Biological Warfare: Warfare involving the use of living organisms or their products as disease etiologic agents against people, animals, or plants.Disaster Planning: Procedures outlined for the care of casualties and the maintenance of services in disasters.Smallpox: An acute, highly contagious, often fatal infectious disease caused by an orthopoxvirus characterized by a biphasic febrile course and distinctive progressive skin eruptions. Vaccination has succeeded in eradicating smallpox worldwide. (Dorland, 28th ed)Civil Defense: Preventive emergency measures and programs designed to protect the individual or community in times of hostile attack.Anthrax: An acute infection caused by the spore-forming bacteria BACILLUS ANTHRACIS. It commonly affects hoofed animals such as sheep and goats. Infection in humans often involves the skin (cutaneous anthrax), the lungs (inhalation anthrax), or the gastrointestinal tract. Anthrax is not contagious and can be treated with antibiotics.Security Measures: Regulations to assure protection of property and equipment.Biological Warfare Agents: Living organisms or their toxic products that are used to cause disease or death of humans during WARFARE.Bacillus anthracis: A species of bacteria that causes ANTHRAX in humans and animals.Smallpox Vaccine: A live VACCINIA VIRUS vaccine of calf lymph or chick embryo origin, used for immunization against smallpox. It is now recommended only for laboratory workers exposed to smallpox virus. Certain countries continue to vaccinate those in the military service. Complications that result from smallpox vaccination include vaccinia, secondary bacterial infections, and encephalomyelitis. (Dorland, 28th ed)Tularemia: A plague-like disease of rodents, transmissible to man. It is caused by FRANCISELLA TULARENSIS and is characterized by fever, chills, headache, backache, and weakness.Francisella tularensis: The etiologic agent of TULAREMIA in man and other warm-blooded animals.Legislation, Food: Laws and regulations concerned with industrial processing and marketing of foods.Mass Behavior: Collective behavior of an aggregate of individuals giving the appearance of unity of attitude, feeling, and motivation.Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.): An agency of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that conducts and supports programs for the prevention and control of disease and provides consultation and assistance to health departments and other countries.Panic: A state of extreme acute, intense anxiety and unreasoning fear accompanied by disorganization of personality function.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Disease Outbreaks: Sudden increase in the incidence of a disease. The concept includes EPIDEMICS and PANDEMICS.Plague: An acute infectious disease caused by YERSINIA PESTIS that affects humans, wild rodents, and their ectoparasites. This condition persists due to its firm entrenchment in sylvatic rodent-flea ecosystems throughout the world. Bubonic plague is the most common form.Public Health Informatics: The systematic application of information and computer sciences to public health practice, research, and learning.Variola virus: A species of ORTHOPOXVIRUS causing infections in humans. No infections have been reported since 1977 and the virus is now believed to be virtually extinct.Public Health Administration: Management of public health organizations or agencies.United States Government Agencies: Agencies of the FEDERAL GOVERNMENT of the United States.Communicable DiseasesMedical Laboratory Personnel: Health care professionals, technicians, and assistants staffing LABORATORIES in research or health care facilities.Social Control Policies: Decisions for determining and guiding present and future objectives from among alternatives.Monkeypox: A viral disease infecting PRIMATES and RODENTS. Its clinical presentation in humans is similar to SMALLPOX including FEVER; HEADACHE; COUGH; and a painful RASH. It is caused by MONKEYPOX VIRUS and is usually transmitted to humans through BITES or via contact with an animal's BLOOD. Interhuman transmission is relatively low (significantly less than smallpox).Laboratory Infection: Accidentally acquired infection in laboratory workers.Education, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Public Health Practice: The activities and endeavors of the public health services in a community on any level.Botulism: A disease caused by potent protein NEUROTOXINS produced by CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM which interfere with the presynaptic release of ACETYLCHOLINE at the NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION. Clinical features include abdominal pain, vomiting, acute PARALYSIS (including respiratory paralysis), blurred vision, and DIPLOPIA. Botulism may be classified into several subtypes (e.g., food-borne, infant, wound, and others). (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1208)Yersinia pestis: The etiologic agent of PLAGUE in man, rats, ground squirrels, and other rodents.Microbiology: The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.Refusal to Treat: Refusal of the health professional to initiate or continue treatment of a patient or group of patients. The refusal can be based on any reason. The concept is differentiated from PATIENT REFUSAL OF TREATMENT see TREATMENT REFUSAL which originates with the patient and not the health professional.Population Surveillance: Ongoing scrutiny of a population (general population, study population, target population, etc.), generally using methods distinguished by their practicability, uniformity, and frequently their rapidity, rather than by complete accuracy.Filoviridae: A family of RNA viruses, of the order MONONEGAVIRALES, containing filamentous virions. Although they resemble RHABDOVIRIDAE in possessing helical nucleocapsids, Filoviridae differ in the length and degree of branching in their virions. There are two genera: EBOLAVIRUS and MARBURGVIRUS.Law Enforcement: Organized efforts to insure obedience to the laws of a community.Sentinel Surveillance: Monitoring of rate of occurrence of specific conditions to assess the stability or change in health levels of a population. It is also the study of disease rates in a specific cohort such as in a geographic area or population subgroup to estimate trends in a larger population. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Communicable Diseases, Emerging: Infectious diseases that are novel in their outbreak ranges (geographic and host) or transmission mode.United StatesAnthrax Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent ANTHRAX.Laboratories: Facilities equipped to carry out investigative procedures.Burkholderia pseudomallei: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that causes MELIOIDOSIS. It has been isolated from soil and water in tropical regions, particularly Southeast Asia.Disease Notification: Notification or reporting by a physician or other health care provider of the occurrence of specified contagious diseases such as tuberculosis and HIV infections to designated public health agencies. The United States system of reporting notifiable diseases evolved from the Quarantine Act of 1878, which authorized the US Public Health Service to collect morbidity data on cholera, smallpox, and yellow fever; each state in the US has its own list of notifiable diseases and depends largely on reporting by the individual health care provider. (From Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Orthopoxvirus: A genus of the family POXVIRIDAE, subfamily CHORDOPOXVIRINAE, comprising many species infecting mammals. Viruses of this genus cause generalized infections and a rash in some hosts. The type species is VACCINIA VIRUS.Communicable Disease Control: Programs of surveillance designed to prevent the transmission of disease by any means from person to person or from animal to man.Terrorism: The use or threatened use of force or violence against persons or property in violation of criminal laws for purposes of intimidation, coercion, or ransom, in support of political or social objectives.Mass Vaccination: Administration of a vaccine to large populations in order to elicit IMMUNITY.Monkeypox virus: A species of ORTHOPOXVIRUS causing an epidemic disease among captive primates.Ebola Vaccines: Vaccines or candidate vaccines used to prevent EBOLA HEMORRHAGIC FEVER.Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola: A highly fatal, acute hemorrhagic fever, clinically very similar to MARBURG VIRUS DISEASE, caused by EBOLAVIRUS, first occurring in the Sudan and adjacent northwestern (what was then) Zaire.Ebolavirus: A genus in the family FILOVIRIDAE consisting of several distinct species of Ebolavirus, each containing separate strains. These viruses cause outbreaks of a contagious, hemorrhagic disease (HEMORRHAGIC FEVER, EBOLA) in humans, usually with high mortality.Melioidosis: A disease of humans and animals that resembles GLANDERS. It is caused by BURKHOLDERIA PSEUDOMALLEI and may range from a dormant infection to a condition that causes multiple abscesses, pneumonia, and bacteremia.Planning Techniques: Procedures, strategies, and theories of planning.Doxycycline: A synthetic tetracycline derivative with similar antimicrobial activity.Rickettsia prowazekii: A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is the etiologic agent of epidemic typhus fever acquired through contact with lice (TYPHUS, EPIDEMIC LOUSE-BORNE) as well as Brill's disease.Information Systems: Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.Vaccinia: The cutaneous and occasional systemic reactions associated with vaccination using smallpox (variola) vaccine.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Vaccinia virus: The type species of ORTHOPOXVIRUS, related to COWPOX VIRUS, but whose true origin is unknown. It has been used as a live vaccine against SMALLPOX. It is also used as a vector for inserting foreign DNA into animals. Rabbitpox virus is a subspecies of VACCINIA VIRUS.Interinstitutional Relations: The interactions between representatives of institutions, agencies, or organizations.Coxiella burnetii: A species of gram-negative bacteria that grows preferentially in the vacuoles of the host cell. It is the etiological agent of Q FEVER.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Q Fever: An acute infectious disease caused by COXIELLA BURNETII. It is characterized by a sudden onset of FEVER; HEADACHE; malaise; and weakness. In humans, it is commonly contracted by inhalation of infected dusts derived from infected domestic animals (ANIMALS, DOMESTIC).Antitoxins: Antisera from immunized animals that is purified and used as a passive immunizing agent against specific BACTERIAL TOXINS.Inhalation Exposure: The exposure to potentially harmful chemical, physical, or biological agents by inhaling them.Vaccines: Suspensions of killed or attenuated microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa), antigenic proteins, synthetic constructs, or other bio-molecular derivatives, administered for the prevention, amelioration, or treatment of infectious and other diseases.Viruses: Minute infectious agents whose genomes are composed of DNA or RNA, but not both. They are characterized by a lack of independent metabolism and the inability to replicate outside living host cells.Air Microbiology: The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the air. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.Disease Transmission, Infectious: The transmission of infectious disease or pathogens. When transmission is within the same species, the mode can be horizontal or vertical (INFECTIOUS DISEASE TRANSMISSION, VERTICAL).Vaccination: Administration of vaccines to stimulate the host's immune response. This includes any preparation intended for active immunological prophylaxis.Spores, Bacterial: Heat and stain resistant, metabolically inactive bodies formed within the vegetative cells of bacteria of the genera Bacillus and Clostridium.Aerosols: Colloids with a gaseous dispersing phase and either liquid (fog) or solid (smoke) dispersed phase; used in fumigation or in inhalation therapy; may contain propellant agents.Botulinum Toxins, Type A: A serotype of botulinum toxins that has specificity for cleavage of SYNAPTOSOMAL-ASSOCIATED PROTEIN 25.Botulinum Toxins: Toxic proteins produced from the species CLOSTRIDIUM BOTULINUM. The toxins are synthesized as a single peptide chain which is processed into a mature protein consisting of a heavy chain and light chain joined via a disulfide bond. The botulinum toxin light chain is a zinc-dependent protease which is released from the heavy chain upon ENDOCYTOSIS into PRESYNAPTIC NERVE ENDINGS. Once inside the cell the botulinum toxin light chain cleaves specific SNARE proteins which are essential for secretion of ACETYLCHOLINE by SYNAPTIC VESICLES. This inhibition of acetylcholine release results in muscular PARALYSIS.World Health: The concept pertaining to the health status of inhabitants of the world.International Cooperation: The interaction of persons or groups of persons representing various nations in the pursuit of a common goal or interest.Infection Control: Programs of disease surveillance, generally within health care facilities, designed to investigate, prevent, and control the spread of infections and their causative microorganisms.Guidelines as Topic: A systematic statement of policy rules or principles. Guidelines may be developed by government agencies at any level, institutions, professional societies, governing boards, or by convening expert panels. The text may be cursive or in outline form but is generally a comprehensive guide to problems and approaches in any field of activity. For guidelines in the field of health care and clinical medicine, PRACTICE GUIDELINES AS TOPIC is available.Vaccines, Attenuated: Live vaccines prepared from microorganisms which have undergone physical adaptation (e.g., by radiation or temperature conditioning) or serial passage in laboratory animal hosts or infected tissue/cell cultures, in order to produce avirulent mutant strains capable of inducing protective immunity.Bacterial Vaccines: Suspensions of attenuated or killed bacteria administered for the prevention or treatment of infectious bacterial disease.Virulence: The degree of pathogenicity within a group or species of microorganisms or viruses as indicated by case fatality rates and/or the ability of the organism to invade the tissues of the host. The pathogenic capacity of an organism is determined by its VIRULENCE FACTORS.Bacterial Toxins: Toxic substances formed in or elaborated by bacteria; they are usually proteins with high molecular weight and antigenicity; some are used as antibiotics and some to skin test for the presence of or susceptibility to certain diseases.Polymerase Chain Reaction: In vitro method for producing large amounts of specific DNA or RNA fragments of defined length and sequence from small amounts of short oligonucleotide flanking sequences (primers). The essential steps include thermal denaturation of the double-stranded target molecules, annealing of the primers to their complementary sequences, and extension of the annealed primers by enzymatic synthesis with DNA polymerase. The reaction is efficient, specific, and extremely sensitive. Uses for the reaction include disease diagnosis, detection of difficult-to-isolate pathogens, mutation analysis, genetic testing, DNA sequencing, and analyzing evolutionary relationships.Bioterrorism: The use of biological agents in TERRORISM. This includes the malevolent use of BACTERIA; VIRUSES; or other BIOLOGICAL TOXINS against people, ANIMALS; or PLANTS.DNA, Bacterial: Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.Anti-Bacterial Agents: Substances that reduce the growth or reproduction of BACTERIA.Mice, Inbred BALB CInfluenza, Human: An acute viral infection in humans involving the respiratory tract. It is marked by inflammation of the NASAL MUCOSA; the PHARYNX; and conjunctiva, and by headache and severe, often generalized, myalgia.Antigens, Bacterial: Substances elaborated by bacteria that have antigenic activity.Antibodies, Bacterial: Immunoglobulins produced in a response to BACTERIAL ANTIGENS.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Disease Models, Animal: Naturally occurring or experimentally induced animal diseases with pathological processes sufficiently similar to those of human diseases. They are used as study models for human diseases.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Sequence Analysis, DNA: A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.Bacterial Proteins: Proteins found in any species of bacterium.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.

Implications of pandemic influenza for bioterrorism response. (1/535)

The 1918-1919 influenza pandemic (Spanish flu) had catastrophic effects upon urban populations in the United States. Large numbers of frightened, critically ill people overwhelmed health care providers. Mortuaries and cemeteries were severely strained by rapid accumulation of corpses of flu victims. Understanding of the outbreak's extent and effectiveness of containment measures was obscured by the swiftness of the disease and an inadequate health reporting system. Epidemic controls such as closing public gathering places elicited both community support and resistance, and fear of contagion incited social and ethnic tensions. Review of this infamous outbreak is intended to advance discussions among health professionals and policymakers about an effective medical and public health response to bioterrorism, an infectious disease crisis of increasing likelihood. Elements of an adequate response include building capacity to care for mass casualties, providing emergency burials that respect social mores, properly characterizing the outbreak, earning public confidence in epidemic containment measures, protecting against social discrimination, and fairly allocating health resources.  (+info)

Infection in the twenty-first century: predictions and postulates. (2/535)

The late Paul Garrod, in whose honour this lecture is named, was 'the right man at the right time'. He seized the opportunities offered by the dawning of the chemotherapeutic era with vigour and enthusiasm and was a formidable link between the traditional laboratory-based bacteriologist and the more clinically orientated 'modern' medical microbiologist. Professor Garrod was a founder member of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy and I had the privilege of meeting him on many occasions. He would have relished the many challenges facing today's microbiologists, infectious disease physicians and public health experts. These will have major implications for antimicrobial chemotherapy in the twenty-first century. The emergence and prevalence of infectious diseases, and the necessity for discovering therapies to treat them, are influenced by many factors. In this lecture I will discuss four which could have a major influence on infectious diseases in the twenty-first century-global warming, biological warfare/terrorism, the dissemination of infections, including those caused by resistant pathogens, by travellers and certain untreatable zoonotic diseases.  (+info)

The role of the clinical laboratory in managing chemical or biological terrorism. (3/535)

BACKGROUND: Domestic and international acts of terrorism using chemicals and pathogens as weapons have recently attracted much attention because of several hoaxes and real incidents. Clinical laboratories, especially those affiliated with major trauma centers, should be prepared to respond rapidly by providing diagnostic tests for the detection and identification of specific agents, so that specific therapy and victim management can be initiated in a timely manner. As first-line responders, clinical laboratory personnel should become familiar with the various chemical or biological agents and be active participants in their local defense programs. APPROACH: We review the selected agents previously considered or used in chemical and biological warfare, outline their poisonous and pathogenic effects, describe techniques used in their identification, address some of the logistical and technical difficulties in maintaining such tests in clinical laboratories, and comment on some of the analytical issues, such as specimen handling and personal protective equipment. CONTENT: The chemical agents discussed include nerve, blistering, and pulmonary agents and cyanides. Biological agents, including anthrax and smallpox, are also discussed as examples for organisms with potential use in bioterrorism. Available therapies for each agent are outlined to assist clinical laboratory personnel in making intelligent decisions regarding implementation of diagnostic tests as a part of a comprehensive defense program. SUMMARY: As the civilian medical community prepares for biological and chemical terrorist attacks, improvement in the capabilities of clinical laboratories is essential in supporting counterterrorism programs designed to respond to such attacks. Accurate assessment of resources in clinical laboratories is important because it will provide local authorities with an alternative resource for immediate diagnostic analysis. It is, therefore, recommended that clinical laboratories identify their current resources and the extent of support they can provide, and inform the authorities of their state of readiness.  (+info)

Lessons from the West Nile viral encephalitis outbreak in New York City, 1999: implications for bioterrorism preparedness. (4/535)

The involvement and expertise of infectious disease physicians, microbiologists, and public health practitioners are essential to the early detection and management of epidemics--both those that are naturally occurring, such as the 1999 outbreak of West Nile virus (WN virus) in New York City, and those that might follow covert acts of bioterrorism. The experience with the WN virus outbreak offers practical lessons in outbreak detection, laboratory diagnosis, investigation, and response that might usefully influence planning for future infectious disease outbreaks. Many of the strategies used to detect and respond to the WN virus outbreak resemble those that would be required to confront other serious infectious disease threats, such as pandemic influenza or bioterrorism. We provide an overview of the critical elements needed to manage a large-scale, fast-moving infectious disease outbreak, and we suggest ways that the existing public health capacity might be strengthened to ensure an effective response to both natural and intentional disease outbreaks.  (+info)

A plague on your city: observations from TOPOFF. (5/535)

The United States Congress directed the Department of Justice to conduct an exercise engaging key personnel in the management of mock chemical, biological, or cyberterrorist attacks. The resulting exercise was called "TOPOFF," named for its engagement of top officials of the United States government. This article offers a number of medical and public health observations and lessons discovered during the bioterrorism component of the exercise. The TOPOFF exercise illuminated problematic issues of leadership and decision-making; the difficulties of prioritization and distribution of scarce resources; the crisis that contagious epidemics would cause in health care facilities; and the critical need to formulate sound principles of disease containment. These lessons should provoke consideration of future directions for bioterrorism planning and preparedness at all levels of government and among the many communities and practitioners with responsibilities for national security and public health.  (+info)

Risks and prevention of nosocomial transmission of rare zoonotic diseases. (6/535)

Americans are increasingly exposed to exotic zoonotic diseases through travel, contact with exotic pets, occupational exposure, and leisure pursuits. Appropriate isolation precautions are required to prevent nosocomial transmission of rare zoonotic diseases for which person-to-person transmission has been documented. This minireview provides guidelines for the isolation of patients and management of staff exposed to the following infectious diseases with documented person-to-person transmission: Andes hantavirus disease, anthrax, B virus infection, hemorrhagic fevers (due to Ebola, Marburg, Lassa, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever, Argentine hemorrhagic fever, and Bolivian hemorrhagic fever viruses), monkeypox, plague, Q fever, and rabies. Several of these infections may also be encountered as bioterrorism hazards (i.e., anthrax, hemorrhagic fever viruses, plague, and Q fever). Adherence to recommended isolation precautions will allow for proper patient care while protecting the health care workers who provide care to patients with known or suspected zoonotic infections capable of nosocomial transmission.  (+info)

Infectious diseases: considerations for the 21st century. (7/535)

The discipline of infectious diseases will assume added prominence in the 21st century in both developed and developing nations. To an unprecedented extent, issues related to infectious diseases in the context of global health are on the agendas of world leaders, health policymakers, and philanthropies. This attention has focused both on scientific challenges such as vaccine development and on the deleterious effects of infectious diseases on economic development and political stability. Interest in global health has led to increasing levels of financial support, which, combined with recent technological advances, provide extraordinary opportunities for infectious disease research in the 21st century. The sequencing of human and microbial genomes and advances in functional genomics will underpin significant progress in many areas, including understanding human predisposition and susceptibility to disease, microbial pathogenesis, and the development new diagnostics, vaccines, and therapies. Increasingly, infectious disease research will be linked to the development of the medical infrastructure and training needed in developing countries to translate scientific advances into operational reality.  (+info)

Bioterrorism: implications for the clinical microbiologist. (8/535)

The specter of bioterrorism has captured the attention of government and military officials, scientists, and the general public. Compared to other sectors of the population, clinical microbiologists are more directly impacted by concerns about bioterrorism. This review focuses on the role envisioned for clinical laboratories in response to a bioterrorist event. The microbiology and clinical aspects of the biological agents thought to be the most likely tools of bioterrorists are presented. The historical background of the problem of bioterrorism and an overview of current U.S. preparedness planning, with an emphasis on the roles of health care professionals, are also included.  (+info)

In the event of a bioterror attack, rapidly estimating the size and time of attack enables short-run forecasts of the number of persons who will be symptomatic and require medical care. We present a Bayesian approach to this problem for use in real time and illustrate it with data from a simulated anthrax attack. The method is simple enough to be implemented in a spreadsheet.
On June 12,2003, the Alameda County Public Health Department and Sandia National Laboratories/CA jointly conducted an exercise that used a Weapons of Mass Destruction-Decision Analysis Center (WMD-DAC) bioterrorism attack simulation to test the effectiveness of the countys emergency response plan. The exercise was driven by an assumed release (in the vicinity of the Berkeley Marina), and subsequent spread, of a small quantity of aerosolized, weapons-grade anthrax spores. The simulation used several key WMD-DAC capabilities, namely: (1) integration with an atmospheric dispersion model to calculate expected dose levels in the affected areas, (2) a individual-tracking capability for both infected and non-infected persons as they made decisions, sought treatment, and received prophylaxis drugs, and (3) a user interface that allows exercise participants to affect the scenario evolution and outcome. The analysis of the countys response plan included documenting and reviewing the decisions made by
Terrorists are working to obtain chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear (CBRN) weapons and we believe that the threat of an attack is very real. While there is no way to predict precisely what may or may not happen, we do know that there are a number of practical steps you can take to protect your family members and your pets.. At a Health Canada conference in Ottawa, two years before the September 11 attacks, a scathing report detailing Canadas level of preparedness for a bioterrorism attack concluded, "Canada is ill-equipped." A year earlier in 1999, the Canadian Security Intelligence Agency said its not a matter of if a bioterrorism attack will occur, but when.. Defence Research and Development allotted more than CAD $60 million in funding for anti-terrorist research projects, such as expanding the use of a Canada-made antidote used to protect against nerve agents, and finding ways to detect and combat nuclear, chemical, biological and radiation terrorist attacks. In February of ...
In February 2007, the Council extended the mandate of this Health Security Committee by three years.. AVAILABILITY AND STOCKPILING OF MEDICINES The bioterrorist attacks in the USA highlighted the fundamental importance of the availability of medicines in the EU and the capability of industry to make good any shortcoming in production and supply. A joint Commission/pharmaceutical industry task force was established in December 2001 to address issues of availability, production capability, storage and distribution capacity for medicines which could be used in the event of a bioterrorist attack.. National stockpiles In order to be able to cope with bioterrorist attacks, most Member States have stockpiled antibiotics at national level, or are in the process of doing so. Two of the larger Member States have offered to share stocks with other Member States. However, the majority of the other Member States did not wish to take up the offers made and the sharing scheme was not discussed further.. As the ...
Brucella, a Gram-negative bacterium, is classified as a potential bioterrorism agent mainly due to the low dose needed to cause infection and the ability to transmit the bacteria via aerosols. Goats/sheep, cattle, pigs, dogs, sheep and rodents are infected by B. melitensis, B. abortus, B. suis, B. canis, B. ovis and B. neotomae, respectively, the six classical Brucella species. Most human cases are caused by B. melitensis and B. abortus. Our aim was to specifically detect Brucellae with smooth lipopolysaccharide (LPS) using a highly sensitive monoclonal antibody (mAb) based immunological assay. To complement molecular detection systems for potential bioterror agents, as required by international biodefense regulations, sets of mAbs were generated by B cell hybridoma technology and used to develop immunological assays. The combination of mAbs most suitable for an antigen capture assay format was identified and an immunoassay using the Luminex xMAP technology was developed.
A biological attack by terrorists that could kill up to 30 million people is increasingly likely due to the ease with which pathogens can be
Source: Wall Street Journal, May 17, 2002. AFTERMATH OF TERROR. Civil-Liberties Issues Check Plans to Fight Bioterrorism. By MARILYN CHASE, Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL. What would happen if another bioterrorist struck the U.S.?. Probably the same confusion, fear and uncoordinated response that happened during last falls anthrax attacks. Federal and state plans to respond to bioterrorism have run up against civil libertarians and a host of others who worry their rights will be trampled. Even some hospital groups have fought against plans for bioterror attacks because they dont want contagious patients in their facilities.. Just seven months ago, when anthrax was killing people and closing parts of the U.S. Postal Service and Washington D.C., nothing seemed more important than preparing for bioterror. A model law, drafted at the request of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was rushed to state governments last fall to help their governors and public-health departments ...
President Bushs budget for 2006 cuts spending for a wide range of public health programs, including several to protect the nation against bioterrorist attacks and to respond to medical emergencies...His plan would also cut the budget of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention by 9 percent, to $6.9 billion...the public health emergency fund of the centers, which helps state and local agencies prepare for bioterror attacks, would be cut 12.6 percent, to $1 billion ...
Scientists at the Scripps Research Institute and the University of Wisconsin have identified two small molecules with promising activity against neurotoxins produced by the Clostridium botulinum, a compound so deadly it has been labeled one of the six highest-risk bioterrorism agents by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.. Because of the high cost and limited applicability of currently available treatments, the newly identified compounds have the potential to fill the existing therapy gap and to provide protection against a bioterrorism attack using the toxin.. The study is being published the week of February 5 in an online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.. "Our study is an important milestone in the fight against biological terrorism," s. ...
A bioterrorism attack involves the deliberate release of viruses, bacteria or other germs that are intended to cause illness or death in people, animals or plants.
Source: Los Angeles Times, May 1, 2002. COMMENTARY. Scientific Speed Is the Key in Fighting Bioterror. America should have a special lab and a system of molecular fingerprinting.. By SCOTT P. LAYNE and CLAIRE M. FRASER, Scott P. Layne is an associate professor of epidemiology at the UCLA School of Public Health. Claire M. Fraser is president of the Institute for Genome Research in Rockville, Md.. Its human nature: The United States fear of another biological attack is fading fast. But it shouldnt.. In Kandahar, U.S. forces have discovered an Al Qaeda laboratory that was to produce anthrax. And one of the Sept. 11 hijackers may have been treated in Florida for cutaneous anthrax last June. The threat of biological terrorism is real.. So far, our efforts have focused on improving the care of potential biological victims. And whether last years perpetrator, still at large, is a lone bio Kaczynski or an organized bio Bin Laden is somewhat beside the point. The primary issue is that the United ...
This Tuesday, Oct. 4, marks the 10th anniversary of the announcement of the first deaths in the 2001 anthrax-letter attacks, the first successful, fatal bioterrorist attack in American history on American soil. The anthrax attacks were recognized in the midst of the grief and disquiet that swept the United States after the Sept. 11 World \[…\]
A national survey of 1,001 Australians found that most were concerned about a bioterrorist attack and were ill-informed about smallpox prevention and response. Since general practitioners were commonly identified as the initial point of care, they should become a focus of bioterrorism response planning in Australia.
New York Times President Bushs budget for 2006 cuts spending for a wide range of public health programs, including several to protect the nation against bioterrorist attacks and to respond to medical emergencies, budget documents show... ...Kim A. Elliott, deputy director of the Trust for Americas Health, a nonprofit advocacy group, said, "Its robbing Peter to pay Paul when you build up the national stockpile at the expense of bioterrorism preparedness activities at the state and local level." View the full story (some sites require registration). ...
In the wake of the recent anthrax attacks, federal officials Tuesday began an inspection program of university facilities across the United States that conduct research on viruses and bacteria with the potential to be used in bioterror, a university official said.
As mandated in the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002, CDCs BioSense program was launched in 2003 with the aim of e…
Target Capabiltities: Prevent: CBRNE Detection, Respond: Citizen Evacuation and Shelter In-place, Protect: Food and Agriculture Safety & Defense, Prevent: Information Sharing and Dissemination, Respond: Isolation and Quarantine, Respond: Mass Prophylaxis, Respond: Medical Surge, Common: Planning, Protect: Epidemiologic Surveillance and Investigation, Respond: Public Safety and Security Response, Common: Risk Management, Prevent: Law Enforcement Investigation and Intervention, Respond: Triage and Pre-hospital Treatment, Respond: WMD/Hazardous Materials Response and Decontamination ...
Bioterrorism: Organizations and Methods - Bioterrorism organizations require a lot of money and technology to pull off a massive bioterrorism attack. Learn about bioterrorism organizations and methods.
After 2005, the department implemented the model throughout the state, although the number of human cases and reported dead birds, along with the models prediction rates, dropped sharply.. In 2007 Carney enrolled as a masters student at Yale and adapted the DYCAST model to track dengue fever in Brazil, using a version of the software that his CUNY collaborators had converted to an open-source platform. With the specific parameters of that disease, DYCAST was able to predict its spread in the city of Riberão Preto in Brazil, Carney said, citing unpublished data.. Carney has continued his analysis and development of DYCAST and dengue at Brown, where he is a doctoral student of ecology and evolutionary biology. He said the software at its core has potential to be adapted as an early warning system for other infectious diseases or even bioterrorism attacks.. In addition to Carney, other authors on the paper include Sean Ahearn and Alan McConchie of CUNY (McConchie is now at the University of ...
Many U.S. schools are not prepared for bioterrorism attacks, outbreaks of emerging infectious diseases or pandemics, despite the recent 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic that resulted in more than 18,000 deaths worldwide, Saint ...
Distributed 11/07/03. Although theres not an imminent danger, some scientists say a widespread disease or bioterrorism attack could wipe out significant portions of the U.S. farm animal population.. The countrys genetic resources support a host of animal industries, and without some action to preserve them, those resources are at risk, according to Dr. Harvey Blackburn, director of the U.S. Department of Agricultures National Animal Germplasm Program.. Speaking to a group of animal scientists at the LSU AgCenter Tuesday (Nov. 4), Blackburn said his program was created by Congress because of concern that some animal industries dependence on one or two breeds of a species could pose long-term problems if other genetic material isnt available. He cited as examples the leghorn chicken and Holstein dairy breed, which currently dominate the poultry and milk industries.. The National Animal Germplasm Program (NAGP) is patterned after the well-established USDA National Plant Germplasm System, which ...
We have had the better part of a year to get ready for swine flu. And yet, the response to the pandemic H1N1 outbreak has been lousy, bioethicist Art Caplan says. What would happen if there were a bioterrorism attack or a truly deadly pandemic?
Inspired by recent advances in genetics, Bay Area scientists are dialing up our inner strength to survive a bioterrorism attack. Labs at Stanford and UC San Francisco were recently selected by the Department of Defense to use a modified form of CRISPR gene editing to boost our body
It will be too late for Congress to act after bioterrorism attack is launched, op-ed, Lubbock Avalanche Journal (Saturday, Sept. 22, 2001 ...
Despite the terrorist attacks of September 11, the anthrax mailings, media coverage and a proliferation of programs about bioterrorist agents, a survey conducted in 2002 found that although four out of five physicians were willing to care for victims of a bioterrorist attack, only one out of five felt well prepared for such a role.
More than 1,100 laboratory incidents involving bacteria, viruses and toxins that pose significant or bioterror risks to people and agriculture were reported to federal regulators during 2008 through 2012,
Sure, bug swarms can spread nasty things, but using them to unleash bioterror isnt as easy as they say, Robert Roy Britt writes in LiveScience. One expert said in the Telegraph today that dispersing... Science News Summaries. | Newser
General Information: This subspecies is virulent in humans, and the strain is a clinical isolate that is also virulent in an animal model. Originally isolated from a human case of tularemia in 1951. There are a large number of insertion sequences including a mariner element, which is a transposon typically found in eukaryotes and is the first instance of this element to be found in a microbe, which may have acquired it during transit through one of the insect vectors. Causative agent of tularemia. This organism was first identified by Edward Francis as the causative agent of a plague-like illness that affected squirrels in Tulare county in California in the early part of the 20th century. The organism now bears his name. The disease, which has been noted throughout recorded history, can be transmitted to humans by infected ticks or deerflies, infected meat, or by aerosol, and thus is a potential bioterrorism agent. This organism has a high infectivity rate, and can invade phagocytic and ...
General Information: This subspecies is virulent in humans, and the strain is a clinical isolate that is also virulent in an animal model. Originally isolated from a human case of tularemia in 1951. There are a large number of insertion sequences including a mariner element, which is a transposon typically found in eukaryotes and is the first instance of this element to be found in a microbe, which may have acquired it during transit through one of the insect vectors. Causative agent of tularemia. This organism was first identified by Edward Francis as the causative agent of a plague-like illness that affected squirrels in Tulare county in California in the early part of the 20th century. The organism now bears his name. The disease, which has been noted throughout recorded history, can be transmitted to humans by infected ticks or deerflies, infected meat, or by aerosol, and thus is a potential bioterrorism agent. This organism has a high infectivity rate, and can invade phagocytic and ...
Since September 11th, the threat of a bioterrorist attack--massive, lethal, and unpreventable--has hung in the air over America. Bracing for Armageddon? offers a vividly written primer for the general reader, shedding light on the science behind potential bioterrorist attacks and revealing what could happen, what is likely to happen, and what almost certainly will not happen.
Laura H. Kahn is the author of One Health and the Politics of Antimicrobial Resistance, published in 2016 by Johns Hopkins University Press. A general internist who began her career in health care as a registered nurse, Kahn is a research scholar with Princeton Universitys Program on Science and Global Security. Her expertise is in public health, biodefense, and pandemics. In 2009, she published Whos In Charge? Leadership during Epidemics, Bioterror Attacks, and Other Public Health Crises. Princeton University awarded her undergraduate course "Hogs, Bats, and Ebola: An Introduction to One Health Policy" a 250th Anniversary Fund award for Innovation in Undergraduate Education. In 2016, the American Veterinary Epidemiology Society awarded her their highest honor, the K.F. Meyer-James H. Steele Gold-Headed Cane Award, for her work on One Health. ...
have suggested that both modeling principles and basic beliefs are important in discussing how we should prepare for possible smallpox terrorist attacks.1 Eichner and Schwehm (ES) amplify these aspects.2 ES focus on "surveillance" as a prevention tool. In the ES world, any contact under "surveillance" would be prevented from transmitting further infections at the moment the contact becomes infectious, irrespective of the total number of contacts under watch. Thus, "surveillance" becomes equivalent to quarantine (which was considered in my earlier modeling work3,4).. Presuming that 75% of transmission from infected contacts can be prevented in this manner strikes ES as reasonable, but strikes me as extremely optimistic in the event of a bioterror attack. The potential for societal chaos in the wake of a smallpox attack should not be underestimated. Nonetheless, combined with the additional assumptions in their Figure 2 (that 90% of the population is susceptible and that isolation of symptomatic ...
WASHINGTON - More than five years after the Sept. 11 attacks, the government cannot show how the $5 billion given to public health departments has better prepared the country for a bioterrorism
The U.S. Defense Department is set to alter the priorities of a 5-year-old program that has made little progress toward developing countermeasures for pathogens that might be genetically tweaked for an act of bioterrorism, despite $1 billion in funding, the Boston Globe reported yesterday (see GSN, Nov. 11, 2010).. Independent research entities funded under the Defense Threat Reduction Agencys Transformational Medical Technologies Initiative were unable to overcome key obstacles in genetic research, officials and biological terrorism experts said. Of more than 50 studies funded by the program and carried out by more than 100 university laboratories, pharmaceutical groups and biotechnology firms, only two drugs of potential use have emerged, the Globe reported. Preliminary clinical trials of the treatments remained a distant possibility.. "Were years away from any reasonable [Food and Drug Administration] certification, let alone production," said a Defense Department contractor with ties to ...
Examines ten key indicators to evaluate state preparedness to respond to bioterrorist attacks and other public health emergencies. Evaluates the federal governments role and performance, and offers recommendations for improving readiness.
The Office of the Gene Technology Regulator (OGTR) is on its way to approve a licence application from PaxVax Australia (PaxVax) for the intentional release of a GMO vaccine consisting…. ...
Not only the potential use of smallpox in a bioterrorist attack but also the zoonotic potential of other poxviruses infecting animals are discussed to be a public health threat. At present, there is no sufficient protection in the human population provided by vaccination. Prophylactic vaccination was effective but has been associated with serious adverse effects. No proven drug treatment is available. Therefore, therapies and new treatment strategies are greatly needed. In this study HEp-2 cells were infected with the orthopoxviruses (OPV) VACV-LE, VACV-MVA-BN, CMLV-CP-19 and Calpoxvirus. In addition, the cell lines 293, A-549, Huh-7 and HSB-2 were infected with Calpoxvirus alone to determine the OPV replication cycle. Irrespective of the analyzed virus and cell line gene expression was regulated similarly for factors involved in transcription (D7R), DNA replication (K4L) or for structural proteins (D8R, A56R, A27L), indicating an important role in virus replication. Furthermore, a siRNA-system ...
It would be a disaster if it happened.Scientists argue they need samples for research and would be vulnerable to bioterrorist attack without them to produce vaccines in case, for example, a country or group still has the virus.
Recent challenges, such as the SARS outbreak and the anthrax incidents in the fall of 2001, have raised concerns about the nations preparedness for a large-scale infectious disease outbreak or bioterrorism event.
...The 2009 American Society for Microbiology (ASM) TREK Diagnostic ABMM/... Dr. Snyder is honored for his efforts in bioterrorism preparedness wh... He is a charter member of the Laboratory Response Network (LRN) that ...,American,Society,for,Microbiology,honors,James,W.,Snyder,biological,biology news articles,biology news today,latest biology news,current biology news,biology newsletters
Encouraging bioscience in countries considered easy targets for terrorists trying to source biological weapons may actually be a good idea
Biowarfare and bioterrorism were subjects that interested few outside a fairly small group of experts until the autumn of 2001. The deliberate release of biological agents through the mail system in the United States completely changed awareness (1), and bioterror moved high on the political and scientific agenda worldwide. The fight against bioterrorism became a key political priority, and several countries, particularly in North America and Europe, took measures to increase preparedness and response capacity to threats and attacks involving the use of biological and chemical agents.
Regulation Is Imperative There are two major concerns for potential risks of biohazards from GMOs. Firstly, the vectors used for introducing genes from one organism to another to make a GMO are highly infectious and virulent biological agents. It is their infectious nature that makes them useful as vectors to introduce alien genes into biological organisms. The risks of the use of virulent vectors for engineering novel life forms have not been assessed. Their use for bioterrorism becomes easier as they spread commercially around the world. Secondly, since GMOs are novel organisms, which have not existed in nature, their impact on the environment and on human health is not known. Ignorance of the impact is being treated as proof of safety, a totally unscientific approach. This has been called a don t look, don t see approach to biosafety. While governments sound alerts and the public panics about the use of biological organisms by terrorists, it is also time to reassess the use of genetically ...
A recent Train-the-Trainer session for the prevention of bioterrorism presented by INTERPOL was attended by law enforcement, customs and public health officials from Asia and the South Pacific.
(CIDRAP News) - Interpols top official said yesterday that evidence collected from terrorists suggests that international law enforcement agencies should be ready to respond to chemical and biological attacks.
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The risk of bioterrorism events involving the intentional airborne release of contagious agents has led to development of new approaches for bio agent defeat technologies both indoors and outdoors. This report describes nanoenergetic gas generators (NGG) system that exhibit long term stability and superior release of biocidal substances for destruction of pathogenic bacteria. The effect of iodine vaporization on destroying of Escherichia coli (E-coli, HB101 K-12 strain) by using expressing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) was investigated. HB101 K-12 has been genetically modified to prevent its growth unless grown on an enriched medium. To obtain quantitative data we used pGLO transformation of bacteria with a gene that codes for GFP. Following the transformation procedure, the bacteria express their newly acquired jellyfish gene and produce the fluorescent protein which causes them to glow a bright green color under ultraviolet light. The experimental results revealed that increasing concentration of
In their cold, sterile labs near Orlando, some local scientists are creating a hot commodity - biological replicas of the human immune system - that could play a role in saving the planet from a pandemic.
The woman offering flu shots for $20 at a Minneapolis college seemed plausible enough that some three dozen people willingly paid their money and got their shots.
Work at new lab could someday save thousands of lives -- or create new risks and place the U.S in violation of international treaties.
... , recent article from Newsweek Magazine January 6 - January 13, 2017. Plague, the scourge of the Middle Ages, is now rare, but its potential as a bioterror weapon has led to a search for a vaccine
A Texas lab cant find a frozen vial of virus that is a potential bioterror agent. Lab officials say its most likely the vial was accidentally destro
For a complete list of publications, please visit: BM Sanborn PubMed. Ku CY, Murtazina DA, Kim YS, Garfield RE, Sanborn BM. 2010. Changes in rat myometrial plasma membrane protein kinase A are confined to parturition. Reproduction. In Press.. Chung D, Kim YS, Phillips JN, Ulloa A, Ku CY, Galan HL, Sanborn BM. 2010. Attenuation of TRPC6 expression specifically reduces the diacylglycerol-mediated increase in intracellular calcium in human myometrial cells. Endocrinology 151:406-416.. Ulloa A, Gonzales AL, Zhong M, Kim YS, Cantlon J, Clay C, Ku CY, Earley S, Sanborn BM. 2009. Reduction in TRPC4 expression specifically attenuates G-protein coupled receptor-stimulated increases in intracellular calcium in human myometrial cells. Cell Calcium 46:73-84. Zhong M, Murtazina DA, Phillips J, Ku CY, Sanborn BM. 2008. Multiple signals regulate PLC beta 3 in human myometrial cells. Biol Reprod 78:1007-1017.. Sanborn BM. 2007. Hormonal signaling and signal pathway crosstalk in the control of myometrial calcium ...
The Bioterrorism Response Act also directs the HHS Secretary to promulgate regulations to establish and enforce safety and security procedures for the possession and use of select agents and toxins, including measures to ensure proper training and appropriate skills to handle such select agents and toxins. See generally, 42 C.F.R. Part 73. The U.S. Department of Agriculture select agents and toxins regulations are found at 7 C.F.R. Part 331 and 9 C.F.R. Part 121. Pursuant to subtitle B of title II of the Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 (the Agricultural Bioterrorism Protection Act), the USDA Secretary has established a list of biological agents and toxins which have the potential to pose a severe threat to animal and plant health, or to animal or plant products (See 7 USC § 8041). This list is found in section 3 (PPQ select agents and toxins) of Part 331 and in section 3 (VS select agents and toxins) and section 4 (Overlap select agents and toxins) ...
Washington Post A decade after envelopes containing anthrax terrorized the nation and alerted officials to the need to protect against bioterrorism, significant gaps remain in the nations capacity to respond to a bioterrorism attack, according to an analysis released Thursday.. Although the anthrax attacks triggered an unprecedented attempt to bolster the nations preparedness, and significant improvements have been made, much more work remains to be done, according to the analysis by the Trust for Americas Health and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, two private nonprofit, nonpartisan research groups.. View the full story (some sites require registration). ...
When Edward Snowden leaked Americas extensive surveillance practices, it didnt just impact American citizens. It changed the way people all over the world thought about their data privacy and how it impacts national security. The increased focus on data privacy hasnt only affected governments either. It has shed new light onto the data collection practices of businesses. Many have called into question how businesses should handle data, with national security matters (Apples refusal to unlock an iPhone is a great example) and data breaches creating big discussions on the subject. A fine line People feel just as negatively about the collection of their personal data today as they did in 2013. However, despite the negative associations, people are becoming more willing to let their data be collected if it will protect national security. Astonishingly, only 20% of people surveyed in 2016 dont support the use of personal data to protect national security. This is a major decrease from the 42% who were
The brainchild of the first National Security Advisor (NSA), Brajesh Mishra, a former member of Indian Foreign Service. The National Security Advisory Board (NSAB) consists of a group of eminent national security experts outside of the government.[9] Members are usually senior retired officials, civilian as well as military, academics and distinguished members of civil society drawn from and having expertise in Internal and External Security, Foreign Affairs, Defence, Science & Technology and Economic Affairs. The first NSAB, constituted in December 1998, headed by the late K. Subrahmanyam produced a draft Nuclear Doctrine for the country in 2001, a Strategic Defence Review in 2002 and a National Security Review in 2007.[10] The board meets at least once a month, and more frequently as required. It provides a long-term prognosis and analysis to the NSC and recommends solutions and address policy issues referred to it. Initially the Board was constituted for one year, but since 2004-06, the Board ...
State and Local Governments must be invited by DHS to apply. DHS will invite governmental organizations to apply for continuation funding under this FOA. The BioWatch Program is a cornerstone of the Department of Homeland Securitys (DHS) comprehensive strategy for countering biological terrorism. The BioWatch Program is an early warning system that is designed to detect the intentional release of select aerosolized biological agents. The BioWatch Programs mission is to provide and maintain a continuous bio-terrorism air monitoring system in metropolitan areas and coordinate with state and local public health communities to prepare for and respond to a bioterrorist event. This mission is accomplished by serving as an early warning system which enhances the security of jurisdictions by providing the needed time to execute their comprehensive concept of operations plans to counter biological terrorism. The Biowatch Program is a critical part of an ongoing national effort to build and sustain ...
Since October 3, 2001, CDC and state and local public health authorities have been investigating cases of bioterrorism-related anthrax. This report updates findings as of October 31, and includes interim guidelines for the clinical evaluation of pers ...
The New York Times publishes an article by Sheryl Gay Stolberg entitled, "Some Experts Say US Is Vulnerable to a Germ Attack." The article claims that the US "is inadequately prepared to confront bioterrorist attacks, according to a broad range of health experts and officials. The nation must develop new vaccines and treatments, they say, but it must also fortify its fragile public health infrastructure, the first line of defense in detecting and containing biological threats." It further notes that since 9/11, "much of the discussion about bioterrorism has centered on a shortage of antibiotics and vaccines. But the bigger problem, officials agree, is a lack of basic public health infrastructure and preparedness that could thwart a terror attack or limit its effects. Doctors are poorly trained to recognize symptoms of infection with possible biological weapons, like plague and anthrax, which can resemble the flu." Asha George, an expert on biological warfare, says, "We are not going to have a ...
The New York Times publishes an article by Sheryl Gay Stolberg entitled, "Some Experts Say US Is Vulnerable to a Germ Attack." The article claims that the US "is inadequately prepared to confront bioterrorist attacks, according to a broad range of health experts and officials. The nation must develop new vaccines and treatments, they say, but it must also fortify its fragile public health infrastructure, the first line of defense in detecting and containing biological threats." It further notes that since 9/11, "much of the discussion about bioterrorism has centered on a shortage of antibiotics and vaccines. But the bigger problem, officials agree, is a lack of basic public health infrastructure and preparedness that could thwart a terror attack or limit its effects. Doctors are poorly trained to recognize symptoms of infection with possible biological weapons, like plague and anthrax, which can resemble the flu." Asha George, an expert on biological warfare, says, "We are not going to have a ...
The overriding question is whether the U.S. is "ready" for a bioterror attack. The answer could well rely on the "other" question of what bio-agent and whats the source? In 1991, 40,000 Russian scientists dispersed throughout the world, with knowledge of what the U.S.S.R. was doing in chemical and biological weapons. The question is to whom did they sell their knowledge? Some believe former Soviet scientists sold technology to countries like Iran, Syria, and North Korea. Lurking is the spectre of al-Qaeda, a group that the Pentagon says continues to pursue biological weapons.. Another scenario is an outbreak of a pandemic. How would the U.S. deal with an infectious disease outbreak? The picture, despite reassurances, is not pretty. Until now, the U.S. has experienced two major biological attacks.. In 1984, the Bhagwan Shree Rajneesh and his followers attempted to take over the town of Dalles, Oregon by contaminating salad bars in the town. In 2001, there was the as yet unsolved mystery of the ...
The mission of the Lint Center for National Security Studies is to foster and further the educational development and opportunities for the next generation of Americas Counterintelligence and National Security Workers. The Center focuses on empowering individuals, enhancing the study of national security issues, and enabling emerging leaders to be mentored by established current-and-former industry experts.
The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) gives the highest priority to developing countermeasures against bioterrorism agents that are highly infective when dispersed in aerosol form. Developing drugs to prevent or treat illnesses caused by bioterrorism agents requires testing their effectiveness in animals since human clinical trials would be unethical. At the request of NIAID, the National Academies conducted a study to examine how such testing could be improved. The report provides recommendations to researchers on selecting the kinds of animal models, aerosol generators, and bioterrorism agent doses that would produce conditions that most closely mimic the disease process in humans. It also urges researchers to fully document experimental parameters in the literature so that studies can be reproduced and compared. The report recommends that all unclassified data on bioterrorism agent studies -- including unclassified, unpublished data from U.S. Army Medical Research ...
An anthrax bioterrorism attack in a transportation hub will require the use of various decontamination approaches, including fogging of sporicidal liquids.
Since the last report (1), six new anthrax cases have been reported. Three of these cases have occupational exposures similar to previously reported cases (1). A fourth case occurred in a mail handler at a facility not previously linked to cases but that receives mail from a facility at which cases have occurred previously. Two new cases have no discernable epidemiologic link with anthrax cases previously reported or sites that are associated with known cases. These new cases suggest that anthrax exposure has occurred or is continuing to occur through means that cannot be ascribed to known contaminated letters or the paths these letters took through the mail service. The public health response to these new anthrax cases will evolve based on ongoing epidemiologic and criminal investigations. Because exposures are being intentionally perpetrated, public health authorities must be vigilant for the appearance of new cases in previously unaffected populations. Prompt data sharing between law ...
Title: PowerPoint Presentation Author: dsmith3 Last modified by: Vivien Maier Created Date: 5/8/2003 5:54:42 PM Document presentation format: On-screen Show – A free PowerPoint PPT presentation (displayed as a Flash slide show) on PowerShow.com - id: 7bd45e-Y2U1Y
The Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and Response Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-188; June 12, 2002) requires that the United States improve its ability to prevent, prepare for, and respond to acts of bioterrorism and other public health emergencies that could threaten either public health and safety or American Agriculture. It necessitates that individuals possessing, using, or transferring agents or toxins deemed a severe threat to public, animal or plant health, or to animal or plant products notify either the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) or the Secretary of the Department of Agriculture (USDA). In accordance with the Act, implementing regulations detailing the requirements for possession, use, and transfer for select agents and toxins were published by HHS (42 CFR Part 73). Registration of an entity requires that an "Application for Laboratory Registration for Possession, Use, and Transfer of Select Agents and Toxins" (APHIS/CDC Form 1) ...
FY10-27. OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-John L. Crapo, CHP, has been named the new associate director for readiness in ORAUs National Security and Emergency Management Programs.. In his new role, Crapo will be responsible for planning, organizing, directing and scheduling all management activities associated with ORAUs support to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Emergency Responses counterterrorism, counter-proliferation and emergency management fields. He will also provide strategic insight into DOEs program goals and plans as they pertain to the emergency response mission.. "John has a strong background in radiological consequence management and regulatory compliance," said Dave Hackemeyer, vice president and director for ORAUs National Security and Emergency Management Programs. "He will do a great job, and he will ensure our support to DOE meets and exceeds expectations.". Before joining ORAU in 2007, Crapo served nearly 20 years in the U.S. Navy as a health physicist. He received a ...
We live in an era of mass surveillance. Private companies monitor our comings and goings, and ad-supported cloud services record and mine our online activities. At the same time, governments have been conducting extensive surveillance in the name of national security. To a large extent, citizens and lawmakers have accepted loss of privacy in exchange for increased security. Can computing technology promote both personal privacy and national security? Panelists will explore how state-of-the-art cryptography, security, networked systems, and data-management technology might enable government agencies to acquire actionable, useful information about legitimate targets of investigation without intruding upon the electronic activity of innocent parties. They will also address the need to use laws and policies in conjunction with technology to hold government agencies accountable for proper use of private information.. ...
While American national security policy has grown more interventionist since the Cold War, Washington has also hoped to shape the world on the cheap. Misled by the stunning success against Iraq in 1991, administrations of both parties have pursued ambitious aims with limited force, committing the countrys military frequently yet often hesitantly, with inconsistent justification. These ventures have produced strategic confusion, unplanned entanglements, and indecisive results. This collection of essays by Richard K. Betts, a leading international politics scholar, investigates the use of American force since the end of the Cold War, suggesting guidelines for making it more selective and successful. Betts brings his extensive knowledge of twentieth century American diplomatic and military history to bear on the full range of theory and practice in national security, surveying the Cold War roots of recent initiatives and arguing that U.S. policy has always been more unilateral than liberal ...
News breaks this morning that the NSA has the ability to monitor 75% of the nations internet traffic at once. They can watch what 75% of Americans are doing at any one time online. Think on that for a moment.. We have already learned that they can monitor your cell phone. They can get access to your individual online browsing history via your internet service provider, and read your emails. Now we learn that they can watch over three-quarters of the nations internet traffic at the drop of a hat.. This has gone far beyond national security.. On Coffee & Markets yesterday Congressman Bob Goodlatte, Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said it is time for more transparency of the NSAs monitoring efforts and called for better oversight of these programs. Both of those suggestions are great first steps to reining in the NSA, but there is more that needs to be done.. "In the name of national security," has become the most overused and hollow phrase in Washington. It seems any activity can be ...
The battle between anti-Trump careerists within the U.S. intelligence community and the commander-in-chief is getting more serious by the day. On Wednesday, in the aftermath of the resignation of Trumps national security advisor, Michael Flynn - thought to be the first of many Trump national security team casualties to come - former NSA analyst and ...
Description: The September 11th attack and subsequent intentional release of anthrax spores via the U.S. postal system have focused policymakers attention on the preparedness and response capability of the nations public health system. The anthrax attacks put a tremendous strain on the U. S. public health infrastructure, an infrastructure that many experts argue has been weakened by years of neglect and under-funding. To better understand the preparedness gaps that exist, as well as the disparate functions and agencies that define public health in this country, the Congressional Research Service (CRS), in conjunction with George Washington Universitys National Health Policy Forum (NHPF), convened a seminar on October 26, 2001, entitled, The U.S. Health Care System: Are State and Local Officials Prepared for Bioterrorism? How Should the Federal Government Assist? ...
Tom Daschle, the other Democratic senator targeted, believes Ivins was the sole culprit.[142] Though the motive according to the FBIs final Amerithrax report related to Ivinss goal to save the failing anthrax vaccine program, the FBI omitted any reference in the report about Sen. Daschle questioning the vaccine. Considering Sen. Daschle was the only targeted entity who had questioned the anthrax vaccine, which tied directly to the stated motive, it remains uncertain as to why the FBI did not report to the American people the fact that Sen. Daschle co-signed a letter on 21 June 2001 with Rep. Gephardt to SecDef Rumsfeld questioning the vaccine and the punishments of U.S. troops for refusing to be inoculated.[143] Instead, the FBI implied witnesses had no "inkling" as to why the Senator was attacked, and that there was no "ostensible" connection to the motive.[144] Although the FBI matched the genetic origin of the attack spores to the spores in Ivinss flask RMR-1029, the spores within flask ...
In the aftermath of the World Trade Center attack on September 11, 2001, there have been several bioterrorism attacks in the continental United States, ...
MADISON - In this time of the chronic threat of terrorism and the possibility of war with an adversary who may be armed with biological weapons high on the wish list of security agencies and battlefield commanders is a quick and easy way to detect the presence of dangerous biological agents. Now with the help of a novel diamond film developed by chemists at the University of Wisconsin-M,Diamond,Film,May,Enable,Critical,New,Sensors,For,Bioterror,biological,advanced biology technology,biology laboratory technology,biology device technology,latest biology technology
Following the high-profile laboratory incidents involving select agents and toxins that occurred at federally regulated laboratories, the National Science and Technology Council established a Fast Track Action Committee on the Select Agent Regulations(FTAC-SAR) under the Subcommittee on Biological Defense Research and Development of its Committee on Homeland and National Security. The FTAC and the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy convened two listening sessions and published a Request for Public Comment in the Federal Register to engage input into how the Select Agent Regulations (SAR) have impacted science, technology, and national security in the United States. Based on this input, the FTAC published the Fast Track Action Committee Report that offered recommendations for FSAP program improvement.. Recommendation #6 (Inventory Control Requirements) The FTAC recommends retaining requirements to maintain inventories of samples containing biological select agents and toxins, ...
UCLA scientists have discovered how the deadly Nipah virus infiltrates human cells to cause encephalitis. Designated as a potential bioterrorism agent by the National Biodefense Research Agenda, the virus exploits a protein essential to embryonic development to enter cells and launch its attack.
Traditional laboratory biosafety guidelines have emphasized use of optimal work practices, appropriate containment equipment, well-designed facilities, and administrative controls to minimize risks of unintentional infection or injury for laboratory workers and to prevent contamination of the outside environment (1). Although clinical and research microbiology laboratories might contain dangerous biologic, chemical, and radioactive materials, to date, only a limited number of reports have been published of materials being used intentionally to injure laboratory workers or others (2--7). However, recently, concern has increased regarding possible use of biologic, chemical, and radioactive materials as terrorism agents (8,9). In the United States, recent terrorism incidents (10) have resulted in the substantial enhancement of existing regulations and creation of new regulations governing laboratory security to prevent such incidents. The Public Health Security and Bioterrorism Preparedness and ...
In order to discuss Biosafety, it is important to understand the concept. Biosafety refers to the prevention of unintentional outbrakes of pathogens, toxins due to accidents or lack of knowledge. It is important to distinguish the concept of Biosafety from Biosecurity. Biosecurity deals with issues of theft, misuse, diversion or any intentional release of dangerous biological material or pathogens (Schmidt, Chapter 6: Do I undestand what I can create? Biosafety issues in synthetic biology, 2009). Although Biosecurity is an important concept, especially when dealing with issues such as bioterrorism and national security, its mostly managed by the government and international regulatory agencies. The scientific community can do little or nothing with respect to Biosecurity in the same manner it can only make small contributions to solve problems such as terrorism or organized crime. Most of the times, researchers can limit themselves to denounce irregularities they detect so that a law ...
The past decade has seen considerable development in the diagnostic application of nonculture methods, including nucleic acid amplification-based methods and mass spectrometry, for the diagnosis of infectious diseases. The implications of these new culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDTs) include bypassing the need to culture organisms, thus potentially affecting public health surveillance systems, which continue to use isolates as the basis of their surveillance programs and to assess phenotypic resistance to antimicrobial agents. CIDTs may also affect the way public health practitioners detect and respond to a bioterrorism event. In response to a request from the Department of Homeland Security, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention cosponsored a workshop to review the impact of CIDTs on the rapid detection and identification of biothreat agents. Four panel discussions were held that covered nucleic acid amplification-based diagnostics, mass ...
In this information age, national security analysts often find themselves searching for a needle in a haystack. The available data is growing much faster…
Global Health is Americas Health and National Security. Samuel L. Stanley, Jr., M.D. Paul Rogers Global Health Ambassador Research!America. Infectious diseases know no borders. The flat, hot and crowded world. Jet travel removes the temporal and geographic barriers Slideshow 5109314 by...
Since 2010 the National Security Council (NSC) has won plaudits for improving the clarity and regularity of national-security co-ordination. It has also been criticised for strategic shortcomings and a lack of capacity to drive forward the implementation of its decisions across government. Joe Devanny appraises the NSCs performance and future prospects, although without access to NSC proceedings it is difficult to infer the quality of its decisions or the coherence of its policies from the ambiguous evidence of apparent policy
entry level jobs and internships the professionals the national security agency (nsa) have one common goal: protect our nation.  the mission requires strong offense and steadfast defense.  the offense collects, processes and disseminates intelligence information derived from
DES MOINES, Iowa - Iowa educators and the American Heart Association say poor childhood health - including obesity rates - has reached a critical level thats impacting far more than just the individuals whose health is at risk. Brian Rhoads, a physical education curriculum leader with West Des Moines Community Schools, says its becoming a national security issue. "Were not having students leave our school systems in a position where they can join the military because theyre not physically healthy to do that," he laments. " ...
We must help break the link between spiraling population growth and poverty. ...Where they have been tried, family planning programs have largely worked. ...Many pro-life advocates ...contend that to condone abortion even implicitly is morally unconscionable. Their view is morally shortsighted. ...if we provide funds for birth control ...we will prevent the conception of millions of babies who would be doomed to the devastation of poverty in the underdeveloped world.. Richard M. Nixon. Seize the Moment. (Simon & Schuster, 1992). President Nixon has recently reasserted his belief that overpopulation gravely threatens world peace and stability. He ranks assistance in population growth as the most important effort the United States can undertake to promote peace and stability. During his presidency he authorized the study that came to be known as NSSM 200 National Security Study Memorandum 200. In order to effectively examine the content and fate of NSSM 200, we need to backtrack a bit to the ...
Read chapter 4 Sources of ELSI Insight: Emerging and Readily Available Technologies and National Security is a study on the ethical, legal, and societal i...
Congressional intelligence committee leaders turned up the heat on the White House over alleged national security leaks on Thursday, with the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee suggesting she might be willing to join Republican demands for an investigation by a special counsel.
President Donald Trump on Monday will release his first National Security Strategy, a congressionally mandated document designed.
President Donald Trump named US Army Lieutenant General H.R. McMaster as his new national security advisor on Monday, taking over the post left vacant after Michael Flynns resignation.. ...
Thumbing his nose at the many Republicans who have bashed her in recent months, President Obama named Susan Rice to be his new National Security Adviser today.
A recently released report by the Homeland Security Departments inspector general has raised questions about the safety of air cargo, leaving cargo vulnerable to a bioterror attack.
Smallpox is a category A biological disease that in the wrong hands could easily become a biological weapon of mass destruction. A single case of smallpox would be considered an emergency caused by intentional release as the disease was confirmed eradicated in December 1979.
The EPRI tool aids local or regional planners to assemble an inventory of critical resources that would be useful in responding to a bioterrorist attack.
Ever since the anthrax and terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the poison ricin has at times been lumped in with other bioterrorism agents because it comes from a relatively common plant and seems easy to make.
South Korea and the U.S. will review the government-level integrated response system that relates to not only biological outbreaks but also bioterrorism threats, and discuss ways to enhance bioterrorism response capability," an MND statement said. Participants will study simulated attack scenarios and review the outcomes to identify weaknesses in response plans ...
Disease or event reporting and surveillance systems represent a primary epidemiological data source for the study of/alert to adverse reactions to medication, emerging diseases, or bioterrorist attacks. These systems synthesize data from millions of reports. The working group will bring together pharmacoepidemiologists, statisticians and computer scientists to investigate current major issues confronting adverse event/disease reporting, surveillance, and analysis. We describe the issues for drug reaction reports; those for disease or symptom reports are similar though they raise their own set of issues as well. In the US, the two major reporting/surveillance systems are AERS and VAERS. AERS, the Adverse Event Reporting System (http://www.fda.gov/cder/aers/) is a data base of drug adverse reactions reported by health professionals and others. AERS is administered by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The system contains adverse reactions detected and reported after marketing of a drug for a ...
Eleven known cases of bioterrorism-related inhalational anthrax (IA) were treated in the United States during 2001. We retrospectively compared 2 methods that have been proposed to screen for IA [1, 2]. The 2 screening protocols for IA were applied to the emergency department charts of patients who presented with possible signs or symptoms of IA at Inova Fairfax Hospital (Falls Church, Virginia) from 20 October 2001 through 3 November 2001. The Mayer criteria [1] would have screened 4 patients (0.4%; 95% CI, 0.1%-0.9%) and generated charges of $1900. If 29 patients (2.6%; 95% CI, 1.7%-3.7%) with ⩾5 symptoms (but without fever and tachycardia) were screened, charges were $13,325. The Hupert criteria [2] would have screened 273 patients (24%; 95% CI, 22%-27%) and generated charges of $126,025. In this outbreak of bioterrorism-related IA, applying the Mayer criteria would have identified both patients with IA and would have generated fewer charges than applying the Hupert criteria.. ...
Today, President Obama signed a Presidential Memorandum on Climate Change and National Security, a historic measure in addressing the national security implications of our changing climate. The memorandum establishes a policy to consider the impacts of climate change in the development of national security-related doctrine, policies, and plans and provides practical guidance to ensure these climate risks are considered. This includes the establishment of a Federal Climate and National Security Working Group (consisting of more than 20 federal agencies and offices), which will identify priorities related to climate change and national security; facilitate the exchange of climate data and information with the intelligence community and identify gaps; recommend research guidelines concerning the federal governments ability to detect climate intervention activities; identify the most current information on regional, country, and geographic areas most vulnerable to current and projected impacts of ...
The unexpected outbreak of an influenza pandemic in the spring of 2009 highlighted the need for states to prepare for all hazards, not just natural disasters and terrorist attacks. The pervasive threat of infectious disease and the more insidious threat of bioterrorism require that public health, emergency management and homeland security professionals work collaboratively to develop preparedness plans and strategies.. The NGA Center, in partnership with the Department of Health and Human Services, has worked to raise awareness among governors of the threat of bioterrorism; to identify state priorities for enhancing public health preparedness; and to encourage regional approaches through which states can work collaboratively to share resources and expertise before, during and after a public health emergency.. The NGA Center assists governors and their staffs by:. ...
Wamwere-Njoroge, G., Longor, B., Kihara, A. and Bett, B. 2019. Mobile phone-based syndromic surveillance system for early detection and control of livestock diseases. Presented at the ILRI Open Access Week Workshop, Nairobi, 23-25 October 2019. Nairobi, Kenya: ILRI ...
Sph 539 Topics in Public Health Preparedness (3). This course provides an overview on a variety of public health topics with a focus on skill and knowledge building in the area of public health preparedness.. Sph 559 Selected Topics in Public Health (2-3). This course focuses on a specific public health topic that might unexpectedly become significant or an interdisciplinary topic that may not fit neatly into the curriculum of a department of the School of Public Health. Possible topics include occupational ergonomics, disaster preparedness, preparedness for biological terrorism, confidentiality of medical data.. Sph 589 (Ehc 589) Emergency Preparedness: The Public Health Perspective (3). Preparedness planning has been an essential but often overlooked aspect of public health. Events of this decade have clarified the need for preparedness training around issues such as bioterrorism and have emphasized a new role for public health workers in community response activities. This course will serve ...
The workshop on "Countering Biological Threats: National Implementation of the Biological Weapons Convention and Multinational Outbreak Response and Bioterrorism Investigation Demonstration" was held in Tbilisi, Georgia, 17-19 May 2011. It was organized by the US Department of Defense (US European Command, Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center, Center for Disaster and Humanitarian Assistance Medicine, and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency) and the US Department of Health and Human Services, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) with the support of the National Center for Disease Control and Public Health of Georgia (NCDC), the US-Georgia Central Public Health Reference Laboratory (CPHRL), and the Ministry of Internal Affairs of Georgia. It included awareness training, a tabletop exercise designed to review the technical guidelines and procedures associated with the United Nations Secretary Generals Mechanism on Investigation of Alleged Use of Biological and ...
Looking for online definition of biological weapon in the Medical Dictionary? biological weapon explanation free. What is biological weapon? Meaning of biological weapon medical term. What does biological weapon mean?
Functional Needs Populations & Emergency Preparedness Education Questions & Answers [March 2011] Oklahoma State Department of Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Services Glenda Ford-Lee, MHR At-Risk Populations Coordinator Aging and Disability Resource Consortium & Emergency Preparedness Education Oklahoma State Department of Health/Emergency Preparedness and Response Services Page 2 Aging and Disability Resource Consortium & Emergency Preparedness Education Oklahoma State Department of Health/Emergency Preparedness and Response Services Page 3 Table of Contents Introduction ....................................................................................................................................7 Functional Needs Populations .........................................................................................................7 Disability Law: Know Your Rights .................................................................................................. 8 The Americans ...
The Bio-Surveillance project was designed to predict and respond to bioterrorism by monitoring non-traditional data sources ...
Response to bioterrorism incident or threat[edit]. Government agencies which would be called on to respond to a bioterrorism ... 2001-11-28), Availability and Comparative Value of Data Elements Required for an Effective Bioterrorism Detection System (PDF) ... Avalanche Photodiodes Target Bioterrorism Agents Newswise, Retrieved on June 25, 2008. *^ Pellerin, Cheryl. "Global Nature of ... The US military has specialized units, which can respond to a bioterrorism event; among them are the United States Marine Corps ...
Weintraub, Pamela (2002). Bio-Terrorism. Citadel Press. p. 51. ISBN 978-0806523989. .. *↑ 10.0 10.1 Lutwick, Larry I.; Lutwick ...
"Smallpox and bioterrorism" (PDF). Bull. World Health Organ. 81 (10): 762-67. doi:10.1590/S0042-96862003001000014. hdl:10665/ ...
Dark biotechnology is the color associated with bioterrorism or biological weapons and biowarfare which uses microorganisms, ...
Bioterrorism[edit]. Talent has been outspoken about what he sees as the nation's vulnerability to a growing bioterrorism threat ...
Biological Weapons: From the Invention of State-sponsored Programs to Contemporary Bioterrorism, (M1 Google Books), Columbia ...
"Bioterrorism Office Gets a New Director". The New York Times. May 2, 2002. Retrieved October 17, 2018.. ... and bioterrorism, to name a few. The organization would also prove to be an important factor in preventing the abuse of ...
"Smallpox and bioterrorism" (PDF). Bull. World Health Organ. 81 (10): 762-67. doi:10.1590/S0042-96862003001000014 (inactive 16 ...
Banoub, Joseph (2011). Detection of Biological Agents for the Prevention of Bioterrorism. Detection of Biological Agents for ... the Prevention of Bioterrorism. NATO Science for Peace and Security Series A: Chemistry and Biology. p. 183. Bibcode:2011dbap. ...
"Bioterrorism Agents/Diseases". Arquivado dende o orixinal o 22 de xullo de 2014. Consultado o 2011-10-16 ...
Ebolavirus is classified as a biosafety level 4 agent, as well as a Category A bioterrorism agent by the Centers for Disease ... Zubray, Geoffrey (2013). Agents of Bioterrorism: Pathogens and Their Weaponization. New York, NY, USA: Columbia University ...
... and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention lists it as a Category A Bioterrorism Agent.[5] It is also listed as a ... "Bioterrorism Agents/Diseases". Archived from the original on 2014-07-22. Retrieved 2011-10-16 ...
CDC Plague map world distribution, publications, information on bioterrorism preparedness and response regarding plague ...
Highlights: Economic collapse - Bioterrorism. 15. 3. "Bad Times All the Time[35]". November 20, 2012 (2012-11-20). N/A. ...
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Category A Bioterrorism Agent, and listed as a Biological Agent for Export Control ...
The bubonic and septicaemic plagues are the most probable form of the plague that would spread as a result of a bioterrorism ... "Bichat guidelines for the clinical management of plague and bioterrorism-related plague". Eurosurveillance. 9 (12): Article 12 ...
"History of biological warfare and bioterrorism" (PDF). Clinical Microbiology and Infection. 20 (6): 498. doi:10.1111/1469- ...
... preparedness to Chicago and the region in the event of immediate and widespread emergencies such as pandemics or bioterrorism. ...
In 2002, during a period of fears about bioterrorism, Offit was the only member of the CDC's advisory panel to vote against a ...
Torrence, Paul F. (2005). Antiviral drug discovery for emerging diseases and bioterrorism threats. Wiley-Interscience. p. 428. ...
"Bioterrorism Agents/Diseases" *↑ The Australia Group. "List of Biological Agents for Export Control" ...
Bioterrorism. *Clostridium vaccine. *Controversies in autism. *Death rates in the 20th century ...
"Fears of bioterrorism or an accidental release". 16 February 2012. Archived from the original on 21 November 2012.. ... raising concerns about a pandemic and bioterrorism.[9] ...
Bioterrorism[edit]. Botulinum toxin has been recognized as a potential agent for use in bioterrorism.[61] It can be absorbed ... Encyclopedia of Bioterrorism Defense. Wiley-Liss. doi:10.1002/0471686786.ebd0012.pub2. ISBN 978-0-471-68678-1.. ... http://www.emsworld.com/article/10324792/botulinum-toxin-a-bioterrorism-weapon *^ McAdams D, Kornblet S (15 July 2011). "Baader ... "Botulism, Botulinum Toxin, and Bioterrorism: Review and Update". Medscape. Cliggott Publishing. Retrieved July 14, 2010 ...
Many fear that this information could be used for bioterrorism[citation needed]. ...
Tularaemia: bioterrorism defence renews interest in Francisella tularensis. Nat. Rev. Microbiol. 2:967-978. ...
Could botulism be used for bioterrorism?. Yes. Botulism toxin could potentially be used for bioterrorism because it is easy to ...
Bioterrorism: pathogens as weapons., Anderson PD,Bokor G,, Journal of pharmacy practice, 2012 Oct [PubMed PMID: 23011963]. ... Management of potential bioterrorism-related conditions., Friedlander AM,, The New England journal of medicine, 2015 Jun 4 [ ... Rodents as potential couriers for bioterrorism agents., Lõhmus M,Janse I,van de Goot F,van Rotterdam BJ,, Biosecurity and ... History of biological warfare and bioterrorism., Barras V,Greub G,, Clinical microbiology and infection : the official ...
... but heightened concerns over bioterrorism have brought smallpox and smallpox vaccination back to the forefront. The previously ... Abstract: Smallpox was eradicated more than 30 years ago, but heightened concerns over bioterrorism have brought smallpox and ...
What is bioterrorism? +. Bioterrorism is the intentional use of biological agents, or germs, to cause illness. Bioterrorism has ...
... and potential as a bioterrorism agent. Outbreaks of respiratory tularemia, caused by inhalation of this bacterium, are poorly ...
Recognizing Bioterrorism. *Programs and Activities. *Tuberculosis Control *TB Services. *Tuberculosis Information For Medical ...
Community Health Centers of the Rutland Region, Inc., a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC), is deemed by the Bureau of Primary Health Care of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to be a federal employee for purposes of medical malpractice claims and, as such, qualified for protection under the Federal Tort Claims Act.. This health center receives U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) funding and has Federal Public Health Service (PHS) deemed status with respect to certain health or health-related claims, including medical malpractice claims, for itself and its covered individuals.. The current Deeming Notice of Community Health is available here Community Health Deeming Notice Federal Tort Claims Act.. According to the FTCA requirements, medical malpractice claims against the health center are reviewed and/or litigated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. An individual who has a claim against the health center is to file an administrative claim ...
... he suspects its more likely to be suspected bioterrorism. Turns out Clive is majorly paranoid about disease- or at least ...
Facebook may involve tailored FTC advertising bioterrorism, are bitter Logistic steht, making cyber of fake experiments . UK ...
... biomedicine for national media since 1981 and is the author of 16 prior books on topics from the infant brain to bioterrorism ...
As many of you know I have put a lot of effort into worrying about both bioterrorism and natural pandemics (I have spent much ...
Law enforcement authorities seeking to detect bioterrorism attacks, doctors diagnosing diseases and regulatory agencies ...
Bioterrorism Simulator (AneSoft). *Blood Gases (Mad Scientist Software). *Body Simulation (Advanced Simulation Corporation) ...
For many people, that warning now carries more weight than ever; fears of bio-terrorism have grown markedly since September 11 ...
... there were two ways the government could ramp up its involvement in protecting against bio-terrorism and epidemics: hire more ...
Bioterrorism, drug--resistant disease, transmission of disease by global travel . . . theres no shortage... ... Bioterrorism response and emergency preparedness have heightened awareness of the public safety role of public health and ... Even as we move to strengthen capacity to fulfill the public health role in responding to bioterrorism, we must be careful that ... Bioterrorism, drug--resistant disease, transmission of disease by global travel . . . theres no shortage of challenges facing ...
Bio-terrorism / Terrorism. *Bipolar. *Bird Flu / Avian Flu. *Birth Control / Contraception. *Bites and Stings ...
... and bioterrorism are just a few of the media subjects that have significant implications for both public policy and personal ...
... and bioterrorism.. At a minimum the laboratory should be able to conduct surveillance on priority diseases. If it is not ...
Bioterrorism Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola Hantavirus Infections Flavivirus Infections Yellow Fever Rift Valley Fever ...
Bioterrorism. Bipolar Disorder. Blood. Blood Banking. board certified. board review. Body Imaging. Bone and Soft Tissue ...
An online continuing education course for nurses, medical health professionals and others interested in understanding Hashimotos Thyroiditis disease, causes, symptoms, lab tests and treatment options from both a holistic and Western medicine approach.
A business impact analysis (BIA) predicts the consequences of disruption of a business function and process and gathers information needed to develop recovery strategies. Potential loss scenarios should be identified during a risk assessment. Operations may also be interrupted by the failure of a supplier of goods or services or delayed deliveries. There are many possible scenarios which should be considered.
Bioterrorism (30) *Blast Effects/Injuries (35) *Botulism (31) *Buruli ulcer (1) *Cancer (6) ...
  • The possible causes include the expanding and mobile global population, mutating viruses that can outfox vaccine makers, the threat of bioterrorism and accelerating climate change that breeds new diseases. (cqpress.com)
  • A workshop organised by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases to review European preparedness to respond to the threats of spreading antimicrobial resistance, bioterrorism and emerging infections, recently took place in Belgium. (eurosurveillance.org)
  • This Research by IIT Guwahati will enable rapid detection of bacteria, which is important not only in healthcare, but also in anti-bioterrorism measures and environmental monitoring applications. (biospectrumindia.com)
  • Bossi P , Tegnell A , Baka A , van Loock F , Werner A , Hendriks J , Maidhof H , Gouvras G . Bichat guidelines for the clinical management of viral encephalitis and bioterrorism-related viral encephalitis. (eurosurveillance.org)
  • Attached is Part II of a video interview with IEM's Dr. Sid Baccam, primary author of "Mass Prophylaxis Dispensing Concerns: Traffic and Public Access to PODs" which was published in the June issue of Biosecurity and Bioterrorism. (iem.com)
  • IEM scientists, led by Computational Epidemiologist Dr. Sid Baccam, published a paper in the June issue of the journal Biosecurity and Bioterrorism entitled "Mass Prophylaxis Dispensing Concerns: Traffic and Public Access to PODs. (iem.com)
  • This document provides information related to public health emergency and bioterrorism preparedness and response training for tribal personnel. (vawnet.org)
  • Now a member of the Bioterrorism Security Assessment Alliance (BSAA), Chris is sent to Africa to investigate a biological agent that is transforming the populace into aggressive and disturbing creatures. (ephemeral-dream.com)