Bipolar Disorder: A major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.Seasonal Affective Disorder: A syndrome characterized by depressions that recur annually at the same time each year, usually during the winter months. Other symptoms include anxiety, irritability, decreased energy, increased appetite (carbohydrate cravings), increased duration of sleep, and weight gain. SAD (seasonal affective disorder) can be treated by daily exposure to bright artificial lights (PHOTOTHERAPY), during the season of recurrence.Dissociative Disorders: Sudden temporary alterations in the normally integrative functions of consciousness.Mood Disorders: Those disorders that have a disturbance in mood as their predominant feature.Affective Disorders, Psychotic: Disorders in which the essential feature is a severe disturbance in mood (depression, anxiety, elation, and excitement) accompanied by psychotic symptoms such as delusions, hallucinations, gross impairment in reality testing, etc.Lod Score: The total relative probability, expressed on a logarithmic scale, that a linkage relationship exists among selected loci. Lod is an acronym for "logarithmic odds."Schizophrenia: A severe emotional disorder of psychotic depth characteristically marked by a retreat from reality with delusion formation, HALLUCINATIONS, emotional disharmony, and regressive behavior.Chromosomes, Human, Pair 4: A specific pair of GROUP B CHROMOSOMES of the human chromosome classification.Genetic Testing: Detection of a MUTATION; GENOTYPE; KARYOTYPE; or specific ALLELES associated with genetic traits, heritable diseases, or predisposition to a disease, or that may lead to the disease in descendants. It includes prenatal genetic testing.Psychotic Disorders: Disorders in which there is a loss of ego boundaries or a gross impairment in reality testing with delusions or prominent hallucinations. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Lithium: An element in the alkali metals family. It has the atomic symbol Li, atomic number 3, and atomic weight [6.938; 6.997]. Salts of lithium are used in treating BIPOLAR DISORDER.Pedigree: The record of descent or ancestry, particularly of a particular condition or trait, indicating individual family members, their relationships, and their status with respect to the trait or condition.Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Antipsychotic Agents: Agents that control agitated psychotic behavior, alleviate acute psychotic states, reduce psychotic symptoms, and exert a quieting effect. They are used in SCHIZOPHRENIA; senile dementia; transient psychosis following surgery; or MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION; etc. These drugs are often referred to as neuroleptics alluding to the tendency to produce neurological side effects, but not all antipsychotics are likely to produce such effects. Many of these drugs may also be effective against nausea, emesis, and pruritus.Microsatellite Repeats: A variety of simple repeat sequences that are distributed throughout the GENOME. They are characterized by a short repeat unit of 2-8 basepairs that is repeated up to 100 times. They are also known as short tandem repeats (STRs).Genetic Linkage: The co-inheritance of two or more non-allelic GENES due to their being located more or less closely on the same CHROMOSOME.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Genotype: The genetic constitution of the individual, comprising the ALLELES present at each GENETIC LOCUS.Genetic Predisposition to Disease: A latent susceptibility to disease at the genetic level, which may be activated under certain conditions.Gene Frequency: The proportion of one particular in the total of all ALLELES for one genetic locus in a breeding POPULATION.Antimanic Agents: Agents that are used to treat bipolar disorders or mania associated with other affective disorders.Depressive Disorder: An affective disorder manifested by either a dysphoric mood or loss of interest or pleasure in usual activities. The mood disturbance is prominent and relatively persistent.Case-Control Studies: Studies which start with the identification of persons with a disease of interest and a control (comparison, referent) group without the disease. The relationship of an attribute to the disease is examined by comparing diseased and non-diseased persons with regard to the frequency or levels of the attribute in each group.Phototherapy: Treatment of disease by exposure to light, especially by variously concentrated light rays or specific wavelengths.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Psychiatric Status Rating Scales: Standardized procedures utilizing rating scales or interview schedules carried out by health personnel for evaluating the degree of mental illness.Depressive Disorder, Major: Marked depression appearing in the involution period and characterized by hallucinations, delusions, paranoia, and agitation.Affective Symptoms: Mood or emotional responses dissonant with or inappropriate to the behavior and/or stimulus.Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: Categorical classification of MENTAL DISORDERS based on criteria sets with defining features. It is produced by the American Psychiatric Association. (DSM-IV, page xxii)Genome, Human: The complete genetic complement contained in the DNA of a set of CHROMOSOMES in a HUMAN. The length of the human genome is about 3 billion base pairs.Emotions: Those affective states which can be experienced and have arousing and motivational properties.Cyclothymic Disorder: An affective disorder characterized by periods of depression and hypomania. These may be separated by periods of normal mood.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Schizophrenic Psychology: Study of mental processes and behavior of schizophrenics.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Comorbidity: The presence of co-existing or additional diseases with reference to an initial diagnosis or with reference to the index condition that is the subject of study. Comorbidity may affect the ability of affected individuals to function and also their survival; it may be used as a prognostic indicator for length of hospital stay, cost factors, and outcome or survival.Antidepressive Agents: Mood-stimulating drugs used primarily in the treatment of affective disorders and related conditions. Several MONOAMINE OXIDASE INHIBITORS are useful as antidepressants apparently as a long-term consequence of their modulation of catecholamine levels. The tricyclic compounds useful as antidepressive agents (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, TRICYCLIC) also appear to act through brain catecholamine systems. A third group (ANTIDEPRESSIVE AGENTS, SECOND-GENERATION) is a diverse group of drugs including some that act specifically on serotonergic systems.Neurotic Disorders: Disorders in which the symptoms are distressing to the individual and recognized by him or her as being unacceptable. Social relationships may be greatly affected but usually remain within acceptable limits. The disturbance is relatively enduring or recurrent without treatment.Color Therapy: A form of phototherapy using color to influence health and to treat various physical or mental disorders. The color rays may be in the visible or invisible spectrum and can be administered through colored lights or applied mentally through suggestion.Schizotypal Personality Disorder: A personality disorder in which there are oddities of thought (magical thinking, paranoid ideation, suspiciousness), perception (illusions, depersonalization), speech (digressive, vague, overelaborate), and behavior (inappropriate affect in social interactions, frequently social isolation) that are not severe enough to characterize schizophrenia.Lithium Carbonate: A lithium salt, classified as a mood-stabilizing agent. Lithium ion alters the metabolism of BIOGENIC MONOAMINES in the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM, and affects multiple neurotransmission systems.Personality Assessment: The determination and evaluation of personality attributes by interviews, observations, tests, or scales. Articles concerning personality measurement are considered to be within scope of this term.Suicide: The act of killing oneself.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Lithium Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain lithium as an integral part of the molecule.Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder: An anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent, persistent obsessions or compulsions. Obsessions are the intrusive ideas, thoughts, or images that are experienced as senseless or repugnant. Compulsions are repetitive and seemingly purposeful behavior which the individual generally recognizes as senseless and from which the individual does not derive pleasure although it may provide a release from tension.Delirium, Dementia, Amnestic, Cognitive Disorders: Cognitive disorders including delirium, dementia, and other cognitive disorders. These may be the result of substance use, trauma, or other causes.Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity: A behavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity. Although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant. The disorder is more frequent in males than females. Onset is in childhood. Symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood. (From DSM-V)Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.Interview, Psychological: A directed conversation aimed at eliciting information for psychiatric diagnosis, evaluation, treatment planning, etc. The interview may be conducted by a social worker or psychologist.Freudian Theory: Philosophic formulations which are basic to psychoanalysis. Some of the conceptual theories developed were of the libido, repression, regression, transference, id, ego, superego, Oedipus Complex, etc.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Amygdala: Almond-shaped group of basal nuclei anterior to the INFERIOR HORN OF THE LATERAL VENTRICLE of the TEMPORAL LOBE. The amygdala is part of the limbic system.Schizophrenic Language: The artificial language of schizophrenic patients - neologisms (words of the patient's own making with new meanings).Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Cognition Disorders: Disturbances in mental processes related to learning, thinking, reasoning, and judgment.Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic: A class of traumatic stress disorders with symptoms that last more than one month. There are various forms of post-traumatic stress disorder, depending on the time of onset and the duration of these stress symptoms. In the acute form, the duration of the symptoms is between 1 to 3 months. In the chronic form, symptoms last more than 3 months. With delayed onset, symptoms develop more than 6 months after the traumatic event.Neuropsychological Tests: Tests designed to assess neurological function associated with certain behaviors. They are used in diagnosing brain dysfunction or damage and central nervous system disorders or injury.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Serotonin Plasma Membrane Transport Proteins: Sodium chloride-dependent neurotransmitter symporters located primarily on the PLASMA MEMBRANE of serotonergic neurons. They are different than SEROTONIN RECEPTORS, which signal cellular responses to SEROTONIN. They remove SEROTONIN from the EXTRACELLULAR SPACE by high affinity reuptake into PRESYNAPTIC TERMINALS. Regulates signal amplitude and duration at serotonergic synapses and is the site of action of the SEROTONIN UPTAKE INHIBITORS.Delusions: A false belief regarding the self or persons or objects outside the self that persists despite the facts, and is not considered tenable by one's associates.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Psychotropic Drugs: A loosely defined grouping of drugs that have effects on psychological function. Here the psychotropic agents include the antidepressive agents, hallucinogens, and tranquilizing agents (including the antipsychotics and anti-anxiety agents).Serotonin: A biochemical messenger and regulator, synthesized from the essential amino acid L-TRYPTOPHAN. In humans it is found primarily in the central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and blood platelets. Serotonin mediates several important physiological functions including neurotransmission, gastrointestinal motility, hemostasis, and cardiovascular integrity. Multiple receptor families (RECEPTORS, SEROTONIN) explain the broad physiological actions and distribution of this biochemical mediator.Conduct Disorder: A repetitive and persistent pattern of behavior in which the basic rights of others or major age-appropriate societal norms or rules are violated. These behaviors include aggressive conduct that causes or threatens physical harm to other people or animals, nonaggressive conduct that causes property loss or damage, deceitfulness or theft, and serious violations of rules. The onset is before age 18. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Psychoanalytic Theory: Conceptual system developed by Freud and his followers in which unconscious motivations are considered to shape normal and abnormal personality development and behavior.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.Somatoform Disorders: Disorders having the presence of physical symptoms that suggest a general medical condition but that are not fully explained by a another medical condition, by the direct effects of a substance, or by another mental disorder. The symptoms must cause clinically significant distress or impairment in social, occupational, or other areas of functioning. In contrast to FACTITIOUS DISORDERS and MALINGERING, the physical symptoms are not under voluntary control. (APA, DSM-V)Psychiatric Department, Hospital: Hospital department responsible for the organization and administration of psychiatric services.Child of Impaired Parents: Child with one or more parents afflicted by a physical or mental disorder.Schizophrenia, Paranoid: A chronic form of schizophrenia characterized primarily by the presence of persecutory or grandiose delusions, often associated with hallucination.Severity of Illness Index: Levels within a diagnostic group which are established by various measurement criteria applied to the seriousness of a patient's disorder.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Prefrontal Cortex: The rostral part of the frontal lobe, bounded by the inferior precentral fissure in humans, which receives projection fibers from the MEDIODORSAL NUCLEUS OF THE THALAMUS. The prefrontal cortex receives afferent fibers from numerous structures of the DIENCEPHALON; MESENCEPHALON; and LIMBIC SYSTEM as well as cortical afferents of visual, auditory, and somatic origin.Prodromal Symptoms: Clinical or physiological indicators that precede the onset of disease.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Sleep Disorders: Conditions characterized by disturbances of usual sleep patterns or behaviors. Sleep disorders may be divided into three major categories: DYSSOMNIAS (i.e. disorders characterized by insomnia or hypersomnia), PARASOMNIAS (abnormal sleep behaviors), and sleep disorders secondary to medical or psychiatric disorders. (From Thorpy, Sleep Disorders Medicine, 1994, p187)Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Melatonin: A biogenic amine that is found in animals and plants. In mammals, melatonin is produced by the PINEAL GLAND. Its secretion increases in darkness and decreases during exposure to light. Melatonin is implicated in the regulation of SLEEP, mood, and REPRODUCTION. Melatonin is also an effective antioxidant.Age of Onset: The age, developmental stage, or period of life at which a disease or the initial symptoms or manifestations of a disease appear in an individual.Community Mental Health Centers: Facilities which administer the delivery of psychologic and psychiatric services to people living in a neighborhood or community.Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Tryptophan Hydroxylase: An enzyme that catalyzes the hydroxylation of TRYPTOPHAN to 5-HYDROXYTRYPTOPHAN in the presence of NADPH and molecular oxygen. It is important in the biosynthesis of SEROTONIN.Personality Disorders: A major deviation from normal patterns of behavior.
... bipolar affective disorder; and other congenital disorders . In particular, the short stature and small brain size ... This gene is implicated in many diseases and disorders, including congenital disorders such as microcephalic osteodysplastic ... which is essential for bipolar spindle formation and chromosome assembly in early mitosis. This ensures normal function and ...
Farmer A, Elkin A, McGuffin P (Jan 2007). "The genetics of bipolar affective disorder". Current Opinion in Psychiatry. 20 (1): ... and an investigation of their association with schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder". Psychiatric Genetics. 11 (2): 71- ... schizoaffective disorder, and bipolar disorder". American Journal of Human Genetics. 75 (5): 862-72. doi:10.1086/425586. PMC ... Blackwood DH, Fordyce A, Walker MT, St Clair DM, Porteous DJ, Muir WJ (Aug 2001). "Schizophrenia and affective disorders-- ...
Blackwood, D. H.; Visscher, P. M.; Muir, W. J. (2001). "Genetic studies of bipolar affective disorder in large families". The ... "Re-evaluation of the linkage relationship between chromosome 11p loci and the gene for bipolar affective disorder in the Old ... "A genome-wide search for chromosomal loci linked to bipolar affective disorder in the Old Order Amish". Nature Genetics. 12 (4 ... search for chromosomal loci linked to mental health wellness in relatives at high risk for bipolar affective disorder among the ...
Blackwood DH, Visscher PM, Muir WJ (Jun 2001). "Genetic studies of bipolar affective disorder in large families". The British ... bipolar affective disorder, and recurrent major depression) was found to be 7.1. Besides large familial-based studies in which ... multiply affected with bipolar disorder also provide evidence for DISC1 as a genetic factor in the etiology of bipolar disorder ... Blackwood DH, Fordyce A, Walker MT, St Clair DM, Porteous DJ, Muir WJ (Aug 2001). "Schizophrenia and affective disorders-- ...
Seasonal affective disorder, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder) exists. Melatonin levels can also be used as a ... Melatonin levels are used as a trait marker for mood disorders, meaning that abnormal levels of melatonin can be used in ... 2010). "Mutation screening of melatonin-related genes in patients with autism spectrum disorders". BMC Med Genomics. 3: 10. doi ... 2007). "Is ASMT a susceptibility gene for autism spectrum disorders? A replication study in European populations". Mol. ...
"Neuroleptic-induced supersensitivity psychosis in patients with bipolar affective disorder". Acta Psychiatr Scand. 81 (5): 437- ... Diagnostic criteria for the disorder and its treatment". Schizophr Res. 5 (1): 21-33. doi:10.1016/0920-9964(91)90050-2. PMID ...
Bansal S, Gupta SK (November 2013). "Sodium Valproate induced priapism in an adult with bipolar affective disorder". Indian ... Priapism may be associated with haematological disorders, especially sickle-cell disease, sickle-cell trait, and other ... conditions such as leukemia, thalassemia, and Fabry's disease, and neurologic disorders such as spinal cord lesions and spinal ...
"The role of the arginine-nitric oxide pathway in the pathogenesis of bipolar affective disorder". European Archives of ... A role for NO in various common psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder ... "Possible role of nitric oxide and adrenomedullin in bipolar affective disorder". Neuropsychobiology. 45 (2): 57-61. doi:10.1159 ... Journal of Affective Disorders. 129 (1-3): 175-82. doi:10.1016/j.jad.2010.09.005. PMID 20888049. Dhir, A; Kulkarni, SK (April ...
"Cytokine profiles in bipolar affective disorder: Focus on acutely ill patients". Journal of Affective Disorders. 90 (2-3): 263- ... Recent studies show pro-inflammatory cytokine processes take place during clinical depression, mania and bipolar disorder, and ... Schildkraut, JJ (1995). "The catecholamine hypothesis of affective disorders: A review of supporting evidence. 1965". The ... former patients with major affective disorder". Neuropsychopharmacology. 16 (4): 294-297. doi:10.1016/s0893-133x(96)00262-x. ...
"The use of lithium in affective disorders, III: a double-blind study of prophylaxis in bipolar illness."American Journal of ... "A possible vulnerability locus for bipolar affective disorder on chromosome 21q22. 3." Nature genetics 8, no. 3 (1994): 291-296 ... Mania: A Short History of Bipolar Disorder David Healy, JHU Press, 29 Dec 2010 Lithium: From Introduction to Public Awareness. ... "The use of lithium in affective disorders: I. Acute endogenous depression." American Journal of Psychiatry 125, no. 4 (1968): ...
Secondary Axis II disorders, bipolar affective disorders, dual diagnosis • Dual Diagnosis: Secondary substance abuse with early ... Skyland Trail specializes in treating adults with Bipolar Disorder, Schizophrenia, Depression, and Dual Diagnosis. In the early ... Community types are: • Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT): Major depressive disorders, anxiety disorders, psychotic illnesses ... Skyland Trail treats patients with a primary diagnosis of mental illness with related substance abuse disorders. Dual Diagnosis ...
Affective disorders include depression, anxiety, and bi-polar disorder. A number of approaches have been utilized to study the ... Affective disorders are characterized by a frequent, fluctuating alteration in mood, affecting the patient's thoughts, emotions ... Elevated levels of tachykinins in CSF have been found in patients with fibromyalgia syndrome which is a disorder that is ... role that neurokinin A plays in the manifestation and continuation of human affective disorders. The measurement of serum ...
情感光譜(如漸層般的情感程度差異)(英语:Affective spectrum). *躁鬱症 *Bipolar I(英语:Bipolar I disorder) ... 躁鬱症分成第一型躁鬱症(英语:bipolar I disorder)與第二型躁鬱症(英语:bipolar II disorder)。它們的差別在於第一型是只要一次狂躁期發作,不論是否有鬱期出現,而第二型則
... bipolar affective disorder, current episode manic without psychotic symptoms (F31.1), bipolar affective disorder, current ... "A quantitative meta-analysis of fMRI studies in bipolar disorder". Bipolar Disorders. 13 (1): 1-15. doi:10.1111/j.1399- ... is sufficient to diagnose bipolar I disorder. Hypomania may be indicative of bipolar II disorder. Manic episodes are often ... "Suicide attempts and psychological risk factors in patients with bipolar and unipolar affective disorder". Gen Hosp Psychiatry ...
"Bipolar disorder, affective psychosis, and schizophrenia in pregnancy and the post-partum period". Lancet. 384 (9956): 1789-99 ... of women after birth and is similar to major depressive disorder. Women with a history of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, ... It may be a form of bipolar disorder. Symptoms usually begin suddenly in the first two weeks after delivery, sometimes in the ... around 37% of women with bipolar disorder have a severe postpartum episode. Women with a prior episode of postpartum psychosis ...
... association with bipolar affective disorder". Molecular Psychiatry. 4 (6): 545-51. doi:10.1038/sj.mp.4000559. PMID 10578236. ... 601 and a four-base pair deletion at 722-725 in exon 1 in relation to bipolar disorder and autism. No direct correlation ... Single nucleotide polymorphisms and other gene variations have been investigated in relation to neuropsychiatric disorders, e.g ... a patient registry was established by the noncommercial International Working Group on Neurotransmitter Related Disorders (iNTD ...
Soreff S, McInnes LA, Ahmed I, Talavera F (5 August 2013). "Bipolar Affective Disorder Treatment & Management". Medscape ... bipolar disorder, autism, and as an adjunct in major depressive disorder. Both generations of medication tend to block ... has demonstrated some efficacy in the acute depressive phase of bipolar disorder. In non-psychotic major depressive disorder ( ... In bipolar disorder, SGAs are most commonly used to rapidly control acute mania and mixed episodes, often in conjunction with ...
In 1992 John was diagnosed with clinical depression and, subsequently with bipolar affective disorder. John's general ... explaining that he often found it difficult to control his disorder. The tribunal found that several events had occurred in ...
"Association between a polymorphism in the pseudoautosomal X-linked gene SYBL1 and bipolar affective disorder". Am. J. Med. ...
"The case of King Saul: did he have recurrent unipolar depression or bipolar affective disorder? - psychiatry in the Old ... believes that passages referring to King Saul's disturbed behavior indicate he was afflicted by a mental disorder, and lists a ...
2006). "No association between genetic variants at the GLYT2 gene and bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia". Psychiatr ...
2000). "A rare coding variant within the wolframin gene in bipolar and unipolar affective disorder cases". Neurosci. Lett. 277 ... detection of five missense polymorphisms but no association with depression or bipolar affective disorder". Journal of ... Affective Disorders. 58 (1): 11-7. doi:10.1016/S0165-0327(99)00099-3. PMID 10760554. Gómez-Zaera M, Strom TM, Rodríguez B, et ... GeneReviews/NCBI/NIH/UW entry on WFS1-Related Disorders This article incorporates text from the United States National Library ...
"Journal of Affective Disorder. 4 (31): 281-294.. *↑ Schürhoff, F. (2000). „Early and late onset bipolar disorders: two ... Lam, D. Wright, K. og Smith, N. (2004). „Dysfunctional assumptions in bipolar disorder". Journal of Affective Disorders. 79 (1- ... Angst, J. (1998). „The emerging epidemiology of hypomania and bipolar II disorder". Journal of Affective Disorders. 50 (2-3): ... Engström, C. (2004). „Bipolar disorder. III: harm avoidance a risk factor for suicide attempts". Bipolar Disorders. 6 (2): 130- ...
... bipolar II, cyclothymia and seasonal affective disorder. Depressive episodes in bipolar disorder tend to have atypical features ... avoidant personality disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and bipolar disorder. Recent ... 2000). Mood Disorders. In Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.) Washington, DC: Author.[ ... Similarly, patients with atypical depression are more likely to suffer from personality disorders and anxiety disorders such as ...
... psychotic depression and mixed affective episodes among 14,529 patients with bipolar disorder". Journal of Affective Disorders ... It can occur in the context of bipolar disorder or major depressive disorder. It can be difficult to distinguish from ... monotherapy in major depressive disorder: A placebo-controlled, randomized study". Journal of Affective Disorders. 128 (1-2): ... Unlike psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, patients with psychotic depression generally ...
... depressive and bipolar II disorders: Evidence that they lie on a dimensional spectrum". Journal of Affective Disorders 92 (1): ... "Prevention of Mental Disorders, Substance Abuse, and Problem Behaviors: A Developmental Perspective. National Academies Press. ... "What is a mental disorder? A perspective from cognitive-affective science" (PDF). Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 58 (12): 656- ... 1.0 1.1 1.2 "Mental disorders" (October 2014). மூல முகவரியிலிருந்து 18 May 2015 அன்று பரணிடப்பட்டது. பார்த்த நாள் 13 May 2015. ...
BIPOLAR DISORDER. *Bipolar disorder is a brain disorder frequently characterized by periods of abnormally elevated mood (mania ... Depression (Schizophrenia, BiPolar Disorder and Seasonal Affective Disorder). Depression can best be defined as a whole-body ... The two major classifications of depressive disorders are unipolar and bipolar. Unipolar disorders are characterized by ... SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER (SAD). SAD is a type of depression that usually occurs during the darker, shorter days of winter ...
The term seasonal affective disorder (SAD) describes episodes of major depression, mania, or hypomania that regularly occur ... The seasonality of bipolar affective disorder: comparison with a primary care sample using the Seasonal Pattern Assessment ... Seasonal affective disorder - Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is defined as recurrent episodes of major depression, mania, or ... Treatment of seasonal affective disorder: unipolar versus bipolar differences. Curr Psychiatry Rep 2004; 6:478. ...
Bipolar Disorder in Teens. *Bipolar Disorder Medications. *Bipolar Q & A. *Bipolar Disorder Quiz *All Bipolar Disorder Articles ... Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a category of depression that emerges in particular seasons of the year. Most people ... Persons with seasonal affective disorder experience the symptoms at a particular time of year. With the changing of seasons, ... Its never too late if youre already experiencing symptoms of seasonal affective disorder. Seeking treatment can help prevent ...
Seasonal Affective Disorder is a type of clinical depression that is triggered only at particular time of the year; it occurs ... Patients with bipolar disorder may suffer from symptoms like hyperactivity, elevated mood and rapid thoughts and speech. ... Causes and Risk Factors of Seasonal Affective Disorder. The exact cause of SAD is unknown. However, it is believed to be due to ... Seasonal Affective Disorder Better Prevented With Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Than Light Therapy. An American psychologist has ...
... and depression in borderline and antisocial personality disorders and bipolar type II affective disorder. J Pers Disord. 1988;2 ... Life events and affective disorders. Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2003;108:61-66. [PubMed] ... major depressive disorder as assessed by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders - patient version (SCID- ... Violence and psychiatric disorders: results from an epidemiological study of young adults in Israel. Psychiatr Q. 1997;68:327- ...
But seasonal affective disorder is officially recognized as sort of a subset of two different mental problems: bipolar disorder ... Granite Geek: Seasonal Affective Disorder is Not Just The Winter Blues By Peter Biello • Feb 21, 2017 ... What else does seasonal affective disorder entail?. Exactly, which is kind of the reason were talking about it. Its sort of a ... Even if you do feel a little down its not necessarily seasonal affective disorder. Its more than just feeling sad. ...
SAD is not identified as a separate mood disorder but rather a subtype of major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. Under ... Seasonal affective disorder. Am Fam Physician. 2012;86(11):1037-1041.. 2. Meesters Y, Gordijn MC. Seasonal affective disorder, ... Seasonal Affective Disorder: Focus on the Winter Blues. Maria Macchiarulo, PharmD Candidate 2018. St. Johns University, ... known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD). Pharmacists in particular may be helpful in detecting this disorder, which can ...
Seasonal affective disorder and vitamin D deficiency can have damaging effects on seniors physical and mental health. ... Supposedly if you have any kind of bipolar disorder a light box could cause mania. But a dawn simulator seems to be safer. It ... Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a form of depression that cycles with the seasons. It can occur during any time of the ... but seniors are also at risk for some lesser-known health hazards like seasonal affective disorder and vitamin D deficiency. ...
... photoneuronic energizer for providing a headworn portable full spectrum light source to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder ... A method of treating Seasonal Affective Disorder is described using a portable ... While current light therapy utilizing stationary indoor apparatus is being applied to patients with bipolar type II SAD in ... It is a further object to provide an improved method to treat Seasonal Affective Disorder that is effective, easy to use and ...
Learn how the condition is associated with substance use disorders. ... Seasonal affective disorder a form of depression that often occurs during winter months. ... seasonal affective disorder can cause long-term depression or bipolar disorder. Additionally, drug or alcohol use can worsen ... Seasonal Affective Disorder and Drinking Problems. Individuals with seasonal affective disorder may be prone to alcohol ...
You can also get hypomanias in spring if you have the full-on version of SAD because it actually counts as a "bipolar" disorder ... You dont BELIEVE in Seasonal Affective Disorder? Do you BELIEVE in non-seasonal affective disorder? What about other mental ... In the past, I wasnt a believer in Seasonal Affective Disorder, or SAD. I thought it was as believable as global warming. ( ... A lot of people describe this as having "cabin fever." Maybe its just this seasonal affective disorder after all. Heres a ...
If youre like most people with seasonal affective disorder, your symptoms start in the fall and may continue into the winter ... Less often, seasonal affective disorder causes depression in the spring or early summer. ... Seasonal affective disorder (also called SAD) is a type of depression that occurs at the same time every year. ... Seasonal affective disorder is considered a subtype of depression or bipolar disorder. Even with a thorough evaluation, it can ...
But how real is seasonal affective disorder (aptly known as SAD)? ... subtype of a mood disorder like depression or bipolar disorder ... Can Winter Really Make You Sick? The Truth About Seasonal Affective Disorder ... Can Winter Really Make You Sick? The Truth About Seasonal Affective Disorder. ... Where is the line between SAD and the simple doldrums? How much winter sadness is the product of a mood-based disorder, and how ...
This pattern may be associated with Bipolar I Disorder, Bipolar II Disorder, or Major Depressive Disorder. ... This term usually applies to recurrent winter depression, but other affective episodes may have a seasonal pattern, and ...
... recovery and follow-up care for Seasonal affective disorder. ... Learn about Seasonal affective disorder, find a doctor, ... Depression is defined as a mood disorder, and there are several subtypes. Bipolar disorder, also known as manic-depressive ... Osborn J, Raetz J, Kost A. Seasonal affective disorder, grief reaction, and adjustment disorder. Med Clin North Am. 2014;98: ... Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that occurs at a certain time of the year, usually in winter. ...
Seasonal affective disorder is a type of depression that occurs at a certain time each year, usually in the fall or winter. ... Light therapy is a way to treat seasonal affective disorder (SAD) by exposure to artificial light. ... Caution for bipolar disorder. Light therapy may trigger mania in some people with bipolar disorder. If you have any concerns ... Light therapy is a way to treat seasonal affective disorder (SAD) by exposure to artificial light. Seasonal affective disorder ...
Seasonal affective disorder is a condition that consists of depressive episodes that are recurrent in the months of winter and ... It may be applied as a seasonal pattern specifier to recurrent major depressive disorders or to bipolar I or II disorders. Up ... How To Deal With Seasonal Affective Disorder. Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a condition that consists of depressive ... Some of the symptoms of seasonal affective disorder include:. *Sleep problems where one is sleepy during the day but also finds ...
Something needs to be done about my Seasonal Affective Disorder and how insufferably cheerful and gratingly pleasant I get ... STAND UP TO STIGMA MENTAL HEALTH PEER SUPPORT GROUPS - Albuquerque, New Mexico - Depression Bipolar Schizophrenia Anxiety etc. ... My Seasonal Affective Disorder is a Real Drag this Time of Year. Something needs to be done about my Seasonal Affective ... My Seasonal Affective Disorder is a Real Drag this Time of Year July 4, 2019 ...
Bipolar affective disorder, or manic-depressive illness (MDI), is a common, severe, and persistent mental illness. This ... What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder, sometimes known as manic depression, is a type of mental disorder where people ... encoded search term (Bipolar%20Affective%20Disorder) and Bipolar Affective Disorder What to Read Next on Medscape. Medscape ... Diagnostic Precursors to Bipolar Disorder in Offspring of Parents With Bipolar Disorder: A Longitudinal Study. Am J Psychiatry ...
... also known as manic depression or bipolar depression, is a mood disorder. Find out more about the symptoms, causes, diagnosis, ... What is Bipolar affective disorder?. Bipolar affective disorder, also known as manic depression or bipolar depression, is a ... Bipolar affective disorder (manic depression): symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and outlook. Bipolar affective disorder is also ... Bipolar disorder causes. Bipolar affective disorder is thought to be due to an imbalance of chemical transmitters in the brain. ...
Previously known as manic depression, bipolar disorder was once thought to occur rarely in youth. ... Bipolar disorder is a mood disorder in which feelings, thoughts, behaviors, and perceptions are altered in the context of ... encoded search term (Pediatric Bipolar Affective Disorder) and Pediatric Bipolar Affective Disorder What to Read Next on ... The risk for bipolar disorder in the offspring of a couple in which 1 parent has bipolar disorder was estimated to be 30-35%. ...
It is also called bipolar affective disorder and manic-depressive disorder. ... Bipolar disorder is a brain disorder, or mental illness, that causes changes in mood, as well as activities, and leads to ... Bipolar Affective Disorder News. Bipolar disorder is a brain disorder, or mental illness, that causes changes in mood, as well ... It is also called bipolar affective disorder and manic-depressive disorder. When people have bipolar disorder, their changes in ...
Mood Disorders. Bipolar Disorder. Pathologic Processes. Mental Disorders. Bipolar and Related Disorders. Genetic Diseases, ... Cannabinoids in Bipolar Affective Disorder. The safety and scientific validity of this study is the responsibility of the study ... Bipolar Affective Disorder Drug: Synthetic cannabinoids (1:1 ratio of THC % CBD) Not Applicable ... Some people with bipolar disorder who use cannabis (marijuana) claim that it eases the symptoms of depression and mania. There ...
The treatment of bipolar disorder is directly related to the phase of the episode (ie, depression or mania) and the severity of ... Drugs & Diseases , Psychiatry , Bipolar Disorder Q&A What is the focus of treatment for bipolar affective disorder (manic- ... What is bipolar disorder? Bipolar disorder, sometimes known as manic depression, is a type of mental disorder where people ... Diagnostic Precursors to Bipolar Disorder in Offspring of Parents With Bipolar Disorder: A Longitudinal Study. Am J Psychiatry ...
The project aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a Collaborative Therapy self management package for people with bipolar ... to explore issues associated with bipolar disorder. Key issues included: education and understanding of bipolar disorder, ... A self-management therapy treatment package for people with bipolar-affective disorder. Principal Researchers. Prof. David ... Phase one of the project has identified the needs and gaps in treatment of people with bipolar disorder from a range of ...
  • SAD is diagnosed according to the criteria in the American Psychiatric Association's Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition ( DSM-5 ). (uspharmacist.com)
  • In addition, people recovering from substance abuse disorders may relapse if they don't practice healthy techniques for managing stress . (drugrehab.com)
  • Falls and hypothermia are likely to top the list of caregiver concerns during the icy winter months, but seniors are also at risk for some lesser-known health hazards like seasonal affective disorder and vitamin D deficiency. (agingcare.com)
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