The spectrum of different living organisms inhabiting a particular region, habitat, or biotope.
The variety of all native living organisms and their various forms and interrelationships.
A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A plant genus of the family CUPRESSACEAE.
Remains, impressions, or traces of animals or plants of past geological times which have been preserved in the earth's crust.
The science of the earth and other celestial bodies and their history as recorded in the rocks. It includes the study of geologic processes of an area such as rock formations, weathering and erosion, and sedimentation. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Animals that have no spinal column.
The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.
A great expanse of continuous bodies of salt water which together cover more than 70 percent of the earth's surface. Seas may be partially or entirely enclosed by land, and are smaller than the five oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, Arctic, and Antarctic).
The study of early forms of life through fossil remains.
Events and activities of the Earth and its structures.
The inanimate matter of Earth, the structures and properties of this matter, and the processes that affect it.
The science dealing with the earth and its life, especially the description of land, sea, and air and the distribution of plant and animal life, including humanity and human industries with reference to the mutual relations of these elements. (From Webster, 3d ed)
Minute free-floating animal organisms which live in practically all natural waters.
Large natural streams of FRESH WATER formed by converging tributaries and which empty into a body of water (lake or ocean).
The study of the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of organisms which inhabit the OCEANS AND SEAS.
A plant genus of the family ASTERACEAE. The common name of snakeroot is also used for POLYGALA; SANICULA; ARISTOLOCHIA and others.
A plant genus of the family FAGACEAE.
Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.
The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.
Organisms that live in water.
Non-native organisms brought into a region, habitat, or ECOSYSTEM by human activity.
Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.
The pattern of any process, or the interrelationship of phenomena, which affects growth or change within a population.
A thick mass of ICE formed over large regions of land; RIVERS; LAKES; ponds; or SEAWATER.
The sequence of transfers of matter and energy from organism to organism in the form of FOOD. Food chains intertwine locally into a food web because most organisms consume more than one type of animal or plant. PLANTS, which convert SOLAR ENERGY to food by PHOTOSYNTHESIS, are the primary food source. In a predator chain, a plant-eating animal is eaten by a larger animal. In a parasite chain, a smaller organism consumes part of a larger host and may itself be parasitized by smaller organisms. In a saprophytic chain, microorganisms live on dead organic matter.
A class of annelid worms with few setae per segment. It includes the earthworms such as Lumbricus and Eisenia.
The hard rigid covering of animals including MOLLUSCS; TURTLES; INSECTS; and crustaceans.
A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)
The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.
The monitoring of the level of toxins, chemical pollutants, microbial contaminants, or other harmful substances in the environment (soil, air, and water), workplace, or in the bodies of people and animals present in that environment.
A phylum of small sessile aquatic animals living as small tufted colonies. Some appear like hydroids or corals, but their internal structure is more advanced. Most bryozoans are matlike, forming thin encrustations on rocks, shells, or kelp. (Storer & Stebbins, General Zoology, 6th ed, p443)
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
Adverse effect upon bodies of water (LAKES; RIVERS; seas; groundwater etc.) caused by CHEMICAL WATER POLLUTANTS.
A field of study concerned with the principles and processes governing the geographic distributions of genealogical lineages, especially those within and among closely related species. (Avise, J.C., Phylogeography: The History and Formation of Species. Harvard University Press, 2000)
Woody, usually tall, perennial higher plants (Angiosperms, Gymnosperms, and some Pterophyta) having usually a main stem and numerous branches.
A type of climate characterized by insufficient moisture to support appreciable plant life. It is a climate of extreme aridity, usually of extreme heat, and of negligible rainfall. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Multicellular, eukaryotic life forms of kingdom Plantae (sensu lato), comprising the VIRIDIPLANTAE; RHODOPHYTA; and GLAUCOPHYTA; all of which acquired chloroplasts by direct endosymbiosis of CYANOBACTERIA. They are characterized by a mainly photosynthetic mode of nutrition; essentially unlimited growth at localized regions of cell divisions (MERISTEMS); cellulose within cells providing rigidity; the absence of organs of locomotion; absence of nervous and sensory systems; and an alternation of haploid and diploid generations.
The continent lying around the South Pole and the southern waters of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. It includes the Falkland Islands Dependencies. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p55)
Environments or habitats at the interface between truly terrestrial ecosystems and truly aquatic systems making them different from each yet highly dependent on both. Adaptations to low soil oxygen characterize many wetland species.
A class in the phylum MOLLUSCA comprised of mussels; clams; OYSTERS; COCKLES; and SCALLOPS. They are characterized by a bilaterally symmetrical hinged shell and a muscular foot used for burrowing and anchoring.
The protection, preservation, restoration, and rational use of all resources in the total environment.
The longterm manifestations of WEATHER. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The ceasing of existence of a species or taxonomic groups of organisms.
Hot springs on the ocean floor. They are commonly found near volcanically active places such as mid-oceanic ridges.
Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.
Members of the phylum Arthropoda, composed of organisms having a hard, jointed exoskeleton and paired jointed legs. It includes the class INSECTS and the subclass ARACHNIDA, many species of which are important medically as parasites or as vectors of organisms capable of causing disease in man.
Free-floating minute organisms that are photosynthetic. The term is non-taxonomic and refers to a lifestyle (energy utilization and motility), rather than a particular type of organism. Most, but not all, are unicellular algae. Important groups include DIATOMS; DINOFLAGELLATES; CYANOBACTERIA; CHLOROPHYTA; HAPTOPHYTA; CRYPTOMONADS; and silicoflagellates.
The branch of science concerned with the interrelationship of organisms and their ENVIRONMENT, especially as manifested by natural cycles and rhythms, community development and structure, interactions between different kinds of organisms, geographic distributions, and population alterations. (Webster's, 3d ed)
A group of cold-blooded, aquatic vertebrates having gills, fins, a cartilaginous or bony endoskeleton, and elongated bodies covered with scales.
Increase in the temperature of the atmosphere near the Earth's surface and in the troposphere, which can contribute to changes in global climate patterns.
A silver metallic element that exists as a liquid at room temperature. It has the atomic symbol Hg (from hydrargyrum, liquid silver), atomic number 80, and atomic weight 200.59. Mercury is used in many industrial applications and its salts have been employed therapeutically as purgatives, antisyphilitics, disinfectants, and astringents. It can be absorbed through the skin and mucous membranes which leads to MERCURY POISONING. Because of its toxicity, the clinical use of mercury and mercurials is diminishing.
The period of history before 500 of the common era.
A climate which is typical of equatorial and tropical regions, i.e., one with continually high temperatures with considerable precipitation, at least during part of the year. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Substances or organisms which pollute the water or bodies of water. Use for water pollutants in general or those for which there is no specific heading.
Any significant change in measures of climate (such as temperature, precipitation, or wind) lasting for an extended period (decades or longer). It may result from natural factors such as changes in the sun's intensity, natural processes within the climate system such as changes in ocean circulation, or human activities.
A large family of narrow-leaved herbaceous grasses of the order Cyperales, subclass Commelinidae, class Liliopsida (monocotyledons). Food grains (EDIBLE GRAIN) come from members of this family. RHINITIS, ALLERGIC, SEASONAL can be induced by POLLEN of many of the grasses.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Atlantic Ocean" is a geographical term referring to one of the world's five oceans, covering approximately 20% of the Earth's surface and separating the continents of Europe and Africa to the east from those of North and South America to the west. It doesn't have a direct medical definition, as it is not a medical term.
The restriction of a characteristic behavior, anatomical structure or physical system, such as immune response; metabolic response, or gene or gene variant to the members of one species. It refers to that property which differentiates one species from another but it is also used for phylogenetic levels higher or lower than the species.
The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)
The gaseous envelope surrounding a planet or similar body. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed)
The effect of GLOBAL WARMING and the resulting increase in world temperatures. The predicted health effects of such long-term climatic change include increased incidence of respiratory, water-borne, and vector-borne diseases.
An animal or plant species in danger of extinction. Causes can include human activity, changing climate, or change in predator/prey ratios.
Organic compounds in which mercury is attached to a methyl group.
Materials applied to fabrics, bedding, furniture, plastics, etc. to retard their burning; many may leach out and cause allergies or other harm.
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
One of the three domains of life (the others being BACTERIA and ARCHAEA), also called Eukarya. These are organisms whose cells are enclosed in membranes and possess a nucleus. They comprise almost all multicellular and many unicellular organisms, and are traditionally divided into groups (sometimes called kingdoms) including ANIMALS; PLANTS; FUNGI; and various algae and other taxa that were previously part of the old kingdom Protista.
*Medical Definition:* 'Lizards' are not typically defined in the field of medicine, as they are a type of reptile and not a medical condition or healthcare-related concept; however, certain lizard species such as the Gila monster and beaded lizards possess venomous bites, which can lead to medical emergencies like envenomation requiring medical attention.
The splitting of an ancestral species into daughter species that coexist in time (King, Dictionary of Genetics, 6th ed). Causal factors may include geographic isolation, HABITAT geometry, migration, REPRODUCTIVE ISOLATION, random GENETIC DRIFT and MUTATION.
The external elements and conditions which surround, influence, and affect the life and development of an organism or population.
Marine, freshwater, or terrestrial mollusks of the class Gastropoda. Most have an enclosing spiral shell, and several genera harbor parasites pathogenic to man.
Substances or energies, for example heat or light, which when introduced into the air, water, or land threaten life or health of individuals or ECOSYSTEMS.
While there isn't a specific medical definition for "North America," I can provide a geographical definition that is often used in public health and medical contexts: North America is the third largest continent by area, encompassing 23 independent states, including the United States, Canada, and Mexico, which are home to diverse populations, cultures, and ecosystems, and share common health-related challenges such as obesity, diabetes, and healthcare access disparities.
Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.
Double-stranded DNA of MITOCHONDRIA. In eukaryotes, the mitochondrial GENOME is circular and codes for ribosomal RNAs, transfer RNAs, and about 10 proteins.
Number of individuals in a population relative to space.
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
Periodic movements of animals in response to seasonal changes or reproductive instinct. Hormonal changes are the trigger in at least some animals. Most migrations are made for reasons of climatic change, feeding, or breeding.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
Animals having a vertebral column, members of the phylum Chordata, subphylum Craniata comprising mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fishes.
Divisions of the year according to some regularly recurrent phenomena usually astronomical or climatic. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
The largest of the continents. It was known to the Romans more specifically as what we know today as Asia Minor. The name comes from at least two possible sources: from the Assyrian asu (to rise) or from the Sanskrit usa (dawn), both with reference to its being the land of the rising sun, i.e., eastern as opposed to Europe, to the west. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p82 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p34)
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but 'Europe' is a geographical continent and not a medical term; therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition.
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
An element with the atomic symbol N, atomic number 7, and atomic weight [14.00643; 14.00728]. Nitrogen exists as a diatomic gas and makes up about 78% of the earth's atmosphere by volume. It is a constituent of proteins and nucleic acids and found in all living cells.
A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.
The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.
I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or concept, it is a country located in South America, known officially as the Federative Republic of Brazil. If you have any questions related to health, medicine, or science, I'd be happy to help answer those!
Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.
The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.

Genetic characterization of root-nodule bacteria associated with Acacia salicina and A. stenophylla (Mimosaceae) across south-eastern Australia. (1/590)

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Biotic resistance to invasion along an estuarine gradient. (2/590)

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Diversity of glycosyl hydrolases from cellulose-depleting communities enriched from casts of two earthworm species. (3/590)

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Microbial community structure across the tree of life in the extreme Rio Tinto. (4/590)

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Community structure of subsurface biofilms in the thermal sulfidic caves ofAcquasanta Terme, Italy. (5/590)

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A specialist-generalist classification of the arable flora and its response to changes in agricultural practices. (6/590)

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Microbial communities and functional genes associated with soil arsenic contamination and the rhizosphere of the arsenic-hyperaccumulating plant Pteris vittata L. (7/590)

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Role of plant residues in determining temporal patterns of the activity, size, and structure of nitrate reducer communities in soil. (8/590)

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'Biota' is a term that refers to the total collection of living organisms in a particular habitat, ecosystem, or region. It includes all forms of life such as plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, and other microorganisms. Biota can be used to describe the communities of living things in a specific area, like a forest biota or marine biota, and it can also refer to the study of these organisms and their interactions with each other and their environment. In medical contexts, 'biota' may specifically refer to the microorganisms that inhabit the human body, such as the gut microbiota.

Biodiversity is the variety of different species of plants, animals, and microorganisms that live in an ecosystem. It also includes the variety of genes within a species and the variety of ecosystems (such as forests, grasslands, deserts, and oceans) that exist in a region or on Earth as a whole. Biodiversity is important for maintaining the health and balance of ecosystems, providing resources and services such as food, clean water, and pollination, and contributing to the discovery of new medicines and other useful products. The loss of biodiversity can have negative impacts on the functioning of ecosystems and the services they provide, and can threaten the survival of species and the livelihoods of people who depend on them.

An "ecosystem" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, as it is a concept that is more commonly used in the fields of ecology and environmental science. However, I can provide you with the general ecological definition of an ecosystem:

An ecosystem is a community of living organisms interacting with each other and their non-living environment, including both biotic factors (plants, animals, microorganisms) and abiotic factors (climate, soil, water, and air). These interactions create a complex network of relationships that form the foundation of ecological processes, such as energy flow, nutrient cycling, and population dynamics.

While there is no direct medical definition for an ecosystem, understanding the principles of ecosystems can have important implications for human health. For example, healthy ecosystems can provide clean air and water, regulate climate, support food production, and offer opportunities for recreation and relaxation, all of which contribute to overall well-being. Conversely, degraded ecosystems can lead to increased exposure to environmental hazards, reduced access to natural resources, and heightened risks of infectious diseases. Therefore, maintaining the health and integrity of ecosystems is crucial for promoting human health and preventing disease.

"Thuja" is a botanical term for a genus of evergreen trees and shrubs, also known as arborvitae or western red cedar. It belongs to the family Cupressaceae. While it has some traditional medicinal uses, there isn't a widely accepted medical definition for "Thuja" in modern medicine.

Historically, preparations made from Thuja occidentalis (eastern white cedar) have been used in alternative and traditional medicine, such as homeopathy. The leaves and twigs are often used to make teas, tinctures, or essential oils. However, it's important to note that the use of Thuja for medicinal purposes can have potential side effects and toxicities, and its effectiveness is not always supported by scientific evidence. Always consult with a healthcare provider before starting any new treatment.

In medical terms, "fossils" do not have a specific or direct relevance to the field. However, in a broader scientific context, fossils are the remains or impressions of prehistoric organisms preserved in petrified form or as a mold or cast in rock. They offer valuable evidence about the Earth's history and the life forms that existed on it millions of years ago.

Paleopathology is a subfield of paleontology that deals with the study of diseases in fossils, which can provide insights into the evolution of diseases and human health over time.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "geology" is not a medical term. It is a scientific discipline that deals with the Earth's physical structure and substance, its history, and the processes that act on it. If you have any questions about medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Invertebrates" is not a medical term. It is a term used in biology to describe a vast group of animals that do not have a vertebral column or spinal cord. This includes creatures such as insects, worms, starfish, and shellfish, among many others. They are classified as invertebrates because they lack a backbone, which is a characteristic of vertebrates, or animals that include humans and other mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soil" is not a term that has a medical definition. Soil is defined as the top layer of earth in which plants grow, a mixture of organic material, clay, sand, and silt. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Oceans and Seas" are not medical terms. Generally speaking, an ocean is a large body of saltwater that covers a majority of the Earth's surface, and a sea is a smaller body of saltwater that may be partially enclosed by land. However, if you have any questions related to marine biology or environmental science, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

Paleontology is not a medical field, but rather it is a branch of earth sciences and biology that deals with the study of prehistoric life forms through the examination of plant and animal fossils, including those of extinct organisms. It involves various disciplines such as stratigraphy, geochronology, and systematics to understand the evolutionary history of life on Earth.

However, I understand that you are looking for information related to a non-medical topic, so here is some additional context:

Paleontology can be divided into several subdisciplines, including vertebrate paleontology (the study of fossilized animals with backbones), invertebrate paleontology (the study of fossilized animals without backbones), paleobotany (the study of fossil plants), micropaleontology (the study of microscopic fossils), and taphonomy (the study of the processes that occur after an organism's death, leading to its preservation as a fossil).

Paleontologists use various techniques to study fossils, including comparative anatomy, histology (the study of tissue structure), and geochemistry. They also rely on other scientific fields such as genetics, physics, and chemistry to help them interpret the data they collect from fossils.

Through their research, paleontologists can learn about the morphology, behavior, ecology, and evolutionary relationships of extinct organisms, providing valuable insights into the history of life on Earth.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "geological processes" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Geological processes refer to the natural events that shape the Earth's surface and interior over time, such as volcanic activity, plate tectonics, erosion, and sedimentation. These processes are studied within the field of geology. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer those!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "geological phenomena" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Geological phenomena refer to natural processes and features related to the earth's physical structure, composition, and the various changes it undergoes over time. This could include things like volcanic eruptions, earthquakes, rock formations, or the formation of fossil fuels. If you have a term that you would like me to provide a medical definition for, I'd be happy to help!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "geography" is not a term that has a medical definition. Geography is a field of study that deals with the location and distribution of physical and cultural features on Earth's surface, as well as how humans interact with and affect those features. It is not a concept that is typically used in a medical context. If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you!

Zooplankton are not a medical term, but they are an important concept in biology and ecology. Zooplankton refer to small, drifting or floating animals that live in watery environments such as oceans, seas, and freshwater bodies. They include various organisms like tiny crustaceans (such as copepods and krill), jellyfish, arrow worms, and larvae of larger aquatic animals. Zooplankton play a crucial role in food chains and nutrient cycling within aquatic ecosystems.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Rivers" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical term referring to large, flowing bodies of water that usually empty into a sea or an ocean. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

I apologize for the confusion, but "Marine Biology" is not a medical term. Instead, it is a branch of biology that deals with the study of marine organisms, their behaviors, and their interactions with the marine environment. Marine biologists investigate various aspects of marine life, such as the ecology, physiology, and genetics of marine plants, animals, and microorganisms. They also study the impact of human activities on marine ecosystems and work towards conservation efforts to protect these environments.

Ageratina is a genus of flowering plants in the aster family, Asteraceae. It includes several species that are commonly known as snakeroots or eupatoriums. These plants are native to North and Central America and are characterized by their clusters of small, white or purple flowers. Some species of Ageratina have medicinal properties and have been used in traditional medicine to treat various ailments, such as skin conditions, fever, and respiratory issues. However, it is important to note that some species of Ageratina can be toxic if ingested, so they should only be used under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional.

'Fagus' is the genus name for beech trees in the family Fagaceae. It includes several species of deciduous trees that are native to the Northern Hemisphere, primarily in North America and Europe. The most common species is the European beech (Fagus sylvatica) and the American beech (Fagus grandifolia).

While 'Fagus' is a valid term in botany, it does not have a medical definition as it is not a term used to describe a medical condition or treatment.

Chemical water pollutants refer to harmful chemicals or substances that contaminate bodies of water, making them unsafe for human use and harmful to aquatic life. These pollutants can come from various sources, including industrial and agricultural runoff, sewage and wastewater, oil spills, and improper disposal of hazardous materials.

Examples of chemical water pollutants include heavy metals (such as lead, mercury, and cadmium), pesticides and herbicides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and petroleum products. These chemicals can have toxic effects on aquatic organisms, disrupt ecosystems, and pose risks to human health through exposure or consumption.

Regulations and standards are in place to monitor and limit the levels of chemical pollutants in water sources, with the aim of protecting public health and the environment.

Biological evolution is the change in the genetic composition of populations of organisms over time, from one generation to the next. It is a process that results in descendants differing genetically from their ancestors. Biological evolution can be driven by several mechanisms, including natural selection, genetic drift, gene flow, and mutation. These processes can lead to changes in the frequency of alleles (variants of a gene) within populations, resulting in the development of new species and the extinction of others over long periods of time. Biological evolution provides a unifying explanation for the diversity of life on Earth and is supported by extensive evidence from many different fields of science, including genetics, paleontology, comparative anatomy, and biogeography.

'Aquatic organisms' are living beings that inhabit bodies of water, such as oceans, seas, lakes, rivers, and ponds. This group includes a wide variety of species, ranging from tiny microorganisms like plankton to large marine mammals like whales. Aquatic organisms can be divided into several categories based on their specific adaptations to their environment, including:

1. Plankton: small organisms that drift with the water currents and include both plants (phytoplankton) and animals (zooplankton).
2. Nekton: actively swimming aquatic organisms, such as fish, squid, and marine mammals.
3. Benthos: organisms that live on or in the bottom of bodies of water, including crustaceans, mollusks, worms, and some types of algae.
4. Neuston: organisms that live at the air-water interface, such as certain species of insects and small fish.

Aquatic organisms play a critical role in maintaining the health and balance of aquatic ecosystems, providing food and habitat for other species, and contributing to global nutrient cycling and climate regulation.

In the context of medical and ecological health, an "introduced species" refers to a plant or animal population that has been intentionally or unintentionally introduced by human actions into a new environment, outside of their natural historical range, where they do not have any known native predecessors. These introductions can occur through various means such as accidental transportation in cargo, deliberate releases for purposes like biological control or pets, and escapes from cultivation.

Introduced species can become invasive if they adapt well to their new environment, reproduce rapidly, outcompete native species for resources, and disrupt local ecosystems. This can lead to significant ecological changes, loss of biodiversity, impacts on human health, and economic consequences. Some introduced species carry diseases or parasites that can affect humans, livestock, and wildlife in the new environment, posing potential public health concerns.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Fresh Water" is not a medical term. It is a term used to describe water that contains low concentrations of dissolved salts and other dissolved minerals. It is distinguished from saline water, which includes saltwater found in the ocean and brackish water found in estuaries. Fresh water is essential for many biological processes and is the primary source of water for human consumption, agriculture, and industrial use.

Population dynamics, in the context of public health and epidemiology, refers to the study of the changes in size and structure of a population over time, as well as the factors that contribute to those changes. This can include birth rates, death rates, migration patterns, aging, and other demographic characteristics. Understanding population dynamics is crucial for planning and implementing public health interventions, such as vaccination programs or disease prevention strategies, as they allow researchers and policymakers to identify vulnerable populations, predict future health trends, and evaluate the impact of public health initiatives.

I am not aware of a medical definition for the term "Ice Cover." The term "ice" is used in a medical context to refer to a solid piece of frozen urine that can form in the urinary tract, but "cover" does not have a specific medical meaning in this context. If you are looking for information about frostbite or cold-related injuries, I would be happy to help with that. Frostbite is a medical condition caused by exposure to extreme cold, often resulting in damage or destruction of the skin and underlying tissues.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "food chain" is not typically used in a medical context. It is a concept from ecology that describes the sequence of organisms through which food and energy pass as one organism eats another.

However, if you're referring to "food web" or "dietary intake," these terms might be more applicable in a medical context. For instance, dietary intake refers to what and how much a person consumes, which can have significant implications for their health. A food web, on the other hand, is a more complex network of relationships between different species that consume and are consumed by others, which can help researchers understand the impacts of changes in one species' population or behavior on others within an ecosystem.

If you meant to ask about something else, please provide more context or clarify your question, and I will do my best to provide a helpful answer!

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Oligochaeta" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in biology, specifically referring to a class of segmented worms, including earthworms and related species. They are characterized by having a simple circulatory system, and most have separate sexes. They are not directly relevant to human medical definition or healthcare context.

Animal shells are hard, protective outer coverings that are produced by certain types of animals, primarily mollusks and arthropods. In mollusks, these include creatures such as clams, oysters, and snails, while in arthropods, they can be found in animals like crabs, lobsters, and insects.

Mollusk shells are typically made of calcium carbonate and are secreted by the mantle tissue of the animal. They provide protection for the soft body of the mollusk and may also serve as a home for hermit crabs. Arthropod exoskeletons, on the other hand, are made up of chitin, a tough polysaccharide, and proteins. These exoskeletons provide support and protection for the animal's body and can be shed periodically as the animal grows.

Animal shells have been used by humans for various purposes throughout history, including tools, jewelry, and decorative arts. They also play an important role in many ecosystems, providing habitats and food sources for other organisms.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "geologic sediments" is not a term used in medical definitions. Geological sediments are deposits of material that accumulate over time, usually in layers, as a result of natural geological processes such as weathering, erosion, and deposition. These sediments can eventually become rock formations and provide important clues about the Earth's history, including information about past climates, environments, and life on Earth.

Seawater is not a medical term, but it is a type of water that covers more than 70% of the Earth's surface. Medically, seawater can be relevant in certain contexts, such as in discussions of marine biology, environmental health, or water safety. Seawater has a high salt content, with an average salinity of around 3.5%, which is much higher than that of freshwater. This makes it unsuitable for drinking or irrigation without desalination.

Exposure to seawater can also have medical implications, such as in cases of immersion injuries, marine envenomations, or waterborne illnesses. However, there is no single medical definition of seawater.

Environmental monitoring is the systematic and ongoing surveillance, measurement, and assessment of environmental parameters, pollutants, or other stressors in order to evaluate potential impacts on human health, ecological systems, or compliance with regulatory standards. This process typically involves collecting and analyzing data from various sources, such as air, water, soil, and biota, and using this information to inform decisions related to public health, environmental protection, and resource management.

In medical terms, environmental monitoring may refer specifically to the assessment of environmental factors that can impact human health, such as air quality, water contamination, or exposure to hazardous substances. This type of monitoring is often conducted in occupational settings, where workers may be exposed to potential health hazards, as well as in community-based settings, where environmental factors may contribute to public health issues. The goal of environmental monitoring in a medical context is to identify and mitigate potential health risks associated with environmental exposures, and to promote healthy and safe environments for individuals and communities.

Bryozoa, also known as moss animals, are a phylum of mostly marine aquatic invertebrates that form colonies of tiny, modular individuals called zooids. Each zooid is typically only a few millimeters long and has a set of ciliated tentacles used for feeding and gas exchange.

Bryozoans are filter feeders, using their tentacles to capture plankton and organic particles from the water. They can be found in a variety of habitats, including shallow coastal waters, deep sea environments, and freshwater systems.

The colonies formed by bryozoans can take many different forms, ranging from encrusting mats to branching or leafy structures. Some species produce mineralized skeletons made of calcium carbonate, while others have soft, flexible bodies.

Bryozoa is a relatively small phylum, with around 6,000 known species. While they are not well-known outside of scientific circles, bryozoans play important ecological roles in many aquatic ecosystems, providing habitat and shelter for other organisms and contributing to the formation of complex communities.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

I apologize, but there seems to be a misunderstanding. "Soil microbiology" is not a medical term; rather, it is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms in soil. It involves understanding the diversity, ecology, and biochemistry of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa, and other microscopic life forms found in soil. This field has applications in agriculture, environmental science, and waste management but is not directly related to medical definitions or human health.

Chemical water pollution is the contamination of water bodies (such as lakes, rivers, oceans, and groundwater) with harmful chemicals or substances that negatively impact water quality and pose a threat to human health, aquatic life, and the environment. These chemical pollutants can come from various sources, including industrial and agricultural activities, waste disposal, oil spills, and chemical accidents. Examples of chemical pollutants include heavy metals (such as mercury, lead, and cadmium), pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other hazardous substances. These chemicals can have toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic effects on living organisms and can disrupt ecosystems, leading to decreased biodiversity and impaired ecological functions.

Phylogeography is not a medical term, but rather a subfield of biogeography and phylogenetics that investigates the spatial distribution of genealogical lineages and the historical processes that have shaped them. It uses genetic data to infer the geographic origins, dispersal routes, and demographic history of organisms, including pathogens and vectors that can affect human health.

In medical and public health contexts, phylogeography is often used to study the spread of infectious diseases, such as HIV/AIDS, influenza, or tuberculosis, by analyzing the genetic diversity and geographic distribution of pathogen isolates. This information can help researchers understand how diseases emerge, evolve, and move across populations and landscapes, which can inform disease surveillance, control, and prevention strategies.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "trees" is not a medical term. It is a common term used in various fields, including biology, ecology, and dendrology, to refer to a woody perennial plant with a single stem or trunk that supports branches and leaves in most species.

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, please provide more context so I can offer an accurate and helpful response.

A desert climate, also known as a hot desert climate or a BWh climate in the Köppen climate classification system, is characterized by extremely low rainfall, typically less than 10 inches (250 mm) per year. This type of climate is found in the world's desert areas, such as the Sahara Desert in Africa, the Mojave Desert in North America, and the Simpson Desert in Australia.

In a desert climate, temperatures can vary greatly between day and night, as well as between summer and winter. During the day, temperatures can reach extremely high levels, often above 100°F (38°C), while at night, they can drop significantly, sometimes below freezing in the winter months.

Desert climates are caused by a combination of factors, including geographical location, topography, and large-scale weather patterns. They typically occur in regions that are located far from sources of moisture, such as bodies of water, and are situated in the interior of continents or on the leeward side of mountain ranges.

Living things in desert climates have adapted to the harsh conditions through various means, such as storing water, reducing evaporation, and limiting activity during the hottest parts of the day. Despite the challenging conditions, deserts support a diverse array of plant and animal life that has evolved to thrive in this unique environment.

I apologize for any confusion, but "plants" is not a term that has a medical definition. The term "plants" refers to a large and diverse group of organisms that obtain their energy through photosynthesis, which is the process of converting sunlight into chemical energy. Plants are typically characterized by having cells with cell walls containing cellulose, chloroplasts containing the pigment chlorophyll, and the ability to synthesize their own food through photosynthesis.

In a medical or biological context, you might be thinking of "plant-based" or "phytomedicine," which refer to the use of plants or plant extracts as a form of medicine or treatment. Phytomedicines have been used for thousands of years in many traditional systems of medicine, and some plant-derived compounds have been found to have therapeutic benefits in modern medicine as well. However, "plants" itself does not have a medical definition.

The Antarctic regions typically refer to the geographical areas surrounding the continent of Antarctica, including the Southern Ocean and various subantarctic islands. These regions are known for their extreme cold, ice-covered landscapes, and unique wildlife adapted to survive in harsh conditions. The Antarctic region is also home to important scientific research stations focused on topics such as climate change, marine life, and space exploration. It's worth noting that the Antarctic Treaty System governs these regions, which prohibits military activity, mineral mining, nuclear testing, and nuclear waste disposal, and promotes scientific research and cooperation among nations.

I apologize for any confusion, but "wetlands" is a term related to environmental science and ecology rather than medicine. Wetlands are transitional areas between land and water that are characterized by the presence of water, which can be permanent or temporary. They are critical ecosystems that provide various important functions, such as water filtration, flood control, and habitat for diverse plant and animal life, including many species of migratory birds.

If you have any questions related to medicine or healthcare, please don't hesitate to ask!

Bivalvia is a class of mollusks, also known as "pelecypods," that have a laterally compressed body and two shells or valves. These valves are hinged together on one side and can be opened and closed to allow the animal to feed or withdraw into its shell for protection.

Bivalves include clams, oysters, mussels, scallops, and numerous other species. They are characterized by their simple body structure, which consists of a muscular foot used for burrowing or anchoring, a soft mantle that secretes the shell, and gills that serve both as respiratory organs and feeding structures.

Bivalves play an important role in aquatic ecosystems as filter feeders, helping to maintain water quality by removing particles and organic matter from the water column. They are also commercially important as a source of food for humans and other animals, and their shells have been used historically for various purposes such as tools, jewelry, and building materials.

The conservation of natural resources refers to the responsible use and management of natural resources, such as water, soil, minerals, forests, and wildlife, in a way that preserves their availability for future generations. This may involve measures such as reducing waste and pollution, promoting sustainable practices, protecting habitats and ecosystems, and engaging in careful planning and decision-making to ensure the long-term sustainability of these resources. The goal of conservation is to balance the needs of the present with the needs of the future, so that current and future generations can continue to benefit from the many goods and services that natural resources provide.

Climate, in the context of environmental science and medicine, refers to the long-term average of weather conditions (such as temperature, humidity, atmospheric pressure, wind, rainfall, and other meteorological elements) in a given region over a period of years to decades. It is the statistical description of the weather patterns that occur in a particular location over long periods of time.

In medical terms, climate can have significant impacts on human health, both physical and mental. For example, extreme temperatures, air pollution, and ultraviolet radiation levels associated with certain climates can increase the risk of respiratory and cardiovascular diseases, heat-related illnesses, and skin cancer. Similarly, changes in climate patterns can affect the distribution and prevalence of infectious diseases, such as malaria and Lyme disease.

Climate change, which refers to significant long-term changes in the statistical distribution of weather patterns over periods ranging from decades to millions of years, can have even more profound impacts on human health, including increased rates of heat-related illnesses and deaths, worsening air quality, and altered transmission patterns of infectious diseases.

"Extinction, Biological" refers to the state or process of a species or taxonomic group becoming extinct, meaning that there are no surviving members remaining alive anywhere in the world. This can occur due to various factors such as environmental changes, competition with other species, overexploitation by humans, or a combination of these and other elements. It is an important concept in the field of biology and conservation, as the extinction of a species can have significant impacts on ecosystems and biodiversity.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "hydrothermal vents" is not typically used in medical definitions. Hydrothermal vents are a geological phenomenon found on the ocean floor, where heated water rich in minerals from the Earth's crust escapes into the ocean. They are of interest in various scientific fields, including geology, marine biology, and astrobiology, but they do not have a direct relevance to medical definitions.

Biomass is defined in the medical field as a renewable energy source derived from organic materials, primarily plant matter, that can be burned or converted into fuel. This includes materials such as wood, agricultural waste, and even methane gas produced by landfills. Biomass is often used as a source of heat, electricity, or transportation fuels, and its use can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on fossil fuels.

In the context of human health, biomass burning can have both positive and negative impacts. On one hand, biomass can provide a source of heat and energy for cooking and heating, which can improve living standards and reduce exposure to harmful pollutants from traditional cooking methods such as open fires. On the other hand, biomass burning can also produce air pollution, including particulate matter and toxic chemicals, that can have negative effects on respiratory health and contribute to climate change.

Therefore, while biomass has the potential to be a sustainable and low-carbon source of energy, it is important to consider the potential health and environmental impacts of its use and implement appropriate measures to minimize any negative effects.

Arthropods are a phylum of animals characterized by the presence of a segmented body, a pair of jointed appendages on each segment, and a tough exoskeleton made of chitin. This phylum includes insects, arachnids (spiders, scorpions, mites), crustaceans (crabs, lobsters, shrimp), and myriapods (centipedes, millipedes). They are the largest group of animals on Earth, making up more than 80% of all described species. Arthropods can be found in nearly every habitat, from the deep sea to mountaintops, and play important roles in ecosystems as decomposers, pollinators, and predators.

Phytoplankton are microscopic photosynthetic organisms that live in watery environments such as oceans, seas, lakes, and rivers. They are a diverse group of organisms, including bacteria, algae, and protozoa. Phytoplankton are a critical component of the marine food chain, serving as primary producers that convert sunlight, carbon dioxide, and nutrients into organic matter through photosynthesis. This organic matter forms the base of the food chain and supports the growth and survival of many larger organisms, including zooplankton, fish, and other marine animals. Phytoplankton also play an important role in global carbon cycling and help to regulate Earth's climate by absorbing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and releasing oxygen.

Ecology is not a medical term, but rather a term used in the field of biology. It refers to the study of the relationships between living organisms and their environment. This includes how organisms interact with each other and with their physical surroundings, such as climate, soil, and water. Ecologists may study the distribution and abundance of species, the flow of energy through an ecosystem, and the effects of human activities on the environment. While ecology is not a medical field, understanding ecological principles can be important for addressing public health issues related to the environment, such as pollution, climate change, and infectious diseases.

I believe there may be a misunderstanding in your question. The term "fishes" is not typically used in a medical context. "Fish" or "fishes" refers to any aquatic organism belonging to the taxonomic class Actinopterygii (bony fish), Chondrichthyes (sharks and rays), or Agnatha (jawless fish).

However, if you are referring to a condition related to fish or consuming fish, there is a medical issue called scombroid fish poisoning. It's a foodborne illness caused by eating spoiled or improperly stored fish from the Scombridae family, which includes tuna, mackerel, and bonito, among others. The bacteria present in these fish can produce histamine, which can cause symptoms like skin flushing, headache, diarrhea, and itchy rash. But again, this is not related to the term "fishes" itself but rather a condition associated with consuming certain types of fish.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Global Warming" is not a medical term. It is a term used in the field of climate science and environmental studies. Global warming refers to the long-term increase in Earth's average temperature. As a result of human activities, especially the release of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere, like carbon dioxide and methane, the planet is experiencing an overall rise in temperatures, leading to various consequences such as melting ice caps, rising sea levels, and changing weather patterns. While not a medical term, it is still a critical issue that can have significant impacts on human health, including increased heat-related illnesses and deaths, changes in disease patterns, and threats to food security.

In the context of medicine, Mercury does not have a specific medical definition. However, it may refer to:

1. A heavy, silvery-white metal that is liquid at room temperature. It has been used in various medical and dental applications, such as therapeutic remedies (now largely discontinued) and dental amalgam fillings. Its use in dental fillings has become controversial due to concerns about its potential toxicity.
2. In microbiology, Mercury is the name of a bacterial genus that includes the pathogenic species Mercury deserti and Mercury avium. These bacteria can cause infections in humans and animals.

It's important to note that when referring to the planet or the use of mercury in astrology, these are not related to medical definitions.

I'm not a medical professional, but the term "History, Ancient" is not a medical term per se. However, in a broader context, it could refer to the study of ancient medical practices, theories, and beliefs that existed in civilizations prior to the Middle Ages or Classical Antiquity. This might include the examination of ancient texts, artifacts, and archaeological evidence to understand how illnesses were treated and viewed in these historical periods. It forms an essential part of the evolution of medical knowledge and practices over time.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "tropical climate" is not a medical term. It is a geographical term that refers to the climate of tropical regions, which are located around the equator. These regions are characterized by high temperatures and consistent rainfall throughout the year.

However, it's worth noting that certain environmental factors, such as climate, can have an impact on human health. For instance, tropical climates can contribute to the spread of certain diseases, like malaria and dengue fever, due to the presence of mosquitoes that thrive in warm, wet environments. But a "tropical climate" itself is not a medical condition or diagnosis.

Water pollutants refer to any substances or materials that contaminate water sources and make them unsafe or unsuitable for use. These pollutants can include a wide range of chemicals, microorganisms, and physical particles that can have harmful effects on human health, aquatic life, and the environment as a whole. Examples of water pollutants include heavy metals like lead and mercury, industrial chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins, agricultural runoff containing pesticides and fertilizers, sewage and wastewater, oil spills, and microplastics. Exposure to water pollutants can cause a variety of health problems, ranging from minor irritations to serious illnesses or even death in extreme cases. Additionally, water pollution can have significant impacts on the environment, including harming or killing aquatic life, disrupting ecosystems, and reducing biodiversity.

Climate change, as defined medically, refers to the long-term alterations in the statistical distribution of weather patterns caused by changes in the Earth's climate system. These changes can have significant impacts on human health and wellbeing.

Medical professionals are increasingly recognizing the importance of addressing climate change as a public health issue. The World Health Organization (WHO) has identified climate change as one of the greatest threats to global health in the 21st century, with potential impacts including increased heat-related mortality, more frequent and severe natural disasters, changes in the distribution of infectious diseases, and decreased food security.

Climate change can also exacerbate existing health disparities, as vulnerable populations such as children, the elderly, low-income communities, and those with chronic medical conditions are often disproportionately affected by its impacts. As a result, addressing climate change is an important public health priority, and medical professionals have a critical role to play in advocating for policies and practices that reduce greenhouse gas emissions and promote adaptation to the changing climate.

Poaceae is not a medical term but a taxonomic category, specifically the family name for grasses. In a broader sense, you might be asking for a medical context where knowledge of this plant family could be relevant. For instance, certain members of the Poaceae family can cause allergies or negative reactions in some people.

In a medical definition, Poaceae would be defined as:

The family of monocotyledonous plants that includes grasses, bamboo, and sedges. These plants are characterized by narrow leaves with parallel veins, jointed stems (called "nodes" and "internodes"), and flowers arranged in spikelets. Some members of this family are important food sources for humans and animals, such as rice, wheat, corn, barley, oats, and sorghum. Other members can cause negative reactions, like skin irritation or allergies, due to their silica-based defense structures called phytoliths.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Atlantic Ocean" is a geographical term referring to one of the five oceans on Earth. It doesn't have a medical definition. The Atlantic Ocean is the second largest ocean, covering approximately 20% of the Earth's surface. It stretches from the Arctic Ocean in the north to the Southern Ocean (or, alternatively, to the Antarctica region) in the south, and is bounded by the Americas to the west and Europe and Africa to the east.

Species specificity is a term used in the field of biology, including medicine, to refer to the characteristic of a biological entity (such as a virus, bacterium, or other microorganism) that allows it to interact exclusively or preferentially with a particular species. This means that the biological entity has a strong affinity for, or is only able to infect, a specific host species.

For example, HIV is specifically adapted to infect human cells and does not typically infect other animal species. Similarly, some bacterial toxins are species-specific and can only affect certain types of animals or humans. This concept is important in understanding the transmission dynamics and host range of various pathogens, as well as in developing targeted therapies and vaccines.

The Arctic region is not a medical term per se, but it is a geographical and environmental term that can have health-related implications. The Arctic is defined as the region surrounding the North Pole, encompassing the Arctic Ocean and parts of Canada, Greenland (Denmark), Russia, the United States (Alaska), Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Iceland. It is characterized by its cold climate, permafrost, and unique ecosystems.

Exposure to the harsh Arctic environment can pose significant health risks, such as hypothermia, frostbite, and other cold-related injuries. Additionally, the Arctic region has been impacted by climate change, leading to changes in the distribution of wildlife, which can have implications for food security and infectious disease transmission.

Therefore, while not a medical term itself, understanding the Arctic regions and their unique environmental and health challenges is important in fields such as wilderness medicine, environmental health, and public health.

In medical terms, the term "atmosphere" is not typically used as a standalone definition or diagnosis. However, in some contexts, it may refer to the physical environment or surroundings in which medical care is provided. For example, some hospitals and healthcare facilities may have different atmospheres depending on their specialties, design, or overall ambiance.

Additionally, "atmosphere" may also be used more broadly to describe the social or emotional climate of a particular healthcare setting. For instance, a healthcare provider might describe a patient's home atmosphere as warm and welcoming, or a hospital ward's atmosphere as tense or chaotic.

It is important to note that "atmosphere" is not a medical term with a specific definition, so its meaning may vary depending on the context in which it is used.

The greenhouse effect is not a medical term, but rather a term used in the field of environmental science and meteorology. However, I can certainly provide a definition for you:

The greenhouse effect refers to the warming of Earth's surface and lower atmosphere caused by the trapping of heat by certain gases in the atmosphere, known as greenhouse gases. These gases include carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O), and fluorinated gases.

When sunlight reaches Earth's surface, it is absorbed and then re-emitted as heat energy, which would normally escape back into space. However, some of this heat is trapped by greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, causing the planet to warm up. This process is essential for life on Earth, as it helps to maintain a stable temperature that supports plant and animal growth.

However, human activities such as burning fossil fuels, deforestation, and agriculture have led to an increase in greenhouse gas emissions, which has caused the natural greenhouse effect to become amplified. This has resulted in global warming and climate change, with potentially serious consequences for both human health and the environment.

An endangered species is a species of animal, plant, or other organism that is at risk of becoming extinct because its population is declining or threatened by changing environmental or demographic factors. This term is defined and used in the context of conservation biology and wildlife management to identify species that need protection and preservation efforts.

The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) maintains a "Red List" of species, categorizing them based on their extinction risk. The categories include "Critically Endangered," "Endangered," "Vulnerable," and "Near Threatened." A species is considered endangered if it meets certain criteria indicating that it faces a very high risk of extinction in the wild.

The primary causes for species to become endangered include habitat loss, fragmentation, degradation, pollution, climate change, overexploitation, and introduction of invasive species. Conservation efforts often focus on protecting habitats, managing threats, and implementing recovery programs to help endangered species recover their populations and reduce the risk of extinction.

Methylmercury compounds are organic forms of mercury, created when methyl groups (CH3) bind to a mercury ion (Hg+). These compounds can be highly toxic and bioaccumulate in living organisms, including humans. They are primarily formed in the environment through the action of bacteria on inorganic mercury, but can also be produced synthetically.

Methylmercury is particularly dangerous because it easily passes through biological membranes, allowing it to enter the brain and other tissues where it can cause significant damage. Exposure to high levels of methylmercury can lead to neurological problems, developmental issues in children, and even death. It's commonly found in contaminated fish and seafood, making these a significant source of human exposure.

Flame retardants are chemical compounds that are added to materials, such as textiles, plastics, and foam furnishings, to reduce their flammability and prevent or slow down the spread of fire. They work by releasing non-flammable gases when exposed to heat, which helps to suppress the flames and prevent ignition. Flame retardants can be applied during the manufacturing process or added as a coating or treatment to existing materials. While flame retardants have been shown to save lives and property by preventing fires or reducing their severity, some types of flame retardants have been linked to health concerns, including endocrine disruption, neurodevelopmental toxicity, and cancer. Therefore, it is important to use flame retardants that are safe for human health and the environment.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Eukaryota is a domain that consists of organisms whose cells have a true nucleus and complex organelles. This domain includes animals, plants, fungi, and protists. The term "eukaryote" comes from the Greek words "eu," meaning true or good, and "karyon," meaning nut or kernel. In eukaryotic cells, the genetic material is housed within a membrane-bound nucleus, and the DNA is organized into chromosomes. This is in contrast to prokaryotic cells, which do not have a true nucleus and have their genetic material dispersed throughout the cytoplasm.

Eukaryotic cells are generally larger and more complex than prokaryotic cells. They have many different organelles, including mitochondria, chloroplasts, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi apparatus, that perform specific functions to support the cell's metabolism and survival. Eukaryotic cells also have a cytoskeleton made up of microtubules, actin filaments, and intermediate filaments, which provide structure and shape to the cell and allow for movement of organelles and other cellular components.

Eukaryotes are diverse and can be found in many different environments, ranging from single-celled organisms that live in water or soil to multicellular organisms that live on land or in aquatic habitats. Some eukaryotes are unicellular, meaning they consist of a single cell, while others are multicellular, meaning they consist of many cells that work together to form tissues and organs.

In summary, Eukaryota is a domain of organisms whose cells have a true nucleus and complex organelles. This domain includes animals, plants, fungi, and protists, and the eukaryotic cells are generally larger and more complex than prokaryotic cells.

I apologize for any confusion, but "lizards" is not a term used in medical definition. Lizards are a group of scaled reptiles constituting the order Squamata, characterized by having skin covered with overlapping scales, external ears, and movable eyelids. They are found worldwide in a variety of habitats, ranging from desert to tropical environments. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, I'd be happy to help!

Genetic speciation is not a widely used term in the scientific literature, but it generally refers to the process by which new species arise due to genetic differences and reproductive isolation. This process can occur through various mechanisms such as mutation, gene flow, genetic drift, natural selection, or chromosomal changes that lead to the accumulation of genetic differences between populations. Over time, these genetic differences can result in the development of reproductive barriers that prevent interbreeding between the populations, leading to the formation of new species.

In other words, genetic speciation is a type of speciation that involves the evolution of genetic differences that ultimately lead to the formation of new species. It is an essential concept in the field of evolutionary biology and genetics, as it explains how biodiversity arises over time.

The term "environment" in a medical context generally refers to the external conditions and surroundings that can have an impact on living organisms, including humans. This includes both physical factors such as air quality, water supply, soil composition, temperature, and radiation, as well as biological factors such as the presence of microorganisms, plants, and animals.

In public health and epidemiology, the term "environmental exposure" is often used to describe the contact between an individual and a potentially harmful environmental agent, such as air pollution or contaminated water. These exposures can have significant impacts on human health, contributing to a range of diseases and disorders, including respiratory illnesses, cancer, neurological disorders, and reproductive problems.

Efforts to protect and improve the environment are therefore critical for promoting human health and preventing disease. This includes measures to reduce pollution, conserve natural resources, promote sustainable development, and mitigate the impacts of climate change.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "snails" is not a medical term. It is a common name used to refer to a large group of land and sea-dwelling mollusks that have coiled shells and move slowly by means of a muscular foot. If you have any questions about medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help! Just let me know what you're looking for.

Environmental pollutants are defined as any substances or energy (such as noise, heat, or light) that are present in the environment and can cause harm or discomfort to humans or other living organisms, or damage the natural ecosystems. These pollutants can come from a variety of sources, including industrial processes, transportation, agriculture, and household activities. They can be in the form of gases, liquids, solids, or radioactive materials, and can contaminate air, water, and soil. Examples include heavy metals, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter, and greenhouse gases.

It is important to note that the impact of environmental pollutants on human health and the environment can be acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) and it depends on the type, concentration, duration and frequency of exposure. Some common effects of environmental pollutants include respiratory problems, cancer, neurological disorders, reproductive issues, and developmental delays in children.

It is important to monitor, control and reduce the emissions of these pollutants through regulations, technology advancements, and sustainable practices to protect human health and the environment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "North America" is not a medical term. It is a geographical term that refers to the third largest continent in the world, which includes countries such as the United States, Canada, and Mexico, among others. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health topics, I'd be happy to help with those!

I am not aware of a medical definition for the term "birds." Birds are a group of warm-blooded vertebrates constituting the class Aves, characterized by feathers, toothless beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, and lightweight but strong skeletons. Some birds, such as pigeons and chickens, have been used in medical research, but the term "birds" itself does not have a specific medical definition.

Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is the genetic material present in the mitochondria, which are specialized structures within cells that generate energy. Unlike nuclear DNA, which is present in the cell nucleus and inherited from both parents, mtDNA is inherited solely from the mother.

MtDNA is a circular molecule that contains 37 genes, including 13 genes that encode for proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation, a process that generates energy in the form of ATP. The remaining genes encode for rRNAs and tRNAs, which are necessary for protein synthesis within the mitochondria.

Mutations in mtDNA can lead to a variety of genetic disorders, including mitochondrial diseases, which can affect any organ system in the body. These mutations can also be used in forensic science to identify individuals and establish biological relationships.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "population density" is actually a term used in population geography and epidemiology, rather than medical terminology. It refers to the number of people living in a specific area or region, usually measured as the number of people per square mile or square kilometer.

However, understanding population density can be important in public health and medicine because it can influence various factors related to health outcomes and healthcare delivery, such as:

1. Disease transmission rates: Higher population densities can facilitate the spread of infectious diseases, particularly those that are transmitted through close contact between individuals.
2. Access to healthcare services: Areas with lower population density might have fewer healthcare resources and providers available, making it more challenging for residents to access necessary medical care.
3. Health disparities: Population density can contribute to health inequities, as urban areas often have better access to healthcare, education, and economic opportunities than rural areas, leading to differences in health outcomes between these populations.
4. Environmental factors: Higher population densities might lead to increased pollution, noise, and other environmental hazards that can negatively impact health.

Therefore, while "population density" is not a medical definition per se, it remains an essential concept for understanding various public health and healthcare issues.

Fungi, in the context of medical definitions, are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as the more familiar mushrooms. The study of fungi is known as mycology.

Fungi can exist as unicellular organisms or as multicellular filamentous structures called hyphae. They are heterotrophs, which means they obtain their nutrients by decomposing organic matter or by living as parasites on other organisms. Some fungi can cause various diseases in humans, animals, and plants, known as mycoses. These infections range from superficial, localized skin infections to systemic, life-threatening invasive diseases.

Examples of fungal infections include athlete's foot (tinea pedis), ringworm (dermatophytosis), candidiasis (yeast infection), histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis. Fungal infections can be challenging to treat due to the limited number of antifungal drugs available and the potential for drug resistance.

Animal migration is a seasonal movement of animals from one place to another, typically over long distances, to find food, reproduce, or escape harsh conditions. This phenomenon is observed in various species, including birds, mammals, fish, and insects. The routes and destinations of these migrations are often genetically programmed and can be quite complex. Animal migration has important ecological consequences and is influenced by factors such as climate change, habitat loss, and human activities.

Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) refers to the specific regions of DNA in a cell that contain the genes for ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Ribosomes are complex structures composed of proteins and rRNA, which play a crucial role in protein synthesis by translating messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins.

In humans, there are four types of rRNA molecules: 18S, 5.8S, 28S, and 5S. These rRNAs are encoded by multiple copies of rDNA genes that are organized in clusters on specific chromosomes. In humans, the majority of rDNA genes are located on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes 13, 14, 15, 21, and 22.

Each cluster of rDNA genes contains both transcribed and non-transcribed spacer regions. The transcribed regions contain the genes for the four types of rRNA, while the non-transcribed spacers contain regulatory elements that control the transcription of the rRNA genes.

The number of rDNA copies varies between species and even within individuals of the same species. The copy number can also change during development and in response to environmental factors. Variations in rDNA copy number have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

A group of chordate animals (Phylum Chordata) that have a vertebral column, or backbone, made up of individual vertebrae. This group includes mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and fish. Vertebrates are characterized by the presence of a notochord, which is a flexible, rod-like structure that runs along the length of the body during development; a dorsal hollow nerve cord; and pharyngeal gill slits at some stage in their development. The vertebral column provides support and protection for the spinal cord and allows for the development of complex movements and behaviors.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "seasons" is not a term that has a medical definition. Seasons refer to the four divisions of the year (spring, summer, autumn or fall, and winter) based on the position of the earth in its orbit around the sun. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

I apologize for any confusion, but "Asia" is not a medical term. It is the largest continent in the world, comprising about 30% of the Earth's total land area and containing around 60% of the world's current human population. It is divided into several regions, including Northern Asia (Siberia), Eastern Asia (China, Japan, Korea, Mongolia, Taiwan), Southern Asia (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Maldives), Southeastern Asia (Vietnam, Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore, Myanmar, Cambodia, Laos, Brunei), and Western Asia (Middle East).

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

Temperature, in a medical context, is a measure of the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment. It is usually measured using a thermometer and reported in degrees Celsius (°C), degrees Fahrenheit (°F), or kelvin (K). In the human body, normal core temperature ranges from about 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) when measured rectally, and can vary slightly depending on factors such as time of day, physical activity, and menstrual cycle. Elevated body temperature is a common sign of infection or inflammation, while abnormally low body temperature can indicate hypothermia or other medical conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Europe" is a geographical and political designation, rather than a medical one. It refers to the continent located entirely in the Northern Hemisphere and mostly in the Eastern Hemisphere. It is bordered by the Arctic Ocean to the north, the Atlantic Ocean to the west, and the Mediterranean Sea to the south. Europe is made up of approximately 50 countries, depending on how one defines a "country."

If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health-related topics, I'd be happy to help answer them!

Biological models, also known as physiological models or organismal models, are simplified representations of biological systems, processes, or mechanisms that are used to understand and explain the underlying principles and relationships. These models can be theoretical (conceptual or mathematical) or physical (such as anatomical models, cell cultures, or animal models). They are widely used in biomedical research to study various phenomena, including disease pathophysiology, drug action, and therapeutic interventions.

Examples of biological models include:

1. Mathematical models: These use mathematical equations and formulas to describe complex biological systems or processes, such as population dynamics, metabolic pathways, or gene regulation networks. They can help predict the behavior of these systems under different conditions and test hypotheses about their underlying mechanisms.
2. Cell cultures: These are collections of cells grown in a controlled environment, typically in a laboratory dish or flask. They can be used to study cellular processes, such as signal transduction, gene expression, or metabolism, and to test the effects of drugs or other treatments on these processes.
3. Animal models: These are living organisms, usually vertebrates like mice, rats, or non-human primates, that are used to study various aspects of human biology and disease. They can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of diseases, the mechanisms of drug action, and the safety and efficacy of new therapies.
4. Anatomical models: These are physical representations of biological structures or systems, such as plastic models of organs or tissues, that can be used for educational purposes or to plan surgical procedures. They can also serve as a basis for developing more sophisticated models, such as computer simulations or 3D-printed replicas.

Overall, biological models play a crucial role in advancing our understanding of biology and medicine, helping to identify new targets for therapeutic intervention, develop novel drugs and treatments, and improve human health.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

Nitrogen is not typically referred to as a medical term, but it is an element that is crucial to medicine and human life.

In a medical context, nitrogen is often mentioned in relation to gas analysis, respiratory therapy, or medical gases. Nitrogen (N) is a colorless, odorless, and nonreactive gas that makes up about 78% of the Earth's atmosphere. It is an essential element for various biological processes, such as the growth and maintenance of organisms, because it is a key component of amino acids, nucleic acids, and other organic compounds.

In some medical applications, nitrogen is used to displace oxygen in a mixture to create a controlled environment with reduced oxygen levels (hypoxic conditions) for therapeutic purposes, such as in certain types of hyperbaric chambers. Additionally, nitrogen gas is sometimes used in cryotherapy, where extremely low temperatures are applied to tissues to reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation.

However, it's important to note that breathing pure nitrogen can be dangerous, as it can lead to unconsciousness and even death due to lack of oxygen (asphyxiation) within minutes.

Medical definitions of water generally describe it as a colorless, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for all forms of life. It is a universal solvent, making it an excellent medium for transporting nutrients and waste products within the body. Water constitutes about 50-70% of an individual's body weight, depending on factors such as age, sex, and muscle mass.

In medical terms, water has several important functions in the human body:

1. Regulation of body temperature through perspiration and respiration.
2. Acting as a lubricant for joints and tissues.
3. Facilitating digestion by helping to break down food particles.
4. Transporting nutrients, oxygen, and waste products throughout the body.
5. Helping to maintain healthy skin and mucous membranes.
6. Assisting in the regulation of various bodily functions, such as blood pressure and heart rate.

Dehydration can occur when an individual does not consume enough water or loses too much fluid due to illness, exercise, or other factors. This can lead to a variety of symptoms, including dry mouth, fatigue, dizziness, and confusion. Severe dehydration can be life-threatening if left untreated.

I am not aware of a specific medical definition for the term "China." Generally, it is used to refer to:

1. The People's Republic of China (PRC), which is a country in East Asia. It is the most populous country in the world and the fourth largest by geographical area. Its capital city is Beijing.
2. In a historical context, "China" was used to refer to various dynasties and empires that existed in East Asia over thousands of years. The term "Middle Kingdom" or "Zhongguo" (中国) has been used by the Chinese people to refer to their country for centuries.
3. In a more general sense, "China" can also be used to describe products or goods that originate from or are associated with the People's Republic of China.

If you have a specific context in which you encountered the term "China" related to medicine, please provide it so I can give a more accurate response.

Molecular evolution is the process of change in the DNA sequence or protein structure over time, driven by mechanisms such as mutation, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. It refers to the evolutionary study of changes in DNA, RNA, and proteins, and how these changes accumulate and lead to new species and diversity of life. Molecular evolution can be used to understand the history and relationships among different organisms, as well as the functional consequences of genetic changes.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a colorless, odorless gas that is naturally present in the Earth's atmosphere. It is a normal byproduct of cellular respiration in humans, animals, and plants, and is also produced through the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas.

In medical terms, carbon dioxide is often used as a respiratory stimulant and to maintain the pH balance of blood. It is also used during certain medical procedures, such as laparoscopic surgery, to insufflate (inflate) the abdominal cavity and create a working space for the surgeon.

Elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the body can lead to respiratory acidosis, a condition characterized by an increased concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood and a decrease in pH. This can occur in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, or other lung diseases that impair breathing and gas exchange. Symptoms of respiratory acidosis may include shortness of breath, confusion, headache, and in severe cases, coma or death.

I apologize, but "Brazil" is not a medical term or condition. It is the largest country in both South America and Latin America by land area and population. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or health concerns, please provide more information and I will do my best to help.

The term "Theoretical Models" is used in various scientific fields, including medicine, to describe a representation of a complex system or phenomenon. It is a simplified framework that explains how different components of the system interact with each other and how they contribute to the overall behavior of the system. Theoretical models are often used in medical research to understand and predict the outcomes of diseases, treatments, or public health interventions.

A theoretical model can take many forms, such as mathematical equations, computer simulations, or conceptual diagrams. It is based on a set of assumptions and hypotheses about the underlying mechanisms that drive the system. By manipulating these variables and observing the effects on the model's output, researchers can test their assumptions and generate new insights into the system's behavior.

Theoretical models are useful for medical research because they allow scientists to explore complex systems in a controlled and systematic way. They can help identify key drivers of disease or treatment outcomes, inform the design of clinical trials, and guide the development of new interventions. However, it is important to recognize that theoretical models are simplifications of reality and may not capture all the nuances and complexities of real-world systems. Therefore, they should be used in conjunction with other forms of evidence, such as experimental data and observational studies, to inform medical decision-making.

Physiological adaptation refers to the changes or modifications that occur in an organism's biological functions or structures as a result of environmental pressures or changes. These adaptations enable the organism to survive and reproduce more successfully in its environment. They can be short-term, such as the constriction of blood vessels in response to cold temperatures, or long-term, such as the evolution of longer limbs in animals that live in open environments.

In the context of human physiology, examples of physiological adaptation include:

1. Acclimatization: The process by which the body adjusts to changes in environmental conditions, such as altitude or temperature. For example, when a person moves to a high-altitude location, their body may produce more red blood cells to compensate for the lower oxygen levels, leading to improved oxygen delivery to tissues.

2. Exercise adaptation: Regular physical activity can lead to various physiological adaptations, such as increased muscle strength and endurance, enhanced cardiovascular function, and improved insulin sensitivity.

3. Hormonal adaptation: The body can adjust hormone levels in response to changes in the environment or internal conditions. For instance, during prolonged fasting, the body releases stress hormones like cortisol and adrenaline to help maintain energy levels and prevent muscle wasting.

4. Sensory adaptation: Our senses can adapt to different stimuli over time. For example, when we enter a dark room after being in bright sunlight, it takes some time for our eyes to adjust to the new light level. This process is known as dark adaptation.

5. Aging-related adaptations: As we age, various physiological changes occur that help us adapt to the changing environment and maintain homeostasis. These include changes in body composition, immune function, and cognitive abilities.

... was to be operated by the Zoological Society of London and would have been the world's first aquarium entirely based on ... Biota! was a proposed aquarium in the Silvertown Quays redevelopment, on the site of Millennium Mills adjacent to the Royal ... Biota! would have formed one of the main public attractions of the 60-acre (24 ha), £1.5 billion development, along with ... "Biota! represents the creation of a new visitor experience not previously seen in the UK". KUD International LLD. Archived from ...
... may refer to: Biota (ecology), the plant and animal life of a region, see Biome Biota, genus and common name for a ... Spain Biota (band), a band from Colorado, USA Biota!, a proposed aquarium in London Biota (album), a 1982 album by Mnemonist ... Look up biota in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... page lists articles associated with the title Biota. If an ... coniferous tree, Platycladus orientalis Biota, Cinco Villas, a municipality in Aragon, ...
"ReR Megacorp BIOTA: Fragment for Balance". Biota homepage Biota discography at Discogs Mnemonists discography at Discogs Biota ... Object Holder was the first Biota album to feature "songs", with lyrics written by Biota's Tom Katsimpalis as well as by guest ... "Openness, Density, Mystery and Wonder... The Strange Case of Biota". Biota homepage. Retrieved 2007-10-01. Couture, François. " ... Biota. Since the mid-1980s, Biota has released numerous idiosyncratic titles, mostly on RēR. These include Rackabones (1985, ...
The Qingjiang biota are a major discovery of fossilized remains dating from the early Cambrian period approximately 518 million ... "The Qingjiang biota-A Burgess Shale-type fossil Lagerstätte from the early Cambrian of South China". Science. 363 (6433): 1338- ...
... is an additional support of the claim that filamentous fossils dated to 2.4 Ga from the Ongeluk Formation ( ... The Volyn biota are fossilized microorganisms found in rock samples from miarolitic cavities of igneous rocks collected in ... The samples of Volyn biota were found in samples from miarolitic pegmatites ("chamber pegmatites") collected from the Korosten ... Usually Precambrian fossils are not well preserved, but the Volyn biota had exceptional conditions for fossilization in ...
... younger Triassic biotas (e.g., the Paris biota, Guanling biota). The presence of such a complete ecosystem implies that either ... The Guiyang biota comes from the northern margin of the Nanpanjang Basin, that was a Triassic equatorial foreland basin on the ... The biota is rich in bony fishes. Teeth of chondrichthyes are also present. Two coelacanth species, ranging between 50 and 100 ... The Guiyang biota includes species from all the trophic levels expected in a marine ecosystem -from primary consumers to apex ...
In 2023, another diverse post-extinction biota was presented from South China, the Dienerian aged Guiyang biota, which includes ... Charbonnier, Sylvain; Brayard, Arnaud; the Paris Biota Team (2019). "New thylacocephalans from the Early Triassic Paris Biota ( ... The Paris biota was found in layers dating back to the earliest Spathian, a substage of the Olenekian stage of the Early ... This biota was later also found in coeval and slightly younger beds in both northeastern Nevada (Elko County) and Caribou ...
The Francevillian biota (Also referred to as Gabon macrofossils, Gabonionta or Francevillian group fossils) are a collection of ... Members of the Francevillian biota The structures are up to 17 centimetres (6.7 in) in size. They form flattened disks with a ... Ediacaran biota History of life Francevillian B Formation Franceville basin El Albani, Abderrazak; Bengtson, Stefan; Canfield, ... However they noted that the Francevillian Biota is still 400 million years older than is currently widely accepted for the ...
The specific epithet biota honours the Biota Environmental Sciences consultancy for their support of the Australian Research ... Bungulla biota is a species of mygalomorph spider in the Idiopidae family. It is endemic to Australia. It was described in 2018 ... "Species Bungulla biota Rix, Raven & Harvey, 2018". Australian Faunal Directory. Dept of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment ...
"Protosterol biota" may explain one mysterious gap in the evolution of complex life". Big Think. 2023-06-18. Retrieved 2023-06- ... The protosterol biota is a group of organisms found in fossilized fats that comprised aquatic protosterol-producing bacteria ... Articles with short description, Short description matches Wikidata, Prehistoric biotas, Proterozoic life, Precambrian fossils ...
Fossils of unambiguous, fully terrestrial organisms are lacking from the Waukesha Biota. Most of the Waukesha Biota fossils ... Its biota is similar to that from the Waukesha site, except that it lacks trilobites. Taphonomy is the study of how organisms ... This biota is preserved in certain strata within the Brandon Bridge Formation, which dates to the early Silurian period. It is ... This biota is one of the few well studied Lagerstättes (exceptional fossil sites) from the Silurian, making it important in our ...
... and some of it was thought to belong to the Jehol Biota. The Yanliao Biota comes from outcrops north of the Han Mountains, in ... The Yanliao Biota is made up of fossils from more than one locality, and the geology has been difficult to interpret (see below ... The Yanliao Biota is the name given to an assembly of fossils preserved in northeastern China from the Middle to Late Jurassic ... Like the Jehol Biota, these deposits are composed of alternating layers of volcanic tuff and sediment, and are considered ...
The term "Ediacaran biota" and similar ("Ediacara" / "Ediacaran" / "Ediacarian" / "Vendian" and "fauna" / "biota") has, at ... Further, unlike later soft-bodied fossil biota such as the Burgess Shale or Solnhofen Limestone, the Ediacaran biota is not ... Mark McMenamin saw such feeding strategies as characteristic for the entire biota, and referred to the marine biota of this ... Constituents of this biota appear to survive through until the extinction of all Ediacarans at the base of the Cambrian. One ...
... do not contain jellyfish-like "discs" (as does the Ediacaran biota), nor any forms close to sponges (the most ... The Huainan biota is a collection of macroscopic skeletal organisms discovered in the early 1980s by Wang and Sun Weiguo in the ... Prehistoric biotas, All stub articles, Paleontological site stubs). ... Precambrian deposits of China (Huainan City, Anhui Province) with an age of 840-740 Ma (Tonian). A similar biota was also found ...
Some scientists have argued that the Jehol Biota evolved directly from the preceding Daohugou Biota without any strongly ... The Jehol Biota is particularly noteworthy for the very high diversity of fossils and the very large numbers of individuals of ... The name "Jehol Biota" was first published by Gu (1962), but was in use by geologists and paleontologists by 1959. This term ... The Jehol Biota was not entirely isolated, however, because it also includes animals which were known from all around the world ...
Biota is the fourth studio album by the free improvisation ensemble Mnemonist Orchestra, released in 1982 by Dys Records. ... 1981.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link) Biota at Discogs (list of releases) (CS1 maint ... Colli, Beppe (March 8, 2005). "An Interview With Bill Sharp/Biota (1994)". CloudsandClocks.net. Retrieved October 10, 2016. ...
Biota is located in a strategic place, controlling one of the fords of the Arba River where a fortress or castle was built, of ... Biota borders Uncastillo to the north and northwest, Sádaba to the west, Luesia and Asín to the east, and Ejea de los ... Biota is a municipality of Spain belonging to the province of Zaragoza, autonomous community of Aragon. The town is part of the ... It was conquered by Aragonese king Sancho Ramírez in 1091, and the placename of Biota is thereby first found in a written ...
A hypothetical list of biota, or "hypothetical list" for short, is a list of taxa (of plants, animals, fungi etc.) which are ... Such lists are sometimes included by authors of regional biota, partly to demonstrate that the authors have considered and ... to encourage researchers and others to seek out the taxa in question so that they can be added to the list of the area's biota ...
The Meyer Desert Formation biota is a fossilized biota (flora and fauna) found in the Dominion Range in the Transantarctic ... Cenozoic Antarctica, Paleontology in Antarctica, Prehistoric biotas, Transantarctic Mountains, Paleogene plants, Neogene plants ...
National Science Museum Imperial Palace Biota Investigation Group) Biota of Imperial Palace Fukiage Garden 2001, Sekai Bunkasha ... Therefore, the biota of the Palace is rich in vegetation as well as in animals of the Animal Kingdom. While small Japanese mole ... The biota of the Palace reflects the long history of the Palace. The present Fukiage Garden is mainly composed of woods, ... The biota of Tokyo Imperial Palace grounds, especially of the Fukiage Garden, consists of enriched and distinct flora and fauna ...
Trinidad and Tobago are continental islands with a geologically very recent history of direct land bridge connection to South America. As a result, unlike most of the Caribbean Islands, Trinidad and Tobago supports a primarily South American flora and fauna and has greater diversity of plant and animal species than the Antilles. However, rates of endemism are lower than in the rest of the Caribbean because there has been less time for genetic isolation from mainland populations because of the history of land bridge connections and hence fewer opportunities for speciation, and so a greater proportion of the species in Trinidad and Tobago are also found on the South American mainland. Trinidad is nearer to mainland South America and has been directly connected to the mainland via land bridges more often and for longer periods than Tobago. This, as well as Trinidad's larger size and more varied topography and hydrology compared to that of Tobago allow greater species and ecosystem diversity on the ...
This is a list of the known wild biota of the Isle of Man. Non-native species are marked *, extinct species are marked †. If ... Biota of the Isle of Man, Environment of the Isle of Man). ...
This is a List of White Sea species, ordered by suspected phylum. 3 species 1 species 1 species 1 species 1 species 1 species. 3 species 3 species 1 species Vendia Odontogriphus (Articles with short description, Short description is different from Wikidata, White Sea, White Sea fossils, Lists of prehistoric animals, Ediacaran life ...
Biota. 16 (2): 309-315. doi:10.24002/biota.v16i2.113. S2CID 191198645. Xiao, Zeyu; Rogiers, Suzy Y.; Sadras, Victor O.; Tyerman ...
... (sleeve). Biota. London, United Kingdom: Recommended Records. 1987.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in ... Bellowing Room is the seventh studio album by experimental electronic music ensemble Biota, released in 1987 by Recommended ... Colli, Beppe (March 8, 2005). "An Interview With Bill Sharp/Biota (1994)". CloudsandClocks.net. Retrieved October 10, 2016. ...
... (sleeve). Biota. London, United Kingdom: Recommended Records. 1988.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV ... Tinct is the eighth studio album by the American experimental electronic music ensemble Biota, released in 1988 by Recommended ... Colli, Beppe (March 8, 2005). "An Interview With Bill Sharp/Biota (1994)". CloudsandClocks.net. Retrieved October 10, 2016. ...
Tumble (booklet). Biota. Surrey, UK: ReR Megacorp. 1989.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) ( ... All music is composed by Biota, except "Shadows Appear to Do" by Deborah Fuller and "...Buffalo Come Back" by C.W. Vrtacek ... "Biota: Tumble > Review". Allmusic. Retrieved October 10, 2016. Colli, Beppe (March 8, 2005). "An Interview With Bill Sharp/ ... Tumble is the ninth studio album by the experimental electronic music ensemble Biota, released in 1989 by ReR Megacorp. The ...
... (sleeve). Biota. London, United Kingdom: Bad Alchemy. 1988.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media ( ... Awry is a 10" vinyl EP by the American experimental electronic music ensemble Biota, released in 1988 by Bad Alchemy. All music ... Colli, Beppe (March 8, 2005). "An Interview With Bill Sharp/Biota (1994)". CloudsandClocks.net. Retrieved October 10, 2016. ...
All music is composed by Biota Adapted from the Invisible Map liner notes. Couture, François. "Biota: Invisible Map > Review". ... Invisible Map (booklet). Biota. Surrey, UK: ReR Megacorp. 2001.{{cite AV media notes}}: CS1 maint: others in cite AV media ( ... Invisible Map is the twelfth studio album by experimental music ensemble Biota, released on June 5, 2001 by ReR Megacorp. ...
Varanidae) Utilized by Yaur Tribe at National Park of Cenderawasih Gulf". Biota. 16 (2). Moseley, Christopher dan R.E. Asher, ...
Biota! was to be operated by the Zoological Society of London and would have been the worlds first aquarium entirely based on ... Biota! was a proposed aquarium in the Silvertown Quays redevelopment, on the site of Millennium Mills adjacent to the Royal ... Biota! would have formed one of the main public attractions of the 60-acre (24 ha), £1.5 billion development, along with ... "Biota! represents the creation of a new visitor experience not previously seen in the UK". KUD International LLD. Archived from ...
... Rodney M. Feldmann, Carrie E. Schweitzer, Shixue Hu, ... and plant fossils collectively referred to as the Luoping Biota has been collected from quarries in the vicinity of the city of ... "Macrurous Decapoda from the Luoping Biota (Middle Triassic) of China," Journal of Paleontology, 86(3), 425-441, (1 May 2012) ... "Macrurous Decapoda from the Luoping Biota (Middle Triassic) of China," Journal of Paleontology 86(3), 425-441, (1 May 2012). ...
NCMI Information and Data Centre » Applications » CAAB - Codes for Australian Aquatic Biota ... NCMI Information and Data Centre » Applications » CAAB - Codes for Australian Aquatic Biota ... Codes for Australian Aquatic Biota (CAAB) Taxon Report. .miic_resize { object-fit: cover; width:350px; } .left { float: left; ...
NCMI Information and Data Centre » Applications » CAAB - Codes for Australian Aquatic Biota ... NCMI Information and Data Centre » Applications » CAAB - Codes for Australian Aquatic Biota ... Codes for Australian Aquatic Biota (CAAB) Taxon Report. .miic_resize { object-fit: cover; width:350px; } .left { float: left; ...
TBT and TBT effects in sediment and biota, to histopathology, ocean acidification and benthos and plankton data. DOME also ... Contaminants in biota from ICES DOME (Marine Environment) This website has limited functionality with javascript off. Please ... TBT and TBT effects in sediment and biota, to histopathology, ocean acidification and benthos and plankton data. DOME also ... For references, please go to https://www.eea.europa.eu/data-and-maps/data/external/contaminants-in-biota-from-ices or scan the ...
... on Shapeways. Learn more before you buy, or discover other cool products in Rings. ...
ISSN 2675-7893 (Online) , MG. Biota
... Miscellaneous species If you would like to be among the first to know when this ...
Bromeliad Biota , Bromeliad Phytotelmata , Bromeliad Terraria , Carnivorous Bromeliads. Bromeliad-inhabiting mosquitoes in ...
A large number of automatic weather stations has been implemented in the frame of the BIOTA AFRICA project by the Namibian ... The presentation has been created within the BIOTA subproject E02 at Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences, Faculty or ...
The Biota of the Gordon Natural Area. Contact Gordon Natural Area Gordon Natural Area Address: Merion Science Center Room 010 ... The Biota of the Gordon Natural Area - Home. Despite being an isolated forest fragment encircled by development, the GNA ... You can also find additional information on the biota of the Gordon in the Gordon Natural Area Collection on DigitalCommons. ...
... the visual/sonic art group Biota have finally completed their Sixth CD for ReR. Unique in their history and method, Biota ... Six years in the making, the visual/sonic art group Biota have finally completed their Sixth CD for ReR. Unique in their ... Biota resemble no one, follow no one and, if the sonic arts were like the visual arts, would by now be a national treasure ... history and method, Biota painstakingly construct complex, organic structures that mix extensive studio processing and musique ...
BIOTA aims to map and analyze biodiversity, including fauna, flora and microorganisms. And also to assess the possibilities of ... BIOTA/Fapesp RESEARCHES The Research Program on Biodiversity Characterization, Conservation, Restoration and Sustainable Use - ... The Research Program on Biodiversity Characterization, Conservation, Restoration and Sustainable Use -BIOTA aims to map and ...
18 Apr: Public consultation opens on BIOTA FAPESPs strategic plan for next eight years. ... On March 25, the FAPESP Research Program on Biodiversity Characterization, Conservation, Restoration and Sustainable Use (BIOTA ...
Humberto R. da Rocha, Helber C. Freitas, Rafael Rosolem, Robinson I.N. Juárez, Rafael N. Tannus, Marcos A. Ligo, Osvaldo M. R. Cabral, Maria A.F. Silva Dias ...
In cooperation with BIOTA-internal and external partners, BIOTA BIOMAPS has established the International Biogeographical ... You are here: Home → research → AG Weigend → Biogeography and macroecology (BIOMAPS) → BIOTA Africa ... The BIOTA AFRICA research network was initiated in 1999 and was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research ...
Isabella Mayara Monteiro de Carvalho Pedrosa, Taís Borges Costa, Renato Gomes Faria, Frederico Gustavo Rodrigues França, Daniel Orsi Laranjeiras, Thiago César Sena Pereira de Oliveira, Cristiane Nikely Silva Palmeira, Selma Torquato, Tami Mott, Gustavo Henrique Calazans Vieira, Adrian Antonio Garda ...
Nuclei and nucleoli in embryo-like fossils from the Ediacaran Wengan Biota (NERC grant NE/J018325/1) ... Tomographic data of tubular fossils from the Ediacaran Wengan Doushantuo biota (NERC grant NE/J018325/1) ... A multicellular organism with embedded cell clusters from the Ediacaran Wengan biota (Doushantuo Formation, South China) (NERC ... Critical appraisal of tubular putative eumetazoans from the Ediacaran Wengan Doushantuo biota. Proceedings of the Royal ...
Short squeeze stock short interest data and short selling information for shares of Biota Pharmaceuticals Incorporated. Short ...
Aggregated assessment of hazardous substances in biota measured in the North East Atlantic, Baltic Sea, and Mediterranean Sea ... Aggregated assessment of hazardous substances in biota measured in the North East Atlantic, Baltic Sea, and Mediterranean Sea ...
Our study provides several insights into the long-term dynamics of the Arctic biota at the circumpolar and regional scales. Our ... Late Quaternary dynamics of Arctic biota from ancient environmental genomics: [+ Correction]. Research output: Contribution to ... During the last glacial-interglacial cycle, Arctic biotas experienced substantial climatic changes, yet the nature, extent and ... Author Correction: Late Quaternary dynamics of Arctic biota from ancient environmental genomics. Nature (2022). https://doi.org ...
The Biota Group has unveiled its newest offering, captive-bred Potters angelfish! We are so excited to see this new species ... Biota Unveils Captive Bred Potters Angelfish. Austin Lefevre. May 5, 2023. 0 The Biota Group has unveiled its newest offering ... Tags biota captive bred potters angelfish. Austin Lefevre. Austin has been in the aquarium industry since 2002, spanning roles ... Heres what Biota had to say about their latest breeding success.. "Potters Angelfish are back and better than ever. The ...
Taxonomic hierarchy of Clade Biota Wagner 2004 [Wiemann, de Queiroz, Rowe, Planavsky, Anderson, Gogarten, Turner & Gauthier ... crown] Clade Biota Wagner 2004 [Wiemann, de Queiroz, Rowe, Planavsky, Anderson, Gogarten, Turner & Gauthier 2020] Status: ... Crown clade: Clade Biota Wagner 2004 [Wiemann, de Queiroz, Rowe, Planavsky, Anderson, Gogarten, Turner & Gauthier 2020] ( ...
Sediment and biota testing is crucial for evaluating the health of aquatic ecosystems. Learn how this type of environmental ... Investigating sediment and biota contamination. Due to enactment of international conventions and national directives, many ... The levels found in biota are the bioavailable fraction as certain contaminants travel through the food chain and can affect ... ALS has an advanced range of capabilities to support sediment and biota programs for the assessment of contamination, to fulfil ...
Biota Captive-Bred Yellow Tang (Zebrasoma flavescens) Item: Please Note: Due to variations within species, your item may not ... LiveAquaria procured these long anticipated, captive-bred gems from Biota Aquariums who partnered with the Oceanic Institute of ...
February 3, 2009 DM 41, s. 2009 - 44Th Annual Biota National Convention And Scientific Sessions. ... February 3, 2009 DM 41, s. 2009 - 44Th Annual Biota National Convention And Scientific Sessions ...
Post-mining calcareous seepages as surrogate habitats for aquatic macroinvertebrate biota of vanishing calcareous spring fens. ... Post-mining calcareous seepages as surrogate habitats for aquatic macroinvertebrate biota of vanishing calcareous spring fens ...
Soil Biota Adversely Affected by Interaction of Inputs and Practices in Chemical-Intensive Agriculture. (Beyond Pesticides, ... Soil biota is essential to ecosystem functioning because it breaks down organic matter, enables chemical elements to be reused ... A study published in February 2016 reveals that a decrease in soil biota impacts the services that healthy soil provides. The ... One Response to "Soil Biota Adversely Affected by Interaction of Inputs and Practices in Chemical-Intensive Agriculture". * 1 ...
Chinese scientists discover Avialae and terrestrial biota dating back to late Jurassic Period in E. Chinas Fujian, filling in ... established the terrestrial biota living 148 to 150 million years ago through studying the minerals and elements inside the ... researchers have named the terrestrial biota the "Zhenghe Fauna," the fauna that contained Avialae in late Jurassic Period and ...
  • In 2001, the program launched an open-access electronic peer-reviewed journal, Biota Neotropica ( www.biotaneotropica.org.br ), to report original research on biodiversity in the Neotropical region. (fapesp.br)
  • Biota Neotropica, 7 , 321-324. (bvsalud.org)
  • In nine years, the BIOTA-FAPESP Program has supported 80 major research projects, trained 150 science Masters and 90 PhD students, produced and stored information on approximately 12,000 species and managed to link and make available data from 35 major biological collections. (fapesp.br)
  • The result is a broad spectrum of chemical parameters from metals, PAHs, brominated flame retardants, TBT and TBT effects in sediment and biota, to histopathology, ocean acidification and benthos and plankton data. (europa.eu)
  • ALS has an advanced range of capabilities to support sediment and biota programs for the assessment of contamination, to fulfil the most stringent regulatory requirements. (alsglobal.com)
  • The Biota Group has unveiled its newest offering, captive-bred Potters angelfish! (reefbuilders.com)
  • The combined team of The Biota Group and Oceanic Institute of Hawaii Pacific University is proud to announce the commercial availability of captive-bred Hawaiian Potter's Angelfish. (reefbuilders.com)
  • LiveAquaria procured these long anticipated, captive-bred gems from Biota Aquariums who partnered with the Oceanic Institute of Hawaii where Yellow Tangs are bred and raised in captivity. (liveaquaria.com)
  • In order to better understand these bottlenecks, we studied Nardus grassland species grown together in communities with fast-growing species in 50-liter pots along a gradient of bioavailable phosphorus with or without inoculated soil biota. (ugent.be)
  • We did not find an effect of the soil biota treatment on the biomass of the oligotrophic indicator species, but did observe a positive effect of inoculation with soil biota on the total biomass of the plant community. (ugent.be)
  • Ecotoxicity tests are bioassays performed to determine if either a potentially toxic compound or an environmental sample (e.g. effluent, leachate, sedimend or soil sample) causes a biologically important response in test organisms (test biota). (microbiotests.com)
  • Plant biota samples (N = 32) and corresponding soil sources were collected. (cdc.gov)
  • Based on such high abundance and diversity of fossils, as well as the accurate chronological framework, researchers have named the terrestrial biota the "Zhenghe Fauna," the fauna that contained Avialae in late Jurassic Period and that was located in the southernmost location on Earth known to date. (globaltimes.cn)
  • Aquatic and terrestrial test biota are used worldwide in ecotoxicological studies. (microbiotests.com)
  • Microbiotests provides a wide range of aquatic and terrestrial test biota that can be used for standardised and culture-independent toxicity testing , bioassay services, or for other research applications. (microbiotests.com)
  • Microbiotests provides following aquatic and terrestrial test biota as described in International Standards and Guidelines for environmental toxicity testing, chemical risk assessment and other research applications. (microbiotests.com)
  • The terrestrial biota plays an important role in the regulation of atmospheric composition and climate. (lu.se)
  • But likewise, an increasing number of studies demonstrate that, beyond CO 2 , atmospherically fast reactive substances that are emitted or consumed by the terrestrial biota, including by vegetation fires, also play a significant role for our understanding of the climate system. (lu.se)
  • A large number of automatic weather stations has been implemented in the frame of the BIOTA AFRICA project by the Namibian National Botanical Research Institute (NBRI) and the Group "Biodiversity, Evolution and Ecology" (BEE) of the University of Hamburg. (biota-africa.org)
  • The Research Program on Biodiversity Characterization, Conservation, Restoration and Sustainable Use - BIOTA aims to map and analyze biodiversity, including fauna, flora and microorganisms. (biota.org.br)
  • Massive shout-out and congratulations to everyone at Biota and the Oceanic Institute of Hawaii Pacific University on another amazing species brought to market. (reefbuilders.com)
  • What are the toxicological effects of mercury in Arctic biota? (usgs.gov)
  • During the last glacial-interglacial cycle, Arctic biotas experienced substantial climatic changes, yet the nature, extent and rate of their responses are not fully understood 1-8 . (ku.dk)
  • Our study provides several insights into the long-term dynamics of the Arctic biota at the circumpolar and regional scales. (ku.dk)
  • The levels found in biota are the bioavailable fraction as certain contaminants travel through the food chain and can affect humans via bioaccumulation and biomagnification in the ecosystem. (alsglobal.com)
  • For references , please go to https://www.eea.europa.eu/data-and-maps/data/external/contaminants-in-biota-from-ices or scan the QR code. (europa.eu)
  • Assessing levels of contaminants in biota provides complementary information to the testing of sediments in isolation. (alsglobal.com)
  • The BIOTA AFRICA research network was initiated in 1999 and was funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) until June 2010 in the context of the BIOLOG programme. (uni-bonn.de)
  • In cooperation with BIOTA-internal and external partners, BIOTA BIOMAPS has established the International Biogeographical Information System on African Plant Diversity (BISAP), comprising distribution data for more than 6,500 African plant species. (uni-bonn.de)
  • The test biota are not provided as living cultures as such, but as dormant or immobilised test species that can be stored for months and activated (= hatched, de-immobilised or germinated) at the time of the performance of the ecotoxicological bioassays. (microbiotests.com)
  • Every single batch of test biota is subject to thorough internal quality control screenings and reference tests according to international standards and guidelines to guarantee the biological quality and viability of the test species. (microbiotests.com)
  • A remarkable assemblage of over 20,000 vertebrate, invertebrate, and plant fossils collectively referred to as the Luoping Biota has been collected from quarries in the vicinity of the city of Luoping. (bioone.org)
  • Six years in the making, the visual/sonic art group Biota have finally completed their Sixth CD for ReR . (soundohm.com)
  • Jurnal Biota by http://jurnal.radenfatah.ac.id/index.php/biota is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License . (radenfatah.ac.id)
  • In Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), biota leaves and branches affect the lung, liver and large intestine meridians. (noraross.com)
  • These freshwater, marine and estuarine biota can also be used as starter culture to maintain live stocks or as back-up in the culturing facility of environmental laboratories. (microbiotests.com)
  • Unique in their history and method, Biota painstakingly construct complex, organic structures that mix extensive studio processing and musique concréte techniques with a highly eclectic orchestra of acoustic and electronic resources - from kit drums, through mediaeval winds, strings and barrel organs to early experimental electronic instruments. (soundohm.com)
  • Biota is also known as Ce Bai Ye in Chinese. (noraross.com)
  • It is also referred to as Oriental arborvitae, Chinese arborvitae, biota or Oriental thuja. (noraross.com)
  • Utilizing the in situ microbial population for biosurveillance allows Biota to deploy and establish end members and monitor temporal changes in complex multi-zone completions without mobilizing service personnel to the well site. (biota.com)
  • You can also find additional information on the biota of the Gordon in the ' Gordon Natural Area Collection ' on DigitalCommons. (wcupa.edu)
  • Can the Biota program serve as a global model for biodiversity efforts? (scielo.br)
  • BIOTA AFRICA has been jointly invented by African and German researchers aiming at the establishment of research supporting sustainable use and conservation of biodiversity in Africa. (vifabio.de)
  • Das Projekt BIOTA Southern Africa war Teil des vom BMBF geförderten Gesamtvorhabens BIOTA-Afrika (BIOdiversity Monitoring Transect Analyses in Africa) , das in drei Großregionen des afrikanischen Kontinents die Biodiversität in Abhängigkeit vom Landschafts- und vom Klimawandel untersuchte. (uni-hamburg.de)
  • 2010) Biodiversity in Southern Africa 1: Patterns at Local Scale - The BIOTA Observatories. (uni-hamburg.de)
  • BIOTA is an environmental consulting company specialized in biodiversity and water. (biota.pt)
  • The BIOTA transects in southern Africa (II. (biota-africa.org)
  • BIOTA Southern Africa beschränkte sich auf den Süden Afrikas (Republik Südafrika und Namibia), wo entlang eines 1800 km langen Nord-Süd verlaufenden Transekts das Ausmaß, die Dynamik und der Wandel der Biodiversität interdisziplinär untersucht wurde. (uni-hamburg.de)
  • Die Projektergebnisse von BIOTA Southern Africa können im dreibändigen Abschlussbericht nachgelesen werden. (uni-hamburg.de)
  • Samples of resident biota and bed sediments were collected in 1992 from 18 sites on or near the floor of the San Joaquin Valley, California, for analysis of 33 organochlorine compounds. (usgs.gov)
  • Assessing levels of contaminants in biota provides complementary information to the testing of sediments in isolation. (alsglobal.com)
  • Patterns of origination, evolution, and extinction of early animal life on this planet are largely interpreted from the fossils of the Precambrian soft-bodied Ediacara Biota, spanning nearly 40 m.y. of the terminal Ediacaran period. (geoscienceworld.org)
  • Biota orientalis (L.) Endl. (chinesenaturalherbs.com)
  • The hypouricemic actions of Biota orientalis (BO) extract and its flavonoid constituents quercetin and rutin, were in vivo examined using oxonate-induced hyperuricemic mice. (nih.gov)
  • The effects of quercetin and rutin were more potent than that of Biota orientalis extract at the same dose of 100 mg/kg. (nih.gov)
  • In addition, Biota orientalis extract, quercetin and rutin, when tested in vivo on mouse liver homogenates, elicited significant inhibitory actions on the xanthine dehydrogenase/xanthine oxidase (XDH/XO) activities. (nih.gov)
  • On March 11th, 2021, Biota Technology was acquired by Novozymes. (cbinsights.com)
  • Shortly after the release of Gyromancy in 1984, the group split into two collaborative factions: a visual arts collective, which retained the name Mnemonists, and the musical group, Biota. (squidco.com)
  • And just like the music by Mnemonists/Biota, Dockstader's music was definitely born in the studio. (cloudsandclocks.net)
  • In the decades since the original publication of the Rare and Endangered Biota of Florida series, new data have been gathered and the condition of the natural environment has changed. (upf.com)
  • Deposit and mobility of cadmium in a marsh-cove ecosystem and the relation to cadmium concentration in biota. (nih.gov)
  • Human colonic biota is a complex microbial ecosystem that serves as a host defense. (nih.gov)
  • Bioremediation refers to the use of biota, including bacteria, algae, fungi, and plants, to reduce or detoxify hazardous substances in the environment. (nih.gov)
  • In 2021, with growing global collaboration around the hypothesis, he determined that BIOTA was ready for its new mission: raising grants for students and young scientists to test this scenario for life's origins and explore its implications for humanity. (biota.org)
  • Biota recently entered into a collaboration with Pangolin Health to develop technical workflows and analytic methods for a number of customers in the Southwestern US. (cbinsights.com)
  • DCC values calculated for a human-sized organism are compared with human dose conversion factors from ICRP Publication 119, demonstrating the consistency of the biota approach with that for humans. (stir.ac.uk)
  • Monitoring pandemics with wastewaterFollowing the recent transaction with Novozymes, Biota is launching diagnostics in an emerging, high-growth opportunity to further broaden its genomic platform: high throughput genomic monitoring of wastewater to detect and defend against pathogen risks. (cbinsights.com)
  • The USBLM requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measure and characterize Hg and geochemical constituents in tailings, sediment, water, and biota at the Helen, Research, and Chicago mines and in Dry Creek. (usgs.gov)
  • Our results permit a preliminary assessment of the mining sources of Hg and associated chemical constituents that could elevate levels of monomethyl Hg (MMeHg) in the water, sediment, and biota that are impacted by historic mining. (usgs.gov)
  • A comprehensive global analysis of spatiotemporal patterns of mercury exposure and effect to biota requires obtaining and synthesizing critical information from known as well as remote and/or poorly documented areas. (springer.com)
  • BIOTA Institute Director and Chief Scientist Dr. Bruce Damer has spent his life pursuing two great questions: how did life on Earth begin, and how can we give that life (and ourselves) a sustainable pathway into the cosmos? (biota.org)
  • Sustainable growth for the global energy marketAlong with new investments in pathogen diagnostics, Biota continues to grow its core energy business. (cbinsights.com)
  • BIOTA believes in long lasting relationships to grow in a sustainable way. (biota.pt)
  • Biota deploys DNA sequencing and data science to explore the earth's subsurface. (cbinsights.com)
  • BIOTA considers its employees welfare fundamental in its company policy. (biota.pt)
  • BIOTA supports continuing professional development of its employees, not only at a technical level, but also regarding safety procedures. (biota.pt)
  • BIOTA is a solidary company, fair and open towards its employees, contributors, and clients. (biota.pt)
  • Biota is known for its highly detailed and often radical compositional approach, which involves extensive electronic processing of traditional acoustic sound sources, often blending and coalescing folk, jazz, chamber, and rock idioms, among other music forms. (squidco.com)
  • As Biota continues to advance its industrial genomics platform across multiple sectors, the company leadership is evolving with the appointment of Mathias Schlecht, Ph.D. to Chief Executive Officer and Ajay Kshatriya to Chairman of the Board. (cbinsights.com)
  • Understanding the biotic response to methylmercury availability in the environment for all biomes and key biota is vital for evaluating the effectiveness of the Minamata Convention on Mercury. (springer.com)
  • Further sampling of water, sediment, and biota at the Helen mine area and the upper part of Dry Creek was completed on July 15, 2003, during low-flow conditions. (usgs.gov)
  • ALS has an advanced range of capabilities to support sediment and biota programs for the assessment of contamination, to fulfil the most stringent regulatory requirements. (alsglobal.com)
  • The bullet points are that Biota is a unique project, defying genre with, like all such cult artists, a small but extremely dedicated public that, over the last 15 years has grown continuously as new listeners discover them. (squidco.com)
  • This paper is an outcome of the workshop entitled 'Estimation of Biomass and Carbon Stocks: the Case of Atlantic Rain Forest', that was conducted at Ubatuba, São Paulo, Brazil, between 4 and 8 December 2006 as part of the Brazilian project 'Ombrophylus Dense Forest floristic composition, structure and function at the Núcleos Picinguaba and Santa Virginia of the Serra do Mar State Park', BIOTA Gradiente. (scielo.br)
  • He conceived of BIOTA in 1996 and guided it through its first two decades of evolution in which it hosted four conferences and a podcast (hosted by Tom Barbalet) on the use of digital spaces to simulate evolution and natural systems. (biota.org)
  • Natural history museums have rewritten their agendas to focus on the study and conservation of ecosystems and biotas. (todayinsci.com)
  • The Biota Beats team keeps exploring the possibilities of making microbiome music. (labiotech.eu)
  • BIOTA reinforces its internal team with the best contributors and experts in the market, to ensure service quality. (biota.pt)
  • BIOTA seeks on a daily basis for more quality in its services, always trying to overcome client's expectations. (biota.pt)
  • Biota Launches COVID-19 Diagnostic In Wastewater Pathogen risk management using wastewater is a new genomics market category Author: Apr 1, 2021 10:17 AM EDT HOUSTON, April 1, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- Biota Technology, the pioneer of industrial genomics, today announces the creation of a new business line to manage pathogen risk in the post-pandemic economy. (cbinsights.com)
  • BIOTA supports fair budgets of projects, ensuring sector sustainability and quality service. (biota.pt)
  • BIOTA integrates local specialists in projects abroad, optimizing service quality. (biota.pt)
  • The Biota program has been in operation for three years now, long enough to pose questions about its promise. (scielo.br)
  • BIOTA aligns with the African proverb "If you want to go fast, go alone. (biota.pt)