Dengue: An acute febrile disease transmitted by the bite of AEDES mosquitoes infected with DENGUE VIRUS. It is self-limiting and characterized by fever, myalgia, headache, and rash. SEVERE DENGUE is a more virulent form of dengue.Dengue Virus: A species of the genus FLAVIVIRUS which causes an acute febrile and sometimes hemorrhagic disease in man. Dengue is mosquito-borne and four serotypes are known.Walkers: Walking aids generally having two handgrips and four legs.Carcinoma 256, Walker: A transplantable carcinoma of the rat that originally appeared spontaneously in the mammary gland of a pregnant albino rat, and which now resembles a carcinoma in young transplants and a sarcoma in older transplants. (Stedman, 25th ed)Severe Dengue: A virulent form of dengue characterized by THROMBOCYTOPENIA and an increase in vascular permeability (grades I and II) and distinguished by a positive pain test (e.g., TOURNIQUET PAIN TEST). When accompanied by SHOCK (grades III and IV), it is called dengue shock syndrome.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Dengue Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent infection with DENGUE VIRUS. These include live-attenuated, subunit, DNA, and inactivated vaccines.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Aedes: A genus of mosquitoes (CULICIDAE) frequently found in tropical and subtropical regions. YELLOW FEVER and DENGUE are two of the diseases that can be transmitted by species of this genus.Premature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).Infant Equipment: Equipment and furniture used by infants and babies in the home, car, and play area.Birth Rate: The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.Down Syndrome: A chromosome disorder associated either with an extra chromosome 21 or an effective trisomy for chromosome 21. Clinical manifestations include hypotonia, short stature, brachycephaly, upslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthus, Brushfield spots on the iris, protruding tongue, small ears, short, broad hands, fifth finger clinodactyly, Simian crease, and moderate to severe INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY. Cardiac and gastrointestinal malformations, a marked increase in the incidence of LEUKEMIA, and the early onset of ALZHEIMER DISEASE are also associated with this condition. Pathologic features include the development of NEUROFIBRILLARY TANGLES in neurons and the deposition of AMYLOID BETA-PROTEIN, similar to the pathology of ALZHEIMER DISEASE. (Menkes, Textbook of Child Neurology, 5th ed, p213)Infant, Low Birth Weight: An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.Metabolic Syndrome X: A cluster of metabolic risk factors for CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES and TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS. The major components of metabolic syndrome X include excess ABDOMINAL FAT; atherogenic DYSLIPIDEMIA; HYPERTENSION; HYPERGLYCEMIA; INSULIN RESISTANCE; a proinflammatory state; and a prothrombotic (THROMBOSIS) state. (from AHA/NHLBI/ADA Conference Proceedings, Circulation 2004; 109:551-556)Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Nephrotic Syndrome: A condition characterized by severe PROTEINURIA, greater than 3.5 g/day in an average adult. The substantial loss of protein in the urine results in complications such as HYPOPROTEINEMIA; generalized EDEMA; HYPERTENSION; and HYPERLIPIDEMIAS. Diseases associated with nephrotic syndrome generally cause chronic kidney dysfunction.Orthopedic Equipment: Nonexpendable items used in the performance of orthopedic surgery and related therapy. They are differentiated from ORTHOTIC DEVICES, apparatus used to prevent or correct deformities in patients.Birth Order: The sequence in which children are born into the family.Birth Certificates: Official certifications by a physician recording the individual's birth date, place of birth, parentage and other required identifying data which are filed with the local registrar of vital statistics.Sjogren's Syndrome: Chronic inflammatory and autoimmune disease in which the salivary and lacrimal glands undergo progressive destruction by lymphocytes and plasma cells resulting in decreased production of saliva and tears. The primary form, often called sicca syndrome, involves both KERATOCONJUNCTIVITIS SICCA and XEROSTOMIA. The secondary form includes, in addition, the presence of a connective tissue disease, usually rheumatoid arthritis.Insect Vectors: Insects that transmit infective organisms from one host to another or from an inanimate reservoir to an animate host.Antibodies, Viral: Immunoglobulins produced in response to VIRAL ANTIGENS.Walking: An activity in which the body advances at a slow to moderate pace by moving the feet in a coordinated fashion. This includes recreational walking, walking for fitness, and competitive race-walking.Turner Syndrome: A syndrome of defective gonadal development in phenotypic females associated with the karyotype 45,X (or 45,XO). Patients generally are of short stature with undifferentiated GONADS (streak gonads), SEXUAL INFANTILISM, HYPOGONADISM, webbing of the neck, cubitus valgus, elevated GONADOTROPINS, decreased ESTRADIOL level in blood, and CONGENITAL HEART DEFECTS. NOONAN SYNDROME (also called Pseudo-Turner Syndrome and Male Turner Syndrome) resembles this disorder; however, it occurs in males and females with a normal karyotype and is inherited as an autosomal dominant.Abnormalities, MultipleCanes: Sticks used as walking aids. The canes may have three or four prongs at the end of the shaft.Thailand: Formerly known as Siam, this is a Southeast Asian nation at the center of the Indochina peninsula. Bangkok is the capital city.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Culicidae: A family of the order DIPTERA that comprises the mosquitoes. The larval stages are aquatic, and the adults can be recognized by the characteristic WINGS, ANIMAL venation, the scales along the wing veins, and the long proboscis. Many species are of particular medical importance.Myelodysplastic Syndromes: Clonal hematopoietic stem cell disorders characterized by dysplasia in one or more hematopoietic cell lineages. They predominantly affect patients over 60, are considered preleukemic conditions, and have high probability of transformation into ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Cushing Syndrome: A condition caused by prolonged exposure to excess levels of cortisol (HYDROCORTISONE) or other GLUCOCORTICOIDS from endogenous or exogenous sources. It is characterized by upper body OBESITY; OSTEOPOROSIS; HYPERTENSION; DIABETES MELLITUS; HIRSUTISM; AMENORRHEA; and excess body fluid. Endogenous Cushing syndrome or spontaneous hypercortisolism is divided into two groups, those due to an excess of ADRENOCORTICOTROPIN and those that are ACTH-independent.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.NicaraguaAntibody-Dependent Enhancement: Enhancement of viral infectivity caused by non-neutralizing antibodies. There are at least two mechanisms known to account for this: mediation by Fc receptors (RECEPTORS, FC) or by complement receptors (RECEPTORS, COMPLEMENT). Either the virus is complexed with antiviral IMMUNOGLOBULIN G and binds to Fc receptors, or virus is coated with antiviral IMMUNOGLOBULIN M and binds to complement receptors.Aprindine: A class Ib anti-arrhythmia agent used to manage ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias.Viral Nonstructural Proteins: Proteins encoded by a VIRAL GENOME that are produced in the organisms they infect, but not packaged into the VIRUS PARTICLES. Some of these proteins may play roles within the infected cell during VIRUS REPLICATION or act in regulation of virus replication or VIRUS ASSEMBLY.Acute Coronary Syndrome: An episode of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA that generally lasts longer than a transient anginal episode that ultimately may lead to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Birth Intervals: The lengths of intervals between births to women in the population.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.VietnamWilliams Syndrome: A disorder caused by hemizygous microdeletion of about 28 genes on chromosome 7q11.23, including the ELASTIN gene. Clinical manifestations include SUPRAVALVULAR AORTIC STENOSIS; MENTAL RETARDATION; elfin facies; impaired visuospatial constructive abilities; and transient HYPERCALCEMIA in infancy. The condition affects both sexes, with onset at birth or in early infancy.DiGeorge Syndrome: Congenital syndrome characterized by a wide spectrum of characteristics including the absence of the THYMUS and PARATHYROID GLANDS resulting in T-cell immunodeficiency, HYPOCALCEMIA, defects in the outflow tract of the heart, and craniofacial anomalies.Gait: Manner or style of walking.Guillain-Barre Syndrome: An acute inflammatory autoimmune neuritis caused by T cell- mediated cellular immune response directed towards peripheral myelin. Demyelination occurs in peripheral nerves and nerve roots. The process is often preceded by a viral or bacterial infection, surgery, immunization, lymphoma, or exposure to toxins. Common clinical manifestations include progressive weakness, loss of sensation, and loss of deep tendon reflexes. Weakness of respiratory muscles and autonomic dysfunction may occur. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1312-1314)Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Arabinofuranosylcytosine Triphosphate: A triphosphate nucleotide analog which is the biologically active form of CYTARABINE. It inhibits nuclear DNA synthesis.Horner Syndrome: A syndrome associated with defective sympathetic innervation to one side of the face, including the eye. Clinical features include MIOSIS; mild BLEPHAROPTOSIS; and hemifacial ANHIDROSIS (decreased sweating)(see HYPOHIDROSIS). Lesions of the BRAIN STEM; cervical SPINAL CORD; first thoracic nerve root; apex of the LUNG; CAROTID ARTERY; CAVERNOUS SINUS; and apex of the ORBIT may cause this condition. (From Miller et al., Clinical Neuro-Ophthalmology, 4th ed, pp500-11)Long QT Syndrome: A condition that is characterized by episodes of fainting (SYNCOPE) and varying degree of ventricular arrhythmia as indicated by the prolonged QT interval. The inherited forms are caused by mutation of genes encoding cardiac ion channel proteins. The two major forms are ROMANO-WARD SYNDROME and JERVELL-LANGE NIELSEN SYNDROME.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Immunoglobulin M: A class of immunoglobulin bearing mu chains (IMMUNOGLOBULIN MU-CHAINS). IgM can fix COMPLEMENT. The name comes from its high molecular weight and originally being called a macroglobulin.BrazilMaternal Age: The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.Birth Injuries: Mechanical or anoxic trauma incurred by the infant during labor or delivery.Flavivirus: A genus of FLAVIVIRIDAE containing several subgroups and many species. Most are arboviruses transmitted by mosquitoes or ticks. The type species is YELLOW FEVER VIRUS.Congenital Abnormalities: Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.Mosquito Control: The reduction or regulation of the population of mosquitoes through chemical, biological, or other means.Self-Help Devices: Devices, not affixed to the body, designed to help persons having musculoskeletal or neuromuscular disabilities to perform activities involving movement.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Serotyping: Process of determining and distinguishing species of bacteria or viruses based on antigens they share.Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome: A syndrome that is associated with microvascular diseases of the KIDNEY, such as RENAL CORTICAL NECROSIS. It is characterized by hemolytic anemia (ANEMIA, HEMOLYTIC); THROMBOCYTOPENIA; and ACUTE RENAL FAILURE.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Crutches: Wooden or metal staffs designed to aid a person in walking. (UMDNS,1999)Compartment Syndromes: Conditions in which increased pressure within a limited space compromises the BLOOD CIRCULATION and function of tissue within that space. Some of the causes of increased pressure are TRAUMA, tight dressings, HEMORRHAGE, and exercise. Sequelae include nerve compression (NERVE COMPRESSION SYNDROMES); PARALYSIS; and ISCHEMIC CONTRACTURE.Tourette Syndrome: A neuropsychological disorder related to alterations in DOPAMINE metabolism and neurotransmission involving frontal-subcortical neuronal circuits. Both multiple motor and one or more vocal tics need to be present with TICS occurring many times a day, nearly daily, over a period of more than one year. The onset is before age 18 and the disturbance is not due to direct physiological effects of a substance or a another medical condition. The disturbance causes marked distress or significant impairment in social, occupational, or other important areas of functioning. (From DSM-IV, 1994; Neurol Clin 1997 May;15(2):357-79)Antiphospholipid Syndrome: The presence of antibodies directed against phospholipids (ANTIBODIES, ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID). The condition is associated with a variety of diseases, notably systemic lupus erythematosus and other connective tissue diseases, thrombopenia, and arterial or venous thromboses. In pregnancy it can cause abortion. Of the phospholipids, the cardiolipins show markedly elevated levels of anticardiolipin antibodies (ANTIBODIES, ANTICARDIOLIPIN). Present also are high levels of lupus anticoagulant (LUPUS COAGULATION INHIBITOR).Balsams: Resinous substances which most commonly originate from trees. In addition to resins, they contain oils, cinnamic acid and BENZOIC ACID.Klinefelter Syndrome: A form of male HYPOGONADISM, characterized by the presence of an extra X CHROMOSOME, small TESTES, seminiferous tubule dysgenesis, elevated levels of GONADOTROPINS, low serum TESTOSTERONE, underdeveloped secondary sex characteristics, and male infertility (INFERTILITY, MALE). Patients tend to have long legs and a slim, tall stature. GYNECOMASTIA is present in many of the patients. The classic form has the karyotype 47,XXY. Several karyotype variants include 48,XXYY; 48,XXXY; 49,XXXXY, and mosaic patterns ( 46,XY/47,XXY; 47,XXY/48,XXXY, etc.).Multiple Birth Offspring: The offspring in multiple pregnancies (PREGNANCY, MULTIPLE): TWINS; TRIPLETS; QUADRUPLETS; QUINTUPLETS; etc.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Adenosine Triphosphate: An adenine nucleotide containing three phosphate groups esterified to the sugar moiety. In addition to its crucial roles in metabolism adenosine triphosphate is a neurotransmitter.Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay: An immunoassay utilizing an antibody labeled with an enzyme marker such as horseradish peroxidase. While either the enzyme or the antibody is bound to an immunosorbent substrate, they both retain their biologic activity; the change in enzyme activity as a result of the enzyme-antibody-antigen reaction is proportional to the concentration of the antigen and can be measured spectrophotometrically or with the naked eye. Many variations of the method have been developed.Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by outbreaks of late term abortions, high numbers of stillbirths and mummified or weak newborn piglets, and respiratory disease in young unweaned and weaned pigs. It is caused by PORCINE RESPIRATORY AND REPRODUCTIVE SYNDROME VIRUS. (Radostits et al., Veterinary Medicine, 8th ed, p1048)Adenosine Triphosphatases: A group of enzymes which catalyze the hydrolysis of ATP. The hydrolysis reaction is usually coupled with another function such as transporting Ca(2+) across a membrane. These enzymes may be dependent on Ca(2+), Mg(2+), anions, H+, or DNA.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Puerto Rico: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies. Its capital is San Juan. It is a self-governing commonwealth in union with the United States. It was discovered by Columbus in 1493 but no colonization was attempted until 1508. It belonged to Spain until ceded to the United States in 1898. It became a commonwealth with autonomy in internal affairs in 1952. Columbus named the island San Juan for St. John's Day, the Monday he arrived, and the bay Puerto Rico, rich harbor. The island became Puerto Rico officially in 1932. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p987 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p436)Amino Acid Motifs: Commonly observed structural components of proteins formed by simple combinations of adjacent secondary structures. A commonly observed structure may be composed of a CONSERVED SEQUENCE which can be represented by a CONSENSUS SEQUENCE.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Entrapment of the MEDIAN NERVE in the carpal tunnel, which is formed by the flexor retinaculum and the CARPAL BONES. This syndrome may be associated with repetitive occupational trauma (CUMULATIVE TRAUMA DISORDERS); wrist injuries; AMYLOID NEUROPATHIES; rheumatoid arthritis (see ARTHRITIS, RHEUMATOID); ACROMEGALY; PREGNANCY; and other conditions. Symptoms include burning pain and paresthesias involving the ventral surface of the hand and fingers which may radiate proximally. Impairment of sensation in the distribution of the median nerve and thenar muscle atrophy may occur. (Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1995, Ch51, p45)Werner Syndrome: An autosomal recessive disorder that causes premature aging in adults, characterized by sclerodermal skin changes, cataracts, subcutaneous calcification, muscular atrophy, a tendency to diabetes mellitus, aged appearance of the face, baldness, and a high incidence of neoplastic disease.Reye Syndrome: A form of encephalopathy with fatty infiltration of the LIVER, characterized by brain EDEMA and VOMITING that may rapidly progress to SEIZURES; COMA; and DEATH. It is caused by a generalized loss of mitochondrial function leading to disturbances in fatty acid and CARNITINE metabolism.Travel: Aspects of health and disease related to travel.Bartter Syndrome: A group of disorders caused by defective salt reabsorption in the ascending LOOP OF HENLE. It is characterized by severe salt-wasting, HYPOKALEMIA; HYPERCALCIURIA; metabolic ALKALOSIS, and hyper-reninemic HYPERALDOSTERONISM without HYPERTENSION. There are several subtypes including ones due to mutations in the renal specific SODIUM-POTASSIUM-CHLORIDE SYMPORTERS.HELLP Syndrome: A syndrome of HEMOLYSIS, elevated liver ENZYMES, and low blood platelets count (THROMBOCYTOPENIA). HELLP syndrome is observed in pregnant women with PRE-ECLAMPSIA or ECLAMPSIA who also exhibit LIVER damage and abnormalities in BLOOD COAGULATION.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Chaplaincy Service, Hospital: Hospital department which administers religious activities within the hospital, e.g., pastoral care, religious services.DNA-Activated Protein Kinase: A serine-threonine protein kinase that, when activated by DNA, phosphorylates several DNA-binding protein substrates including the TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEIN P53 and a variety of TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Disease Vectors: Invertebrates or non-human vertebrates which transmit infective organisms from one host to another.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Bloom Syndrome: An autosomal recessive disorder characterized by telangiectatic ERYTHEMA of the face, photosensitivity, DWARFISM and other abnormalities, and a predisposition toward developing cancer. The Bloom syndrome gene (BLM) encodes a RecQ-like DNA helicase.Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome: A heterogeneous group of autosomally inherited COLLAGEN DISEASES caused by defects in the synthesis or structure of FIBRILLAR COLLAGEN. There are numerous subtypes: classical, hypermobility, vascular, and others. Common clinical features include hyperextensible skin and joints, skin fragility and reduced wound healing capability.Brugada Syndrome: An autosomal dominant defect of cardiac conduction that is characterized by an abnormal ST-segment in leads V1-V3 on the ELECTROCARDIOGRAM resembling a right BUNDLE-BRANCH BLOCK; high risk of VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA; or VENTRICULAR FIBRILLATION; SYNCOPAL EPISODE; and possible sudden death. This syndrome is linked to mutations of gene encoding the cardiac SODIUM CHANNEL alpha subunit.Angelman Syndrome: A syndrome characterized by multiple abnormalities, MENTAL RETARDATION, and movement disorders. Present usually are skull and other abnormalities, frequent infantile spasms (SPASMS, INFANTILE); easily provoked and prolonged paroxysms of laughter (hence "happy"); jerky puppetlike movements (hence "puppet"); continuous tongue protrusion; motor retardation; ATAXIA; MUSCLE HYPOTONIA; and a peculiar facies. It is associated with maternal deletions of chromosome 15q11-13 and other genetic abnormalities. (From Am J Med Genet 1998 Dec 4;80(4):385-90; Hum Mol Genet 1999 Jan;8(1):129-35)Esophagitis, Peptic: INFLAMMATION of the ESOPHAGUS that is caused by the reflux of GASTRIC JUICE with contents of the STOMACH and DUODENUM.RNA, Viral: Ribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of viruses.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Adult: A syndrome characterized by progressive life-threatening RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY in the absence of known LUNG DISEASES, usually following a systemic insult such as surgery or major TRAUMA.SingaporeFollow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Viral Envelope Proteins: Layers of protein which surround the capsid in animal viruses with tubular nucleocapsids. The envelope consists of an inner layer of lipids and virus specified proteins also called membrane or matrix proteins. The outer layer consists of one or more types of morphological subunits called peplomers which project from the viral envelope; this layer always consists of glycoproteins.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Antigens, Viral: Substances elaborated by viruses that have antigenic activity.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Intellectual Disability: Subnormal intellectual functioning which originates during the developmental period. This has multiple potential etiologies, including genetic defects and perinatal insults. Intelligence quotient (IQ) scores are commonly used to determine whether an individual has an intellectual disability. IQ scores between 70 and 79 are in the borderline range. Scores below 67 are in the disabled range. (from Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1992, Ch55, p28)Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome: A viral disorder characterized by high FEVER, dry COUGH, shortness of breath (DYSPNEA) or breathing difficulties, and atypical PNEUMONIA. A virus in the genus CORONAVIRUS is the suspected agent.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Restless Legs Syndrome: A disorder characterized by aching or burning sensations in the lower and rarely the upper extremities that occur prior to sleep or may awaken the patient from sleep.Cuba: An island in the Greater Antilles in the West Indies, south of Florida. With the adjacent islands it forms the Republic of Cuba. Its capital is Havana. It was discovered by Columbus on his first voyage in 1492 and conquered by Spain in 1511. It has a varied history under Spain, Great Britain, and the United States but has been independent since 1902. The name Cuba is said to be an Indian name of unknown origin but the language that gave the name is extinct, so the etymology is a conjecture. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p302 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p132)Job Syndrome: Primary immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by recurrent infections and hyperimmunoglobulinemia E. Most cases are sporadic. Of the rare familial forms, the dominantly inherited subtype has additional connective tissue, dental and skeletal involvement that the recessive type does not share.Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome: A rare, X-linked immunodeficiency syndrome characterized by ECZEMA; LYMPHOPENIA; and, recurrent pyogenic infection. It is seen exclusively in young boys. Typically, IMMUNOGLOBULIN M levels are low and IMMUNOGLOBULIN A and IMMUNOGLOBULIN E levels are elevated. Lymphoreticular malignancies are common.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Americas: The general name for NORTH AMERICA; CENTRAL AMERICA; and SOUTH AMERICA unspecified or combined.Fetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Parity: The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.Sri LankaParaneoplastic Syndromes: In patients with neoplastic diseases a wide variety of clinical pictures which are indirect and usually remote effects produced by tumor cell metabolites or other products.Rain: Water particles that fall from the ATMOSPHERE.Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Vaginal Birth after Cesarean: Delivery of an infant through the vagina in a female who has had a prior cesarean section.Infant, Small for Gestational Age: An infant having a birth weight lower than expected for its gestational age.Sweet Syndrome: Condition characterized by large, rapidly extending, erythematous, tender plaques on the upper body usually accompanied by fever and dermal infiltration of neutrophilic leukocytes. It occurs mostly in middle-aged women, is often preceded by an upper respiratory infection, and clinically resembles ERYTHEMA MULTIFORME. Sweet syndrome is associated with LEUKEMIA.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome: An acquired defect of cellular immunity associated with infection by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), a CD4-positive T-lymphocyte count under 200 cells/microliter or less than 14% of total lymphocytes, and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections and malignant neoplasms. Clinical manifestations also include emaciation (wasting) and dementia. These elements reflect criteria for AIDS as defined by the CDC in 1993.Endorphins: One of the three major groups of endogenous opioid peptides. They are large peptides derived from the PRO-OPIOMELANOCORTIN precursor. The known members of this group are alpha-, beta-, and gamma-endorphin. The term endorphin is also sometimes used to refer to all opioid peptides, but the narrower sense is used here; OPIOID PEPTIDES is used for the broader group.Indonesia: A republic stretching from the Indian Ocean east to New Guinea, comprising six main islands: Java, Sumatra, Bali, Kalimantan (the Indonesian portion of the island of Borneo), Sulawesi (formerly known as the Celebes) and Irian Jaya (the western part of New Guinea). Its capital is Djakarta. The ethnic groups living there are largely Chinese, Arab, Eurasian, Indian, and Pakistani; 85% of the peoples are of the Islamic faith.Asia, Southeastern: The geographical area of Asia comprising BORNEO; BRUNEI; CAMBODIA; INDONESIA; LAOS; MALAYSIA; the MEKONG VALLEY; MYANMAR (formerly Burma), the PHILIPPINES; SINGAPORE; THAILAND; and VIETNAM.Body Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Pupa: An inactive stage between the larval and adult stages in the life cycle of insects.Polynesia: The collective name for the islands of the central Pacific Ocean, including the Austral Islands, Cook Islands, Easter Island, HAWAII; NEW ZEALAND; Phoenix Islands, PITCAIRN ISLAND; SAMOA; TONGA; Tuamotu Archipelago, Wake Island, and Wallis and Futuna Islands. Polynesians are of the Caucasoid race, but many are of mixed origin. Polynesia is from the Greek poly, many + nesos, island, with reference to the many islands in the group. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p966 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p426)Antibodies, Neutralizing: Antibodies that reduce or abolish some biological activity of a soluble antigen or infectious agent, usually a virus.Vaginal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the VAGINA.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Dependent Ambulation: To move about or walk on foot with the use of aids.Wounds and Injuries: Damage inflicted on the body as the direct or indirect result of an external force, with or without disruption of structural continuity.IndiaChurg-Strauss Syndrome: Widespread necrotizing angiitis with granulomas. Pulmonary involvement is frequent. Asthma or other respiratory infection may precede evidence of vasculitis. Eosinophilia and lung involvement differentiate this disease from POLYARTERITIS NODOSA.Vero Cells: A CELL LINE derived from the kidney of the African green (vervet) monkey, (CERCOPITHECUS AETHIOPS) used primarily in virus replication studies and plaque assays.Respiratory Distress Syndrome, Newborn: A condition of the newborn marked by DYSPNEA with CYANOSIS, heralded by such prodromal signs as dilatation of the alae nasi, expiratory grunt, and retraction of the suprasternal notch or costal margins, mostly frequently occurring in premature infants, children of diabetic mothers, and infants delivered by cesarean section, and sometimes with no apparent predisposing cause.Sturge-Weber Syndrome: A non-inherited congenital condition with vascular and neurological abnormalities. It is characterized by facial vascular nevi (PORT-WINE STAIN), and capillary angiomatosis of intracranial membranes (MENINGES; CHOROID). Neurological features include EPILEPSY; cognitive deficits; GLAUCOMA; and visual defects.Space-Time Clustering: A statistically significant excess of cases of a disease, occurring within a limited space-time continuum.Neutralization Tests: The measurement of infection-blocking titer of ANTISERA by testing a series of dilutions for a given virus-antiserum interaction end-point, which is generally the dilution at which tissue cultures inoculated with the serum-virus mixtures demonstrate cytopathology (CPE) or the dilution at which 50% of test animals injected with serum-virus mixtures show infectivity (ID50) or die (LD50).United StatesFever: An abnormal elevation of body temperature, usually as a result of a pathologic process.Budd-Chiari Syndrome: A condition in which the hepatic venous outflow is obstructed anywhere from the small HEPATIC VEINS to the junction of the INFERIOR VENA CAVA and the RIGHT ATRIUM. Usually the blockage is extrahepatic and caused by blood clots (THROMBUS) or fibrous webs. Parenchymal FIBROSIS is uncommon.Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Viremia: The presence of viruses in the blood.Developmental Disabilities: Disorders in which there is a delay in development based on that expected for a given age level or stage of development. These impairments or disabilities originate before age 18, may be expected to continue indefinitely, and constitute a substantial impairment. Biological and nonbiological factors are involved in these disorders. (From American Psychiatric Glossary, 6th ed)Chediak-Higashi Syndrome: A form of phagocyte bactericidal dysfunction characterized by unusual oculocutaneous albinism, high incidence of lymphoreticular neoplasms, and recurrent pyogenic infections. In many cell types, abnormal lysosomes are present leading to defective pigment distribution and abnormal neutrophil functions. The disease is transmitted by autosomal recessive inheritance and a similar disorder occurs in the beige mouse, the Aleutian mink, and albino Hereford cattle.Facies: The appearance of the face that is often characteristic of a disease or pathological condition, as the elfin facies of WILLIAMS SYNDROME or the mongoloid facies of DOWN SYNDROME. (Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)Consumer Product SafetyMothers: Female parents, human or animal.Virus Replication: The process of intracellular viral multiplication, consisting of the synthesis of PROTEINS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; and sometimes LIPIDS, and their assembly into a new infectious particle.
When the brain was examined, more than half were found to have Dandy-Walker anomaly and/or agenesis of the corpus callosum. A ... 1989) estimated the prevalence of Fryns syndrome to be 0.7 per 10,000 births based on the diagnosis of 6 cases in a series of ... noted the phenotypic overlap between Fryns syndrome and the Pallister-Killian syndrome (601803), which is a dysmorphic syndrome ... In a postneonatal survivor of Fryns syndrome, Riela et al. (1995) described myoclonus appearing shortly after birth, which was ...
Other causes of congenital hydrocephalus include neural tube defects, arachnoid cysts, Dandy-Walker syndrome, and Arnold-Chiari ... Hydrocephalus can occur due to birth defects or be acquired later in life. Associated birth defects include neural tube defects ... In developing countries, the condition often goes untreated at birth. Before birth, the condition is difficult to diagnose, and ... Dandy-Walker malformation. In newborns and toddlers with hydrocephalus, the head circumference is enlarged rapidly and soon ...
The Dandy-Walker complex is a genetically sporadic disorder that occurs one in every 30,000 live births. Prenatal diagnosis and ... "Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page" by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Dandy-Walker Alliance, a ... Recent research has found that Dandy-Walker syndrome often occurs in patients with PHACES syndrome. Treatment for individuals ... It is named for Walter Dandy and Arthur Earl Walker. In the majority of individuals with Dandy-Walker malformation, signs and ...
Many disorders include the Dandy-Walker phenotype and thus it is not pathognomonic for 3C syndrome. CHARGE syndrome can also be ... 3C syndrome is very rare, occurring in less than 1 birth per million. Because of consanguinity due to a founder effect, it is ... Dandy-Walker malformation is also occasionally seen in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome, which is characterized by heart defects and ... The syndrome was first reported in 1987 in two sisters who had similar craniofacial abnormalities, Dandy-Walker phenotype, and ...
Dandy Walker malformation is a relatively common congenital brain malformation with a prevalence of 1:30,000 live births. Dandy ... Joubert syndrome (JS) is one of the most commonly diagnosed syndromes associated with the molar tooth sign (MTS), or hypoplasia ... CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link) J.C. Murray; J.A. Johnson; T.D. Bird (1985). "Dandy-Walker malformation: ... Surveys suggest that prenatal exposure to teratogens such as rubella or alcohol are correlated with development of Dandy Walker ...
Dandy-Walker syndrome, and spina bifida. The eyes can be severely damaged and affected individuals may be blind. They may also ... 13q deletion syndrome can only be definitively diagnosed by genetic analysis, which can be done prenatally or after birth. ... 13q deletion syndrome was first described in 1963 and fully characterized in 1971. "13q deletion syndrome". www.socialstyrelsen ... 13q deletion syndrome is a rare genetic disease caused by the deletion of some or all of the large arm of human chromosome 13. ...
... regression syndrome Chorioangioma Cleft palate Club foot Coarctation of the aorta Conjoined twins Cystic hygroma Dandy-Walker ... Fetal abnormalities are conditions that affect a fetus or embryo and may be fatal or cause disease after birth. Acardiac twin ... Down Syndrome) Turner's syndrome (Monosomy X) Twin-to-twin transfusion syndrome Ureterocele VACTERL association Vein of Galen ... Ectopia cordis Encephalocele Endocardial cushion defect Esophageal atresia Exstrophy of the bladder Fetal alcohol syndrome ...
... while three had brain malformations including dilated ventricles with hypogenesis of the corpus callosum and Dandy-Walker ... A study of five cases showed an association with Coffin-Siris syndrome, as well as a wide gap between the first and second toes ... An infant with complete trisomy 9 surviving 20 days after birth showed clinical features including a small face, wide ... Chromosome 9, Trisomy Mosaic MaggiBlair.com Maggi Blair - Trisomy 9 Mosaic Syndrome TRISOMY 9p / Mosaic Trisomy 9 / Trisomy 9 ...
... and another due to the fetus suffering from Dandy-Walker syndrome (whom she named "Tate Elise"). In May 1990, Davis graduated ... She married Underwood on January 24, 1982, and gave birth to her first daughter, Amber, later that year. When Wendy was 19, she ... Walker, T. (June 28, 2013). "Wendy Davis: Single mother from trailer park who has become heroine of pro-choice movement". ...
Waking near the beach, she manages to return home and discovers she has Dandy Walker syndrome, which has allowed her to survive ... Moments after his birth and his mother's subsequent death, the Son of Man's father decided to turn his son into a work of art. ... Thomas Wayne in the years before Bruce's birth. Hurt makes his escape by forcing Bruce to choose between capturing him or ...
Dandy-Walker syndrome Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The CNS features the Dandy Lecture in honor of Walter Dandy during its ... which marked the birth of cerebrovascular neurosurgery. During his 40-year medical career, Dandy published five books and more ... The Dandy-Walker malformation is a congenital malformation associated with hydrocephalus. In 1921 Dandy reported a case of ... This congenital anomaly became known as the Dandy-Walker cyst. It is associated with closure of the foramina of Luschka and ...
"Association of facial hemangioma with Dandy-Walker and other posterior fossa malformations". Journal of Pediatrics. 122 (3): ... PHACE Syndrome is the uncommon association between large infantile hemangiomas, usually of the face, and birth defects of the ... Hemangiomas associated with PHACE Syndrome are usually small or not visible at birth, but are easier to see during the first ... PHACE Syndrome Handbook - Dr. Beth Drolet In 2013, the PHACE Syndrome Community was formed. The non-profit entity was developed ...
Other congenital anomalies of the nervous system include the Arnold-Chiari malformation, the Dandy-Walker malformation, ... The CDC and National Birth Defect Project studied the incidence of birth defects in the US. Key findings include: Down syndrome ... syndromes involving multiple systems, and Down's syndrome. Recent studies have concluded that 5-9% of Down's syndrome cases are ... Yang, Q.; Wen, S.W.; Leader, A.; Chen, X.K.; Lipson, J.; Walker, M. (7 December 2006). "Paternal age and birth defects: how ...
Other congenital anomalies of the nervous system include the Arnold-Chiari malformation, the Dandy-Walker malformation, ... 1q21.1 deletion syndrome/1q21.1 duplication syndrome/TAR syndrome/1p36 deletion syndrome) *1 ... A birth defect, also known as a congenital disorder, is a condition present at birth regardless of its cause.[3] Birth defects ... "Birth Defects". Dec 15, 2015. Retrieved 17 Jan 2016.. *^ a b c d "Birth Defects: Condition Information". www.nichd.nih.gov. ...
Other congenital anomalies of the nervous system include the Arnold-Chiari malformation, the Dandy-Walker malformation, ... at low birth weight, or with asphyxia, a birth defect, a disability, fetal alcohol syndrome, or AIDS".[63] Bradley and Corwyn ... A birth defect, also known as a congenital disorder, is a condition present at birth regardless of its cause.[3] Birth defects ... "Birth Defects". Dec 15, 2015. Retrieved 17 Jan 2016.. *^ a b c d "Birth Defects: Condition Information". www.nichd.nih.gov. ...
Charles had been followed by the birth of two girls, Emma in 1829 and Henrietta in 1833, before William's birth. These children ... In 1867 Bell and Dandy published Morris's epic poem, The Life and Death of Jason, at his own expense. The book was a retelling ... 7, Hammersmith Terrace is operated by the Emery Walker Trust, and is open to the public for tours. In 2013, the Cary Graphic ... Biographer Fiona MacCarthy suggests that Morris might have suffered from a form of Tourette's syndrome as he exhibited some of ...
Dandy-Walker syndrome. *other reduction deformities *Holoprosencephaly. *Lissencephaly. *Pachygyria. *Hydranencephaly. *Septo- ... It is also important to understand the role of birth defects in the development of hindbrain malformations that can lead to ... and may lead to preventive treatment that can stop the formation of some birth abnormalities. Dietary supplements of folic acid ...
Dandy Walker Syndrome. Dandy-Walker syndrome is a brain malformation with symptoms of increased intracranial pressure like ... Birth Defect - Genetic Birth Defects Drug-Induced Birth Defects Birth defects - Infections Multifactorial Birth Defects Drugs ... Birth Defects - Infections. Birth defects are abnormalities, which occur before the birth of the baby and can be caused due to ... Drug-Induced Birth Defects. Birth defects are abnormalities of function, structure or metabolism that are present since birth. ...
Dandy-Walker malformation affects brain development, primarily development of the cerebellum, which is the part of the brain ... Dandy-Walker malformation can also be a feature of genetic syndromes that are caused by mutations in specific genes. However, ... suggests that Dandy-Walker malformation could be caused by environmental factors that affect early development before birth. ... medlineplus.gov/genetics/condition/dandy-walker-malformation/ Dandy-Walker malformation. ...
Learn more about Dandy-Walker Syndrome at Medical City Dallas DefinitionCausesRisk ... Dandy-Walker syndrome is a brain deformity that develops before birth. The deformity occurs in an area in the back of the brain ... Dandy-Walker syndrome may be inherited. If a parent has Dandy-Walker syndrome, the child has a higher risk of the condition. ... Symptoms of Dandy-Walker syndrome often occur in infancy. Some may not appear until childhood. Most are found within the first ...
Dandy-Walker Syndrome. • Head Trauma - Tumors. • Heart Disease. • Learning Disabilities. • Meningitis. • Porencephaly. • Spina ... National Birth Defect Registry Help us discover the causes of birth defects by participating in the National Birth Defect ... Birth Defect Research for Children is a 501 (C) (3) non-profit organization. Our federal ID number is 59-219-3816.. © Birth ... Each fact sheet discusses how rare or common the birth defect is, causes of the birth defect, diagnosis, treatment and care. ...
Both died a few hours after birth. At birth, the propositus was noted to also havewide sutures with an occipital encephalocele ... Dandy-Walker syndrome is a congenital brain malformation that consists of the triad hypoplasia or absence of the vermis, upward ... In both children, CT scan of the brain revealed typical features of Dandy-Walker syndrome which were cerebellar aplasia, cystic ... 2000) reported the diagnosis of neurofibromatosis type 1 in monozygotic twins with Dandy-Walker syndrome. The twins, both males ...
Adult Manifestation of the Dandy-Walker Syndrome.- (7) Retroflexed Holoprosencephaly: X-ray CT findings and MRI findings.- (8) ... Overt Hydrocephalus at Birth: Origin and outcome.- (2) Factors Affecting Intellectual Outcome in Pediatric Brain Tumor Patients ... Major Index to Pension List of the War of 1812: 3 Annie Walker Burns English Book ... Infantile Hydrocephalus and the Slit Ventricle Syndrome in Early Infancy.- (27) Slit-ventricle Syndrome Presenting Spells of ...
What is Dandy Walker syndrome? Meaning of Dandy Walker syndrome medical term. What does Dandy Walker syndrome mean? ... Looking for online definition of Dandy Walker syndrome in the Medical Dictionary? Dandy Walker syndrome explanation free. ... who suffers from a condition called Dandy Walker syndrome and requires special schooling and medical care.. FOSTER DAD, BIRTH ... Dandy-Walker syndrome. (redirected from Dandy Walker syndrome) Dandy-Walker syndrome. [dan´de-wawk´er] congenital hydrocephalus ...
The Dandy-Walker complex is a genetically sporadic disorder that occurs one in every 30,000 live births. Prenatal diagnosis and ... "Dandy-Walker Syndrome Information Page" by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Dandy-Walker Alliance, a ... Recent research has found that Dandy-Walker syndrome often occurs in patients with PHACES syndrome. Treatment for individuals ... It is named for Walter Dandy and Arthur Earl Walker. In the majority of individuals with Dandy-Walker malformation, signs and ...
Dandy-Walker malformation and mega cisterna magna, but not Dandy-Walker variant, have ... ... Both have a low birth weight and microcephalic malformation syndrome leading to early death. The 46,XX patient also had a ... Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is characterized by cystic dilatation of the 4th ventricle and absence of the cerebellar vermis. ... Dandy-Walker syndrome, a congenital malformation of the hindbrain involving the cerebellum and the fourth ventricle, is a rare ...
Premature Birth * Tonyas Story Multiples, Dandy-Walker Syndrome Share This Page: Post Pinterest Print ... Premature Birth. Laurie, a mom from New Holland, shares the story of her son Lukes birth and experience in the Neonatal ... I also had some of the same nurses that were at my daughters births and that was really comforting. ...
Dandy-Walker Syndrome. Dandy-Walker Syndrome is a congenital brain defect in humans characterized by malformations to the ... Agent Orange Birth Defects. Sprayed extensively by the US military in Vietnam, Agent Orange contained a dioxin contaminant ... The syndrome is named for physicians Walter Dandy and Arthur Walker who described associated signs and symptoms of the syndrome ... Despite reports by Vietnamese citizens and Vietnam War veterans of increased rates of stillbirths and birth defects in their ...
DWM may also occur as part of a genetic syndrome that includes multiple birth defects, such as the PHACES syndrome of facial ... Dandy Walker malformation is diagnosed with the use of ultrasound, CT and MRI. Prenatal diagnosis of Dandy-Walker malformation ... The sonographic diagnosis of Dandy-Walker and Dandy-Walker variant: associated findings and outcomes. Prenat Diagn 2000;20(4): ... The frequency of Dandy Walker malformation in the US is approximately 1 per 25,000 -35,000 live births and affects more females ...
... hydrocephalus can occur in isolation or may be associated with other conditions such as spina bifida or Dandy Walker syndrome. ... Hydrocephalus occurs in two out of every 1,000 births in the United States. It is not known how many people develop it after ... However, experts have found a connection between a rare genetic disorder called L1 syndrome and hydrocephalus. L1 syndrome is ... Hydrocephalus can be present at birth or be acquired later in life as a result of a tumor, head injury, meningitis or ...
Conditions noted after birth included cataracts, Dandy-Walker syndrome (discovered on antenatal ultrasound), intrauterine ... By year of birth.. Alternate Text: The figure above shows reported cases of rubella and congenital rubella syndrome in the ... Congenital rubella syndrome (CRS) is caused by fetal infection with rubella virus from the mother and characterized by birth ... A throat swab and urine specimen, collected 7 days after birth, as well as a nasopharyngeal swab, collected 10 days after birth ...
Dandy-Walker Syndrome. Dandy-Walker Syndrome is a congenital brain defect in humans characterized by malformations to the ... Drama of Life Before Birth (1965), by Life Magazine and Lennart Nilsson. Life Magazines 1965 cover story "Drama of Life ... The syndrome is named for physicians Walter Dandy and Arthur Walker who described associated signs and symptoms of the syndrome ... He collaborated with pediatrician Kenneth Blackfan to provide the first clinical description of Dandy-Walker Syndrome, a ...
... resources and questions answered by our Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Specialists for Jung Wolff Back Stahl syndrome ... Underactive thyroid gland from birth 0000851 Dandy-Walker malformation. 0001305 Growth delay. Delayed growth ... Jung Wolff Back Stahl syndrome Title Other Names:. Anterior chamber cleavage disorder, cerebellar hypoplasia, hypothyroidism, ... PubMed is a searchable database of medical literature and lists journal articles that discuss Jung Wolff Back Stahl syndrome. ...
infections present at birth. *Down syndrome. *Dandy-Walker malformation. Emergency issues. Contact your childs doctor ...
Dandy-Walker Syndrome Fight Has Lamar County Roots. November 9, 2007 Press Release In 2005 while awaiting the birth of their ... learned that he would be born with a rare birth defect called Dandy-Walker Syndrome and a condition called hydrocephalus. ...
Dandy-Walker Syndrome: a birth defect in which the cerebellum is malformed, the fourth ventricle is enlarged, and the ... Aicardi Syndrome: a genetic syndrome in which girls have agenesis of the corpus callosum, as well as eye and other brain ... Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: medical condition in which a fetus is exposed to alcohol and subsequently exhibits a pattern of unusual ... Andermann Syndrome: a condition in which individuals (almost exclusively found in the certain part of Quebec) have agenesis of ...
SSRIs, however, are a medication that might increase the risks of having a child with birth defects. And the drug maker did not ... Dandy-Walker Syndrome. * Anencephaly. * Hydrocephaly. * Encephalocele (neural tube defect/sac-like protrusions of brain) ... A baby born with birth defects may not necessarily require a birth defect surgery, a financially difficult situation that can ... A baby born with birth defects may not necessarily require a birth defect surgery, a financially difficult situation that can ...
In low resource setting, 47.8% of severe hydrocephalus and 55.6% of Dandy-walker syndrome cases died prior to 1 year of age [. ... These changes had a great impact on the birth prevalence of certain birth defects in China, such as NTDs and Down syndrome [. ... also called Dandy-Walker syndrome (Q03.1); other specified types of congenital hydrocephalus (Q03.8); and unspecified ... The risk of birth defects in multiple births: a population-based study. Matern Child Health J. 2006;10(1):75-81. CrossRefPubMed ...
... preterm birth with severe intraventricular hemorrhage, Dandy-Walker syndrome, meningitis, stroke, or spina bifida). Inclusion ... Cell death, axonal damage, and cell birth in the immature rat brain following induction of hydrocephalus. Exp Neurol 1998;154: ... between birth and approximately 51 months), the measures selected for this study were limited to broader developmental tests. ...
When the brain was examined, more than half were found to have Dandy-Walker anomaly and/or agenesis of the corpus callosum. A ... 1989) estimated the prevalence of Fryns syndrome to be 0.7 per 10,000 births based on the diagnosis of 6 cases in a series of ... noted the phenotypic overlap between Fryns syndrome and the Pallister-Killian syndrome (601803), which is a dysmorphic syndrome ... In a postneonatal survivor of Fryns syndrome, Riela et al. (1995) described myoclonus appearing shortly after birth, which was ...
Hydrocephalus or accumulation of the cerebrospinal fluid in the brain may occur in babies due to birth defects. In kids, they ... The symptoms can be spotted soon after birth. A baby with Dandy-Walker syndrome has slow motor development. Their head also ... What is Dandy-Walker? Dandy-Walker Alliance.. 7.. ↑. Marty Elquist and MaryAnn Demchak. Dandy Walker Syndrome. Colorado ... 3. Dandy-Walker Syndrome. This is a rare malformation of the cerebellum, the part of the brain that controls movement. In this ...
  • In 1996, the US National Academy of Sciences reported that there was evidence that suggested dioxin and Agent Orange exposure caused spina bifida, a birth defect in which the spinal cord develops improperly. (asu.edu)
  • Arnold·Chiari syndrome is frequently associated with spina bifida. (brainscape.com)
  • As the genes on the short arm of chromosome 13 are relatively insignificant in comparison with those on the long arm, the clinical manifestation is similar to that seen in 13q deletion syndrome. (socialstyrelsen.se)
  • What genes are related to Dandy-Walker syndrome? (chask.org)
  • Autosomal recessive inheritance might occur in some families where the syndrome recurred in siblings who tested negative in the aforementioned genes (although recurrence in siblings might also be explained by parental germline mosaicism for dominant mutations). (bredagenetics.com)
  • Whole exome sequencing may reveal pathogenic mutations in known and as-yet-unknown genes while enabling immediate differential diagnosis with similar conditions such as Nicolaides-Baraitser and Cornelia de Lange syndromes . (bredagenetics.com)
  • Due to genetic heterogeneity and the possibility of as yet unknown associated genes, Coffin-Siris syndrome is a perfect candidate to panel testing based on clinical exome sequencing or whole exome sequencing. (bredagenetics.com)
  • This page provides brief descriptions and links to resources for some of the more common-although still relatively rare-syndromes and prenatal/congenital causes. (nationaldb.org)
  • Because of the autosomal recessive inheritence of Neu-Laxova syndrome, in countries with high rates of consanguineous marriage, serial prenatal ultrasound examinations with genetic counseling should be performed on pregnant women at high risk to offer termination of affected pregnancies. (lymphedemapeople.com)
  • The gene responsible for Fraser syndrome has not yet been identified, but it is known to be transmitted as a non-sex linked (autosomal) recessive trait. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Infants with 13q deletion syndrome will have low birth weights owing to intrauterine growth restriction. (socialstyrelsen.se)
  • PHACE (or PHACES) syndrome is most commonly found in female, singleton, term, normal birth weight infants. (mhmedical.com)
  • It is classified as an overgrowth syndrome, which means that affected infants are considerably larger than normal (macrosomia) and tend to be taller than their peers during childhood. (nih.gov)
  • Some infants with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome have an abnormally large tongue (macroglossia), which may interfere with breathing, swallowing, and speaking. (nih.gov)