Dura Mater: The outermost of the three MENINGES, a fibrous membrane of connective tissue that covers the brain and the spinal cord.Craniotomy: Any operation on the cranium or incision into the cranium. (Dorland, 28th ed)Biopsy: Removal and pathologic examination of specimens in the form of small pieces of tissue from the living body.Pia Mater: The innermost layer of the three meninges covering the brain and spinal cord. It is the fine vascular membrane that lies under the ARACHNOID and the DURA MATER.Arachnoid: A delicate membrane enveloping the brain and spinal cord. It lies between the PIA MATER and the DURA MATER. It is separated from the pia mater by the subarachnoid cavity which is filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID.Parietal Bone: One of a pair of irregularly shaped quadrilateral bones situated between the FRONTAL BONE and OCCIPITAL BONE, which together form the sides of the CRANIUM.Meningeal Arteries: Arteries which supply the dura mater.Cranial Sutures: A type of fibrous joint between bones of the head.Neurosurgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the nervous system or its parts.Pneumocephalus: Presence of air or gas within the intracranial cavity (e.g., epidural space, subdural space, intracerebral, etc.) which may result from traumatic injuries, fistulous tract formation, erosions of the skull from NEOPLASMS or infection, NEUROSURGICAL PROCEDURES, and other conditions.Meninges: The three membranes that cover the BRAIN and the SPINAL CORD. They are the dura mater, the arachnoid, and the pia mater.Frontal Bone: The bone that forms the frontal aspect of the skull. Its flat part forms the forehead, articulating inferiorly with the NASAL BONE and the CHEEK BONE on each side of the face.Sumatriptan: A serotonin agonist that acts selectively at 5HT1 receptors. It is used in the treatment of MIGRAINE DISORDERS.Trigeminal Nerve: The 5th and largest cranial nerve. The trigeminal nerve is a mixed motor and sensory nerve. The larger sensory part forms the ophthalmic, mandibular, and maxillary nerves which carry afferents sensitive to external or internal stimuli from the skin, muscles, and joints of the face and mouth and from the teeth. Most of these fibers originate from cells of the TRIGEMINAL GANGLION and project to the TRIGEMINAL NUCLEUS of the brain stem. The smaller motor part arises from the brain stem trigeminal motor nucleus and innervates the muscles of mastication.Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea: Discharge of cerebrospinal fluid through the nose. Common etiologies include trauma, neoplasms, and prior surgery, although the condition may occur spontaneously. (Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1997 Apr;116(4):442-9)Meningioma: A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)Meningeal Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the meningeal coverings of the brain and spinal cord.Hematoma, Subdural: Accumulation of blood in the SUBDURAL SPACE between the DURA MATER and the arachnoidal layer of the MENINGES. This condition primarily occurs over the surface of a CEREBRAL HEMISPHERE, but may develop in the spinal canal (HEMATOMA, SUBDURAL, SPINAL). Subdural hematoma can be classified as the acute or the chronic form, with immediate or delayed symptom onset, respectively. Symptoms may include loss of consciousness, severe HEADACHE, and deteriorating mental status.Laminectomy: A surgical procedure that entails removing all (laminectomy) or part (laminotomy) of selected vertebral lamina to relieve pressure on the SPINAL CORD and/or SPINAL NERVE ROOTS. Vertebral lamina is the thin flattened posterior wall of vertebral arch that forms the vertebral foramen through which pass the spinal cord and nerve roots.Biopsy, Needle: Removal and examination of tissue obtained through a transdermal needle inserted into the specific region, organ, or tissue being analyzed.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Epidural Space: Space between the dura mater and the walls of the vertebral canal.Subarachnoid Space: The space between the arachnoid membrane and PIA MATER, filled with CEREBROSPINAL FLUID. It contains large blood vessels that supply the BRAIN and SPINAL CORD.Skull Base: The inferior region of the skull consisting of an internal (cerebral), and an external (basilar) surface.Creutzfeldt-Jakob Syndrome: A rare transmissible encephalopathy most prevalent between the ages of 50 and 70 years. Affected individuals may present with sleep disturbances, personality changes, ATAXIA; APHASIA, visual loss, weakness, muscle atrophy, MYOCLONUS, progressive dementia, and death within one year of disease onset. A familial form exhibiting autosomal dominant inheritance and a new variant CJD (potentially associated with ENCEPHALOPATHY, BOVINE SPONGIFORM) have been described. Pathological features include prominent cerebellar and cerebral cortical spongiform degeneration and the presence of PRIONS. (From N Engl J Med, 1998 Dec 31;339(27))Craniosynostoses: Premature closure of one or more CRANIAL SUTURES. It often results in plagiocephaly. Craniosynostoses that involve multiple sutures are sometimes associated with congenital syndromes such as ACROCEPHALOSYNDACTYLIA; and CRANIOFACIAL DYSOSTOSIS.Hematoma, Epidural, Cranial: Accumulation of blood in the EPIDURAL SPACE between the SKULL and the DURA MATER, often as a result of bleeding from the MENINGEAL ARTERIES associated with a temporal or parietal bone fracture. Epidural hematoma tends to expand rapidly, compressing the dura and underlying brain. Clinical features may include HEADACHE; VOMITING; HEMIPARESIS; and impaired mental function.Hematoma, Subdural, Acute: Accumulation of blood in the SUBDURAL SPACE with acute onset of neurological symptoms. Symptoms may include loss of consciousness, severe HEADACHE, and deteriorating mental status.Brain Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Tissue Transplantation: Transference of tissue within an individual, between individuals of the same species, or between individuals of different species.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Foramen Magnum: The large hole at the base of the skull through which the SPINAL CORD passes.Decompression, Surgical: A surgical operation for the relief of pressure in a body compartment or on a body part. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Scalp: The outer covering of the calvaria. It is composed of several layers: SKIN; subcutaneous connective tissue; the occipitofrontal muscle which includes the tendinous galea aponeurotica; loose connective tissue; and the pericranium (the PERIOSTEUM of the SKULL).Spinal Canal: The cavity within the SPINAL COLUMN through which the SPINAL CORD passes.Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Calcitonin gene-related peptide. A 37-amino acid peptide derived from the calcitonin gene. It occurs as a result of alternative processing of mRNA from the calcitonin gene. The neuropeptide is widely distributed in neural tissue of the brain, gut, perivascular nerves, and other tissue. The peptide produces multiple biological effects and has both circulatory and neurotransmitter modes of action. In particular, it is a potent endogenous vasodilator.Subdural Space: Potential cavity which separates the ARACHNOID MATER from the DURA MATER.Isoindoles: Benzopyrroles with the nitrogen at the number two carbon, in contrast to INDOLES which have the nitrogen adjacent to the six-membered ring.Cadaver: A dead body, usually a human body.Trigeminal Ganglion: The semilunar-shaped ganglion containing the cells of origin of most of the sensory fibers of the trigeminal nerve. It is situated within the dural cleft on the cerebral surface of the petrous portion of the temporal bone and gives off the ophthalmic, maxillary, and part of the mandibular nerves.Meningitis: Inflammation of the coverings of the brain and/or spinal cord, which consist of the PIA MATER; ARACHNOID; and DURA MATER. Infections (viral, bacterial, and fungal) are the most common causes of this condition, but subarachnoid hemorrhage (HEMORRHAGES, SUBARACHNOID), chemical irritation (chemical MENINGITIS), granulomatous conditions, neoplastic conditions (CARCINOMATOUS MENINGITIS), and other inflammatory conditions may produce this syndrome. (From Joynt, Clinical Neurology, 1994, Ch24, p6)Trigeminal Nucleus, Spinal: Nucleus of the spinal tract of the trigeminal nerve. It is divided cytoarchitectonically into three parts: oralis, caudalis (TRIGEMINAL CAUDAL NUCLEUS), and interpolaris.Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Trephining: The removal of a circular disk of the cranium.Longitudinal Ligaments: Two extensive fibrous bands running the length of the vertebral column. The anterior longitudinal ligament (ligamentum longitudinale anterius; lacertus medius) interconnects the anterior surfaces of the vertebral bodies; the posterior longitudinal ligament (ligamentum longitudinale posterius) interconnects the posterior surfaces. The commonest clinical consideration is OSSIFICATION OF POSTERIOR LONGITUDINAL LIGAMENT. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Fatal Outcome: Death resulting from the presence of a disease in an individual, as shown by a single case report or a limited number of patients. This should be differentiated from DEATH, the physiological cessation of life and from MORTALITY, an epidemiological or statistical concept.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Ligamentum Flavum: The paired bands of yellow elastic tissue that connect adjoining laminae of the vertebrae. With the laminae, it forms the posterior wall of the spinal canal and helps hold the body erect.Hematoma, Subdural, Chronic: Accumulation of blood in the SUBDURAL SPACE with delayed onset of neurological symptoms. Symptoms may include loss of consciousness, severe HEADACHE, and deteriorating mental status.Migraine Disorders: A class of disabling primary headache disorders, characterized by recurrent unilateral pulsatile headaches. The two major subtypes are common migraine (without aura) and classic migraine (with aura or neurological symptoms). (International Classification of Headache Disorders, 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004: suppl 1)Headache: The symptom of PAIN in the cranial region. It may be an isolated benign occurrence or manifestation of a wide variety of HEADACHE DISORDERS.Spinal Cord Compression: Acute and chronic conditions characterized by external mechanical compression of the SPINAL CORD due to extramedullary neoplasm; EPIDURAL ABSCESS; SPINAL FRACTURES; bony deformities of the vertebral bodies; and other conditions. Clinical manifestations vary with the anatomic site of the lesion and may include localized pain, weakness, sensory loss, incontinence, and impotence.Myelography: X-ray visualization of the spinal cord following injection of contrast medium into the spinal arachnoid space.Head Injuries, Penetrating: Head injuries which feature compromise of the skull and dura mater. These may result from gunshot wounds (WOUNDS, GUNSHOT), stab wounds (WOUNDS, STAB), and other forms of trauma.
... the dura mater. Further analysis of the bones concluded that the areas around the holes began to heal, which suggests that this ... Tissue analysis comes from either surgical biopsies or post mortem autopsies. Common tissue samples include muscle fibers and ... Methods that utilize small craniotomies in conjunction with high-clarity microscopic visualization of neural tissue offer ...
... the dura mater ("hard mother"), arachnoid mater ("spidery mother"), and pia mater ("tender mother"). The arachnoid and pia are ... This is then often confirmed by a biopsy. Based on the findings, the tumors are divided into different grades of severity. ... The primary and most desired course of action described in medical literature is surgical removal (resection) via craniotomy. ... Between the arachnoid mater and the pia mater is the subarachnoid space which contains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This fluid ...
When testing and corresponding elimination are complete, the dura mater is closed, and fentanyl is given to bathe the sensory ... Meningeal biopsy. Spinal cord and spinal canal. *Spinal cord and roots *Cordotomy ...
... thus exposing the dura mater in order to treat health problems related to intracranial pressure and other diseases. ... Liver biopsy. *Liver transplantation. *Portal hypertension *Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt [TIPS]. *Distal ...
... the dura mater ("hard mother"), arachnoid mater ("spidery mother"), and pia mater ("tender mother"). The arachnoid and pia are ... The primary and most desired course of action described in medical literature is surgical removal (resection) via craniotomy. ... The result is then often confirmed by a biopsy.[1] Based on the findings, the tumors are divided into different grades of ... Between the arachnoid mater and the pia mater is the subarachnoid space which contains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This fluid ...
... the dura mater. Further analysis of the bones concluded that the areas around the holes began to heal, which suggests that this ... Tissue analysis comes from either surgical biopsies or post mortem autopsies. Common tissue samples include muscle fibers and ... Methods that utilize small craniotomies in conjunction with high-clarity microscopic visualization of neural tissue offer ...
... the patient had a right frontal craniotomy and dural biopsy in May 2006. The dura mater contained multiple areas of fibrosis ... Section of dura mater from the right frontal lobe shows fibrosis and blue-staining area of calcification. A multinucleated ... Nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy with involvement of the dura mater. Virchows Arch 2006;449:389-91. ... 4 The histologic changes in the dura mater of our patient were similar to those previously reported.4,6,8 ...
Craniotomy was performed in order to repair CSF leak, re-biopsy and debulk the extracranial and part of the intracranial tumor ... dura mater and cerebellum as well as the left temporal and parietal lobes, and the content of left orbit (Fig. 1). The neoplasm ...
The dura mater (the outermost layer of the brain tissue) is opened, the tumor is located and then removed (resected). After the ... An open biopsy involves exposing the tumor and then removing a small portion of it. A needle biopsy is performed by making an ... Craniotomy: The most commonly performed surgery for removal of a brain tumor is called a craniotomy. "Crani" means skull, " ... Biopsy: A biopsy is a surgical procedure to remove a small piece of tumor in order to confirm the diagnosis. The sample is ...
The epidural mass was easily peeled off the dura mater. The dura was then excised widely around the tumor mass, and attention ... More commonly, invasion of the calvaria is reported after previous surgery, either through a craniotomy or biopsy site (5-9). ... Shuangshoti S, Kasantikul V, Suwanwela N. Spontaneous penetration of dura mater and bone by glioblastoma multiforme. J Surg ... Right parietal dura with tumor (arrows) on both sides of the dura (original magnification ×40). ...
Craniotomy What is a craniotomy? A craniotomy is the surgical removal of part of the bone from the skull to expose the brain ... ANerv_20140304_v0_002 For some craniotomy procedures, doctors use computers and imaging (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] or ... The thick outer covering of the brain directly underneath the bone (dura mater) will be separated from the bone and carefully ... Doctors may also use craniotomy to take a biopsy of the brain or remove fluid. An endoscopic craniotomy involves inserting a ...
It was firmly attached to the bony structures and dura. The tumor was removed together with the dura mater close to the ... 1E and F). To define the diagnosis, a biopsy was taken from the lumen of the sphenoid sinus on July 31, 2003. Upon histological ... Bilateral fronto-orbital craniotomy was performed. The procedure revealed that the tumor had not infiltrated the brain, but ... A patch of fascia lata was used to close the defect in the dura mater. The nasal cavity was separated with an additional piece ...
... outermost layer is the dura mater. The middle tissue layer is the arachnoid mater, and the innermost layer is the pia mater. ... Your doctor may recommend a craniotomy to remove abnormal brain tissue such as a brain tumor, a sample of tissue by biopsy, a ... Your surgeon will make an incision in the dura mater to expose your brain. Then your tumor will be removed. The incision in the ... Blood vessels, called bridging veins, connect the surface of your brain with the dura mater. Other blood vessels, called ...
Surgery is used to: remove a sample of the tumour (biopsy) to find out the type of tumour and plan treatment remove as much of ... The surgeon then makes a cut in the covering of the brain (dura mater) and pulls it apart slightly to find and reach the tumour ... Craniotomy. A craniotomy is the most common type of surgery used to treat brain and spinal cord tumours. It is surgery that ... It can also be used to biopsy or remove tumours within the ventricles of the brain. ...
The dura mater (the thick outer covering of the brain directly underneath the bone) will be separated from the bone and ... What is a craniotomy?. A craniotomy is the surgical removal of part of the bone from the skull to expose the brain. Specialized ... Other uses include stereotactic biopsy of the brain (a needle is guided into an abnormal area so that a piece of tissue may be ... An endoscopic craniotomy is another type of craniotomy that involves the insertion of a lighted scope with a camera into the ...
Keywords: dura mater, plastics, autofascia, collagen, chitosan.. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need ... Wilson TG, Carnio J, Schenk R, Cochran D. Immediate implant covered with connective tissue membranes: human biopsies. J ... Cerebrospinal fluid leakaf termicrosurgical surgery in vestibular schwannomas viaretro sigmoidal craniotomy. Neurol Res. 2011; ... Repair of the duramater with processed collagen devices. J Biomed Mater Res B Appl Biomater. 2007;83:580-8. ...
dura mater - the outermost, toughest, and most fibrous of the three membranes (meninges) that cover the brain and spinal cord. ... craniotomy - surgery performed on the skull where a portion of bone is removed to gain access to the brain, and the bone is PUT ... biopsy - examination of a small amount of tissue taken from the patients body to make a diagnosis. ...
MeSH-major] Dura Mater / pathology. Lymphoma, B-Cell / diagnosis. Meningeal Neoplasms / diagnosis ... Measurement of IL-2 receptor and biopsy with flow cytometry were necessary to work out the treatment strategy of the spinal ... Craniotomy. Decompression, Surgical. Epidural Space / pathology. Epidural Space / radiography. Epidural Space / surgery. Female ... These patients were divided into 3 groups by therapeutic regimens; Group I included 12 patients who received only biopsy or ...
Tentorium cerebelli: Formed by the dura mater, separates the cerebrum from the cerebellum. ... Implantation, puncture, evacuation, drainage, biopsy, aspiration, exploration, treatment, decompression, removal, section, ... Craniotomy [codes 61304-61315, 61320-61323, 61440, 61490, 61533-61546, 61556-61557, 61566-61571]: This procedure also takes out ... is a swelling of the sensory root and contains the cell bodies of most sensory neurons and occupies a cavity in the dura matter ...
Antonio Pacchioni (1665-1726): early studies of the dura mater By: Andrea Brunori, Roberto Vagnozzi and Renato Giuffrè ... Posterior fossa craniotomy for lesions of the cerebellopontine angle Technical note By: Christopher S. Ogilvy and Robert G. ...
Venous engorgement at the dura mater across the sella turcica could produce reactive hyperaemia and possible increase in size ... Most of these patients, like our index case, have shown low-pressure subdural collection during craniotomy. ... Such explanation is confirmed by meningeal biopsy showing proliferation of fibroblasts without inflammation.11 12 ... The commonest cause, however, is a spontaneous defect of the dura (spontaneous intracranial hypotension [SIH]), though a ...
Pulsed Estrogen Therapy Prevents Post-OVX Porcine Dura Mater Microvascular Network Weakening via a PDGF-BB-Dependent Mechanism ... Craniotomy was finally closed with a glass window cemented to the skull to allow chronic imaging over weeks in absence of scar ... This protocol involves: (1) the culturing of human cells from the cerebral cortex obtained from adult human brain biopsies; (2 ... the dura mater (DM). The pathogenesis of these disorders remains mysterious and how estrogen regulates structural and ...
... the dura mater. Further analysis of the bones concluded that the areas around the holes began to heal, which suggests that this ... Tissue analysis comes from either surgical biopsies or post mortem autopsies. Common tissue samples include muscle fibers and ... Methods that utilize small craniotomies in conjunction with high-clarity microscopic visualization of neural tissue offer ...
A craniotomy is the surgical removal of part of the bone from the skull to expose the brain for surgery. The surgeon uses ... The dura mater (the thick outer covering of the brain directly underneath the bone) will be separated from the bone and ... Other uses include stereotactic biopsy of the brain (a needle is guided into an abnormal area so that a piece of tissue may be ... Craniotomy. Facebook Twitter Linkedin Pinterest Print. What is a craniotomy? A craniotomy is the surgical removal of part of ...
It forms most often in the dura mater. A grade I meningioma can be cured if it is completely removed by surgery. ... an open biopsy may be done. A part of the skull is removed in an operation called a craniotomy. A sample of brain tissue is ... A biopsy is also used to diagnose a brain tumor.. If imaging tests show there may be a brain tumor, a biopsy is usually done. ... Sometimes a biopsy or surgery cannot be done.. For some tumors, a biopsy or surgery cannot be done safely because of where the ...
The dura mater (the thick outer covering of the brain directly underneath the bone) will be separated from the bone and ... Other uses include stereotactic biopsy of the brain (a needle is guided into an abnormal area so that a piece of tissue may be ... Craniotomy. Procedure overview. What is a craniotomy?. A craniotomy is the surgical removal of part of the bone from the skull ... Repairing a tear in the membrane lining the brain (dura mater). *Relieving pressure within the brain (intracranial pressure) by ...
... the dura mater ("hard mother"), arachnoid mater ("spidery mother"), and pia mater ("tender mother"). The arachnoid and pia are ... This is then often confirmed by a biopsy. Based on the findings, the tumors are divided into different grades of severity. ... The primary and most desired course of action described in medical literature is surgical removal (resection) via craniotomy. ... Between the arachnoid mater and the pia mater is the subarachnoid space which contains cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). This fluid ...
Epidural (extradural): Immediately outside the dura mater.. Epidural hematoma: A blood clot between the dura mater and the ... Biopsy: The removal of a small portion of tissue, usually for the purpose of pathological examination and diagnosis. ... Craniotomy: Surgical opening of the skull, usually by creating a flap of bone. ... Meninges: The three membranes-the dura mater, arachnoid mater, and pia mater-covering the spinal cord and brain. ...
Meningiomas are neoplasms that arise fromarachnoidal cell rests in the dura mater. The greatmajority are benign and relatively ... In thesecases, craniotomy should be considered first, as istrue for patients who can undergo resection withoutanticipated ... Stereotactic biopsy was performed under localanesthesia, and the diagnosis of oligoastrocytoma grade2 was made (Figure2). ... A right pterional craniotomy was performed. Usingmicrosurgical technique, the tumor was dissected offthe right middle cerebral ...
The brain meninga (dura mater) was not affected by the neoplasia, so tissue direction was amenable. ... Skin Biopsies - face, lateral body and dorsum. (Dimitra Psalla, DVM, PhD). Histopathological findings: There is moderate ... Despite this, during gradual enlargement of the craniotomy, special precautions was taken not damage the ipsilateral left one. ... A fluid filled epidural (over dura mater) cavity was found. It was filled by thick bright yellow purulent fluid. After ...
Dura Mater / pathology. Female. Hemoglobins / analysis. Humans. Leukocyte Count. Neoplasm Invasiveness. New Zealand. ... Velnar T, Bunc G: Iatrogenic metastasis of a benign meningioma to the periosteum at the site of previous craniotomy: a case ... Reid-Nicholson M, Iyengar P, Friedlander MA, Lin O: Fine needle aspiration biopsy of primary mucinous carcinoma of the skin: a ... Biopsy, Fine-Needle. Bone and Bones / pathology. Epithelial Cells / pathology. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Neoplasm ...
  • The commonest cause, however, is a spontaneous defect of the dura (spontaneous intracranial hypotension [SIH]), though a trivial traumatic event can be elicited retrospectively in around one third of such patients. (hkmj.org)
  • A number of serious intracranial pathologic conditions linked to E2 deficiencies, such as dural sinus thrombosis, dural fistulae, non-parenchymal intracranial hemorrhages, migraines, and spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks, involve the vessels not of the brain itself, but of the outer fibrous membrane of the brain, the dura mater (DM). (jove.com)
  • In a very small subset of cases, after the dura is opened and the cortex is exposed, intracranial electrical stimulation testing (ECS) is performed. (ncigt.org)
  • After opening of the dura mater and corticectomy, the lesion was white, infiltrative, crumbly, and not very hemorrhagic, had no planes of cleavage, and had indistinct margins from adjacent normal white matter. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Image guidance is used to perform a minimal craniotomy with optimized exposure of the lesion. (ncigt.org)
  • The authors therefore analyzed the feasibility of an automatic device (C-Port xA, Cardica) designed for constructing an end-to-side anastomosis with or without flow interruption for a middle cerebral artery (MCA) bypass in a human cadaveric model and in an in vivo craniotomy simulation model. (thejns.org)
  • Otros investigadores ya han demostrado que, por ejemplo, los patrones de actividad cerebral que muestra mi cerebro cuando pienso en un martillo son muy similares a los patrones que muestra el tuyo cuando piensa en la palabra martillo", añade. (neurocirugia.com)
  • In a conventional craniotomy, surgeons guide themselves by what they see, their knowledge of anatomy, and their interpretation of the pre-operative scans. (unm.edu)
  • For some craniotomy procedures, doctors use computers and imaging (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] or computerized tomography [CT] scans). (lifebridgehealth.org)
  • Some craniotomy procedures may use the guidance of computers and imaging (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] or computerized tomography [CT] scans) to reach the precise location within the brain that is to be treated. (vidanthealth.com)
  • In addition,the patient avoided the risks (however low) of generalanesthesia, infection, CSF leak, and hemorrhage thatare associated with craniotomy. (uhnj.org)
  • Reference 7 This case highlights the possible discrepancy between mild clinical manifestations and severe TMA features on renal biopsy. (canada.ca)
  • CSF may appear red following a recent subarachnoid hemorrhage or when the lumbar puncture that obtained the CSF caused traumatic injury to the dura that surround the fluid. (scribd.com)
  • The surgeon then makes a cut in the covering of the brain (dura mater) and pulls it apart slightly to find and reach the tumour. (cancer.ca)
  • Results of skin biopsy from the right palm revealed fibrocellular thickening of dermal collagen, patchy calcification of blood vessel walls and dermal collagen, and increased Alcian-blue-positive mucin staining consistent with NSF. (ajnr.org)