Halogenated anti-infective agent that is used against trematode and cestode infestations.
Nontoxic laxative vermicide effective for taenia infestation. It tends to produce colic and nausea. It is also used as a veterinary fungicide, anthelmintic, and antiprotozoan. (From Merck, 11th ed.)
Infections with true tapeworms of the helminth subclass CESTODA.
A chlorinated bisphenol antiseptic with a bacteriostatic action against Gram-positive organisms, but much less effective against Gram-negative organisms. It is mainly used in soaps and creams and is an ingredient of various preparations used for skin disorders. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p797)
A subclass of segmented worms comprising the tapeworms.
Agents used to treat tapeworm infestations in man or animals.
Agents, usually topical, that cause the contraction of tissues for the control of bleeding or secretions.
A water-soluble medicinal preparation applied to the skin.
A group of DITERPENES cyclized into 3-ring PHENANTHRENES.
A general term most often used to describe severe or complete loss of muscle strength due to motor system disease from the level of the cerebral cortex to the muscle fiber. This term may also occasionally refer to a loss of sensory function. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p45)
Phenanthrenes are aromatic hydrocarbons consisting of three benzene rings fused together in a linear arrangement, commonly found in various plants and some animals, and can act as precursors for certain steroid hormones or exhibit pharmacological activities with potential therapeutic uses.
'Laboratory animals' are non-human creatures that are intentionally used in scientific research, testing, and education settings to investigate physiological processes, evaluate the safety and efficacy of drugs or medical devices, and teach anatomy, surgical techniques, and other healthcare-related skills.
Derivatives of acetamide that are used as solvents, as mild irritants, and in organic synthesis.

Fasciola hepatica infestation as a very rare cause of extrahepatic cholestasis. (1/11)

Fasciola hepatica, an endemic parasite in Turkey, is still a very rare cause of cholestasis worldwide. Through ingestion of contaminated water plants like watercress, humans can become the definitive host of this parasite. Cholestatic symptoms may be sudden but in some cases they may be preceded by a long period of fever, eosinophilia and vague gastrointestinal symptoms. We report a woman with cholangitis symptoms of sudden onset which was proved to be due to Fasciola hepatica infestation by an endoscopic retrograde cholangiography.  (+info)

Slack and Slick K(Na) channels regulate the accuracy of timing of auditory neurons. (2/11)

The Slack (sequence like a calcium-activated K channel) and Slick (sequence like an intermediate conductance K channel) genes, which encode sodium-activated K+ (K(Na)) channels, are expressed at high levels in neurons of the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB) in the auditory brainstem. These neurons lock their action potentials to incoming stimuli with a high degree of temporal precision. Channels with unitary properties similar to those of Slack and/or Slick channels, which are gated by [Na+]i and [Cl-]i and by changes in cytoplasmic ATP levels, are present in MNTB neurons. Manipulations of the level of K(Na) current in MNTB neurons, either by increasing levels of internal Na+ or by exposure to a pharmacological activator of Slack channels, significantly enhance the accuracy of timing of action potentials at high frequencies of stimulation. These findings suggest that such fidelity of timing at high frequencies may be attributed in part to high-conductance K(Na) channels.  (+info)

Evaluation of marked rise in fecal egg output after bithionol administration to horse and its application as a diagnostic marker for equine Anoplocephala perfoliata infection. (3/11)

To establish a reliable diagnostic measure for equine Anoplocephala perfoliata infection, the impact of deworming was examined in 12 Thoroughbreds to which bithionol (5-10 mg/kg body weight) was administered and feces were examined by the modified Wisconsin method using sucrose solution. One day after the administration, cestode eggs were detected in previously fecal egg-negative 3 horses and increased in the other 9 horses. The optimum time for post-deworming egg detection was examined in following horses: 17 mares were administered bithionol and 10 mares were used as controls. The fecal egg count was significantly (P<0.01) higher one day after the administration than that on other pre- and post-administration days, while no significant changes occurred in fecal egg count in the controls, demonstrating that one day after bithionol administration is the optimum time for detecting fecal cestode eggs. The diagnostic deworming involving bithionol and fecal examination on the day following administration provides a reliable diagnosis for equine Anoplocephala perfoliata infection.  (+info)

Novel inhibitors complexed with glutamate dehydrogenase: allosteric regulation by control of protein dynamics. (4/11)

 (+info)

Phosphorylation of histone H2AX is a powerful tool for detecting chemical photogenotoxicity. (5/11)

 (+info)

Involvement of autotaxin/lysophospholipase D expression in intestinal vessels in aggravation of intestinal damage through lymphocyte migration. (6/11)

 (+info)

Rapid identification of antifungal compounds against Exserohilum rostratum using high throughput drug repurposing screens. (7/11)

 (+info)

In vitro inhibition of Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis growth by bithionol, dichlorophene, and hexachlorophene. (8/11)

Bithionol, dichlorophene, and hexachlorophene, which are used in treating some helminthic infections, killed trophozoites of Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis in modified BI-S-33 and Asami media, respectively. Virtually all G. lamblia and T. vaginalis cells were killed within 24 h with a 0.42 mM concentration of these compounds, except that 0.93 mM dichlorophene was required for sterilizing T. vaginalis in the same period. In modified BI-S-33 and Asami media from which bovine and human sera were omitted, respectively, the inhibitory actions of the compounds against in vitro growth of these protozoa were significantly enhanced. Trophozoites of G. lamblia and T. vaginalis could be killed in shorter than 10 min with 0.074 mM dichlorophene and 0.0025 mM hexachlorophene, respectively, in serum-free media. G. lamblia, which was incubated in the complete medium containing dichlorophene, showed a characteristic swelling of the ventral side which led to disruption of the parasite, whereas bithionol caused a thin crack in the cytoplasm of T. vaginalis incubated in Asami medium. The crack appeared to enlarge and result in vacuolization of T. vaginalis. These observations suggest that bithionol, dichlorophene, and hexachlorophene merit further evaluation to ascertain whether they are useful for treatment of giardiasis and trichomoniasis.  (+info)

Bithionol is an oral antiparasitic medication that has been used to treat infections caused by certain types of tapeworms, such as Paragonimus westermani (lung fluke) and Fasciolopsis buski (intestinal fluke). It works by inhibiting the metabolic processes of the parasites, which helps to eliminate them from the body.

Bithionol is no longer commonly used due to the availability of safer and more effective antiparasitic drugs. Its use may be associated with several side effects, including nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, dizziness, and skin rashes. In some cases, it may also cause liver damage or allergic reactions.

It is important to note that bithionol should only be used under the supervision of a healthcare professional, as its use requires careful monitoring and dosage adjustment based on the patient's response to treatment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Dichlorophen" is not a medical term or a widely recognized pharmacological agent in clinical use. It might be referring to certain chemical compounds that contain dichlorophenyl groups, which are used in various industrial applications and pesticides. However, these are not typically used in medical contexts.

If you have any more specific information about the term or its context, I'd be happy to help further!

Cestode infections, also known as tapeworm infections, are caused by the ingestion of larval cestodes (tapeworms) present in undercooked meat or contaminated water. The most common types of cestode infections in humans include:

1. Taeniasis: This is an infection with the adult tapeworm of the genus Taenia, such as Taenia saginata (beef tapeworm) and Taenia solium (pork tapeworm). Humans become infected by consuming undercooked beef or pork that contains viable tapeworm larvae. The larvae then mature into adult tapeworms in the human intestine, where they can live for several years, producing eggs that are passed in the feces.
2. Hydatid disease: This is a zoonotic infection caused by the larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus, which is commonly found in dogs and other carnivores. Humans become infected by accidentally ingesting eggs present in dog feces or contaminated food or water. The eggs hatch in the human intestine and release larvae that migrate to various organs, such as the liver or lungs, where they form hydatid cysts. These cysts can grow slowly over several years and cause symptoms depending on their location and size.
3. Diphyllobothriasis: This is an infection with the fish tapeworm Diphyllobothrium latum, which is found in freshwater fish. Humans become infected by consuming raw or undercooked fish that contain viable tapeworm larvae. The larvae mature into adult tapeworms in the human intestine and can cause symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhea, and vitamin B12 deficiency.

Preventing cestode infections involves practicing good hygiene, cooking meat thoroughly, avoiding consumption of raw or undercooked fish, and washing fruits and vegetables carefully before eating. In some cases, treatment with antiparasitic drugs may be necessary to eliminate the tapeworms from the body.

Hexachlorophene is a synthetic antimicrobial compound, historically used for its broad-spectrum bacteriostatic properties. Its medical definition is as a white crystalline powder with a slight characteristic odor, soluble in alcohol, chloroform, and ether, and sparingly soluble in water. It has been used as a topical antiseptic and surgical scrub for its effectiveness against gram-positive bacteria, some fungi, and viruses. However, due to concerns about neurotoxicity, particularly in infants, its use is now largely restricted to medical applications that require extensive sterilization, such as certain types of wound care.

Cestoda is a class of parasitic worms belonging to the phylum Platyhelminthes, also known as flatworms. Cestodes are commonly known as tapeworms and have a long, flat, segmented body that can grow to considerable length in their adult form. They lack a digestive system and absorb nutrients through their body surface.

Cestodes have a complex life cycle involving one or two intermediate hosts, usually insects or crustaceans, and a definitive host, which is typically a mammal, including humans. The tapeworm's larval stage develops in the intermediate host, and when the definitive host consumes the infected intermediate host, the larvae mature into adults in the host's intestine.

Humans can become infected with tapeworms by eating raw or undercooked meat from infected animals or through accidental ingestion of contaminated water or food containing tapeworm eggs or larvae. Infection with tapeworms can cause various symptoms, including abdominal pain, diarrhea, weight loss, and vitamin deficiencies.

Anticestodal agents are a type of medication used to treat infections caused by tapeworms (cestodes) and other related parasites. These agents work by either stunting the growth or killing the parasites, which allows the body to expel them naturally. Common anticestodal agents include niclosamide, praziquantel, and albendazole. It is important to note that proper diagnosis of the specific type of tapeworm infection is necessary for effective treatment, as different medications may be more or less effective against certain species.

Astringents are substances that cause the contraction of body tissues, particularly the skin and mucous membranes. They have the ability to shrink or constrict proteins in the skin or mucous membrane, leading to a tightening effect. This is often used in various medical and cosmetic applications.

In a medical context, astringents are often used to:

1. Dry up weeping or oozing wounds or sores.
2. Reduce local inflammation.
3. Control bleeding from minor cuts or wounds by constricting the blood vessels.

Commonly used astringent substances include tannins, found in plants like oak bark and witch hazel, as well as aluminum salts, found in some antiperspirants. Astringents are often applied topically in the form of lotions, gels, or solutions. However, they can also be used systemically, although this is less common.

It's important to note that while astringents have therapeutic uses, they can also cause skin irritation and dryness if not used properly. Therefore, it's recommended to follow the instructions provided by a healthcare professional or as directed on the product label.

A skin cream is not a medical term per se, but it generally refers to a topical emollient preparation intended for application to the skin. It contains a mixture of water, oil, and active ingredients, which are formulated to provide various benefits such as moisturizing, protecting, soothing, or treating specific skin conditions. The exact definition and composition may vary depending on the product's intended use and formulation.

Examples of active ingredients in skin creams include:

1. Moisturizers (e.g., glycerin, hyaluronic acid) - help to retain water in the skin, making it feel softer and smoother.
2. Emollients (e.g., shea butter, coconut oil, petrolatum) - provide a protective barrier that helps prevent moisture loss and soften the skin.
3. Humectants (e.g., urea, lactic acid, alpha-hydroxy acids) - attract water from the environment or deeper layers of the skin to hydrate the surface.
4. Anti-inflammatory agents (e.g., hydrocortisone, aloe vera) - help reduce redness, swelling, and itching associated with various skin conditions.
5. Antioxidants (e.g., vitamin C, vitamin E, green tea extract) - protect the skin from free radical damage and environmental stressors that can lead to premature aging.
6. Sunscreen agents (e.g., zinc oxide, titanium dioxide, chemical filters) - provide broad-spectrum protection against UVA and UVB rays.
7. Skin lighteners (e.g., hydroquinone, kojic acid, arbutin) - help reduce the appearance of hyperpigmentation and even out skin tone.
8. Acne treatments (e.g., benzoyl peroxide, salicylic acid, retinoids) - target acne-causing bacteria, unclog pores, and regulate cell turnover to prevent breakouts.

It is essential to choose a skin cream based on your specific skin type and concerns, as well as any medical conditions or allergies you may have. Always consult with a dermatologist or healthcare provider before starting a new skincare regimen.

Abietanes are a subclass of diterpenes, which are a type of organic compound consisting of four isoprene units and having the chemical formula C20H32. Diterpenes are synthesized by a wide variety of plants and some animals, and they have diverse biological activities.

Abietanes are characterized by a distinctive carbon skeleton that contains three six-membered rings arranged in a linear fashion, with the fourth ring being a five-membered ring. This particular structure is derived from geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), a precursor to many diterpenes.

Abietanes are found in various natural sources, including pine resin, where they exist as resin acids such as abietic acid, pimaric acid, and isopimaric acid. These compounds have been studied for their potential medicinal properties, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and anticancer activities. However, more research is needed to fully understand the therapeutic potential of abietanes and to develop safe and effective treatments based on these compounds.

Paralysis is a loss of muscle function in part or all of your body. It can be localized, affecting only one specific area, or generalized, impacting multiple areas or even the entire body. Paralysis often occurs when something goes wrong with the way messages pass between your brain and muscles. In most cases, paralysis is caused by damage to the nervous system, especially the spinal cord. Other causes include stroke, trauma, infections, and various neurological disorders.

It's important to note that paralysis doesn't always mean a total loss of movement or feeling. Sometimes, it may just cause weakness or numbness in the affected area. The severity and extent of paralysis depend on the underlying cause and the location of the damage in the nervous system.

Phenanthrenes are not typically defined in a medical context, but they are a class of organic compounds that have a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon structure consisting of three benzene rings fused together. They can be found in some natural products and have been studied for their potential pharmacological properties. Some phenanthrenes have shown anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and cytotoxic activities, among others. However, more research is needed to fully understand their therapeutic potential and safety profile.

'Laboratory animals' are defined as non-human creatures that are used in scientific research and experiments to study various biological phenomena, develop new medical treatments and therapies, test the safety and efficacy of drugs, medical devices, and other products. These animals are kept under controlled conditions in laboratory settings and are typically purpose-bred for research purposes.

The use of laboratory animals is subject to strict regulations and guidelines to ensure their humane treatment and welfare. The most commonly used species include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, dogs, cats, non-human primates, and fish. Other less common species may also be used depending on the specific research question being studied.

The primary goal of using laboratory animals in research is to advance our understanding of basic biological processes and develop new medical treatments that can improve human and animal health. However, it is important to note that the use of animals in research remains a controversial topic due to ethical concerns regarding their welfare and potential for suffering.

Acetamides are organic compounds that contain an acetamide functional group, which is a combination of an acetyl group (-COCH3) and an amide functional group (-CONH2). The general structure of an acetamide is R-CO-NH-CH3, where R represents the rest of the molecule.

Acetamides are found in various medications, including some pain relievers, muscle relaxants, and anticonvulsants. They can also be found in certain industrial chemicals and are used as intermediates in the synthesis of other organic compounds.

It is important to note that exposure to high levels of acetamides can be harmful and may cause symptoms such as headache, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. Chronic exposure has been linked to more serious health effects, including liver and kidney damage. Therefore, handling and use of acetamides should be done with appropriate safety precautions.

... was formerly used in soaps and cosmetics until the U.S. FDA banned it for its photosensitizing effects. The compound ... Bithionol has two aromatic rings with a sulfur atom bonded between them and multiple chlorine ions and hydroxyl groups attached ... Bithionol is the first known soluble adenylyl cyclase inhibitor to act through the bicarbonate binding site via a mostly ... Bithionol is an antibacterial, anthelmintic, and algaecide. It is used to treat Anoplocephala perfoliata (tapeworms) in horses ...
Bithionol for human therapeutic use. Bragantia spp. containing aristolochic acid(s) for human therapeutic use. Buclosamide for ...
Praziquantel is not effective, and older drugs such as bithionol are moderately effective but also cause more side effects. ... There are also reports of bithionol being used successfully. Nitazoxanide has been found effective in trials, but is currently ... Fasciolicides (drugs against Fasciola spp.) fall into five main chemical groups: Halogenated phenols: bithionol (Bitin), ...
Drugs used to treat infestation include triclabendazole, praziquantel, bithionol, albendazole, levamisole, and mebendazole. ...
The drug of choice to treat paragonimiasis is praziquantel, although bithionol may also be used. Triclabendazole is useful in P ...
... and bithionol. Ivermectin, which is widely used for many helminthic parasites, has low effectivity against F. hepatica, as does ...
Other medications can also be used such as bithionol, niclofan, and triclabendazole with high cure rates.[citation needed] ...
To obtain the worms from the host, piperazine citrate, levamisole and bithionol can be administered to the patient. ...
Bithionol is an alternative drug for treatment of this disease but is associated with skin rashes and urticaria. For additional ...
100 mg bithionol/kg B.W. or 200 mg bithionol/kg B.W. significantly reduces the numbers of this monogenean on the gills of the ... Ki Hong Kim & Eun Seok Choi evaluated the oral administration of mebendazole or bithionol for the control of Microcotyle ... with oral administration of mebendazole and bithionol". Aquaculture. 167 (1-2): 115-121. doi:10.1016/S0044-8486(98)00300-7. ...
... including bithionol, niclosamide, nicoflan, and Praziquantel. All drugs showed lower prevalence of eggs in feces, however only ...
Three 2-g doses of niclosamide or two 50 mg/kg doses of bithionol have also been effective when praziquantel was either not ...
... unlike the previously used drug bithionol, which required extended treatment and involved more severe side effects. The latest ...
On the other hand, there are other antihelminthic drugs available such as bithionol, thiabendazole, metronidazole, and others, ...
Several compounds of well-known antiprotozoal activity, including niclosamide, oxyclozanide, bithionol sulfoxide, toltrazuril, ...
D10AA01 Fluorometholone D10AA02 Methylprednisolone D10AA03 Dexamethasone D10AB01 Bithionol D10AB02 Sulfur D10AB03 Tioxolone ...
... bithionol (INN) bithionoloxide (INN) bitipazone (INN) bitolterol (INN) bitoscanate (INN) bivalirudin (INN) bivatuzumab ...
Examples of such sodium salts are (selection): Bispyribac, bithionol, bosentan, brequinar, bromfenac, Cefmenoxime, ceftiofur, ...
... mucolytic compounds such as L-cysteine ethyl ester and the parasiticide bithionol have been tested with some success although ...
The molecular formula C12H6Cl4O2S (molar mass: 356.05 g/mol, exact mass: 353.8843 u) may refer to: Bithionol Tetradifon This ...
... fungicides benzohydroxamic acid benzovindiflupyr berberine bethoxazin bifujunzhi binapacryl biphenyl bitertanol bithionol ...
QP52AG02 Hexachlorophene QP52AG03 Niclosamide QP52AG04 Resorantel QP52AG05 Rafoxanide QP52AG06 Oxyclozanide QP52AG07 Bithionol ...
P02BA01 Praziquantel P02BA02 Oxamniquine P02BB01 Metrifonate P02BX01 Bithionol P02BX02 Niridazole P02BX03 Stibophen P02BX04 ...
Bithionol was formerly used in soaps and cosmetics until the U.S. FDA banned it for its photosensitizing effects. The compound ... Bithionol has two aromatic rings with a sulfur atom bonded between them and multiple chlorine ions and hydroxyl groups attached ... Bithionol is the first known soluble adenylyl cyclase inhibitor to act through the bicarbonate binding site via a mostly ... Bithionol is an antibacterial, anthelmintic, and algaecide. It is used to treat Anoplocephala perfoliata (tapeworms) in horses ...
... : The Cure for Paragonimiasis. Bithionol Sulfoxide , By: Admin , Last Updated: March, 06, 2020 ... Bithionol and Bithionol Sulfoxide have been used extensively for cure and research related to parasitology which includes ...
Bithionol. Evidence-based: No. Bithionol is an antibacterial ingredient found in some detergents, creams, and lotions. Its ...
In this in vitro study, we evaluated the antitumor efficacy of cisplatin in combination with Bithionol (BT) against a panel of ... Ayyagari, V.N., Hsieh, Th.J., Diaz-Sylvester, P.L. et al. Evaluation of the cytotoxicity of the Bithionol - cisplatin ... In this in vitro study, we evaluated the antitumor efficacy of cisplatin in combination with Bithionol (BT) against a panel of ... Evaluation of the cytotoxicity of the Bithionol - cisplatin combination in a panel of human ovarian cancer cell lines. * ...
Bithionol / Chlorhexidine / Hexachlorophene. Artificial sweeteners. Calcium cyclamate / Cyclamates / Sodium cyclohexylsulfamate ...
Which is better bithionol or bithionol sulfoxide?? by dpk 10 years ago 1,722 Parasites Support ... Re: Which is better bithionol or bithionol sulfoxi... by dpk 10 years ago 1,376 Parasites Support ... Bithionol is tolerated well. by dpk 4 years ago 148 Parasites: RX ...
Bithionol, 100 G. Biochemicals , Biochemical Reagents , Biochemical Reagents (A - D) Substance Name:CP 3438; NSC 9872; NSC ... Bithionol, 25 G. Biochemicals , Biochemical Reagents , Biochemical Reagents (A - D) Substance Name:CP 3438; NSC 9872; NSC 47129 ...
bithionol Bitin (Tanabe, Japan) Bitin (Tanabe, Japan) bithionol Brolene (Aventis, Canada) propamidine isethionate chloroquine ... bithionol (Lorothidol , Bitin ) *pyrethroids are used in insecticide treated net (ITN) and in "zampirone" spirals (from the ...
These prohibited substances include bithionol, chloroform, mercury compounds, methylene chloride, vinyl chloride, and ...
... bithionol, dichlorophen, diphenylamine, hexachlorophene, parinol); carbamate fungicides (benthiavalicarb, furophanate, iodocarb ...
For instance, usage of methylene chloride, Bithionol, and significant chemicals are banned from being used in personal care ...
... bithionol) inhibition stopped after 72 hours of 5% O2 hypoxia, and respiration was fully recovered. As a result, the glycolysis ... or AOA combined with the glutamatedehydrogenase inhibitor Bithionol reduced OXPHOS cell respiration to 15% and 10%, ...
Bithionol Sulfoxide 2000 mg. * ALBENMEC MINI. * Albendazole forte. * ALBENMEC. * Albendazole Tablets 152mg. ...
... including bithionol, Chlorofluorcarbon propellants, vinyl chloride and nearly 1,000 other ingredients that the European Union ...
ALBENDAZOLE AMPHOTALIDE ANTHIOLIMINE ANTIMONIATE DE MEGLUMINE BEPHENIUM HYDROXYNAPHTOATE BISMUTH CARBONATE BASIQUE BITHIONOL ...
Bithionol: Used as a germicide in creams. May cause sensitivity to light, skin rashes and swelling.This germicide is closely ...
The FDA also prohibits and restricts certain ingredients when it comes to cosmetics, including bithionol, mercury compounds, ...
Dive into the research topics where Juan Francisco Rivera Medina is active. These topic labels come from the works of this person. Together they form a unique fingerprint ...
bithionol sulfone. *cbmicro_009341. *oprea1_165919. *oxichloron. *phenol, 2,2-sulfonylbis(4,6-dichloro- ...
Bithionol Sulphoxide. Bimatorpost. Bronopol BP. Butamben USP. Betamethasone. Betamethasone Valerate. Betamethasone dipropionate ...
Moltus Research Laboratories is leading Manufacturer,Exporter,Supplier company of Malonate Derivatives based in Boisar, Maharashtra, India
Bithionol is alternate treatment. Epidemiology. *Humans or other mammals are definitive host ...
Bithionol is used in de-worming animals. Narasin is an uncommon antibiotic. Tribromsalan is used externally as an antiseptic. ... These include emetine, fluorosalan, sunitinib malate, bithionol, narasin, tribromsalan, and lestaurtinib. Emetine (as the name ...
B-014 Bithionol 1.0% pet NAP-17 B-041 B-041 Benzydamine hydrochloride 2.0% pet EP-18 ...
Re: How to mix bithionol for ingestion? by BrightSideOfLife 20 months ago 374 Parasites: RX ...
Structure of glutamate dehydrogenase complexed with bithionol *Links data. *Chain information summary ...
The first three cases responded satisfactorily to treatment with bithionol; the fourth patient died because of systemic failure ... The first three cases responded satisfactorily to treatment with bithionol; the fourth patient died because of systemic failure ... The first three cases responded satisfactorily to treatment with bithionol; the fourth patient died because of systemic failure ... The first three cases responded satisfactorily to treatment with bithionol; the fourth patient died because of systemic failure ...
Some other treatments for Fascioliasis that are effective are the bithionol and nitazoxanide. Furthermore, a short course of ...
  • Bithionol and Bithionol Sulfoxide have been used extensively for cure and research related to parasitology which includes fasciol. (moltuslab.com)
  • EWG's Skin Deep Database notes that "cosmetics companies may use any ingredient or raw material in their products without government review or approval," including bithionol, Chlorofluorcarbon propellants, vinyl chloride and nearly 1,000 other ingredients that the European Union has banned. (kaightshop.com)
  • citation needed] This inhibition of the soluble adenylyl cyclase by bithionol at the bicarbonate binding site is demonstrated through a mixed-inhibition graph, where higher concentrations of bithionol have a lower Vmax and a larger Km. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bithionol has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of soluble adenylyl cyclase, an intracellular enzyme important in the catalysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). (wikipedia.org)
  • Arginine 176 usually interacts with the ATP and other catalytic ions at the active site, so when it turns from its normal position to interact with the bithionol inhibitor, it no longer functions in keeping the ATP bound to the active site. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bithionol is the first known soluble adenylyl cyclase inhibitor to act through the bicarbonate binding site via a mostly allosteric mechanism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bithionol was formerly used in soaps and cosmetics until the U.S. FDA banned it for its photosensitizing effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evaluation of marked rise in fecal egg output after bithionol administration to horse and its application as a diagnostic marker for equine Anoplocephala perfoliata infection" (pdf). (wikipedia.org)
  • Arginine 176 usually interacts with the ATP and other catalytic ions at the active site, so when it turns from its normal position to interact with the bithionol inhibitor, it no longer functions in keeping the ATP bound to the active site. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bithionol, a halogenated phenol previously used as first line agent for the treatment of fascioliasis in USA is no longer available. (medscape.com)
  • Treatment options are limited, with older effective therapies such as emetine and bithionol no longer used due to safety issues and unavailability, and most common anthelminthics having poor efficacy. (nih.gov)