Blinking: Brief closing of the eyelids by involuntary normal periodic closing, as a protective measure, or by voluntary action.Eyelids: Each of the upper and lower folds of SKIN which cover the EYE when closed.Blepharospasm: Excessive winking; tonic or clonic spasm of the orbicularis oculi muscle.Refractory Period, Psychological: A delayed response interval occurring when two stimuli are presented in close succession.Reflex, Abnormal: An abnormal response to a stimulus applied to the sensory components of the nervous system. This may take the form of increased, decreased, or absent reflexes.Facial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Sea Lions: A group comprised of several species of aquatic carnivores in different genera, in the family Otariidae. In comparison to FUR SEALS, they have shorter, less dense hair.Tears: The fluid secreted by the lacrimal glands. This fluid moistens the CONJUNCTIVA and CORNEA.Facial Muscles: Muscles of facial expression or mimetic muscles that include the numerous muscles supplied by the facial nerve that are attached to and move the skin of the face. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Oculomotor Muscles: The muscles that move the eye. Included in this group are the medial rectus, lateral rectus, superior rectus, inferior rectus, inferior oblique, superior oblique, musculus orbitalis, and levator palpebrae superioris.Electromyography: Recording of the changes in electric potential of muscle by means of surface or needle electrodes.Facial Paralysis: Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis.Conditioning, Eyelid: Reflex closure of the eyelid occurring as a result of classical conditioning.Dry Eye Syndromes: Corneal and conjunctival dryness due to deficient tear production, predominantly in menopausal and post-menopausal women. Filamentary keratitis or erosion of the conjunctival and corneal epithelium may be caused by these disorders. Sensation of the presence of a foreign body in the eye and burning of the eyes may occur.Reaction Time: The time from the onset of a stimulus until a response is observed.Saccades: An abrupt voluntary shift in ocular fixation from one point to another, as occurs in reading.Personal Space: Invisible boundaries surrounding the individual's body which are maintained in relation to others.Electrooculography: Recording of the average amplitude of the resting potential arising between the cornea and the retina in light and dark adaptation as the eyes turn a standard distance to the right and the left. The increase in potential with light adaptation is used to evaluate the condition of the retinal pigment epithelium.Los AngelesAttention: Focusing on certain aspects of current experience to the exclusion of others. It is the act of heeding or taking notice or concentrating.Photic Stimulation: Investigative technique commonly used during ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHY in which a series of bright light flashes or visual patterns are used to elicit brain activity.Fixation, Ocular: The positioning and accommodation of eyes that allows the image to be brought into place on the FOVEA CENTRALIS of each eye.Accessory Nerve: The 11th cranial nerve which originates from NEURONS in the MEDULLA and in the CERVICAL SPINAL CORD. It has a cranial root, which joins the VAGUS NERVE (10th cranial) and sends motor fibers to the muscles of the LARYNX, and a spinal root, which sends motor fibers to the TRAPEZIUS and the sternocleidomastoid muscles.Photophobia: Abnormal sensitivity to light. This may occur as a manifestation of EYE DISEASES; MIGRAINE; SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE; MENINGITIS; and other disorders. Photophobia may also occur in association with DEPRESSION and other MENTAL DISORDERS.San FranciscoVolition: Voluntary activity without external compulsion.Air Movements: The motion of air currents.Serial Learning: Learning to make a series of responses in exact order.Oculomotor Nerve: The 3d cranial nerve. The oculomotor nerve sends motor fibers to the levator muscles of the eyelid and to the superior rectus, inferior rectus, and inferior oblique muscles of the eye. It also sends parasympathetic efferents (via the ciliary ganglion) to the muscles controlling pupillary constriction and accommodation. The motor fibers originate in the oculomotor nuclei of the midbrain.Peromyscus: A genus of the subfamily SIGMODONTINAE consisting of 49 species. Two of these are widely used in medical research. They are P. leucopus, or the white-footed mouse, and P. maniculatus, or the deer mouse.Encephalitis, California: A viral infection of the brain caused by serotypes of California encephalitis virus (ENCEPHALITIS VIRUS, CALIFORNIA) transmitted to humans by the mosquito AEDES triseriatus. The majority of cases are caused by the LA CROSSE VIRUS. This condition is endemic to the midwestern United States and primarily affects children between 5-10 years of age. Clinical manifestations include FEVER; VOMITING; HEADACHE; and abdominal pain followed by SEIZURES, altered mentation, and focal neurologic deficits. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, p13)Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Ocular Physiological Phenomena: Processes and properties of the EYE as a whole or of any of its parts.Cornea: The transparent anterior portion of the fibrous coat of the eye consisting of five layers: stratified squamous CORNEAL EPITHELIUM; BOWMAN MEMBRANE; CORNEAL STROMA; DESCEMET MEMBRANE; and mesenchymal CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM. It serves as the first refracting medium of the eye. It is structurally continuous with the SCLERA, avascular, receiving its nourishment by permeation through spaces between the lamellae, and is innervated by the ophthalmic division of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE via the ciliary nerves and those of the surrounding conjunctiva which together form plexuses. (Cline et al., Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)Pattern Recognition, Visual: Mental process to visually perceive a critical number of facts (the pattern), such as characters, shapes, displays, or designs.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Asian Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the original peoples of the Far East, Southeast Asia, or the Indian subcontinent.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Brain Stem: The part of the brain that connects the CEREBRAL HEMISPHERES with the SPINAL CORD. It consists of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; and MEDULLA OBLONGATA.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Parkinson Disease, Secondary: Conditions which feature clinical manifestations resembling primary Parkinson disease that are caused by a known or suspected condition. Examples include parkinsonism caused by vascular injury, drugs, trauma, toxin exposure, neoplasms, infections and degenerative or hereditary conditions. Clinical features may include bradykinesia, rigidity, parkinsonian gait, and masked facies. In general, tremor is less prominent in secondary parkinsonism than in the primary form. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1998, Ch38, pp39-42)Visual Perception: The selecting and organizing of visual stimuli based on the individual's past experience.Superior Colliculi: The anterior pair of the quadrigeminal bodies which coordinate the general behavioral orienting responses to visual stimuli, such as whole-body turning, and reaching.Synkinesis: An involuntary movement accompanying a volitional movement. It often refers to facial movements that accompany FACIAL PARALYSIS.Reflex: An involuntary movement or exercise of function in a part, excited in response to a stimulus applied to the periphery and transmitted to the brain or spinal cord.Interferometry: Measurement of distances or movements by means of the phenomena caused by the interference of two rays of light (optical interferometry) or of sound (acoustic interferometry).MexicoTrigeminal Nuclei: Nuclei of the trigeminal nerve situated in the brain stem. They include the nucleus of the spinal trigeminal tract (TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS, SPINAL), the principal sensory nucleus, the mesencephalic nucleus, and the motor nucleus.Functional Laterality: Behavioral manifestations of cerebral dominance in which there is preferential use and superior functioning of either the left or the right side, as in the preferred use of the right hand or right foot.Lateral Medullary Syndrome: INFARCTION of the dorsolateral aspect of MEDULLA OBLONGATA in the BRAIN STEM. It is caused by occlusion of the VERTEBRAL ARTERY and/or the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Clinical manifestations vary with the size of infarction, but may include loss of pain and temperature sensation in the ipsilateral face and contralateral body below the chin; ipsilateral HORNER SYNDROME; ipsilateral ATAXIA; DYSARTHRIA; VERTIGO; nausea, hiccup; dysphagia; and VOCAL CORD PARALYSIS. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p801)Encephalitis, Arbovirus: Infections of the brain caused by arthropod-borne viruses (i.e., arboviruses) primarily from the families TOGAVIRIDAE; FLAVIVIRIDAE; BUNYAVIRIDAE; REOVIRIDAE; and RHABDOVIRIDAE. Life cycles of these viruses are characterized by ZOONOSES, with birds and lower mammals serving as intermediate hosts. The virus is transmitted to humans by the bite of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) or TICKS. Clinical manifestations include fever, headache, alterations of mentation, focal neurologic deficits, and COMA. (From Clin Microbiol Rev 1994 Jan;7(1):89-116; Walton, Brain's Diseases of the Nervous System, 10th ed, p321)United StatesHabituation, Psychophysiologic: The disappearance of responsiveness to a repeated stimulation. It does not include drug habituation.Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.Geography: The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)Trigeminal Neuralgia: A syndrome characterized by recurrent episodes of excruciating pain lasting several seconds or longer in the sensory distribution of the TRIGEMINAL NERVE. Pain may be initiated by stimulation of trigger points on the face, lips, or gums or by movement of facial muscles or chewing. Associated conditions include MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS, vascular anomalies, ANEURYSMS, and neoplasms. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p187)Abducens Nerve: The 6th cranial nerve which originates in the ABDUCENS NUCLEUS of the PONS and sends motor fibers to the lateral rectus muscles of the EYE. Damage to the nerve or its nucleus disrupts horizontal eye movement control.Stereotypic Movement Disorder: Motor behavior that is repetitive, often seemingly driven, and nonfunctional. This behavior markedly interferes with normal activities or results in severe bodily self-injury. The behavior is not due to the direct physiological effects of a substance or a general medical condition. (DSM-IV, 1994)Hospitals, County: Hospitals controlled by the county government.Physical Stimulation: Act of eliciting a response from a person or organism through physical contact.Cerebellar Diseases: Diseases that affect the structure or function of the cerebellum. Cardinal manifestations of cerebellar dysfunction include dysmetria, GAIT ATAXIA, and MUSCLE HYPOTONIA.Perceptual Masking: The interference of one perceptual stimulus with another causing a decrease or lessening in perceptual effectiveness.Health Maintenance Organizations: Organized systems for providing comprehensive prepaid health care that have five basic attributes: (1) provide care in a defined geographic area; (2) provide or ensure delivery of an agreed-upon set of basic and supplemental health maintenance and treatment services; (3) provide care to a voluntarily enrolled group of persons; (4) require their enrollees to use the services of designated providers; and (5) receive reimbursement through a predetermined, fixed, periodic prepayment made by the enrollee without regard to the degree of services provided. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Air: The mixture of gases present in the earth's atmosphere consisting of oxygen, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, and small amounts of other gases.Psychophysics: The science dealing with the correlation of the physical characteristics of a stimulus, e.g., frequency or intensity, with the response to the stimulus, in order to assess the psychologic factors involved in the relationship.Galvanic Skin Response: A change in electrical resistance of the skin, occurring in emotion and in certain other conditions.Eschscholzia: A plant genus of the family PAPAVERACEAE that contains benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloids.Pacific OceanMacaca mulatta: A species of the genus MACACA inhabiting India, China, and other parts of Asia. The species is used extensively in biomedical research and adapts very well to living with humans.Cues: Signals for an action; that specific portion of a perceptual field or pattern of stimuli to which a subject has learned to respond.Facial Neuralgia: Neuralgic syndromes which feature chronic or recurrent FACIAL PAIN as the primary manifestation of disease. Disorders of the trigeminal and facial nerves are frequently associated with these conditions.Acceleration: An increase in the rate of speed.Ethnic Groups: A group of people with a common cultural heritage that sets them apart from others in a variety of social relationships.Apomorphine: A derivative of morphine that is a dopamine D2 agonist. It is a powerful emetic and has been used for that effect in acute poisoning. It has also been used in the diagnosis and treatment of parkinsonism, but its adverse effects limit its use.Dystonia: An attitude or posture due to the co-contraction of agonists and antagonist muscles in one region of the body. It most often affects the large axial muscles of the trunk and limb girdles. Conditions which feature persistent or recurrent episodes of dystonia as a primary manifestation of disease are referred to as DYSTONIC DISORDERS. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p77)NevadaTask Performance and Analysis: The detailed examination of observable activity or behavior associated with the execution or completion of a required function or unit of work.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Evoked Potentials: Electrical responses recorded from nerve, muscle, SENSORY RECEPTOR, or area of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM following stimulation. They range from less than a microvolt to several microvolts. The evoked potential can be auditory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, AUDITORY), somatosensory (EVOKED POTENTIALS, SOMATOSENSORY), visual (EVOKED POTENTIALS, VISUAL), or motor (EVOKED POTENTIALS, MOTOR), or other modalities that have been reported.Awareness: The act of "taking account" of an object or state of affairs. It does not imply assessment of, nor attention to the qualities or nature of the object.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Pons: The front part of the hindbrain (RHOMBENCEPHALON) that lies between the MEDULLA and the midbrain (MESENCEPHALON) ventral to the cerebellum. It is composed of two parts, the dorsal and the ventral. The pons serves as a relay station for neural pathways between the CEREBELLUM to the CEREBRUM.Cataplexy: A condition characterized by transient weakness or paralysis of somatic musculature triggered by an emotional stimulus or physical exertion. Cataplexy is frequently associated with NARCOLEPSY. During a cataplectic attack, there is a marked reduction in muscle tone similar to the normal physiologic hypotonia that accompanies rapid eye movement sleep (SLEEP, REM). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p396)Pesticides: Chemicals used to destroy pests of any sort. The concept includes fungicides (FUNGICIDES, INDUSTRIAL); INSECTICIDES; RODENTICIDES; etc.Pedunculopontine Tegmental Nucleus: Dense collection of cells in the caudal pontomesencephalic tegmentum known to play a role in the functional organization of the BASAL GANGLIA and in the modulation of the thalamocortical neuronal system.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Muscimol: A neurotoxic isoxazole isolated from species of AMANITA. It is obtained by decarboxylation of IBOTENIC ACID. Muscimol is a potent agonist of GABA-A RECEPTORS and is used mainly as an experimental tool in animal and tissue studies.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.Uncompensated Care: Medical services for which no payment is received. Uncompensated care includes charity care and bad debts.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)State Health Plans: State plans prepared by the State Health Planning and Development Agencies which are made up from plans submitted by the Health Systems Agencies and subject to review and revision by the Statewide Health Coordinating Council.Sciuridae: A family of the order Rodentia which contains 49 genera. Some of the more common genera are MARMOTA, which includes the marmot and woodchuck; Sciurus, the gray squirrel, S. carolinensis, and the fox squirrel, S. niger; Tamias, the eastern and western chipmunk; and Tamiasciurus, the red squirrel. The flying squirrels, except the scaly-tailed Anomaluridae, also belong to this family.Environmental Monitoring: The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.Coccidioidomycosis: Infection with a fungus of the genus COCCIDIOIDES, endemic to the SOUTHWESTERN UNITED STATES. It is sometimes called valley fever but should not be confused with RIFT VALLEY FEVER. Infection is caused by inhalation of airborne, fungal particles known as arthroconidia, a form of FUNGAL SPORES. A primary form is an acute, benign, self-limited respiratory infection. A secondary form is a virulent, severe, chronic, progressive granulomatous disease with systemic involvement. It can be detected by use of COCCIDIOIDIN.Phylogeny: The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.Arousal: Cortical vigilance or readiness of tone, presumed to be in response to sensory stimulation via the reticular activating system.Corneal Topography: The measurement of curvature and shape of the anterior surface of the cornea using techniques such as keratometry, keratoscopy, photokeratoscopy, profile photography, computer-assisted image processing and videokeratography. This measurement is often applied in the fitting of contact lenses and in diagnosing corneal diseases or corneal changes including keratoconus, which occur after keratotomy and keratoplasty.Biomechanical Phenomena: The properties, processes, and behavior of biological systems under the action of mechanical forces.Medicaid: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XIX, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, administered by the states, that provides health care benefits to indigent and medically indigent persons.Environmental Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals.Magnetics: The study of MAGNETIC PHENOMENA.Emigration and Immigration: The process of leaving one's country to establish residence in a foreign country.Agriculture: The science, art or practice of cultivating soil, producing crops, and raising livestock.Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.Independent Practice Associations: A partnership, corporation, association, or other legal entity that enters into an arrangement for the provision of services with persons who are licensed to practice medicine, osteopathy, and dentistry, and with other care personnel. Under an IPA arrangement, licensed professional persons provide services through the entity in accordance with a mutually accepted compensation arrangement, while retaining their private practices. Services under the IPA are marketed through a prepaid health plan. (From Facts on File Dictionary of Health Care Management, 1988)Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Quercus: A plant genus of the family FAGACEAE that is a source of TANNINS. Do not confuse with Holly (ILEX).Legislation, Medical: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Psychomotor Performance: The coordination of a sensory or ideational (cognitive) process and a motor activity.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Bunyaviridae: A family of viruses, mainly arboviruses, consisting of a single strand of RNA. Virions are enveloped particles 90-120 nm diameter. The complete family contains over 300 members arranged in five genera: ORTHOBUNYAVIRUS; HANTAVIRUS; NAIROVIRUS; PHLEBOVIRUS; and TOSPOVIRUS.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Bird Diseases: Diseases of birds not considered poultry, therefore usually found in zoos, parks, and the wild. The concept is differentiated from POULTRY DISEASES which is for birds raised as a source of meat or eggs for human consumption, and usually found in barnyards, hatcheries, etc.Persea: A plant genus in the LAURACEAE family. The tree, Persea americana Mill., is known for the Avocado fruit, the food of commerce.GABA Agonists: Endogenous compounds and drugs that bind to and activate GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID receptors (RECEPTORS, GABA).Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.Hawaii: A group of islands in Polynesia, in the north central Pacific Ocean, comprising eight major and 114 minor islands, largely volcanic and coral. Its capital is Honolulu. It was first reached by Polynesians about 500 A.D. It was discovered and named the Sandwich Islands in 1778 by Captain Cook. The islands were united under the rule of King Kamehameha 1795-1819 and requested annexation to the United States in 1893 when a provisional government was set up. Hawaii was established as a territory in 1900 and admitted as a state in 1959. The name is from the Polynesian Owhyhii, place of the gods, with reference to the two volcanoes Mauna Kea and Mauna Loa, regarded as the abode of the gods. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p493 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p2330)Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Neural Inhibition: The function of opposing or restraining the excitation of neurons or their target excitable cells.Culex: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) commonly found in tropical regions. Species of this genus are vectors for ST. LOUIS ENCEPHALITIS as well as many other diseases of man and domestic and wild animals.Contact Lenses, Hydrophilic: Soft, supple contact lenses made of plastic polymers which interact readily with water molecules. Many types are available, including continuous and extended-wear versions, which are gas-permeable and easily sterilized.Head Movements: Voluntary or involuntary motion of head that may be relative to or independent of body; includes animals and humans.Memory, Short-Term: Remembrance of information for a few seconds to hours.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Pinnipedia: The suborder of aquatic CARNIVORA comprising the WALRUSES; FUR SEALS; SEA LIONS; and EARLESS SEALS. They have fusiform bodies with very short tails and are found on all sea coasts. The offspring are born on land.Convergence, Ocular: The turning inward of the lines of sight toward each other.Attentional Blink: Temporary visual deficit or impaired visual processing occurring in a rapid serial visual presentation task. After a person identifies the first of two visual targets, the ability to detect the second target is impaired for the next few hundred milliseconds. This phenomenon is called attentional blink.Commerce: The interchange of goods or commodities, especially on a large scale, between different countries or between populations within the same country. It includes trade (the buying, selling, or exchanging of commodities, whether wholesale or retail) and business (the purchase and sale of goods to make a profit). (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, p411, p2005 & p283)Social Control Policies: Decisions for determining and guiding present and future objectives from among alternatives.Seawater: The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Christianity: The religion stemming from the life, teachings, and death of Jesus Christ: the religion that believes in God as the Father Almighty who works redemptively through the Holy Spirit for men's salvation and that affirms Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior who proclaimed to man the gospel of salvation. (From Webster, 3d ed)Umbellularia: A plant genus in the LAURACEAE family. The tree, Umbellularia californica (Hook. & Arn.) Nutt., is known for aromatic leaves used in SPICES having a similar flavor to LAURUS.Air Pollutants: Any substance in the air which could, if present in high enough concentration, harm humans, animals, vegetation or material. Substances include GASES; PARTICULATE MATTER; and volatile ORGANIC CHEMICALS.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Acoustic Stimulation: Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.Periaqueductal Gray: Central gray matter surrounding the CEREBRAL AQUEDUCT in the MESENCEPHALON. Physiologically it is probably involved in RAGE reactions, the LORDOSIS REFLEX; FEEDING responses, bladder tonus, and pain.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Dopamine Agonists: Drugs that bind to and activate dopamine receptors.Law Enforcement: Organized efforts to insure obedience to the laws of a community.Inhibition (Psychology): The interference with or prevention of a behavioral or verbal response even though the stimulus for that response is present; in psychoanalysis the unconscious restraining of an instinctual process.Nitric Acid: Nitric acid (HNO3). A colorless liquid that is used in the manufacture of inorganic and organic nitrates and nitro compounds for fertilizers, dye intermediates, explosives, and many different organic chemicals. Continued exposure to vapor may cause chronic bronchitis; chemical pneumonitis may occur. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)Median Nerve: A major nerve of the upper extremity. In humans, the fibers of the median nerve originate in the lower cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord (usually C6 to T1), travel via the brachial plexus, and supply sensory and motor innervation to parts of the forearm and hand.Capitation Fee: A method of payment for health services in which an individual or institutional provider is paid a fixed, per capita amount without regard to the actual number or nature of services provided to each patient.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Fear: The affective response to an actual current external danger which subsides with the elimination of the threatening condition.Introduced Species: Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Mexican Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican descent.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Acculturation: Process of cultural change in which one group or members of a group assimilate various cultural patterns from another.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Bays: An area of water mostly surrounded by land, usually smaller than a gulf, and affording access to the sea.Encephalomyelitis, Western Equine: A form of arboviral encephalitis (which primarily affects horses) endemic to western and central regions of NORTH AMERICA. The causative organism (ENCEPHALOMYELITIS VIRUS, WESTERN EQUINE) may be transferred to humans via the bite of mosquitoes (CULEX tarsalis and others). Clinical manifestations include headache and influenza-like symptoms followed by alterations in mentation, SEIZURES, and COMA. DEATH occurs in a minority of cases. Survivors may recover fully or be left with residual neurologic dysfunction, including PARKINSONISM, POSTENCEPHALITIC. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1996, Ch26, pp8-9)Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Sensory Thresholds: The minimum amount of stimulus energy necessary to elicit a sensory response.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Public Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.PhilippinesInsurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Haloperidol: A phenyl-piperidinyl-butyrophenone that is used primarily to treat SCHIZOPHRENIA and other PSYCHOSES. It is also used in schizoaffective disorder, DELUSIONAL DISORDERS, ballism, and TOURETTE SYNDROME (a drug of choice) and occasionally as adjunctive therapy in INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY and the chorea of HUNTINGTON DISEASE. It is a potent antiemetic and is used in the treatment of intractable HICCUPS. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1994, p279)Trees: Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.Economics, Hospital: Economic aspects related to the management and operation of a hospital.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Mytilus: A genus of marine mussels in the family MYTILIDAE, class BIVALVIA. The species MYTILUS EDULIS is the highly edible common mussel.TexasHealth Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Genetic Variation: Genotypic differences observed among individuals in a population.Reference Values: The range or frequency distribution of a measurement in a population (of organisms, organs or things) that has not been selected for the presence of disease or abnormality.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Cerebellum: The part of brain that lies behind the BRAIN STEM in the posterior base of skull (CRANIAL FOSSA, POSTERIOR). It is also known as the "little brain" with convolutions similar to those of CEREBRAL CORTEX, inner white matter, and deep cerebellar nuclei. Its function is to coordinate voluntary movements, maintain balance, and learn motor skills.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Sequoia: A plant genus of the family TAXODIACEAE known for including some of the tallest trees.Epidemiological Monitoring: Collection, analysis, and interpretation of data about the frequency, distribution, and consequences of disease or health conditions, for use in the planning, implementing, and evaluating public health programs.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Conservation of Natural Resources: The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.Pacific States: The geographic designation for states bordering on or located in the Pacific Ocean. The states so designated are Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington. (U.S. Geologic Survey telephone communication)Medical Indigency: The condition in which individuals are financially unable to access adequate medical care without depriving themselves and their dependents of food, clothing, shelter, and other essentials of living.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Managed Care Programs: Health insurance plans intended to reduce unnecessary health care costs through a variety of mechanisms, including: economic incentives for physicians and patients to select less costly forms of care; programs for reviewing the medical necessity of specific services; increased beneficiary cost sharing; controls on inpatient admissions and lengths of stay; the establishment of cost-sharing incentives for outpatient surgery; selective contracting with health care providers; and the intensive management of high-cost health care cases. The programs may be provided in a variety of settings, such as HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS and PREFERRED PROVIDER ORGANIZATIONS.Animals, Wild: Animals considered to be wild or feral or not adapted for domestic use. It does not include wild animals in zoos for which ANIMALS, ZOO is available.Taxes: Governmental levies on property, inheritance, gifts, etc.Climate: The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
  • Blink-182 at the 1999 Teen Choice Awards in Los Angeles. (fuse.tv)
  • Blink-182 introduce hosts Kathy Griffin and Adam Carolla on the 1999 Billboard Music Awards in Las Vegas. (fuse.tv)
  • 1999-10-13 04:00:00 PDT Pasadena -- Ahmed H. Zewail , a chemist at the California Institute of Technology , won the Nobel Prize in chemistry yesterday for finding a way to freeze- frame the private matings of molecules using ultra-fast laser probes, a technique that could revolutionize everything from dentistry to microelectronics. (sfgate.com)
  • The patient everyone knew as "Sixty-Six Garage" is confined to a bed at Villa Coronado Skilled Nursing Facility in Coronado, Calif. The victim of a car accident in 1999, no one knew his real identity. (latimes.com)
  • In 1999, he had been in a crash in the California desert, somewhere near the U.S.-Mexico border. (latimes.com)
  • Attentional blink (AB) is a phenomenon that reflects the temporal costs in the allocating selective attention. (wikipedia.org)
  • The precise adaptive significance behind the attentional blink is unknown, but it is thought to be a product of a two-stage visual processing system attempting to allocate episodic context to targets. (wikipedia.org)
  • One curious aspect of attentional blink is that it usually includes "lag 1 sparing", meaning that targets presented very close together in time (at "lag 1" or consecutively in the RSVP stream) are not affected by the attentional blink, even though items presented at slightly greater lags are significantly impaired. (wikipedia.org)
  • In attentional blink, participants in experiments have trouble reporting multiple targets that are in succession to one another, and will only report one accurately when these targets are presented to them 200ms to 500ms apart according to a study by Visser et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • A possible explanation for lag-1 sparing is that this phenomenon is heavily interconnected with attentional blink, but does not operate on the same cognitive mechanisms and requires different stimuli to occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the hypothesis, targets presented during this refractory period cannot trigger a release of norepinephrine, resulting in the attentional blink. (wikipedia.org)
  • The episodic distinctiveness hypothesis of the ST2 model suggests that the attentional blink reflects a limitation of the visual system attempting to allocate unique episodic contexts to the ephemeral target stimuli presented in RSVP. (wikipedia.org)
  • The attentional blink can be moderated by changes in visual similarity between targets and distractor stimuli, but it can also be affected by conceptual similarities, suggesting that stimuli are processed to quite a deep level preconsciously, with much of the resulting information discarded before it reaches consciousness. (wikipedia.org)
  • The emotional attentional blink (EAB) refers to a temporary impairment in the ability to identify a target when it is preceded by an emotional distractor. (springer.com)
  • Here we tested the extent to which the EAB can be attenuated by inducing a diffuse top-down attentional state, which has been shown to improve target identification in an analogous attentional phenomenon, the attentional blink. (springer.com)
  • Our results demonstrate that the EAB is robust to manipulations of top-down attention, suggesting that the temporary capture of attention by emotionally salient stimuli involves processes that are distinct from those that produce the attentional blink. (springer.com)
  • Short-term memory and the attentional blink: Capacity versus content. (springer.com)
  • Task-irrelevant visual motion and flicker attenuate the attentional blink. (springer.com)
  • The attentional blink reveals the probabilistic nature of discrete conscious perception. (springer.com)
  • Beyond the attentional blink: Visual masking by object substitution. (springer.com)
  • In showing that the differences between subitizing and counting reflect attentional factors, my research has been important for those studying low level grouping in vision, the attentional blink, inattentional blindness, change detection, and a variety of disorders including Alzheimer's and Williams syndromes. (uoguelph.ca)
  • The first album from Blink-182 to feature vocalist/guitarist Matt Skiba (Alkaline Trio frontman), who replaced former member Tom Delonge (now of Angels & Airways). (elusivedisc.com)
  • You've had a little bit of time to let the first Tom DeLonge -free Blink-182 single to settle in and now they've hit us with another one off their forthcoming album. (moshtix.com.au)
  • We're nearing the release of the band's first album without DeLonge California . (moshtix.com.au)
  • The crash prompted Hoppus and DeLonge to reconnect with the drummer in support of his recovery, and in 2009 blink-182 announced that they were reuniting, hitting the road with Weezer for their reunion tour. (apple.com)
  • As the release date for Blink-182 's comeback LP , the band's first without founding guitarist Tom DeLonge , approaches, conversation surrounding the iconic pop-punk group has flourished. (fuse.tv)
  • The group, with original drummer Scott Raynor, emerged from the Southern California punk scene of the early 1990s and first gained notoriety for high-energy live shows and irreverent lyrical toilet humor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hän liittyi Blink 182:een vuonna 1997, milloin entinen rumpali Scott Raynor erotettiin alkoholiongelmien takia. (wikipedia.org)
  • BUY NOW ONLY IF YOU ARE A BLINK-182 FAN!Also buy the new album from Blink: Take Off Your Pants and Jacket! (swapadvd.com)
  • On Enema of the State , blink-182 preserve their goofball pop-punk cred but acknowledge there's more to life than juvenile behavior. (apple.com)
  • blink-182 live album The Mark, Tom and Travis Show (The Enema Strikes Back! (altpress.com)
  • The single "Bored To Death", featured on the album "California", marks the first new recording by the band since 2011's "Neighbourhoods. (elusivedisc.com)
  • It'll be out 1st July and for those who feel like they've been starved of new Blink material since the release of their last album Neighbourhoods in 2011, they've jammed it with 16 tracks, so there's plenty to be consumed. (moshtix.com.au)
  • Experience northern California's best kept secret in design and craft: J.B. Blunk (1926-2002), a mid-century artist whose connection to nature governed his daily life. (museumca.org)
  • Još dok je bio član Blink-182 , sarađivao je s bivšim članom Travis Barkerom na projektu Box Car Racer godine 2002. (wikipedia.org)
  • We report rapid and substantial decreases in luminal [Ca 2+ ], called "Ca 2+ blinks," within nanometer-sized stores (the junctional cisternae of the SR) during elementary Ca 2+ release events in heart cells. (pnas.org)
  • In theory, a rapid refilling of local store Ca 2+ from the bulk of ER/SR might occur and prevent significant local Ca 2+ depletion ( 21 , 22 ). (pnas.org)
  • Rapid blinking can indicate stress or fear. (readersdigest.ca)
  • Blink-182 at KROQ Acoustic Xmas Show at Anaheim Pond in Los Angeles, California. (fuse.tv)
  • Hiding amid the crowds in Los Angeles-the capital of the Kingdom of Southern California-Daniel is trying to go straight. (tor.com)
  • Contact lens wearers with a red eye really need to see an ophthalmologist," Jafri, the assistant professor of ophthalmology at the University of California, Los Angeles, told TODAY. (today.com)
  • Working with the eye's natural tears to keep them feeling fresh, Blink Contacts® Lubricating Eye Drops provides long-lasting comfort and protection for patients with RGP and soft contact lenses. (healthsnap.ca)
  • Blinking also regulates tears, which nourish and cleanse the surface of the eye The blinking rate in newborns is only 2 times per minute. (aapos.org)
  • Blink-182 discography "13 Miles" only appears on the "Man Overboard" single. (wikipedia.org)
  • Our results afforded insights into mechanisms underlying spark termination and refractoriness, intra-SR Ca 2+ communication, and local regulation of store Ca 2+ signaling. (pnas.org)
  • Quantum dots can absorb specific colors of light, too, but using them to harvest sunlight in photovoltaics is not yet very efficient, due in part to the mechanisms behind blinking. (nersc.gov)
  • Blinking is a normal reflex that protects the eye from dryness, bright light, and fingers or other objects coming towards it. (aapos.org)
  • Blinking can also increase in response to pain, bright light, changes in temperature and humidity, and conversation. (aapos.org)
  • Re: [EVDL] Weird Nissan Leaf behavior: 3rd charging light blinks after new pack install: cold weather package. (mail-archive.com)
  • Sharp AQUOS Quattron won't power on, power light blinks, but TV screen stays black won't power on. (justanswer.com)
  • Tried to restart - no luck - power light just blinks nothing more. (justanswer.com)
  • Thanks for the info, does the power light on TV blink like 1 slow then 1 fast flash pattern? (justanswer.com)
  • Whether you are looking for a relaxing lunch, family-friendly dinner or night out to enjoy excellent margaritas, the Old Blinking Light welcomes you! (opentable.com)
  • With private access to an outdoor patio of Colorado's beautiful front range, the Old Blinking Light is the ultimate private dining experience in Highlands Ranch. (opentable.com)
  • Quantum dots (shown here dissolved in liquid under ultraviolet light) offer tantalizing prospects for new technologies if scientists can stop them blinking. (nersc.gov)
  • California Gov. Gavin Newsom still needs to sign the bill, which he is expected to do. (bigthink.com)
  • That was the name on his hospital bracelet, the name on the door to his room, the name on the sign above his bed, the name the state of California used to pay the nursing home for his care. (latimes.com)
  • The threat of a lawsuit from a similarly named Irish band forced them to change their name to blink-182, but that did not slow them down: the group earned a higher profile by touring the world with Pennywise and NOFX on the 1996-1997 Warped Tour, in addition to appearing on innumerable skate/surf/snowboarding videos. (apple.com)
  • and is there something I can do besides drops and trying to learn to blink consciously. (medhelp.org)
  • Now there's a more effective option lubricating eye drops for contact lens wearers that helps the body recapture the natural relief of a blink. (healthsnap.ca)
  • FOR EXTRA COMFORT: Place 1 or 2 drops of Blink Contacts® Lubricating Eye Drops on each side of each lens before application. (healthsnap.ca)
  • Rabbit Hole follows on from Bored To Death and brings exactly what you would expect from a Blink song - ferocious percussion, a racing tempo and bratty vocals. (moshtix.com.au)
  • Whereas the ER/SR serves primarily as the intracellular Ca 2+ store, luminal Ca 2+ plays an active role in many regulatory systems, including store-operated capacitative Ca 2+ entry ( 5 , 6 ), Ca 2+ -induced Ca 2+ release ( 7 - 9 ), and ER/SR stress-mediated cell death ( 10 , 11 ). (pnas.org)
  • Alternatively, this failing could be due to lack of a means to probe Ca 2+ inside this delicate membrane-bound intracellular structure with the required sensitivity, resolution, and speed, given the extremely small release flux involved (≈2·10 -19 mol of Ca 2+ ) ( 12 , 17 ). (pnas.org)
  • I just do not like it and hate to talk to people face to face especially if I forget to forcible blink. (medhelp.org)
  • Unfortunately, blinking isn't always enough for people who experience dryness associated with contact lens wear. (healthsnap.ca)
  • Matt Salo - executive director of the National Association of Medicaid Directors - told California Healthline that the number of people who will fall into the coverage gap probably "is not enough cause for any state to say 'yes' they are going to expand Medicaid" when state officials and legislators oppose the initiative. (californiahealthline.org)
  • We are executing on our strategy to install Blink EV charging stations at locations where people visit as part of their daily routines. (businesswire.com)
  • While there has been much in these events to recall to the cool observer the saying of Carlyle, "There are twenty-eight millions of people in Great Britain, mostly fools," it is yet a mistake to regard California as a community widely differing from more Eastern States. (wikisource.org)
  • But California Boy had never been good at speaking to new people. (yaledailynews.com)
  • I'd documented what life was like for people kept alive this way - more than 4,000 in California alone - and the life and death choices their families were forced to make. (latimes.com)
  • The American rock band Blink-182 has recorded songs for seven studio albums, as well as numerous extended plays. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originally known as simply Blink, the band debuted in 1993 with a self-released EP, Fly Swatter. (apple.com)
  • However, if Blink is 'just another band' in your collection of CD's, then I would say don't bother, because one can't appreciate the short time spent with Mark Tom and Travis in this movie unless they already know them. (swapadvd.com)
  • Okay, Blink 182 is my favourite band but it's not worth it! (swapadvd.com)
  • Even for a band like Blink 182, I recommend Urethra Chronicles, I've never seen it, but I hear all over than it's really good! (swapadvd.com)
  • We are a tribute band to the ever popular Blink-182. (gigsalad.com)
  • When your pharmacist asks for payment, show them your Blink Card. (blinkhealth.com)
  • I hope Blink releases a DVD with the music video for 'The Rock Show' off of 'Take Off Your Pants & Jacket' one of Blink's best albums to date. (swapadvd.com)
  • And, in fact, the newness and plasticity of society in such a State as California permits general tendencies to show themselves more quickly than in older sections, just as in the younger and more flexible parts of the tree the direction of the wind is most easily seen. (wikisource.org)
  • Luminal Ca 2+ in the endoplasmic and sarcoplasmic reticulum (ER/SR) plays an important role in regulating vital biological processes, including store-operated capacitative Ca 2+ entry, Ca 2+ -induced Ca 2+ release, and ER/SR stress-mediated cell death. (pnas.org)
  • Local Ca 2+ releases from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) or sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in muscle have been shown to underlie neurosecretion, memory encoding, neurite growth, muscle contraction, and apoptosis ( 1 - 4 ). (pnas.org)
  • Contrary to expectations, the biologists found that in both regions--California and the Eastern Seaboard--the disease had evolved to become more virulent over time. (nsf.gov)
  • Blink is guaranteed to work at over 40,000 pharmacies nationwide, including most major chain locations in every state. (blinkhealth.com)
  • The California State Assembly Committee on Public Safety approved such a ballot measure for the November 2012 election. (calwatchdog.com)
  • With upcoming redistricting in California, elected state politicians may not be able to remain immune from unpopular votes as they have in the past in electoral districts protected by gerrymandering. (calwatchdog.com)
  • California lawmakers voted in favor of a bill that would phase out private prisons, and four ICE detention centers in the state, by 2028. (bigthink.com)