A genus of onygenacetous mitosporic fungi whose perfect state is Ajellomyces (see ONYGENALES). The species Blastomyces dermatitidis (perfect state Ajellomyces dermatitidis) causes blastomycosis.
A fungal infection that may appear in two forms: 1, a primary lesion characterized by the formation of a small cutaneous nodule and small nodules along the lymphatics that may heal within several months; and 2, chronic granulomatous lesions characterized by thick crusts, warty growths, and unusual vascularity and infection in the middle or upper lobes of the lung.
A mitosporic Onygenales fungal genus causing HISTOPLASMOSIS in humans and animals. Its single species is Histoplasma capsulatum which has two varieties: H. capsulatum var. capsulatum and H. capsulatum var. duboisii. Its teleomorph is AJELLOMYCES capsulatus.
Substances of fungal origin that have antigenic activity.
A mitosporic fungal genus which causes COCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS.
Suspensions of attenuated or killed fungi administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious fungal disease.
Infection resulting from inhalation or ingestion of spores of the fungus of the genus HISTOPLASMA, species H. capsulatum. It is worldwide in distribution and particularly common in the midwestern United States. (From Dorland, 27th ed)
Pulmonary diseases caused by fungal infections, usually through hematogenous spread.
A mitosporic Ophiostomataceae fungal genus, whose species Sporothrix schenckii is a well-known animal pathogen. The conidia of this soil fungus may be inhaled causing a primary lung infection, or may infect independently via skin punctures.
Histoplasmin is an antigen extracted from the histoplasmoma fungus (Histoplasma capsulatum), used in skin tests to detect previous exposure or infection to this pathogen that causes histoplasmosis.
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
Immunoglobulins produced in a response to FUNGAL ANTIGENS.
A sterile solution containing the by-products of growth products of COCCIDIOIDES IMMITIS, injected intracutaneously as a test for COCCIDIOIDOMYCOSIS.
Reproductive bodies produced by fungi.
MYCOSES of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges which may result in ENCEPHALITIS; MENINGITIS, FUNGAL; MYELITIS; BRAIN ABSCESS; and EPIDURAL ABSCESS. Certain types of fungi may produce disease in immunologically normal hosts, while others are classified as opportunistic pathogens, causing illness primarily in immunocompromised individuals (e.g., ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME).

Blastomycosis acquired occupationally during prairie dog relocation--Colorado, 1998. (1/211)

On August 31, 1998, two suspected cases of fungal pneumonia were reported to the Boulder County (Colorado) Health Department (BCHD). Both patients were immunocompetent, otherwise healthy adults working for the City of Boulder Open Space (CBOS) program on a prairie dog relocation project. This report summarizes the epidemiologic investigation by BCHD, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, and CDC; the findings indicate that these two persons acquired blastomycosis in Colorado, which is outside the area where the disease is endemic.  (+info)

Targeted gene disruption reveals an adhesin indispensable for pathogenicity of Blastomyces dermatitidis. (2/211)

Systemic fungal infections are becoming more common and difficult to treat, yet the pathogenesis of these infectious diseases remains poorly understood. In many cases, pathogenicity can be attributed to the ability of the fungi to adhere to target tissues, but the lack of tractable genetic systems has limited progress in understanding and interfering with the offending fungal products. In Blastomyces dermatitidis, the agent of blastomycosis, a respiratory and disseminated mycosis of people and animals worldwide, expression of the putative adhesin encoded by the WI-1 gene was investigated as a possible virulence factor. DNA-mediated gene transfer was used to disrupt the WI-1 locus by allelic replacement, resulting in impaired binding and entry of yeasts into macrophages, loss of adherence to lung tissue, and abolishment of virulence in mice; each of these properties was fully restored after reconstitution of WI-1 by means of gene transfer. These findings establish the pivotal role of WI-1 in adherence and virulence of B. dermatitidis yeasts. To our knowledge, they offer the first example of a genetically proven virulence determinant among systemic dimorphic fungi, and underscore the value of reverse genetics for studies of pathogenesis in these organisms.  (+info)

Thoracic blastomycosis and empyema. (3/211)

Blastomycosis is endemic in river valley areas of the southeastern and Midwestern United States. Pulmonary manifestations include chronic cough and pleuritic pain. Radiographic appearance of the infection can mimic bronchogenic lung carcinoma. Pleural effusion is rarely associated with this pulmonary infection, and empyema has not been previously reported. We report a case of pulmonary and pleural Blastomyces dermatitidis infection presenting as empyema thoracis. Diagnosis and treatment were attained with video-assisted thoracoscopic (VATS) pleural and lung biopsy and debridement.  (+info)

Disseminated blastomycosis in a rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta). (4/211)

An 8-year-old male rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) died following a 6-day illness consisting of progressive depression, anorexia, labored abdominal breathing, coughing, and tachypnea. Gross necropsy findings included severe multifocal (miliary) granulomatous pneumonia, granulomatous splenitis, and multifocal cerebral abscesses. Histologic examination revealed 10-15-microm broad-based budding organisms within pyogranulomatous inflammatory lesions in the lung, tracheobronchial lymph node, brain, spleen, and liver. The distribution of extrapulmonary lesions was intermediate between that described for dogs and that described for humans. These findings were consistent with blastomycosis, which is previously unreported in nonhuman primates.  (+info)

T-Cell epitopes and human leukocyte antigen restriction elements of an immunodominant antigen of Blastomyces dermatitidis. (5/211)

Humans infected with the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis develop strong T-lymphocyte responses to WI-1, an immunodominant antigen that has been shown to elicit protective immunity in mice. In the present study, the T-cell epitopes of WI-1 and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) restricting elements that display them were investigated. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 37 patients with a confirmed history of blastomycosis were tested for a response to WI-1 in primary proliferation assays; PBMC from 35 (95%) responded. Six patients whose PBMC proliferated strongly in response to WI-1 (defined as a stimulation index greater than 50) were tested further for responses to subcloned, recombinant fragments of the antigen. These patients responded chiefly to sequences within the N terminus and the 25-amino-acid tandem repeat. Cloned CD4(+) T cells from an infected individual were used to delineate more precisely the peptide epitopes in the fragments and HLA restricting elements that present them. A majority of the T-cell clones recognized an epitope spanning amino acids 149 to 172 within the N terminus, displayed by HLA-DR 15. A minority of the clones, which have been shown to perform a cytolytic function in vitro, recognized an epitope in the tandem repeat displayed by HLA-DPw4, an uncommon restricting element. Tandem repeat epitopes required display by the beta chain of DPw4 heterodimers. Thus, human T cells with different functions in vitro also recognize distinct regions of WI-1, raising the possibility that HLA restricting elements that present them could modulate immunity during blastomycosis by selection and display of WI-1 peptides.  (+info)

Molecular epidemiology of Blastomyces dermatitidis. (6/211)

The inhalation of conidia of Blastomyces dermatitidis, a fungus found in soil, causes disease in humans and animals. We studied the genetic diversity of this pathogen by extracting DNA yeasts and analyzing them with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based typing system we developed, which used restriction fragment analysis of amplicons from the regions between the rDNA repeats and allowed us to class isolates into 3 major groups. Strains were further differentiated by use of PCR fingerprinting with 3 different primers. Fifty-nine isolates collected over 35 years from 15 regions (United States, India, Africa, Canada) were analyzed. Genotypic groups A, B, and C contained 17, 23, and 19 isolates, which were divided into 5, 15, and 12 types, respectively. All 16 isolates from North America in group A were from the upper midwestern United States or Canada, whereas 0 of 20 isolates from the southeastern United States were in group A. Studies of the largest collection from 1 locale (Eagle River, WI), revealed that the soil isolates studied were not responsible for the majority of cases in this outbreak, as previously proposed, and that >1 strain was present in the environment and in patients. Overall, these results provide a tool for the epidemiological study of blastomycosis and illuminate the genetic and geographic diversity of this important pathogen.  (+info)

Cell wall biogenesis of Blastomyces dermatitidis. Evidence for a novel mechanism of cell surface localization of a virulence-associated adhesin via extracellular release and reassociation with cell wall chitin. (7/211)

Pathogenic yeast of Blastomyces dermatitidis express a surface protein adhesin, WI-1. Due to the crucial role of WI-1 in adherence and disease pathogenesis, we investigated how the protein localizes to the surface of B. dermatitidis. WI-1 released extracellularly by wild-type yeast coated the surfaces of co-cultured knockout yeast within 3 h of incubation, implying that secreted WI-1 provides a pathway for loading the protein onto the yeast cell wall. In radioligand binding assays, purified WI-1 bound saturably, specifically, and with high affinity (K(d) = 8.3 x 10(-9)) to the cell surface of knockout yeast devoid of WI-1. WI-1 added exogenously, in vitro, to knockout yeast was indistinguishable from native cell surface WI-1 by fluorescence staining and restored adhesivity to the knockout yeast in macrophage binding and phagocytosis assays. Analysis of interactions between WI-1 and elements of the yeast cell wall identified chitin as the anchor point for WI-1. This interaction was shown to hinge on the 24-amino acid tandem repeat sequence of WI-1. Efforts to extract surface WI-1 from the yeast demonstrated that it is fastened to the wall by non-covalent interactions and covalent links between cysteine residues. We conclude that the yeast cell surface adhesin WI-1 localizes to the cell wall, in part, through extracellular release followed by high affinity binding back onto exposed chitin fibrils. These findings point to a novel pathway of cell wall biogenesis in yeast and an unanticipated role for chitin in anchoring and displaying a surface adhesin and virulence determinant.  (+info)

Expanding epidemiology of blastomycosis: clinical features and investigation of 2 cases in Colorado. (8/211)

On the basis of case reports of blastomycosis, Blastomyces dermatitidis is widely accepted to be endemic in the central United States in and around the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys. Blastomycosis also occurs in parts of Canada and in the southeastern United States. However, there has been no large-scale skin testing, and the environmental range of B. dermatitidis may have been underestimated. We describe 2 immunocompetent patients with blastomycosis acquired while working in the Front Range region of the Rocky Mountains. The patients were coworkers engaged in a prairie dog relocation project. In the course of this work, they had extensive contact with contaminated soil. Significantly above-average rainfall before the exposure may have contributed to favorable conditions for sporulation of the fungus.  (+info)

"Blastomyces" is a genus of fungi that can cause a pulmonary or systemic infection known as blastomycosis in humans and animals. The fungus exists in the environment, particularly in damp soil and decomposing organic matter, and is typically found in certain regions of North America. Infection occurs when a person inhales spores of the fungus, which can lead to respiratory symptoms such as cough, fever, and chest pain. The infection can also disseminate to other parts of the body, causing various symptoms depending on the organs involved.

Blastomycosis is a fungal infection caused by the inhalation of spores of the fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis. It primarily affects the lungs but can also spread to other parts of the body, such as the skin, bones, and central nervous system. The initial symptoms of blastomycosis may include cough, fever, chest pain, and difficulty breathing. If left untreated, the infection can become severe and potentially life-threatening. Treatment typically involves antifungal medications, such as itraconazole or amphotericin B.

Histoplasma is a genus of dimorphic fungi that can cause the infectious disease histoplasmosis in humans and animals. The two species that are most commonly associated with disease are Histoplasma capsulatum and Histoplasma duboisii. These fungi are found worldwide, but are particularly prevalent in certain regions such as the Ohio and Mississippi River Valleys in the United States and parts of Central and South America.

Histoplasma exists in two forms: a mold that grows in soil and other environments, and a yeast form that infects human and animal hosts. The fungi are typically inhaled into the lungs, where they can cause respiratory symptoms such as cough, fever, and shortness of breath. In severe cases, histoplasmosis can disseminate throughout the body and affect other organs, leading to more serious complications.

Histoplasma is often found in soil enriched with bird or bat droppings, and exposure can occur through activities such as digging, gardening, or cleaning chicken coops. While histoplasmosis can be a serious disease, it is usually treatable with antifungal medications. However, some people may develop chronic or severe forms of the disease, particularly those with weakened immune systems.

Fungal antigens are substances found on or produced by fungi that can stimulate an immune response in a host organism. They can be proteins, polysaccharides, or other molecules that are recognized as foreign by the host's immune system. Fungal antigens can be used in diagnostic tests to identify fungal infections, and they can also be targets of immune responses during fungal infections. In some cases, fungal antigens may contribute to the pathogenesis of fungal diseases by inducing inflammatory or allergic reactions. Examples of fungal antigens include the cell wall components of Candida albicans and the extracellular polysaccharide galactomannan produced by Aspergillus fumigatus.

'Coccidioides' is a genus of fungi that are commonly found in the soil in certain geographical areas, including the southwestern United States and parts of Mexico and Central and South America. The two species of this genus, C. immitis and C. posadasii, can cause a serious infection known as coccidioidomycosis (also called Valley Fever) in humans and animals who inhale the spores of the fungi.

The infection typically begins in the lungs and can cause symptoms such as cough, fever, chest pain, fatigue, and weight loss. In some cases, the infection can spread to other parts of the body, leading to more severe and potentially life-threatening complications. People with weakened immune systems, such as those with HIV/AIDS or who are receiving immunosuppressive therapy, are at higher risk for developing severe coccidioidomycosis.

A fungal vaccine is a biological preparation that provides active acquired immunity against fungal infections. It contains one or more fungal antigens, which are substances that can stimulate an immune response, along with adjuvants to enhance the immune response. The goal of fungal vaccines is to protect against invasive fungal diseases, especially in individuals with weakened immune systems, such as those undergoing chemotherapy, organ transplantation, or HIV/AIDS treatment.

Fungal vaccines can work by inducing both humoral and cell-mediated immunity. Humoral immunity involves the production of antibodies that recognize and neutralize fungal antigens, while cell-mediated immunity involves the activation of T cells to directly attack infected cells.

Currently, there are no licensed fungal vaccines available for human use, although several candidates are in various stages of development and clinical trials. Some examples include vaccines against Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, and Pneumocystis jirovecii.

Histoplasmosis is a pulmonary and systemic disease caused by the dimorphic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum. It is typically acquired through the inhalation of microconidia from contaminated soil, particularly in areas associated with bird or bat droppings. The infection can range from asymptomatic to severe, depending on factors like the individual's immune status and the quantity of inhaled spores.

In acute histoplasmosis, symptoms may include fever, cough, fatigue, chest pain, and headache. Chronic or disseminated forms of the disease can affect various organs, such as the liver, spleen, adrenal glands, and central nervous system, leading to more severe complications. Diagnosis often involves serological tests, cultures, or histopathological examination of tissue samples. Treatment depends on the severity and dissemination of the disease, with antifungal medications like itraconazole or amphotericin B being commonly used for moderate to severe cases.

Fungal lung diseases, also known as fungal pneumonia or mycoses, refer to a group of respiratory disorders caused by the infection of fungi in the lungs. These fungi are commonly found in the environment, such as soil, decaying organic matter, and contaminated materials. People can develop lung diseases from fungi after inhaling spores or particles that contain fungi.

There are several types of fungal lung diseases, including:

1. Aspergillosis: This is caused by the Aspergillus fungus and can affect people with weakened immune systems. It can cause allergic reactions, lung infections, or invasive aspergillosis, which can spread to other organs.
2. Cryptococcosis: This is caused by the Cryptococcus fungus and is usually found in soil contaminated with bird droppings. It can cause pneumonia, meningitis, or skin lesions.
3. Histoplasmosis: This is caused by the Histoplasma capsulatum fungus and is commonly found in the Ohio and Mississippi River valleys. It can cause flu-like symptoms, lung infections, or disseminated histoplasmosis, which can spread to other organs.
4. Blastomycosis: This is caused by the Blastomyces dermatitidis fungus and is commonly found in the southeastern and south-central United States. It can cause pneumonia, skin lesions, or disseminated blastomycosis, which can spread to other organs.
5. Coccidioidomycosis: This is caused by the Coccidioides immitis fungus and is commonly found in the southwestern United States. It can cause flu-like symptoms, lung infections, or disseminated coccidioidomycosis, which can spread to other organs.

Fungal lung diseases can range from mild to severe, depending on the type of fungus and the person's immune system. Treatment may include antifungal medications, surgery, or supportive care. Prevention measures include avoiding exposure to contaminated soil or dust, wearing protective masks in high-risk areas, and promptly seeking medical attention if symptoms develop.

"Sporothrix" is a genus of fungi that includes several species, the most well-known of which is "Sporothrix schenckii." This particular species is an environmental saprophyte, commonly found in soil, plant matter, and decaying organic material. It can cause a disease in humans and animals known as sporotrichosis, which is a subcutaneous infection that typically affects the skin and underlying tissue. The infection usually occurs after traumatic inoculation of the fungus through the skin, often from activities such as gardening or handling contaminated plant material.

The infection initially presents as a painless, nodular lesion at the site of inoculation, which can later ulcerate and spread to other parts of the body through lymphatic channels. Disseminated sporotrichosis is rare but can occur in immunocompromised individuals, affecting various organs such as the lungs, bones, and central nervous system.

Proper diagnosis of sporotrichosis involves direct examination and culture of clinical specimens, as well as serological tests and molecular techniques. Treatment typically includes oral antifungal medications such as itraconazole or posaconazole, although amphotericin B may be required in severe cases or in patients with compromised immune systems.

Histoplasmin is not a medical condition or diagnosis itself, but it's a term related to a skin test used in medicine. Histoplasmin is an antigen extract derived from the histoplasmoma (a form of the fungus Histoplasma capsulatum) used in the histoplasmin skin test. This test is utilized to determine whether a person has been infected with the histoplasmosis fungus, which causes the disease histoplasmosis.

The histoplasmin skin test involves injecting a small amount of histoplasmin under the surface of the skin, usually on the forearm. If the person has previously been exposed to Histoplasma capsulatum, their immune system will recognize the antigen and produce a reaction (a hard, red, swollen area) at the injection site within 24-72 hours. The size of this reaction helps healthcare professionals determine if the person has developed an immune response to the fungus, indicating past or current infection with histoplasmosis.

It's important to note that a positive histoplasmin skin test does not necessarily mean that the person is currently sick with histoplasmosis. Instead, it shows that they have been exposed to the fungus at some point in their life and have developed an immune response to it.

Fungi, in the context of medical definitions, are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as the more familiar mushrooms. The study of fungi is known as mycology.

Fungi can exist as unicellular organisms or as multicellular filamentous structures called hyphae. They are heterotrophs, which means they obtain their nutrients by decomposing organic matter or by living as parasites on other organisms. Some fungi can cause various diseases in humans, animals, and plants, known as mycoses. These infections range from superficial, localized skin infections to systemic, life-threatening invasive diseases.

Examples of fungal infections include athlete's foot (tinea pedis), ringworm (dermatophytosis), candidiasis (yeast infection), histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis. Fungal infections can be challenging to treat due to the limited number of antifungal drugs available and the potential for drug resistance.

Fungal antibodies are a type of protein called immunoglobulins that are produced by the immune system in response to the presence of fungi in the body. These antibodies are specifically designed to recognize and bind to antigens on the surface of fungal cells, marking them for destruction by other immune cells.

There are several types of fungal antibodies, including IgA, IgG, IgM, and IgE, each with a specific role in the immune response. For example, IgG antibodies are the most common type of antibody found in the blood and provide long-term immunity to fungi, while IgE antibodies are associated with allergic reactions to fungi.

Fungal antibodies can be measured in the blood or other bodily fluids to help diagnose fungal infections, monitor the effectiveness of treatment, or assess immune function in individuals who are at risk for fungal infections, such as those with weakened immune systems due to HIV/AIDS, cancer, or organ transplantation.

Coccidioidin is a preparation derived from the filtrate of a culture of Coccidioides immitis, a fungus that is the causative agent of coccidioidomycosis, also known as Valley Fever. It is used in skin tests to diagnose coccidioidomycosis infection and determine if a person has developed immunity to the disease.

When Coccidioidin is injected into the skin, a positive reaction (induration or swelling) may indicate a current or past infection with Coccidioides immitis. However, it's important to note that a negative result does not necessarily rule out an infection, and further diagnostic tests may be needed for confirmation.

It's also worth noting that skin testing with coccidioidin can have false-positive results in people who have been vaccinated against other types of fungal infections or have certain medical conditions. Therefore, the test should be interpreted carefully and used in conjunction with other clinical findings and diagnostic tests.

Fungal spores are defined as the reproductive units of fungi that are produced by specialized structures called hyphae. These spores are typically single-celled and can exist in various shapes such as round, oval, or ellipsoidal. They are highly resistant to extreme environmental conditions like heat, cold, and dryness, which allows them to survive for long periods until they find a suitable environment to germinate and grow into a new fungal organism. Fungal spores can be found in the air, water, soil, and on various surfaces, making them easily dispersible and capable of causing infections in humans, animals, and plants.

Central nervous system (CNS) fungal infections refer to invasive fungal diseases that affect the brain and/or spinal cord. These types of infections are relatively uncommon but can be serious and potentially life-threatening, especially in individuals with weakened immune systems due to conditions such as HIV/AIDS, cancer, or organ transplantation.

There are several types of fungi that can cause CNS infections, including:

1. Candida species: These are yeast-like fungi that can cause a range of infections, from superficial to systemic. When they invade the CNS, they can cause meningitis or brain abscesses.
2. Aspergillus species: These are mold-like fungi that can cause invasive aspergillosis, which can affect various organs, including the brain.
3. Cryptococcus neoformans: This is a yeast-like fungus that primarily affects people with weakened immune systems. It can cause meningitis or brain abscesses.
4. Coccidioides species: These are mold-like fungi that can cause coccidioidomycosis, also known as Valley Fever. While most infections are limited to the lungs, some people may develop disseminated disease, which can affect the CNS.
5. Histoplasma capsulatum: This is a mold-like fungus that causes histoplasmosis, which primarily affects the lungs but can disseminate and involve the CNS.

Symptoms of CNS fungal infections may include headache, fever, altered mental status, seizures, stiff neck, and focal neurologic deficits. Diagnosis typically involves a combination of clinical evaluation, imaging studies (such as MRI or CT), and laboratory tests (such as cerebrospinal fluid analysis or fungal cultures). Treatment usually involves long-term antifungal therapy, often with a combination of drugs, and may also include surgical intervention in some cases.

... Gilchrist & W.R. Stokes (1898) was an illegitimate homonym of Blastomyces Costantin & Rolland (1888) (a synonym of ... Blastomyces is a genus of fungi in the order Onygenales. Species are known human pathogens and show thermal dimorphism, ... de Hoog GS, Redhead SA, Feng P, Jiang Y, Dukik K, Sigler L (2016). "Proposals to conserve Blastomyces Gilchrist & W. R. Stokes ... Blastomyces, Emergomyces, Emmonsia, Emmonsiellopsis". Fungal Diversity. 90: 245-291. doi:10.1007/s13225-018-0403-y. S2CID ...
... , MycoBank Blastomyces cerolytica in Index Fungorum v t e (Articles with short description, Short ... Blastomyces cerolytica is a species of yeast-like fungus. It was discovered and named by Mahmoud K.S. Muftić, and published in ... Muftic, Mahmoud K. S. (1957). "Blastomyces cerolytica (sp. n.) and its relation to Coccidioides". Mycopathologia. 8 (1): 18-26 ...
Three more species have been described: Blastomyces emzantsi, Blastomyces parvus and Blastomyces percursus. Along with two ... Blastomyces at the U.S. National Library of Medicine Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) "Blastomyces dermatitidis". Mycology ... Blastomyces dermatitidis itself is a sexual organism, occurring in nature as both a + mating type and a − mating type. This is ... Blastomyces dermatitidis is absent or nearly so from the Lake Erie area, but occurs sporadically on the north shore of Lake ...
In eastern North America, the most common cause of blastomycosis is Blastomyces dermatitidis, but Blastomyces gilchristii has ... The most closely related blastomycosis-causing fungi, Blastomyces dermatitidis and Blastomyces gilchristii, diverged during the ... In endemic areas, Blastomyces dermatitidis lives in soil and rotten wood near lakes and rivers. Although it has never been ... Blastomyces dermatitidis is found in the soil and decaying organic matter like wood or leaves. Outdoor activities like hunting ...
Blastomyces cerolytica, MycoBank Index of Botanists, Harvard University Herbaria & Libraries Ian Johnson, A Mosque in Munich, p ... Muftić discovered and named a species of yeastlike fungus, blastomyces cerolytica. His author abbreviation in botany is "Muftic ... "Blastomyces cerolytica (sp. n.) and its relation to Coccidioides". Mycopathologia. 8 (1): 18-26. doi:10.1007/BF02053115. PMID ...
Font, R. L. (1967). "Endogenous Mycotic Panophthalmitis Caused by Blastomyces dermatitidis". Archives of Ophthalmology. 77 (2 ...
Cryptococcus neoformans Blastomyces dermatitidis Obligate intracellular parasites cannot reproduce outside their host cell, ... "The unappreciated intracellular lifestyle of Blastomyces dermatitidis". Journal of Immunology. 194 (4): 1796-1805. doi:10.4049/ ...
Walker K, Skelton H, Smith K (November 2002). "Cutaneous lesions showing giant yeast forms of Blastomyces dermatitidis". ...
Sequencing can be used as a tool to discriminate the fungus from its close relative, the genus Blastomyces. The target is the ... The fungus is closely related to the genus Blastomyces. The fungus is dimorphic growing in two distinct forms. It grows as ... and their phylogenetic relationship to Blastomyces dermatitidis (Ajellomyces dermatitidis) and other systemic fungal pathogens ...
Walker K, Skelton H, Smith K (2002). "Cutaneous lesions showing giant yeast forms of Blastomyces dermatitidis". Journal of ...
Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cladophialophora bantiana, Histoplasma capsulatum, Mucor sp., Sporothrix schenckii and Trichophyton ...
The two most common are Blastomyces dermatitidis and Coccidioides immitis.[citation needed] In osteomyelitis involving the ...
Infectious causes include tuberculosis, Actinomyces israelii, Nocardia, and Blastomyces dermatitidis. Malignancy and trauma can ...
H. capsulatum is an ascomycetous fungus closely related to Blastomyces dermatitidis. It is potentially sexual, and its sexual ...
Certain strains of fungi that may cause laryngitis include; Histoplasma, Blastomyces, Candida (especially in immunocompromised ...
Primary pathogens include the following: Cryptococcus neoformans, Coccidioides immitis, Blastomyces dermatitides, and ...
Blastomyces - occurs in soil rich in decaying organic matter in the Midwest United States. Meningitis is an unusual ...
Blastomycosis* is a fungal disease caused by Blastomyces dermatitidis that affects both dogs and humans. Dogs are ten times ...
Fungal causes include Coccidioides immitis (valley fever), Cryptococcus neoformans (cryptococcosis), and Blastomyces ...
The disease is often misdiagnosed as Blastomyces dermatitidis or Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis due to its similar morphology.[ ...
Such strains continue to produce small aleuroconidia similar in appearance to the aleurioconidia of Blastomyces dermatitidis. ...
Dimorphic fungi, which include Blastomyces dermatitidis and Paracoccidioides brasiliensis, are known causative agents of ...
Blastomyces, Emergomyces, Emmonsia, Emmonsiellopsis". Fungal Diversity. 90: 245-291. doi:10.1007/s13225-018-0403-y. Vilela R, ...
Blastomyces, Emergomyces, Emmonsia, Emmonsiellopsis". Fungal Diversity. 90 (1): 245-291. doi:10.1007/s13225-018-0403-y. hdl: ...
Blastomyces, Emergomyces, Emmonsia, Emmonsiellopsis". Fungal Diversity. 90: 245-291. doi:10.1007/s13225-018-0403-y. OIE Manual ...
Blastomyces, Emergomyces, Emmonsia, Emmonsiellopsis". Fungal Diversity. 90: 245-291. doi:10.1007/s13225-018-0403-y. Schwartz IS ...
Blastomycosis, caused by Blastomyces species including Blastomyces dermatitidis, is a fungal disease that affects both dogs and ...
Blastomyces dermatitidis, and Candida species. A parasitic worm is often assumed to be the cause of eosinophilic meningitis ...
It is most often caused by Histoplasma capsulatum, Blastomyces, Cryptococcus neoformans, Pneumocystis jiroveci (pneumocystis ...
Antifungal activity against Candida albicans, non-albicans Candida spp., Cryptococcus neoformans, Blastomyces dermatitidis, ...
Blastomyces Gilchrist & W.R. Stokes (1898) was an illegitimate homonym of Blastomyces Costantin & Rolland (1888) (a synonym of ... Blastomyces is a genus of fungi in the order Onygenales. Species are known human pathogens and show thermal dimorphism, ... de Hoog GS, Redhead SA, Feng P, Jiang Y, Dukik K, Sigler L (2016). "Proposals to conserve Blastomyces Gilchrist & W. R. Stokes ... Blastomyces, Emergomyces, Emmonsia, Emmonsiellopsis". Fungal Diversity. 90: 245-291. doi:10.1007/s13225-018-0403-y. S2CID ...
"Molecular Epidemiology of Blastomyces gilchristii Clusters, Minnesota, USA" 28, no. 9 (2022). Bagal, Ujwal R. et al. "Molecular ... Sorensen, R. H. and Casad, D. E. "Use Of Case Survey Technique To Detect Origin Of Blastomyces Infections" 84, no. 6 (1969). ... Blastomyces gilchristii was confirmed as the cause of infection. Genomic analyses corresponded with epidemiologic findings for ... Sorensen, R. H. and Casad, D. E. (1969). Use Of Case Survey Technique To Detect Origin Of Blastomyces Infections. 84(6). ...
Blastomyces lives in the environment and is a fungis that produces fungal spores. When people or animals breathe in the spores ... Life cycle of Blastomyces. Blastomyces lives in the environment as a mold that produces fungal spores. The spores are too small ... There are no publicly available tests to detect Blastomyces in the environment. Testing environmental samples for Blastomyces ... Blastomyces lives in the environment, particularly in moist soil and in decomposing plant matter such as wood and leaves. In ...
Blastomyces dermatitidis. Sorry, but you do not have permission to view this content. ...
Blastomyces dermatitidis is an endemic fungus that causes acute and chronic infections in humans and other animals. ... Blastomyces dermatitidis is an endemic fungus that causes acute and chronic infections in humans and other animals. It is found ... Blastomyces Dermatitidis (Blastomycosis). Author: Brian Holtry. Last updated on August 15, 2020. ... https://microbewiki.kenyon.edu/index.php/Blastomyces_dermatitidis. http://www.mdedge.com/idpractitioner/dsm/1522/infectious- ...
Blastomyces is a dimorphic fungus with yeast forms in tissues (37 º C) and hyphal forms in culture (25 º C). Yeast forms are 8- ... Blastomycosis: Blastomyces dermatitidis. Blastomycosis is endemic in the Ohio and Mississippi River valley, around the Great ... Cryptococci may occasionally be confused with histoplasma and Blastomyces. The round shape for cryptococcus versus oval shape ... in size and shape for cryptococcus versus uniform size for histoplasma and double-contoured refractile wall of Blastomyces ...
Blastomyces dermatitidis -gram stain of BAL showing broad-based budding yeast, characteristic of Blastomyces dermatitidis. ( ... The yeast form of Blastomyces dermatitidis is inhibited by cycloheximide.. While the filamentous form of Blastomyces ... Blastomyces is found in a filamentous mould form. At body temperature (37oC) it grows in a discrete yeast form. Blastomyces ... Blastomyces dermatitidis is very pathogenic and should be handled with extreme care in a Level 3 laboratory.. New Content ( ...
Unknown 8 = Blastomyces dermatitidis. Direct microscopy (H&E staining): H&E stain of lung tissue containing abundant broad- ... Culture: Typical colony morphology of Blastomyces dermatitidis. Thallus develops slowly, developing a fine white to tan aerial ... based budding yeast cells morphologically consistent with Blastomyces dermatitidis. (1000X magnification). ...
Blastomycosis is an infection caused by breathing in the Blastomyces dermatitidis fungus. The fungus is found in decaying wood ... Blastomycosis is an infection caused by breathing in the Blastomyces dermatitidis fungus. The fungus is found in decaying wood ... Blastomycosis is an infection caused by breathing in the Blastomyces dermatitidis fungus. The fungus is found in decaying wood ...
Categories: Blastomyces Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, CopyrightRestricted 51 ...
If its an initial positive result for Histoplasma antigen, well send a Blastomyces antigen study. Based on which one is ... Particularly in our part of the country, Blastomyces cross-reacts almost 100% with the Histoplasma antigen. Now, you could ...
Blastomyces dermatitidis, Cryptococcus neoformans, [9] Coccidioides immitis (mostly pericarditis; rarely endocarditis). * Mucor ...
What we know about blastomyces, the fungus that killed 1 & infected 100 at a Michigan paper mill ...
Scientists also include disease that transfers from fungus to humans, as in the case of Blastomycosis (Blastomyces dermatitidis ...
Because culturing Blastomyces can pose a severe biohazard to laboratory personnel, the laboratory should be notified of the ... Blastomycosis is a pulmonary disease caused by inhaling spores of the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis. Occasionally, ... Inhaling spores of the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces can cause pulmonary disease and, less commonly, disseminated infection ( ... 1 Treatment reference Blastomycosis is a pulmonary disease caused by inhaling spores of the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces ...
... of Commercially Available Acridinium Ester-labeled Chemiluminescent DNA Probes for Culture Identification of Blastomyces ...
with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease Pulmonary disease Diseases involving the respiratory system. Blastomyces/ ...
Powered by Pure, Scopus & Elsevier Fingerprint Engine™ All content on this site: Copyright © 2024 Elsevier B.V. or its licensors and contributors. All rights are reserved, including those for text and data mining, AI training, and similar technologies. For all open access content, the Creative Commons licensing terms apply We use cookies to help provide and enhance our service and tailor content. By continuing you agree to the use of cookies. ...
Blastomyces dermatitidis is another fungus that can get into a dogs nose. Urine antigen testing is accurate for diagnosis and ...
Blastomyces is a dimorphic fungus with yeast forms in tissues (37 º C) and hyphal forms in culture (25 º C). Yeast forms are 8- ... Blastomycosis: Blastomyces dermatitidis. Blastomycosis is endemic in the Ohio and Mississippi River valley, around the Great ... Cryptococci may occasionally be confused with histoplasma and Blastomyces. The round shape for cryptococcus versus oval shape ... in size and shape for cryptococcus versus uniform size for histoplasma and double-contoured refractile wall of Blastomyces ...
Blastomyces antigen detection for monitoring progression of blastomycosis in a pregnant adolescent. Tarr, Megan; Marcinak, John ... Rabbit Antithymocyte Globulin Causes Blastomyces and Histoplasma Antigenemia. Kaur, Amrit; Eberlein, Michael; Klesney-Tait, ... anti-Coccidioides and anti-Blastomyces antibodies. Bahr, Nathan C; Panackal, Anil A; Durkin, Michelle M; Smedema, Melinda L; ...
A deadly dimorph: what you need to know about Blastomyces spp.  Dunn, Deirdre (2019) ...
BAD 1 (Blastomyces adhesin 1), which is a surface protein that promotes adhesion to cells in the respiratory system and ...
  • was confirmed with a molecular probe stable and afebrile, despite remaining tachycardic and (AccuProbe Blastomyces dermatitidis Culture Identifica- tachypneic. (cdc.gov)
  • Blastomyces dermatitidis is an endemic fungus that causes acute and chronic infections in humans and other animals. (antiinfectivemeds.com)
  • Blastomyces dermatitidis is a dimorphic fungus meaning its morphology can express two different forms primarily depending on temperature. (blogspot.com)
  • Blastomyces dermatitidis is most likely a soil saprobe (lives on decaying organic matter). (blogspot.com)
  • Blastomyces dermatitidis is infrequently isolated directly from the environment, however acidic soils with rich organic debris such as decaying vegetative matter, animal excreta (providing increased nitrogen content), which is protected from direct sunlight may offer the optimal opportunity. (blogspot.com)
  • KOH & calcofluor white preparations were the first preparations examined under a UV microscope where fluorescent yeast-like cells showed tell-tale broad-based budding, characteristic of Blastomyces dermatitidis . (blogspot.com)
  • Blastomyces dermatitidis -gram stain of BAL showing broad-based budding yeast, characteristic of Blastomyces dermatitidis . (blogspot.com)
  • H&E stain of lung tissue containing abundant broad-based budding yeast cells morphologically consistent with Blastomyces dermatitidis . (edu.au)
  • Typical colony morphology of Blastomyces dermatitidis . (edu.au)
  • Blastomycosis is an infection caused by breathing in the Blastomyces dermatitidis fungus. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Diana Khuu] Blastomycosis is a fungal disease caused by blastomyces dermatitidis. (cdc.gov)
  • Diana Khuu] We decided to do this study because, even though we know quite a bit about the biology and risk factors of infection by Blastomyces dermatitidis , the public health burden of blastomycosis deaths in the United States was unknown. (cdc.gov)
  • Scientists also include disease that transfers from fungus to humans, as in the case of Blastomycosis ( Blastomyces dermatitidis ) . (earth.com)
  • Using standard fungal culturing methods, each sample was analyzed for three potentially infectious microorganisms: Blastomyces dermatitidis Cryptococcus neoformans, and Histoplasma capsulatum. (cdc.gov)
  • Blastomycosis is a pulmonary disease caused by inhaling spores of the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis . (msdmanuals.com)
  • Infection with Blastomyces dermatitidis. (ocu-radiology.jp)
  • Blastomyces is a genus of dimorphic fungi, and the most clinically significant species within this genus is Blastomyces dermatitidis. (labtestpk.com)
  • Blastomycosis, caused by the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces (most commonly the species (spp. (cdc.gov)
  • Illness in a person with compelling evidence (e.g., culture, histopathology, seroconversion) of a different fungal infection, such as histoplasmosis or coccidioidomycosis, and meeting only non-confirmatory laboratory criteria for blastomycosis should not be counted as a case of blastomycosis since other fungal infections can cause false positive Blastomyces antigen and antibody test results. (cdc.gov)
  • When an environmental sample tests positive for Blastomyces, it isn't necessarily a source of infection, and when a sample tests negative, that doesn't necessarily mean that the fungus isn't there. (cdc.gov)
  • Particularly in our part of the country, Blastomyces cross-reacts almost 100% with the Histoplasma antigen. (medscape.com)
  • Rabbit Antithymocyte Globulin Causes Blastomyces and Histoplasma Antigenemia. (bvsalud.org)
  • BACKGROUND: The Americas are home to biologically and clinically diverse endemic fungi, including Blastomyces , Coccidioides , Emergomyces , Histoplasma , Paracoccidioides and Sporothrix . (urosario.edu.co)
  • Intravenous fluoro- sputum specimen revealed broad-based budding yeast quinolone was administered for suspected left upper lobe with refractile cell walls characteristic of Blastomyces . (cdc.gov)
  • Following the 2013 description of B. gilchristii as patchy opacification of the right lung that was not observed a cryptic species of Blastomyces spp. (cdc.gov)
  • Blastomyces is a genus of fungi in the order Onygenales. (wikipedia.org)
  • Identification of characteristic Blastomyces spp. (cdc.gov)
  • Blastomyces lives in the environment as a mold that produces fungal spores. (cdc.gov)
  • Blastomyces Gilchrist & W.R. Stokes (1898) was an illegitimate homonym of Blastomyces Costantin & Rolland (1888) (a synonym of Chrysosporium), but has now been conserved against the earlier name because of its widespread use in clinical literature. (wikipedia.org)
  • At ambient environmental temperatures (~25 to 30 o C), Blastomyces is found in a filamentous mould form. (blogspot.com)
  • The identification of During the first 2 days in hospital, the patient was a Blastomyces sp. (cdc.gov)
  • Blastomyces lives in the environment, particularly in moist soil and in decomposing plant matter such as wood and leaves. (cdc.gov)
  • Culture of Blastomyces spp. (cdc.gov)
  • BAD 1 ( Blastomyces adhesin 1), which is a surface protein that promotes adhesion to cells in the respiratory system and modulates the immune system of the host animal. (slu.se)
  • There are no publicly available tests to detect Blastomyces in the environment. (cdc.gov)
  • Blastomyces gilchristii was confirmed as the cause of infection. (nih.gov)
  • Infection with Blastomyces occurs when a cat or dog inhales the fungal spores into the lungs. (vin.com)
  • Infection is caused by inhalation of Blastomyces from moist soil rich in organic debris. (unboundmedicine.com)
  • Intravenous fluoro- sputum specimen revealed broad-based budding yeast quinolone was administered for suspected left upper lobe with refractile cell walls characteristic of Blastomyces . (cdc.gov)
  • contained Blastomyces yeast visible on microscopy. (cdc.gov)
  • Blastomyces yeast in budding stage, as seen through a microscope. (vin.com)
  • Environmental assessments identified a river and unpaved typically occur when Blastomyces spores are inhaled. (cdc.gov)
  • A tumor-like lesion in the lung of a horse caused by a blastomyces (Torula). (nih.gov)
  • or (3) a positive Blastomyces antigen test with compatible clinical illness. (mn.us)
  • No differences in clinical manifestations have been reported among these Blastomyces species. (cdc.gov)
  • Four of the 5 patients were hospitalized, of which 3 had sputum cultures that were positive for Blastomyces sp. (cdc.gov)
  • 7 , 8 ), this molecular technology has not been used to investigate Blastomyces spp. (cdc.gov)
  • or (3) a positive Blastomyces molecular assay. (mn.us)
  • Only 1 sister was hospitalized and had a positive culture for Blastomyces sp. (cdc.gov)
  • Robbins MA, Mullen HS En Bloc Ovariohysterectomy as a Treatment for Dystocia in Dogs and Cats Veterinary Surgery 23[1]:48-52. (vetspecialty.com)
  • In Minnesota, about 1/3 of cases live and are diagnosed in a different county than where they were exposed to Blastomyces . (mn.us)
  • While most people are exposed in northern counties, or those along the Mississippi or St. Croix Rivers, this map shows that people can be exposed to Blastomyces in many counties across the state. (mn.us)