
  • Widely acknowledged as the foremost introductory text, the new edition-now presented in full color throughout-has been thoroughly updated to reflect new and rapidly changing areas in anesthesia practice including new chapters on awareness under anesthesia, quality and patient safety, orthopedics, and expanded coverage of new ultrasound techniques in regional anesthesiology with detailed illustrated guidance. (elsevier.com)
  • Michael Lew, chair of the Department of Anesthesiology at City of Hope, says researchers here are exploring ways to make anesthesia care even better. (cityofhope.org)
  • At City of Hope, the Department of Anesthesiology uses advanced technologies in the administration of anesthesia to patients. (cityofhope.org)
  • This affords them the opportunity to spend additional time in the OR under the tutelage of our anesthesia residents and faculty, thereby confirming their interest in anesthesiology. (mcw.edu)
  • Supported by the Department of Anesthesiology, Section on Obstetrical Anesthesia, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. (asahq.org)
  • In 1985, Williams Obstetrics recommended avoiding regional anesthesia because "of concern for sudden, severe hypotension induced by splanchnic blockade and, in turn, the immediate danger from pressor agents and subsequent danger from large volumes of aqueous fluid given to try to correct hypotension so induced. (asahq.org)
  • The severely preeclamptic patient's reduced plasma volume is thought to place the patient at unusual risk for hypotension in response to regional anesthesia-induced sympathetic blockade. (asahq.org)
  • We have been careful not to make women who select epidurals feel guilty-so careful that it has been easy for mothers to ignore low-medication or unmedicated alternatives,`` writes Sharron S. Humenick, University of Wyoming nursing professor, in the Journal of Perinatal Education. (chicagotribune.com)
  • The amount of medication administered from an epidural can be increased or decreased, depending on a mother's preferences. (healthline.com)
  • She was treated with medication, bladder training and physical therapy and recovered slowly but gradually, finally discharged 2 months after block with mild weakeness of left leg. (koreamed.org)
  • If you are very numb from the block, you may have a harder time bearing down to push your baby through the birth canal. (medlineplus.gov)
  • A blood patch involves injecting a small amount of the person's own blood into the area where the leak is most likely occurring to seal the hole and to increase pressure in the spinal canal and relieve the pull on the membranes surrounding the canal. (uwhealth.org)
  • The amount of CSF per body weight is higher in neonates and infants (4 mL/kg) compared with adults (2 mL/kg), and the CSF is localized primarily in the spinal canal. (nysora.com)
  • The spinal canal is covered by the dura mater , through which the spinal needle enters. (wikidoc.org)
  • The epidural space is a potential space that lies underneath the ligamenta flava , and outside the dura mater (outside layer of the spinal canal). (wikidoc.org)
  • The technique of "single-shot" lumbar epidural anaesthesia was first developed in 1921 by Spanish military surgeon Fidel Pagés (1886-1923). (wikipedia.org)