Birth Rate: The number of births in a given population per year or other unit of time.Birth Weight: The mass or quantity of heaviness of an individual at BIRTH. It is expressed by units of pounds or kilograms.Premature Birth: CHILDBIRTH before 37 weeks of PREGNANCY (259 days from the first day of the mother's last menstrual period, or 245 days after FERTILIZATION).Live Birth: The event that a FETUS is born alive with heartbeats or RESPIRATION regardless of GESTATIONAL AGE. Such liveborn is called a newborn infant (INFANT, NEWBORN).Pregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Infant, Low Birth Weight: An infant having a birth weight of 2500 gm. (5.5 lb.) or less but INFANT, VERY LOW BIRTH WEIGHT is available for infants having a birth weight of 1500 grams (3.3 lb.) or less.Pregnancy Outcome: Results of conception and ensuing pregnancy, including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; SPONTANEOUS ABORTION; INDUCED ABORTION. The outcome may follow natural or artificial insemination or any of the various ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, such as EMBRYO TRANSFER or FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Infant, Newborn: An infant during the first month after birth.Pregnancy in Adolescence: Pregnancy in human adolescent females under the age of 19.Pregnancy Rate: The ratio of the number of conceptions (CONCEPTION) including LIVE BIRTH; STILLBIRTH; and fetal losses, to the mean number of females of reproductive age in a population during a set time period.Birth Certificates: Official certifications by a physician recording the individual's birth date, place of birth, parentage and other required identifying data which are filed with the local registrar of vital statistics.Embryo Transfer: The transfer of mammalian embryos from an in vivo or in vitro environment to a suitable host to improve pregnancy or gestational outcome in human or animal. In human fertility treatment programs, preimplantation embryos ranging from the 4-cell stage to the blastocyst stage are transferred to the uterine cavity between 3-5 days after FERTILIZATION IN VITRO.Fertilization in Vitro: An assisted reproductive technique that includes the direct handling and manipulation of oocytes and sperm to achieve fertilization in vitro.Multiple Birth Offspring: The offspring in multiple pregnancies (PREGNANCY, MULTIPLE): TWINS; TRIPLETS; QUADRUPLETS; QUINTUPLETS; etc.Illegitimacy: The state of birth outside of wedlock. It may refer to the offspring or the parents.Maternal Age: The age of the mother in PREGNANCY.Reproductive Techniques, Assisted: Clinical and laboratory techniques used to enhance fertility in humans and animals.Birth Order: The sequence in which children are born into the family.Pregnancy, Multiple: The condition of carrying two or more FETUSES simultaneously.Gestational Age: The age of the conceptus, beginning from the time of FERTILIZATION. In clinical obstetrics, the gestational age is often estimated as the time from the last day of the last MENSTRUATION which is about 2 weeks before OVULATION and fertilization.Ovulation Induction: Techniques for the artifical induction of ovulation, the rupture of the follicle and release of the ovum.Vital Statistics: Used for general articles concerning statistics of births, deaths, marriages, etc.Oocyte Retrieval: Procedures to obtain viable OOCYTES from the host. Oocytes most often are collected by needle aspiration from OVARIAN FOLLICLES before OVULATION.Sperm Injections, Intracytoplasmic: An assisted fertilization technique consisting of the microinjection of a single viable sperm into an extracted ovum. It is used principally to overcome low sperm count, low sperm motility, inability of sperm to penetrate the egg, or other conditions related to male infertility (INFERTILITY, MALE).Infertility, Female: Diminished or absent ability of a female to achieve conception.Infant Mortality: Postnatal deaths from BIRTH to 365 days after birth in a given population. Postneonatal mortality represents deaths between 28 days and 365 days after birth (as defined by National Center for Health Statistics). Neonatal mortality represents deaths from birth to 27 days after birth.Embryo Implantation: Endometrial implantation of EMBRYO, MAMMALIAN at the BLASTOCYST stage.Infertility: Inability to reproduce after a specified period of unprotected intercourse. Reproductive sterility is permanent infertility.Pregnancy Complications: Conditions or pathological processes associated with pregnancy. They can occur during or after pregnancy, and range from minor discomforts to serious diseases that require medical interventions. They include diseases in pregnant females, and pregnancies in females with diseases.Abortion, Spontaneous: Expulsion of the product of FERTILIZATION before completing the term of GESTATION and without deliberate interference.Cesarean Section: Extraction of the FETUS by means of abdominal HYSTEROTOMY.Cryopreservation: Preservation of cells, tissues, organs, or embryos by freezing. In histological preparations, cryopreservation or cryofixation is used to maintain the existing form, structure, and chemical composition of all the constituent elements of the specimens.Delivery, Obstetric: Delivery of the FETUS and PLACENTA under the care of an obstetrician or a health worker. Obstetric deliveries may involve physical, psychological, medical, or surgical interventions.Reproductive Control Agents: Substances used either in the prevention or facilitation of pregnancy.Birth Intervals: The lengths of intervals between births to women in the population.Follicle Stimulating Hormone, Human: A major gonadotropin secreted by the human adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Follicle-stimulating hormone stimulates GAMETOGENESIS and the supporting cells such as the ovarian GRANULOSA CELLS, the testicular SERTOLI CELLS, and the LEYDIG CELLS. FSH consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. The alpha subunit is common in the three human pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH, and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity.Gamete Intrafallopian Transfer: A technique that came into use in the mid-1980's for assisted conception in infertile women with normal fallopian tubes. The protocol consists of hormonal stimulation of the ovaries, followed by laparoscopic follicular aspiration of oocytes, and then the transfer of sperm and oocytes by catheterization into the fallopian tubes.Prenatal Care: Care provided the pregnant woman in order to prevent complications, and decrease the incidence of maternal and prenatal mortality.Clomiphene: A triphenyl ethylene stilbene derivative which is an estrogen agonist or antagonist depending on the target tissue. Note that ENCLOMIPHENE and ZUCLOMIPHENE are the (E) and (Z) isomers of Clomiphene respectively.Single Embryo Transfer: The techniques used to select and/or place only one embryo from FERTILIZATION IN VITRO into the uterine cavity to establish a singleton pregnancy.Abortion, Legal: Termination of pregnancy under conditions allowed under local laws. (POPLINE Thesaurus, 1991)Abortion, Habitual: Three or more consecutive spontaneous abortions.Birth Injuries: Mechanical or anoxic trauma incurred by the infant during labor or delivery.Fertility Agents, Female: Compounds which increase the capacity to conceive in females.Fertility: The capacity to conceive or to induce conception. It may refer to either the male or female.Cohort Studies: Studies in which subsets of a defined population are identified. These groups may or may not be exposed to factors hypothesized to influence the probability of the occurrence of a particular disease or other outcome. Cohorts are defined populations which, as a whole, are followed in an attempt to determine distinguishing subgroup characteristics.Paternal Age: Age of the biological father.United StatesInsemination, Artificial, Homologous: Human artificial insemination in which the husband's semen is used.National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.): A center in the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE which is primarily concerned with the collection, analysis, and dissemination of health statistics on vital events and health activities to reflect the health status of people, health needs, and health resources.Sex Ratio: The number of males per 100 females.Fetal Death: Death of the developing young in utero. BIRTH of a dead FETUS is STILLBIRTH.Embryo Culture Techniques: The technique of maintaining or growing mammalian EMBRYOS in vitro. This method offers an opportunity to observe EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT; METABOLISM; and susceptibility to TERATOGENS.Parity: The number of offspring a female has borne. It is contrasted with GRAVIDITY, which refers to the number of pregnancies, regardless of outcome.Congenital Abnormalities: Malformations of organs or body parts during development in utero.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Fetal Mortality: Number of fetal deaths with stated or presumed gestation of 20 weeks or more in a given population. Late fetal mortality is death after of 28 weeks or more.Single Parent: A natural, adoptive, or substitute parent of a dependent child, who lives with only one parent. The single parent may live with or visit the child. The concept includes the never-married, as well as the divorced and widowed.Obstetric Labor, Premature: Onset of OBSTETRIC LABOR before term (TERM BIRTH) but usually after the FETUS has become viable. In humans, it occurs sometime during the 29th through 38th week of PREGNANCY. TOCOLYSIS inhibits premature labor and can prevent the BIRTH of premature infants (INFANT, PREMATURE).Stillbirth: The event that a FETUS is born dead or stillborn.Cleavage Stage, Ovum: The earliest developmental stage of a fertilized ovum (ZYGOTE) during which there are several mitotic divisions within the ZONA PELLUCIDA. Each cleavage or segmentation yields two BLASTOMERES of about half size of the parent cell. This cleavage stage generally covers the period up to 16-cell MORULA.Twins: Two individuals derived from two FETUSES that were fertilized at or about the same time, developed in the UTERUS simultaneously, and born to the same mother. Twins are either monozygotic (TWINS, MONOZYGOTIC) or dizygotic (TWINS, DIZYGOTIC).Nafarelin: A potent synthetic agonist of GONADOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE with 3-(2-naphthyl)-D-alanine substitution at residue 6. Nafarelin has been used in the treatments of central PRECOCIOUS PUBERTY and ENDOMETRIOSIS.Abortion, Induced: Intentional removal of a fetus from the uterus by any of a number of techniques. (POPLINE, 1978)Minors: A person who has not attained the age at which full civil rights are accorded.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Parental Notification: Reporting to parents or guardians about care to be provided to a minor (MINORS).Marital Status: A demographic parameter indicating a person's status with respect to marriage, divorce, widowhood, singleness, etc.Vaginal Birth after Cesarean: Delivery of an infant through the vagina in a female who has had a prior cesarean section.Oocyte Donation: Transfer of preovulatory oocytes from donor to a suitable host. Oocytes are collected, fertilized in vitro, and transferred to a host that can be human or animal.Infant, Small for Gestational Age: An infant having a birth weight lower than expected for its gestational age.Labor, Induced: Artificially induced UTERINE CONTRACTION. Generally, LABOR, OBSTETRIC is induced with the intent to cause delivery of the fetus and termination of pregnancy.Animals, Newborn: Refers to animals in the period of time just after birth.Insemination, Artificial: Artificial introduction of SEMEN or SPERMATOZOA into the VAGINA to facilitate FERTILIZATION.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Demography: Statistical interpretation and description of a population with reference to distribution, composition, or structure.Menotropins: Extracts of urine from menopausal women that contain high concentrations of pituitary gonadotropins, FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE and LUTEINIZING HORMONE. Menotropins are used to treat infertility. The FSH:LH ratio and degree of purity vary in different preparations.Blastocyst: A post-MORULA preimplantation mammalian embryo that develops from a 32-cell stage into a fluid-filled hollow ball of over a hundred cells. A blastocyst has two distinctive tissues. The outer layer of trophoblasts gives rise to extra-embryonic tissues. The inner cell mass gives rise to the embryonic disc and eventual embryo proper.Preimplantation Diagnosis: Determination of the nature of a pathological condition or disease in the OVUM; ZYGOTE; or BLASTOCYST prior to implantation. CYTOGENETIC ANALYSIS is performed to determine the presence or absence of genetic disease.Hispanic Americans: Persons living in the United States of Mexican (MEXICAN AMERICANS), Puerto Rican, Cuban, Central or South American, or other Spanish culture or origin. The concept does not include Brazilian Americans or Portuguese Americans.Anovulation: Suspension or cessation of OVULATION in animals or humans with follicle-containing ovaries (OVARIAN FOLLICLE). Depending on the etiology, OVULATION may be induced with appropriate therapy.Family Planning Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by a government, to guide and determine present and future decisions on population control by limiting the number of children or controlling fertility, notably through family planning and contraception within the nuclear family.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Parturition: The process of giving birth to one or more offspring.Home Childbirth: Childbirth taking place in the home.Maternal Exposure: Exposure of the female parent, human or animal, to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents in the environment or to environmental factors that may include ionizing radiation, pathogenic organisms, or toxic chemicals that may affect offspring. It includes pre-conception maternal exposure.Sperm Retrieval: Procedures to obtain viable sperm from the male reproductive tract, including the TESTES, the EPIDIDYMIS, or the VAS DEFERENS.Fallopian Tube Diseases: Diseases involving the FALLOPIAN TUBES including neoplasms (FALLOPIAN TUBE NEOPLASMS); SALPINGITIS; tubo-ovarian abscess; and blockage.Immunity, Herd: The non-susceptibility to infection of a large group of individuals in a population. A variety of factors can be responsible for herd immunity and this gives rise to the different definitions used in the literature. Most commonly, herd immunity refers to the case when, if most of the population is immune, infection of a single individual will not cause an epidemic. Also, in such immunized populations, susceptible individuals are not likely to become infected. Herd immunity can also refer to the case when unprotected individuals fail to contract a disease because the infecting organism has been banished from the population.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.Seasons: Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Reproductive Techniques: Methods pertaining to the generation of new individuals, including techniques used in selective BREEDING, cloning (CLONING, ORGANISM), and assisted reproduction (REPRODUCTIVE TECHNIQUES, ASSISTED).Prenatal Exposure Delayed Effects: The consequences of exposing the FETUS in utero to certain factors, such as NUTRITION PHYSIOLOGICAL PHENOMENA; PHYSIOLOGICAL STRESS; DRUGS; RADIATION; and other physical or chemical factors. These consequences are observed later in the offspring after BIRTH.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Midwifery: The practice of assisting women in childbirth.Mothers: Female parents, human or animal.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Family Planning Services: Health care programs or services designed to assist individuals in the planning of family size. Various methods of CONTRACEPTION can be used to control the number and timing of childbirths.European Continental Ancestry Group: Individuals whose ancestral origins are in the continent of Europe.Reproduction: The total process by which organisms produce offspring. (Stedman, 25th ed)Fetal Development: Morphological and physiological development of FETUSES.Perinatal Care: The care of women and a fetus or newborn given before, during, and after delivery from the 28th week of gestation through the 7th day after delivery.Azoospermia: A condition of having no sperm present in the ejaculate (SEMEN).African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Odds Ratio: The ratio of two odds. The exposure-odds ratio for case control data is the ratio of the odds in favor of exposure among cases to the odds in favor of exposure among noncases. The disease-odds ratio for a cohort or cross section is the ratio of the odds in favor of disease among the exposed to the odds in favor of disease among the unexposed. The prevalence-odds ratio refers to an odds ratio derived cross-sectionally from studies of prevalent cases.Child Development: The continuous sequential physiological and psychological maturing of an individual from birth up to but not including ADOLESCENCE.Infant, Premature, DiseasesEducational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome: A complication of OVULATION INDUCTION in infertility treatment. It is graded by the severity of symptoms which include OVARY enlargement, multiple OVARIAN FOLLICLES; OVARIAN CYSTS; ASCITES; and generalized EDEMA. The full-blown syndrome may lead to RENAL FAILURE, respiratory distress, and even DEATH. Increased capillary permeability is caused by the vasoactive substances, such as VASCULAR ENDOTHELIAL GROWTH FACTORS, secreted by the overly-stimulated OVARIES.Fertilization: The fusion of a spermatozoon (SPERMATOZOA) with an OVUM thus resulting in the formation of a ZYGOTE.WisconsinGonadotropins: Hormones that stimulate gonadal functions such as GAMETOGENESIS and sex steroid hormone production in the OVARY and the TESTIS. Major gonadotropins are glycoproteins produced primarily by the adenohypophysis (GONADOTROPINS, PITUITARY) and the placenta (CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN). In some species, pituitary PROLACTIN and PLACENTAL LACTOGEN exert some luteotropic activities.Infant, Premature: A human infant born before 37 weeks of GESTATION.Chorionic Gonadotropin: A gonadotropic glycoprotein hormone produced primarily by the PLACENTA. Similar to the pituitary LUTEINIZING HORMONE in structure and function, chorionic gonadotropin is involved in maintaining the CORPUS LUTEUM during pregnancy. CG consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is virtually identical to the alpha subunits of the three pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH, and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity (CHORIONIC GONADOTROPIN, BETA SUBUNIT, HUMAN).Follicle Stimulating Hormone: A major gonadotropin secreted by the adenohypophysis (PITUITARY GLAND, ANTERIOR). Follicle-stimulating hormone stimulates GAMETOGENESIS and the supporting cells such as the ovarian GRANULOSA CELLS, the testicular SERTOLI CELLS, and LEYDIG CELLS. FSH consists of two noncovalently linked subunits, alpha and beta. Within a species, the alpha subunit is common in the three pituitary glycoprotein hormones (TSH, LH, and FSH), but the beta subunit is unique and confers its biological specificity.Body Height: The distance from the sole to the crown of the head with body standing on a flat surface and fully extended.Obstetric Labor Complications: Medical problems associated with OBSTETRIC LABOR, such as BREECH PRESENTATION; PREMATURE OBSTETRIC LABOR; HEMORRHAGE; or others. These complications can affect the well-being of the mother, the FETUS, or both.Apgar Score: A method, developed by Dr. Virginia Apgar, to evaluate a newborn's adjustment to extrauterine life. Five items - heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, reflex irritability, and color - are evaluated 60 seconds after birth and again five minutes later on a scale from 0-2, 0 being the lowest, 2 being normal. The five numbers are added for the Apgar score. A score of 0-3 represents severe distress, 4-7 indicates moderate distress, and a score of 7-10 predicts an absence of difficulty in adjusting to extrauterine life.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Buserelin: A potent synthetic analog of GONADOTROPIN-RELEASING HORMONE with D-serine substitution at residue 6, glycine10 deletion, and other modifications.FinlandOocytes: Female germ cells derived from OOGONIA and termed OOCYTES when they enter MEIOSIS. The primary oocytes begin meiosis but are arrested at the diplotene state until OVULATION at PUBERTY to give rise to haploid secondary oocytes or ova (OVUM).Continental Population Groups: Groups of individuals whose putative ancestry is from native continental populations based on similarities in physical appearance.EnglandEmbryo, Mammalian: The entity of a developing mammal (MAMMALS), generally from the cleavage of a ZYGOTE to the end of embryonic differentiation of basic structures. For the human embryo, this represents the first two months of intrauterine development preceding the stages of the FETUS.Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone: A decapeptide that stimulates the synthesis and secretion of both pituitary gonadotropins, LUTEINIZING HORMONE and FOLLICLE STIMULATING HORMONE. GnRH is produced by neurons in the septum PREOPTIC AREA of the HYPOTHALAMUS and released into the pituitary portal blood, leading to stimulation of GONADOTROPHS in the ANTERIOR PITUITARY GLAND.Infertility, Male: The inability of the male to effect FERTILIZATION of an OVUM after a specified period of unprotected intercourse. Male sterility is permanent infertility.Breast Feeding: The nursing of an infant at the breast.Asphyxia Neonatorum: Respiratory failure in the newborn. (Dorland, 27th ed)Labor, Obstetric: The repetitive uterine contraction during childbirth which is associated with the progressive dilation of the uterine cervix (CERVIX UTERI). Successful labor results in the expulsion of the FETUS and PLACENTA. Obstetric labor can be spontaneous or induced (LABOR, INDUCED).Embryonic Development: Morphological and physiological development of EMBRYOS.Residence Characteristics: Elements of residence that characterize a population. They are applicable in determining need for and utilization of health services.Population Dynamics: The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.Intensive Care Units, Neonatal: Hospital units providing continuing surveillance and care to acutely ill newborn infants.Maternal Health Services: Organized services to provide health care to expectant and nursing mothers.
  • But the March of Dimes said California's success is noteworthy, as the state sees half a million births each year -- the most of any state -- and "has a racially diverse population in a mix of urban, suburban and rural communities that have a variety of healthcare and economic needs. (cnn.com)
  • Fewer than 4 million births were counted in 2011, a one percent drop from the year before, and the lowest number of births since 1998. (eurasiareview.com)
  • Preterm birth is the leading cause of newborn death, and babies who survive often face serious and sometimes lifelong health problems such as developmental delays or vision loss, according to the organization. (cnn.com)
  • The average age of women giving birth was just over 31 by 2010, while there was a 22% increase in those aged 35 and older having babies. (rte.ie)
  • In an encouraging development, the rate of premature births and low birthweight babies declined after a long upward trend, according to a report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. (reuters.com)
  • For the first time since 1984 there was a drop in the percentage of babies born with low birth weight, which similarly increases the risk of a baby's health problems. (reuters.com)
  • Alongside a focus on specific elements such as reducing smoking in pregnancy and monitoring fetal movements, the Saving Babies' Lives Care Bundle is now being updated in 2019 to include measures to reduce preterm birth. (tommys.org)
  • Preterm babies are born at a higher rate in the US than in 130 other countries, including many poorer nations, according to a report released today, Born Too Soon: The Global Action Report on Preterm Birth , published by the March of Dimes and almost fifty other groups, including the World Health Organization . (rwjf.org)
  • Preterm birth (birth before 37 weeks completed gestation) is the leading cause of newborn death in the US-nearly half a million US babies are born too early each year. (rwjf.org)
  • Babies who survive an early birth often have breathing problems, cerebral palsy, intellectual disabilities, and other lifelong problems. (rwjf.org)
  • Even babies born just a few weeks early have higher rates of hospitalization and illness than full-term infants, and the costs exceed $26 billion each year. (rwjf.org)
  • The three-year improvement in the U.S. preterm birth rate means that 40,000 more babies were given a healthy start in life and spared the risk of life-long health consequences of an early birth. (cafemom.com)
  • The nation's birth rates last year reached record lows for women in their teens and 20s, a government report shows, leading to the fewest babies in 32 years. (adn.com)
  • He estimates 5.7 million babies would have been born in the past decade if fertility rates hadn't fallen from pre-recession levels. (adn.com)
  • A veteran nurse, Barron was in charge of infection control and quality assurance at the hospital when she noticed there had been two babies born with the birth defect of anencephaly in a six month period. (truth-out.org)
  • Almost all babies with the defect die shortly after birth. (truth-out.org)
  • The falling birth rate is also at odds with the increase in babies being born statewide during the same time period. (sfexaminer.com)
  • I keep expecting to see the birth rates go up and then they don't," said demographer Kenneth M. Johnson of University of New Hampshire's Carsey School of Public Policy.He estimates 5.7 million babies would have been born in the past decade if fertility rates hadn't fallen from pre-recession levels. (wesh.com)
  • The number of babies born to native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders was stable.The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report also found:-Overall, the U.S. birth rate for women ages 15 to 44 was 59 births per 1,000 women, an all-time low. (wesh.com)
  • According to the report, 29 percent of the teen births in the state - 1,136 babies - were born to teenagers 15 to 17 years old. (telegram.com)
  • Worcester had a birth rate of 31.6 - or 244 - babies born to women between the ages of 15 and 19. (telegram.com)
  • In 2009, the city's birth rate was 28.3 - or 219 - babies born to women of the same age group. (telegram.com)
  • The authors of the report estimate that if 1991 birth rates had prevailed through 2010, 3.4 million additional babies would have been born to teenagers during these years. (nytimes.com)
  • The survival rate of premature babies has gone up in recent decades as neonatal care has become more sophisticated. (kpbs.org)
  • He said Arkansas has several programs in place to deal with preterm births, including "Stork's Nest" and "Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait. (publicnewsservice.org)
  • Overall, the U.S. received a "C" grade, with the number of preterm births falling from 542,893 babies in 2006 to about 450,000 in 2013. (californiahealthline.org)
  • According to epidemiologists, fewer births in states such as California may be delaying the annual onset of a common intestinal virus in the southwest. (medindia.net)
  • Thirty-five states and Washington reduced the percentage of women of childbearing age who smoked, and 28 states, Washington and Puerto Rico lowered the rate of late preterm births: infants born between 34 and 36 weeks gestation. (cnn.com)
  • Berlan, who did not conduct this research, said the reason she's so excited is "because we know that the vast majority of teen births are unintended. (wtvr.com)
  • The national birth date dipped 10 percent from 2000-10, the state's dropped 12 percent and Orange County's plummeted 23 percent, with 16.5 births per 1,000 population in 2000 falling to 12.7 per 1,000 in 2010. (ocweekly.com)
  • Watch the one-hour webinar , CDC highlighted findings from the recent Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) on reductions in teen birth rates and persistent disparities and program partners in North Carolina and South Carolina described their efforts to address the social determinants of health through the Office of Adolescent Health/CDC Teen Pregnancy Prevention Community-Wide Initiative. (cdc.gov)
  • To control for the effect of population size, analyses of fertility and mortality usually use rates. (encyclopedia.com)
  • By 2010, there was a 2% decline in the mortality rate of live births and still births, compared to 2001. (rte.ie)
  • First, the estimates and projections of vital rates, vital events, and midyear population presented are based on careful evaluation of census and survey results and, in part because of this evaluation process and associated estimation processes, represent a set of consistent estimates and projections of population, fertility, mortality, and international migration. (economy.com)
  • The birth rate (along with mortality and migration rate) are used to calculate population growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • Our goal was to investigate the neonatal mortality rate and the mortality rate during the NICU stay for extremely low birth weight infants born in Japan in 2005. (aappublications.org)
  • The neonatal mortality rate and the mortality rate during the NICU stay were 13.0% and 17.0%, respectively, which were lower than 17.7% and 21.5% in the survey in 2000. (aappublications.org)
  • The mortality rates of extremely low birth weight infants who were born in 2005 demonstrated definite improvement. (aappublications.org)
  • Advances in perinatal technology, such as pulmonary surfactant replacement therapy, high-frequency oscillatory ventilation, and prenatal administration of glucocorticosteroids, have resulted in decreasing mortality rates for preterm infants. (aappublications.org)
  • Perinatal care systems, such as regionalization and prenatal maternal transfer, also have decreased mortality rates for infants. (aappublications.org)
  • In the latest 3 surveys, the mortality rates for ELBW infants have been improving. (aappublications.org)
  • 1 - 3 The objectives of this study were to investigate the mortality rate of ELBW infants in 2005, to compare the data with those for previous years, and to elucidate factors influencing mortality rates. (aappublications.org)
  • We know that there are no reductions in maternal and neonatal mortality when the cesarean birth rate is above 15%, yet globally these rates are escalating and birthing units are becoming surgical suites for more than one-third of women giving birth. (nursingcenter.com)
  • On the other hand, in developing countries (especially in rural areas and among poor, uninsured women), the recommended lower limit for cesarean births is 5% to 10% in order to avoid high rates of maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity from obstetrical complications of vaginal births, because many of these areas do not have the resources to manage high-risk pregnancies. (nursingcenter.com)
  • A 2013 Harvard study that showed that black women in states that formerly had Jim Crow laws enforcing racial segregation, a higher rate of infant mortality than in other states. (kpbs.org)
  • On the flip side, the increase in births to older moms is also important, said Martin. (wtvr.com)
  • In 2015, the Chinese government reformed its infamous "one-child policy" to allow two births for most couples, hoping that it would address a looming demographic crisis by boosting the nation's birthrate. (chinadigitaltimes.net)
  • But for parents, there might be a small silver lining - new research is strengthening the evidence that premature birth rates may be dropping. (yahoo.com)
  • Looking at different windows of time, the researchers found that premature birth rates were down between 15 to 23%, neonatologist and lead study author Jasper Been told the New York Times . (yahoo.com)
  • In both of those reports - which were compiled and published independent of each other, but at similar times - doctors found that premature birth rates had dropped drastically. (yahoo.com)
  • One bright spot in the report was that three states and Puerto Rico did show a decline in their premature birth rates. (kpbs.org)
  • The states with the highest premature birth rates were mostly in the South and the lower Midwest. (kpbs.org)
  • The highest rate was Mississippi with 13.6 percent and the next was Louisiana with 12.7 percent. (kpbs.org)
  • Crude birth rates at the end of the twentieth century range from over 40 per 1,000 in many African countries and a few Asian countries such as Yemen and Afghanistan to less than 12 per 1,000 in the slow-growing or declining countries of Europe and Japan (Population Reference Bureau 1998). (encyclopedia.com)
  • The 2012 rate represents a 10% drop and the best rate since 1998. (cnn.com)
  • This report underscores the need for action to reduce premature birth in the U.S., and state and territorial health officials have a critical role in championing and implementing proven solutions," says David L. Lakey, M.D., president of the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials and Commissioner of the Texas Department of State Health Services. (rwjf.org)