Biostatistics: The application of STATISTICS to biological systems and organisms involving the retrieval or collection, analysis, reduction, and interpretation of qualitative and quantitative data.Epidemiology: Field of medicine concerned with the determination of causes, incidence, and characteristic behavior of disease outbreaks affecting human populations. It includes the interrelationships of host, agent, and environment as related to the distribution and control of disease.Biometry: The use of statistical and mathematical methods to analyze biological observations and phenomena.Schools, Health Occupations: Schools which offer training in the area of health.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Personnel Management: Planning, organizing, and administering all activities related to personnel.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Capacity Building: Organizational development including enhancement of management structures, processes and procedures, within organizations and among different organizations and sectors to meet present and future needs.Education, Public Health Professional: Education and training in PUBLIC HEALTH for the practice of the profession.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Data Interpretation, Statistical: Application of statistical procedures to analyze specific observed or assumed facts from a particular study.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Quantitative Trait Loci: Genetic loci associated with a QUANTITATIVE TRAIT.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Chromosome Mapping: Any method used for determining the location of and relative distances between genes on a chromosome.Quantitative Trait, Heritable: A characteristic showing quantitative inheritance such as SKIN PIGMENTATION in humans. (From A Dictionary of Genetics, 4th ed)Crosses, Genetic: Deliberate breeding of two different individuals that results in offspring that carry part of the genetic material of each parent. The parent organisms must be genetically compatible and may be from different varieties or closely related species.Genetic Markers: A phenotypically recognizable genetic trait which can be used to identify a genetic locus, a linkage group, or a recombination event.Dissertations, Academic as Topic: Dissertations embodying results of original research and especially substantiating a specific view, e.g., substantial papers written by candidates for an academic degree under the individual direction of a professor or papers written by undergraduates desirous of achieving honors or distinction.Clinical Protocols: Precise and detailed plans for the study of a medical or biomedical problem and/or plans for a regimen of therapy.Students, Public Health: Individuals enrolled in a school of PUBLIC HEALTH or a formal educational program in public health.Schools, Public Health: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of public health.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Health Services Research: The integration of epidemiologic, sociological, economic, and other analytic sciences in the study of health services. Health services research is usually concerned with relationships between need, demand, supply, use, and outcome of health services. The aim of the research is evaluation, particularly in terms of structure, process, output, and outcome. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Clinical Medicine: The study and practice of medicine by direct examination of the patient.Sample Size: The number of units (persons, animals, patients, specified circumstances, etc.) in a population to be studied. The sample size should be big enough to have a high likelihood of detecting a true difference between two groups. (From Wassertheil-Smoller, Biostatistics and Epidemiology, 1990, p95)Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Likelihood Functions: Functions constructed from a statistical model and a set of observed data which give the probability of that data for various values of the unknown model parameters. Those parameter values that maximize the probability are the maximum likelihood estimates of the parameters.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Psychology, Applied: The science which utilizes psychologic principles to derive more effective means in dealing with practical problems.Heart Valves: Flaps of tissue that prevent regurgitation of BLOOD from the HEART VENTRICLES to the HEART ATRIA or from the PULMONARY ARTERIES or AORTA to the ventricles.Empirical Research: The study, based on direct observation, use of statistical records, interviews, or experimental methods, of actual practices or the actual impact of practices or policies.Leadership: The function of directing or controlling the actions or attitudes of an individual or group with more or less willing acquiescence of the followers.National Institute of General Medical Sciences (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts and supports basic biomedical research that is not targeted to specific diseases and funds studies on genes, proteins, and cells, as well as on fundamental processes like communication within and between cells and metabolism. It was established in 1962.BostonFellowships and Scholarships: Stipends or grants-in-aid granted by foundations or institutions to individuals for study.Eligibility Determination: Criteria to determine eligibility of patients for medical care programs and services.Philosophy: A love or pursuit of wisdom. A search for the underlying causes and principles of reality. (Webster, 3d ed)SwedenInfluenza A virus: The type species of the genus INFLUENZAVIRUS A that causes influenza and other diseases in humans and animals. Antigenic variation occurs frequently between strains, allowing classification into subtypes and variants. Transmission is usually by aerosol (human and most non-aquatic hosts) or waterborne (ducks). Infected birds shed the virus in their saliva, nasal secretions, and feces.Fungal Polysaccharides: Cell wall components constituting a polysaccharide core found in fungi. They may act as antigens or structural substrates.Endpoint Determination: Establishment of the level of a quantifiable effect indicative of a biologic process. The evaluation is frequently to detect the degree of toxic or therapeutic effect.Multivariate Analysis: A set of techniques used when variation in several variables has to be studied simultaneously. In statistics, multivariate analysis is interpreted as any analytic method that allows simultaneous study of two or more dependent variables.EncyclopediasTennesseeAlaskaPrescription Drugs: Drugs that cannot be sold legally without a prescription.Indians, North American: Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.

Human coronary artery remodeling, beginning and end of the atherosclerotic process. (1/257)

BACKGROUND, AIMS OF THE STUDY: The objective of the study was to relate the progress of coronary artery remodeling to the earliest stages of the atherosclerotic process. For this purpose, a mathematical model for description of dimensional change of the coronary artery wall and its constituent components was developed and applied. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study used coronary artery samples randomly taken from each of 83 consecutive, unselected postmortems. All samples were routinely fixed and processed to paraffin for the preparation of right-angled, 5-micron sections, routinely stained and mounted for subsequent analysis. Computer assisted image analysis, using 32 systematic random, radial sampling lines, was used for interactive measurements of distance from centre of lumen to points defining intima, media and adventitia thickness along the radial intercept, which were subsequently tabled for analysis of variance, calculations of (group-vessel) means, and related to stage of pathology. RESULTS: Pre-atherosclerotic changes, before any localised changes in especially intima dimensions, are found, consisting of a process of gradual vascular widening, associated with temporally at least partly dissociated increases in width, which as a fraction of total vessel radius show a phased process. In these, the intima first increases, subsequently remains stable, and finally reduces in width proportionally to the increasing diameter. The media shows a similar initial increase, on average stabilising in the third phase after reaching a plateau value in the second. The adventitia, already increasing in phase 1, continues to increase in phase 2, accelerating in phase 3. The complex process, as found, occurs systematically in all vessels, is distributed circumferentially, and precedes the development of localised lesions of the intima. CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest the existence of a diffuse complex of changes, consisting of a gradual vascular widening followed by narrowing, with associated mural changes reflecting the atherosclerotic process.  (+info)

Empirical efficiency maximization: improved locally efficient covariate adjustment in randomized experiments and survival analysis. (2/257)

It has long been recognized that covariate adjustment can increase precision in randomized experiments, even when it is not strictly necessary. Adjustment is often straightforward when a discrete covariate partitions the sample into a handful of strata, but becomes more involved with even a single continuous covariate such as age. As randomized experiments remain a gold standard for scientific inquiry, and the information age facilitates a massive collection of baseline information, the longstanding problem of if and how to adjust for covariates is likely to engage investigators for the foreseeable future. In the locally efficient estimation approach introduced for general coarsened data structures by James Robins and collaborators, one first fits a relatively small working model, often with maximum likelihood, giving a nuisance parameter fit in an estimating equation for the parameter of interest. The usual advertisement is that the estimator will be asymptotically efficient if the working model is correct, but otherwise will still be consistent and asymptotically Gaussian. However, by applying standard likelihood-based fits to misspecified working models in covariate adjustment problems, one can poorly estimate the parameter of interest. We propose a new method, empirical efficiency maximization, to optimize the working model fit for the resulting parameter estimate. In addition to the randomized experiment setting, we show how our covariate adjustment procedure can be used in survival analysis applications. Numerical asymptotic efficiency calculations demonstrate gains relative to standard locally efficient estimators  (+info)

Empirical vs natural weighting in random effects meta-analysis. (3/257)

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A novel approach to cancer staging: application to esophageal cancer. (4/257)

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Estimation and inference for case-control studies with multiple non-gold standard exposure assessments: with an occupational health application. (5/257)

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Variable selection and dependency networks for genomewide data. (6/257)

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A semiparametric 2-part mixed-effects heteroscedastic transformation model for correlated right-skewed semicontinuous data. (7/257)

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Rank-based estimation in the {ell}1-regularized partly linear model for censored outcomes with application to integrated analyses of clinical predictors and gene expression data. (8/257)

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  • The NIHR grant for the CBRC has enabled the formation of a Biostatistics Group which sits across the UCL Statistics Department and the UCL faculty of Life and Biomedical Sciences. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • I get an engineer degree in Biometrics (1991) and Phd in Biostatistics (with application to genetics data) in France (1995). (peertechz.com)
  • The Biostatistics Service Center (BSC) provides professional, high quality data analysis, biostatistical computing, and data management services to a wide range of clients in biomedical and public health research, including observational studies (epidemiologic or clinical), clinical trials, outcomes research (including studies involving large prescription and diagnostic databases), and animal studies. (drexel.edu)
  • The UCL Partners Biostatistics Network is a network of medical statisticians from various departments across UCL/H. It has been developed to improve communication between medical statisticians, and to help build a stronger presence of statisticians involved in medical research within these institutions. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • The UCL/H Biostatistics network is open to all statisticians working in medical research at UCL/H. The webpage is currently hosted by Statistical Science. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • This volume of the Biostatistics and Health Sciences Set focuses on statistics applied to clinical research. (elsevier.com)
  • Presenting high-level statistics in an accessible manner across research fields in public health, this book is suitable for use as a textbook for biostatistics and epidemiology courses or for consulting the statistical applications in public health. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • The BCC's scope encompasses all non-cancer research at FSM, and it is distinct from the Biostatistics Core Facility in the Cancer Center. (northwestern.edu)
  • It is affiliated with NUCATS and its BERD program (Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Research Design). (northwestern.edu)
  • At the CCEB we rise to that challenge through research and training in epidemiology and in biostatistics. (upenn.edu)
  • My current research interest is bioinformatics and biostatistics applied to the identification of molecular targets in complex diseases (cancer, cardiovascular). (peertechz.com)
  • The HUB Team led by Marie-Agnès Dillies and Christophe Malabat is part of the Center of Bioinformatics, BioStatistics and Integrative Biology . (pasteur.fr)
  • The first half of this covers concepts in biostatistics as applied to epidemiology, primarily categorical data analysis, analysis of case-control, cross-sectional, cohort studies, and clinical trials. (upenn.edu)
  • Learning Objectives The goal of this course is to equip biostatistics and quantitative scientists with core applied statistical concepts and methods: 1) The course will refresh the mathematical, computational, statistical and probability background that students will need to take the course. (merlot.org)
  • The Biostatistics Group has recently created web lectures to provide an introduction to quantitative methods for health researchers and postgraduate students, and to provide a refresher or revision course for those researchers who have previously attended a module or short course. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Now in its ninth edition, Wayne W. Daniel's Biostatistics: A Foundation for Analysis in the Health Sciences provides a comprehensive introduction to biostatistics as it is used in the biological sciences. (abebooks.com)
  • Graduates of Pitt Public Health's internationally recognized biostatistics programs are in high demand and have a wide array of career opportunities. (pitt.edu)
  • The masters programs in Biostatistics provide advanced training in the theory and application of statistical methods in public health, clinical medicine, and the biological sciences. (brown.edu)
  • Biostatistics is the application of statistical methods to biological problems, traditionally mostly within medicine and agriculture. (chalmers.se)
  • Students with strong skills, training and interest in mathematics and a desire to work primarily as biostatisticians in health care and biological settings should consider the MS in Biostatistics program. (ucdenver.edu)
  • The Biostatistics M.S. is a Master of Science in Professional Science degree, which consists of advanced science courses, business management courses, and a capstone internship. (mtsu.edu)
  • Are you interested in a degree project (examensarbete) in biostatistics? (ki.se)
  • Biostatistics: A Foundation for Analysis in the Health Sciences", 10th Edition. (uh.edu)
  • The application and all supporting materials for the PhD in Biostatistics must be submitted through SOPHAS . (albany.edu)
  • The objective of Biostatistics is to advance statistical science and its application to problems of human health and disease, with the ultimate goal of advancing the public's health. (ovid.com)