Biosensing Techniques: Any of a variety of procedures which use biomolecular probes to measure the presence or concentration of biological molecules, biological structures, microorganisms, etc., by translating a biochemical interaction at the probe surface into a quantifiable physical signal.Proteins: Linear POLYPEPTIDES that are synthesized on RIBOSOMES and may be further modified, crosslinked, cleaved, or assembled into complex proteins with several subunits. The specific sequence of AMINO ACIDS determines the shape the polypeptide will take, during PROTEIN FOLDING, and the function of the protein.Computer Simulation: Computer-based representation of physical systems and phenomena such as chemical processes.Models, Molecular: Models used experimentally or theoretically to study molecular shape, electronic properties, or interactions; includes analogous molecules, computer-generated graphics, and mechanical structures.Molecular Dynamics Simulation: A computer simulation developed to study the motion of molecules over a period of time.Biopolymers: Polymers synthesized by living organisms. They play a role in the formation of macromolecular structures and are synthesized via the covalent linkage of biological molecules, especially AMINO ACIDS; NUCLEOTIDES; and CARBOHYDRATES.Models, Chemical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of chemical processes or phenomena; includes the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Biological Phenomena: Biological processes, properties, and characteristics of the whole organism in human, animal, microorganisms, and plants, and of the biosphere.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Solvents: Liquids that dissolve other substances (solutes), generally solids, without any change in chemical composition, as, water containing sugar. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Static Electricity: The accumulation of an electric charge on a objectNanotechnology: The development and use of techniques to study physical phenomena and construct structures in the nanoscale size range or smaller.Protein Interaction Mapping: Methods for determining interaction between PROTEINS.Thermodynamics: A rigorously mathematical analysis of energy relationships (heat, work, temperature, and equilibrium). It describes systems whose states are determined by thermal parameters, such as temperature, in addition to mechanical and electromagnetic parameters. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed)Nucleic Acids: High molecular weight polymers containing a mixture of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides chained together by ribose or deoxyribose linkages.Streptavidin: A 60-kDa extracellular protein of Streptomyces avidinii with four high-affinity biotin binding sites. Unlike AVIDIN, streptavidin has a near neutral isoelectric point and is free of carbohydrate side chains.Computers, Molecular: Computers whose input, output and state transitions are carried out by biochemical interactions and reactions.Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Biomolecular: NMR spectroscopy on small- to medium-size biological macromolecules. This is often used for structural investigation of proteins and nucleic acids, and often involves more than one isotope.Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Transistors, Electronic: Electrical devices that are composed of semiconductor material, with at least three connections to an external electronic circuit. They are used to amplify electrical signals, detect signals, or as switches.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.Nanostructures: Materials which have structured components with at least one dimension in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. These include NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOPARTICLES; NANOTUBES; and NANOWIRES.Data Mining: Use of sophisticated analysis tools to sort through, organize, examine, and combine large sets of information.Quantum Theory: The theory that the radiation and absorption of energy take place in definite quantities called quanta (E) which vary in size and are defined by the equation E=hv in which h is Planck's constant and v is the frequency of the radiation.Surface Plasmon Resonance: A biosensing technique in which biomolecules capable of binding to specific analytes or ligands are first immobilized on one side of a metallic film. Light is then focused on the opposite side of the film to excite the surface plasmons, that is, the oscillations of free electrons propagating along the film's surface. The refractive index of light reflecting off this surface is measured. When the immobilized biomolecules are bound by their ligands, an alteration in surface plasmons on the opposite side of the film is created which is directly proportional to the change in bound, or adsorbed, mass. Binding is measured by changes in the refractive index. The technique is used to study biomolecular interactions, such as antigen-antibody binding.Microfluidic Analytical Techniques: Methods utilizing the principles of MICROFLUIDICS for sample handling, reagent mixing, and separation and detection of specific components in fluids.Protein Conformation: The characteristic 3-dimensional shape of a protein, including the secondary, supersecondary (motifs), tertiary (domains) and quaternary structure of the peptide chain. PROTEIN STRUCTURE, QUATERNARY describes the conformation assumed by multimeric proteins (aggregates of more than one polypeptide chain).Microscopy, Atomic Force: A type of scanning probe microscopy in which a probe systematically rides across the surface of a sample being scanned in a raster pattern. The vertical position is recorded as a spring attached to the probe rises and falls in response to peaks and valleys on the surface. These deflections produce a topographic map of the sample.Sociobiology: The comparative study of social organization in animals including humans, especially with regard to its genetic basis and evolutionary history. (Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed)Water: A clear, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for most animal and plant life and is an excellent solvent for many substances. The chemical formula is hydrogen oxide (H2O). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Gold: A yellow metallic element with the atomic symbol Au, atomic number 79, and atomic weight 197. It is used in jewelry, goldplating of other metals, as currency, and in dental restoration. Many of its clinical applications, such as ANTIRHEUMATIC AGENTS, are in the form of its salts.Immobilized Proteins: Proteins that are chemically bound to a substrate material which renders their location fixed. The immobilization of proteins allows their use in chemical reactions without being diluted by solvent.Molecular Conformation: The characteristic three-dimensional shape of a molecule.Protein Binding: The process in which substances, either endogenous or exogenous, bind to proteins, peptides, enzymes, protein precursors, or allied compounds. Specific protein-binding measures are often used as assays in diagnostic assessments.Liquid Crystals: Materials in intermediate state between solid and liquid.Silicon: A trace element that constitutes about 27.6% of the earth's crust in the form of SILICON DIOXIDE. It does not occur free in nature. Silicon has the atomic symbol Si, atomic number 14, and atomic weight [28.084; 28.086].Bioengineering: The application of engineering principles and methods to living organisms or biological systems.Databases, Protein: Databases containing information about PROTEINS such as AMINO ACID SEQUENCE; PROTEIN CONFORMATION; and other properties.Models, Biological: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of biological processes or diseases. For disease models in living animals, DISEASE MODELS, ANIMAL is available. Biological models include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Phosgene: A highly toxic gas that has been used as a chemical warfare agent. It is an insidious poison as it is not irritating immediately, even when fatal concentrations are inhaled. (From The Merck Index, 11th ed, p7304)Cell Physiological Phenomena: Cellular processes, properties, and characteristics.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.DNA: A deoxyribonucleotide polymer that is the primary genetic material of all cells. Eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms normally contain DNA in a double-stranded state, yet several important biological processes transiently involve single-stranded regions. DNA, which consists of a polysugar-phosphate backbone possessing projections of purines (adenine and guanine) and pyrimidines (thymine and cytosine), forms a double helix that is held together by hydrogen bonds between these purines and pyrimidines (adenine to thymine and guanine to cytosine).Systems Biology: Comprehensive, methodical analysis of complex biological systems by monitoring responses to perturbations of biological processes. Large scale, computerized collection and analysis of the data are used to develop and test models of biological systems.Probability Theory: The branch of mathematics dealing with the purely logical properties of probability. Its theorems underlie most statistical methods. (Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Molecular Biology: A discipline concerned with studying biological phenomena in terms of the chemical and physical interactions of molecules.Solutions: The homogeneous mixtures formed by the mixing of a solid, liquid, or gaseous substance (solute) with a liquid (the solvent), from which the dissolved substances can be recovered by physical processes. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Binding Sites: The parts of a macromolecule that directly participate in its specific combination with another molecule.Graphite: An allotropic form of carbon that is used in pencils, as a lubricant, and in matches and explosives. It is obtained by mining and its dust can cause lung irritation.Biophysics: The study of PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and PHYSICAL PROCESSES as applied to living things.Metal Nanoparticles: Nanoparticles produced from metals whose uses include biosensors, optics, and catalysts. In biomedical applications the particles frequently involve the noble metals, especially gold and silver.Computer-Aided Design: The use of computers for designing and/or manufacturing of anything, including drugs, surgical procedures, orthotics, and prosthetics.Aptamers, Nucleotide: Nucleotide sequences, generated by iterative rounds of SELEX APTAMER TECHNIQUE, that bind to a target molecule specifically and with high affinity.Biotin: A water-soluble, enzyme co-factor present in minute amounts in every living cell. It occurs mainly bound to proteins or polypeptides and is abundant in liver, kidney, pancreas, yeast, and milk.Refractometry: Measurement of the index of refraction (the ratio of the velocity of light or other radiation in the first of two media to its velocity in the second as it passes from one into the other).Quantum Dots: Nanometer sized fragments of semiconductor crystalline material which emit PHOTONS. The wavelength is based on the quantum confinement size of the dot. They can be embedded in MICROBEADS for high throughput ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY TECHNIQUES.Entropy: The measure of that part of the heat or energy of a system which is not available to perform work. Entropy increases in all natural (spontaneous and irreversible) processes. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Molecular Probes: A group of atoms or molecules attached to other molecules or cellular structures and used in studying the properties of these molecules and structures. Radioactive DNA or RNA sequences are used in MOLECULAR GENETICS to detect the presence of a complementary sequence by NUCLEIC ACID HYBRIDIZATION.Biotechnology: Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.Spectrum Analysis, Raman: Analysis of the intensity of Raman scattering of monochromatic light as a function of frequency of the scattered light.Databases, Genetic: Databases devoted to knowledge about specific genes and gene products.Kinetics: The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Motion: Physical motion, i.e., a change in position of a body or subject as a result of an external force. It is distinguished from MOVEMENT, a process resulting from biological activity.Photons: Discrete concentrations of energy, apparently massless elementary particles, that move at the speed of light. They are the unit or quantum of electromagnetic radiation. Photons are emitted when electrons move from one energy state to another. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 11th ed)Interferometry: Measurement of distances or movements by means of the phenomena caused by the interference of two rays of light (optical interferometry) or of sound (acoustic interferometry).Peptides: Members of the class of compounds composed of AMINO ACIDS joined together by peptide bonds between adjacent amino acids into linear, branched or cyclical structures. OLIGOPEPTIDES are composed of approximately 2-12 amino acids. Polypeptides are composed of approximately 13 or more amino acids. PROTEINS are linear polypeptides that are normally synthesized on RIBOSOMES.Molecular Structure: The location of the atoms, groups or ions relative to one another in a molecule, as well as the number, type and location of covalent bonds.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Systems Integration: The procedures involved in combining separately developed modules, components, or subsystems so that they work together as a complete system. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Optical Processes: Behavior of LIGHT and its interactions with itself and materials.Protein Array Analysis: Ligand-binding assays that measure protein-protein, protein-small molecule, or protein-nucleic acid interactions using a very large set of capturing molecules, i.e., those attached separately on a solid support, to measure the presence or interaction of target molecules in the sample.RNA: A polynucleotide consisting essentially of chains with a repeating backbone of phosphate and ribose units to which nitrogenous bases are attached. RNA is unique among biological macromolecules in that it can encode genetic information, serve as an abundant structural component of cells, and also possesses catalytic activity. (Rieger et al., Glossary of Genetics: Classical and Molecular, 5th ed)Stochastic Processes: Processes that incorporate some element of randomness, used particularly to refer to a time series of random variables.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Software Design: Specifications and instructions applied to the software.Polystyrenes: Polymerized forms of styrene used as a biocompatible material, especially in dentistry. They are thermoplastic and are used as insulators, for injection molding and casting, as sheets, plates, rods, rigid forms and beads.Systems Theory: Principles, models, and laws that apply to complex interrelationships and interdependencies of sets of linked components which form a functioning whole, a system. Any system may be composed of components which are systems in their own right (sub-systems), such as several organs within an individual organism.Ligands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Database Management Systems: Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.Multiprotein Complexes: Macromolecular complexes formed from the association of defined protein subunits.Fluorescence: The property of emitting radiation while being irradiated. The radiation emitted is usually of longer wavelength than that incident or absorbed, e.g., a substance can be irradiated with invisible radiation and emit visible light. X-ray fluorescence is used in diagnosis.Gene Regulatory Networks: Interacting DNA-encoded regulatory subsystems in the GENOME that coordinate input from activator and repressor TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS during development, cell differentiation, or in response to environmental cues. The networks function to ultimately specify expression of particular sets of GENES for specific conditions, times, or locations.Metabolism: The chemical reactions that occur within the cells, tissues, or an organism. These processes include both the biosynthesis (ANABOLISM) and the breakdown (CATABOLISM) of organic materials utilized by the living organism.Enzymes: Biological molecules that possess catalytic activity. They may occur naturally or be synthetically created. Enzymes are usually proteins, however CATALYTIC RNA and CATALYTIC DNA molecules have also been identified.Models, Theoretical: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of systems, processes, or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Microfluidics: The study of fluid channels and chambers of tiny dimensions of tens to hundreds of micrometers and volumes of nanoliters or picoliters. This is of interest in biological MICROCIRCULATION and used in MICROCHEMISTRY and INVESTIGATIVE TECHNIQUES.Adsorption: The adhesion of gases, liquids, or dissolved solids onto a surface. It includes adsorptive phenomena of bacteria and viruses onto surfaces as well. ABSORPTION into the substance may follow but not necessarily.Chemistry Techniques, Analytical: Methodologies used for the isolation, identification, detection, and quantitation of chemical substances.Porosity: Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.Fluorescent Dyes: Agents that emit light after excitation by light. The wave length of the emitted light is usually longer than that of the incident light. Fluorochromes are substances that cause fluorescence in other substances, i.e., dyes used to mark or label other compounds with fluorescent tags.Biochemistry: The study of the composition, chemical structures, and chemical reactions of living things.Biotinylation: Incorporation of biotinyl groups into molecules.Protein Folding: Processes involved in the formation of TERTIARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE.Temperature: The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.Energy Transfer: The transfer of energy of a given form among different scales of motion. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed). It includes the transfer of kinetic energy and the transfer of chemical energy. The transfer of chemical energy from one molecule to another depends on proximity of molecules so it is often used as in techniques to measure distance such as the use of FORSTER RESONANCE ENERGY TRANSFER.Ions: An atom or group of atoms that have a positive or negative electric charge due to a gain (negative charge) or loss (positive charge) of one or more electrons. Atoms with a positive charge are known as CATIONS; those with a negative charge are ANIONS.Sequence Analysis, Protein: A process that includes the determination of AMINO ACID SEQUENCE of a protein (or peptide, oligopeptide or peptide fragment) and the information analysis of the sequence.Spectrometry, Fluorescence: Measurement of the intensity and quality of fluorescence.Spectrum Analysis: The measurement of the amplitude of the components of a complex waveform throughout the frequency range of the waveform. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Nucleic Acid Conformation: The spatial arrangement of the atoms of a nucleic acid or polynucleotide that results in its characteristic 3-dimensional shape.Monte Carlo Method: In statistics, a technique for numerically approximating the solution of a mathematical problem by studying the distribution of some random variable, often generated by a computer. The name alludes to the randomness characteristic of the games of chance played at the gambling casinos in Monte Carlo. (From Random House Unabridged Dictionary, 2d ed, 1993)Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Glass: Hard, amorphous, brittle, inorganic, usually transparent, polymerous silicate of basic oxides, usually potassium or sodium. It is used in the form of hard sheets, vessels, tubing, fibers, ceramics, beads, etc.Protein Interaction Maps: Graphs representing sets of measurable, non-covalent physical contacts with specific PROTEINS in living organisms or in cells.Macromolecular Substances: Compounds and molecular complexes that consist of very large numbers of atoms and are generally over 500 kDa in size. In biological systems macromolecular substances usually can be visualized using ELECTRON MICROSCOPY and are distinguished from ORGANELLES by the lack of a membrane structure.Hydrogen Bonding: A low-energy attractive force between hydrogen and another element. It plays a major role in determining the properties of water, proteins, and other compounds.Nanoparticles: Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.Phase Transition: A change of a substance from one form or state to another.Models, Statistical: Statistical formulations or analyses which, when applied to data and found to fit the data, are then used to verify the assumptions and parameters used in the analysis. Examples of statistical models are the linear model, binomial model, polynomial model, two-parameter model, etc.Protein Structure, Tertiary: The level of protein structure in which combinations of secondary protein structures (alpha helices, beta sheets, loop regions, and motifs) pack together to form folded shapes called domains. Disulfide bridges between cysteines in two different parts of the polypeptide chain along with other interactions between the chains play a role in the formation and stabilization of tertiary structure. Small proteins usually consist of only one domain but larger proteins may contain a number of domains connected by segments of polypeptide chain which lack regular secondary structure.Scattering, Small Angle: Scattering of a beam of electromagnetic or acoustic RADIATION, or particles, at small angles by particles or cavities whose dimensions are many times as large as the wavelength of the radiation or the de Broglie wavelength of the scattered particles. Also know as low angle scattering. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed) Small angle scattering (SAS) techniques, small angle neutron (SANS), X-ray (SAXS), and light (SALS, or just LS) scattering, are used to characterize objects on a nanoscale.Programming Languages: Specific languages used to prepare computer programs.Chemistry, Physical: The study of CHEMICAL PHENOMENA and processes in terms of the underlying PHYSICAL PHENOMENA and processes.Colloids: Two-phase systems in which one is uniformly dispersed in another as particles small enough so they cannot be filtered or will not settle out. The dispersing or continuous phase or medium envelops the particles of the discontinuous phase. All three states of matter can form colloids among each other.Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions: The thermodynamic interaction between a substance and WATER.Protein Engineering: Procedures by which protein structure and function are changed or created in vitro by altering existing or synthesizing new structural genes that direct the synthesis of proteins with sought-after properties. Such procedures may include the design of MOLECULAR MODELS of proteins using COMPUTER GRAPHICS or other molecular modeling techniques; site-specific mutagenesis (MUTAGENESIS, SITE-SPECIFIC) of existing genes; and DIRECTED MOLECULAR EVOLUTION techniques to create new genes.Microscopy, Fluorescence: Microscopy of specimens stained with fluorescent dye (usually fluorescein isothiocyanate) or of naturally fluorescent materials, which emit light when exposed to ultraviolet or blue light. Immunofluorescence microscopy utilizes antibodies that are labeled with fluorescent dye.Molecular Docking Simulation: A computer simulation technique that is used to model the interaction between two molecules. Typically the docking simulation measures the interactions of a small molecule or ligand with a part of a larger molecule such as a protein.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Protein Multimerization: The assembly of the QUATERNARY PROTEIN STRUCTURE of multimeric proteins (MULTIPROTEIN COMPLEXES) from their composite PROTEIN SUBUNITS.Molecular Motor Proteins: Proteins that are involved in or cause CELL MOVEMENT such as the rotary structures (flagellar motor) or the structures whose movement is directed along cytoskeletal filaments (MYOSIN; KINESIN; and DYNEIN motor families).Crystallography, X-Ray: The study of crystal structure using X-RAY DIFFRACTION techniques. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Protein Structure, Secondary: The level of protein structure in which regular hydrogen-bond interactions within contiguous stretches of polypeptide chain give rise to alpha helices, beta strands (which align to form beta sheets) or other types of coils. This is the first folding level of protein conformation.Microspheres: Small uniformly-sized spherical particles, of micrometer dimensions, frequently labeled with radioisotopes or various reagents acting as tags or markers.Carbohydrates: The largest class of organic compounds, including STARCH; GLYCOGEN; CELLULOSE; POLYSACCHARIDES; and simple MONOSACCHARIDES. Carbohydrates are composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen in a ratio of Cn(H2O)n.Protons: Stable elementary particles having the smallest known positive charge, found in the nuclei of all elements. The proton mass is less than that of a neutron. A proton is the nucleus of the light hydrogen atom, i.e., the hydrogen ion.Proteomics: The systematic study of the complete complement of proteins (PROTEOME) of organisms.Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer: A type of FLUORESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY using two FLUORESCENT DYES with overlapping emission and absorption spectra, which is used to indicate proximity of labeled molecules. This technique is useful for studying interactions of molecules and PROTEIN FOLDING.Drug Design: The molecular designing of drugs for specific purposes (such as DNA-binding, enzyme inhibition, anti-cancer efficacy, etc.) based on knowledge of molecular properties such as activity of functional groups, molecular geometry, and electronic structure, and also on information cataloged on analogous molecules. Drug design is generally computer-assisted molecular modeling and does not include pharmacokinetics, dosage analysis, or drug administration analysis.Diffusion: The tendency of a gas or solute to pass from a point of higher pressure or concentration to a point of lower pressure or concentration and to distribute itself throughout the available space. Diffusion, especially FACILITATED DIFFUSION, is a major mechanism of BIOLOGICAL TRANSPORT.Cluster Analysis: A set of statistical methods used to group variables or observations into strongly inter-related subgroups. In epidemiology, it may be used to analyze a closely grouped series of events or cases of disease or other health-related phenomenon with well-defined distribution patterns in relation to time or place or both.Spectrophotometry, Infrared: Spectrophotometry in the infrared region, usually for the purpose of chemical analysis through measurement of absorption spectra associated with rotational and vibrational energy levels of molecules. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Electrochemistry: The study of chemical changes resulting from electrical action and electrical activity resulting from chemical changes.Molecular Sequence Data: Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.Proteome: The protein complement of an organism coded for by its genome.Drug Discovery: The process of finding chemicals for potential therapeutic use.Amino Acid Sequence: The order of amino acids as they occur in a polypeptide chain. This is referred to as the primary structure of proteins. It is of fundamental importance in determining PROTEIN CONFORMATION.Electrons: Stable elementary particles having the smallest known negative charge, present in all elements; also called negatrons. Positively charged electrons are called positrons. The numbers, energies and arrangement of electrons around atomic nuclei determine the chemical identities of elements. Beams of electrons are called CATHODE RAYS.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.Biophysical Phenomena: The physical characteristics and processes of biological systems.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Protein Stability: The ability of a protein to retain its structural conformation or its activity when subjected to physical or chemical manipulations.Lasers: An optical source that emits photons in a coherent beam. Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation (LASER) is brought about using devices that transform light of varying frequencies into a single intense, nearly nondivergent beam of monochromatic radiation. Lasers operate in the infrared, visible, ultraviolet, or X-ray regions of the spectrum.Poisson Distribution: A distribution function used to describe the occurrence of rare events or to describe the sampling distribution of isolated counts in a continuum of time or space.Gene Expression Profiling: The determination of the pattern of genes expressed at the level of GENETIC TRANSCRIPTION, under specific circumstances or in a specific cell.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Electrodes: Electric conductors through which electric currents enter or leave a medium, whether it be an electrolytic solution, solid, molten mass, gas, or vacuum.Muramidase: A basic enzyme that is present in saliva, tears, egg white, and many animal fluids. It functions as an antibacterial agent. The enzyme catalyzes the hydrolysis of 1,4-beta-linkages between N-acetylmuramic acid and N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in peptidoglycan and between N-acetyl-D-glucosamine residues in chitodextrin. EC 3.2.1.17.Principal Component Analysis: Mathematical procedure that transforms a number of possibly correlated variables into a smaller number of uncorrelated variables called principal components.Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Spectroscopic method of measuring the magnetic moment of elementary particles such as atomic nuclei, protons or electrons. It is employed in clinical applications such as NMR Tomography (MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING).Genomics: The systematic study of the complete DNA sequences (GENOME) of organisms.Microscopy, Electron, Scanning: Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.Crystallization: The formation of crystalline substances from solutions or melts. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Elasticity: Resistance and recovery from distortion of shape.Particle Size: Relating to the size of solids.Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization: A mass spectrometric technique that is used for the analysis of large biomolecules. Analyte molecules are embedded in an excess matrix of small organic molecules that show a high resonant absorption at the laser wavelength used. The matrix absorbs the laser energy, thus inducing a soft disintegration of the sample-matrix mixture into free (gas phase) matrix and analyte molecules and molecular ions. In general, only molecular ions of the analyte molecules are produced, and almost no fragmentation occurs. This makes the method well suited for molecular weight determinations and mixture analysis.Microscopy: The use of instrumentation and techniques for visualizing material and details that cannot be seen by the unaided eye. It is usually done by enlarging images, transmitted by light or electron beams, with optical or magnetic lenses that magnify the entire image field. With scanning microscopy, images are generated by collecting output from the specimen in a point-by-point fashion, on a magnified scale, as it is scanned by a narrow beam of light or electrons, a laser, a conductive probe, or a topographical probe.Polyethylene Glycols: Polymers of ETHYLENE OXIDE and water, and their ethers. They vary in consistency from liquid to solid depending on the molecular weight indicated by a number following the name. They are used as SURFACTANTS, dispersing agents, solvents, ointment and suppository bases, vehicles, and tablet excipients. Some specific groups are NONOXYNOLS, OCTOXYNOLS, and POLOXAMERS.Solubility: The ability of a substance to be dissolved, i.e. to form a solution with another substance. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Calibration: Determination, by measurement or comparison with a standard, of the correct value of each scale reading on a meter or other measuring instrument; or determination of the settings of a control device that correspond to particular values of voltage, current, frequency or other output.Serum Albumin, Bovine: Serum albumin from cows, commonly used in in vitro biological studies. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Mass Spectrometry: An analytical method used in determining the identity of a chemical based on its mass using mass analyzers/mass spectrometers.Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared: A spectroscopic technique in which a range of wavelengths is presented simultaneously with an interferometer and the spectrum is mathematically derived from the pattern thus obtained.Amino Acids: Organic compounds that generally contain an amino (-NH2) and a carboxyl (-COOH) group. Twenty alpha-amino acids are the subunits which are polymerized to form proteins.Structure-Activity Relationship: The relationship between the chemical structure of a compound and its biological or pharmacological activity. Compounds are often classed together because they have structural characteristics in common including shape, size, stereochemical arrangement, and distribution of functional groups.Dimerization: The process by which two molecules of the same chemical composition form a condensation product or polymer.Lipid Bilayers: Layers of lipid molecules which are two molecules thick. Bilayer systems are frequently studied as models of biological membranes.Nucleic Acid Hybridization: Widely used technique which exploits the ability of complementary sequences in single-stranded DNAs or RNAs to pair with each other to form a double helix. Hybridization can take place between two complimentary DNA sequences, between a single-stranded DNA and a complementary RNA, or between two RNA sequences. The technique is used to detect and isolate specific sequences, measure homology, or define other characteristics of one or both strands. (Kendrew, Encyclopedia of Molecular Biology, 1994, p503)Catalysis: The facilitation of a chemical reaction by material (catalyst) that is not consumed by the reaction.Sequence Alignment: The arrangement of two or more amino acid or base sequences from an organism or organisms in such a way as to align areas of the sequences sharing common properties. The degree of relatedness or homology between the sequences is predicted computationally or statistically based on weights assigned to the elements aligned between the sequences. This in turn can serve as a potential indicator of the genetic relatedness between the organisms.Oligopeptides: Peptides composed of between two and twelve amino acids.Hydrogen-Ion Concentration: The normality of a solution with respect to HYDROGEN ions; H+. It is related to acidity measurements in most cases by pH = log 1/2[1/(H+)], where (H+) is the hydrogen ion concentration in gram equivalents per liter of solution. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)Evolution, Molecular: The process of cumulative change at the level of DNA; RNA; and PROTEINS, over successive generations.Models, Genetic: Theoretical representations that simulate the behavior or activity of genetic processes or phenomena. They include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.Base Sequence: The sequence of PURINES and PYRIMIDINES in nucleic acids and polynucleotides. It is also called nucleotide sequence.Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis: Hybridization of a nucleic acid sample to a very large set of OLIGONUCLEOTIDE PROBES, which have been attached individually in columns and rows to a solid support, to determine a BASE SEQUENCE, or to detect variations in a gene sequence, GENE EXPRESSION, or for GENE MAPPING.Escherichia coli: A species of gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped bacteria (GRAM-NEGATIVE FACULTATIVELY ANAEROBIC RODS) commonly found in the lower part of the intestine of warm-blooded animals. It is usually nonpathogenic, but some strains are known to produce DIARRHEA and pyogenic infections. Pathogenic strains (virotypes) are classified by their specific pathogenic mechanisms such as toxins (ENTEROTOXIGENIC ESCHERICHIA COLI), etc.Phenotype: The outward appearance of the individual. It is the product of interactions between genes, and between the GENOTYPE and the environment.Circular Dichroism: A change from planar to elliptic polarization when an initially plane-polarized light wave traverses an optically active medium. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Cattle: Domesticated bovine animals of the genus Bos, usually kept on a farm or ranch and used for the production of meat or dairy products or for heavy labor.Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A species of the genus SACCHAROMYCES, family Saccharomycetaceae, order Saccharomycetales, known as "baker's" or "brewer's" yeast. The dried form is used as a dietary supplement.Immunoglobulin G: The major immunoglobulin isotype class in normal human serum. There are several isotype subclasses of IgG, for example, IgG1, IgG2A, and IgG2B.Recombinant Proteins: Proteins prepared by recombinant DNA technology.Rabbits: The species Oryctolagus cuniculus, in the family Leporidae, order LAGOMORPHA. Rabbits are born in burrows, furless, and with eyes and ears closed. In contrast with HARES, rabbits have 22 chromosome pairs.Cell Membrane: The lipid- and protein-containing, selectively permeable membrane that surrounds the cytoplasm in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Cell Line: Established cell cultures that have the potential to propagate indefinitely.Cells, Cultured: Cells propagated in vitro in special media conducive to their growth. Cultured cells are used to study developmental, morphologic, metabolic, physiologic, and genetic processes, among others.
Biomolecular NMR spectroscopy[edit]. Proteins[edit]. Main article: Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of proteins ...
Biomolecular structure[edit]. A scleroprotein forms long protein filaments, which are shaped like rods or wires. Scleroproteins ...
Biomolecular targets. *TAAR1 (agonist). *σ1R (agonist). *σ2R (agonist). *α2A adrenoceptor (agonist) ...
"Biomolecular Concepts. 3 (2): 117-126. doi:10.1515/bmc-2011-0060. PMC 3431554 . PMID 22942912.. ...
Biomolecular complex. Groups of (bio)molecules Sub-cellular level. Organelle. Functional groups of biomolecules, biochemical ...
Biomolecular targets. *TAAR1 (agonist). *σ1R (agonist). *σ2R (agonist). *α2A adrenoceptor (agonist) ...
Meza-Aguilar, Diana G; Boucard, Antony A (1 January 2014). "Latrophilins updated". Biomolecular Concepts. 5 (6). doi:10.1515/ ...
Biomolecular targets. *TAAR1 (full agonist). *CART (mRNA inducer). *5-HT1A receptor (low affinity ligand) ...
"Biomolecular Concepts. 2 (1-2): 39-46. doi:10.1515/BMC.2011.004. PMC 3110071. PMID 21666837.. ...
Biomolecular Chemistry. 16 (8): 1263-1271. doi:10.1039/c7ob03017g. PMID 29308815.. ...
Biomolecular Structure Analysis. *Center for Analytical Ultracentrifugation of Macromolecular Assemblies (CAUMA). *Center for ...
Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry. 2 (19): 2701-6. CiteSeerX 10.1.1.626.8241. doi:10.1039/B411910J. PMID 15455136.. ...
Hoffmann-Röder, A.; Krause, N. (2005). "The golden gate to catalysis". Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry. 3 (3): 387-91. doi: ...
Biomolecular Chemistry. 6 (13): 2242-55. doi:10.1039/b719950c. PMID 18563254.. ...
Biomolecular Chemistry. 5 (1): 54-7. doi:10.1039/b613890j. PMID 17164905.. ...
Biomolecular Chemistry. 3 (17): 3201. doi:10.1039/B508752J. Milner, Sinead Eileen, et al. "Bioactivities of glycoalkaloids and ...
"Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry. 6 (12): 2076-84. doi:10.1039/b801223g. PMC 3758137. PMID 18528569.. ... "Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry. 15 (9): 2104-2118. doi:10.1039/c7ob00006e. PMID 28220174.. ...
"Journal of Biomolecular NMR. 60 (2-3): 73-75. doi:10.1007/s10858-014-9855-x. ISSN 0925-2738. PMC 4207954.. ... "Journal of Biomolecular NMR. 64 (4): 307-332. doi:10.1007/s10858-016-0029-x. ISSN 0925-2738. PMC 4861749.. ... "Journal of Biomolecular NMR. 41 (4): 221-239. doi:10.1007/s10858-008-9255-1. PMC 2575051. PMID 18668206.. ... Clore, G. Marius (2011). "Adventures in Biomolecular NMR". Encyclopedia of Magnetic Resonance (PDF). John Wiley & Sons. doi: ...
Journal of Biomolecular Screening. 19 (4): 516-25. doi:10.1177/1087057113518067. PMID 24476585.. ...
Journal of Biomolecular NMR. 2 (2): 137-47. doi:10.1007/BF01875525. PMID 1330130.. ...
by specific biomolecular targets: targeted therapy *molecular chaperone therapy. *by chelation: chelation therapy ...
Journal of Biomolecular Technology. 19 (18): 341-357.. CS1 maint: Explicit use of et al. (link) ...
"Journal of Biomolecular Screening. 21 (4): 414-21. doi:10.1177/1087057115618347. PMC 4800460. PMID 26637553.. ... MST has been used to estimate the enthalpic and entropic contributions to biomolecular interactions.[10] ... Asmari M, Ratih R, Alhazmi HA, El Deeb S (February 2018). "Thermophoresis for characterizing biomolecular interaction". Methods ... "Microscale thermophoresis quantifies biomolecular interactions under previously challenging conditions". Methods. 59 (3): 301- ...
"Biomolecular systems". Retrieved April 23, 2014. Max Planck Institute, Munich. "Organization". Retrieved April 23, 2014. Max ... The researchers in the Biomolecular Systems department, headed by Peter H. Seeberger, are using new methods for synthesizing ...
Biomolecular Concepts. 3 (4): 345-64. doi:10.1515/bmc-2012-0001. PMC 3438915 . PMID 22977648. Hélène Ollivier; Karine Pichavant ...
Biomolecular Engineering. 20: 333-337. doi:10.1016/s1389-0344(03)00043-1. Taylor, MW; Radax R; Steger D; Wagner M (2007). " ...
3D Printing of Biomolecular Models for Research and Pedagogy. Eduardo Da Veiga Beltrame1, James Tyrwhitt-Drake2, Ian Roy3, Raed ... Illustrated are the stages in producing a physical 3D biomolecular print: (i) preparing the model, including selecting the ... Da Veiga Beltrame, E., Tyrwhitt-Drake, J., Roy, I., Shalaby, R., Suckale, J., Pomeranz Krummel, D. 3D Printing of Biomolecular ... Locate the molecular data file of the biomolecular structure to print from a database-either the PDB, EMDB, or PubChem ( ...
... Pre-submission queries please contact Richard Kelly, Executive Editor Email: Send us an email ... Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry (OBC) publishes original and high impact research and reviews in organic chemistry. ... Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry. Organic synthesis, supramolecular chemistry, chemical biology and more. On average get a ... Download our author guidelines for Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry Reviews (PDF).. Perspectives. Personal viewpoints, taking ...
... Pre-submission queries please contact Katie Lim, Executive Editor Email: Send us an email ... Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry (OBC) publishes original and high impact research and reviews in organic chemistry. ... Download our author guidelines for Organic and Biomolecular Chemistry Reviews (PDF).. Comments. Comments and Replies are a ... Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry. Organic synthesis, supramolecular chemistry, chemical biology and more. On average get a ...
The Biomolecular Measurement Division provides the measurement science, standards, technology, and data required to support the ... Biomolecular Measurement Division. The Biomolecular Measurement Division provides the measurement science, standards, ... Welcome to the Biomolecular Measurement Division. In partnership with U.S. industry, government agencies, and scientific ... The NIST presence at IBBR is BMDs Biomolecular Structure and Function Group. ...
... Transient liquid-like droplets made up of proteins and RNA are ... What happens if a prioritized target clusters in transient biomolecular condensates? Does the diffusion of drugs into these ... A growing number of biomolecular condensates have been identified in the cytoplasm and nucleus. Not all compartments are ... Now, a growing appreciation for the importance of biomolecular condensates - transient liquid-like droplets made up of proteins ...
BioMolecular Explorer 3D: Explore the Molecules. Software for interactive molecular exploration in High School Biology courses. ...
By hosting a diverse set of speakers, we are able to support the local scientific community and foster interdisciplinary collaborations. Our seminars encompass the theory, development and applications of computational methods from leaders of both academics and industry. These well attended events are open to the public and cater towards graduate students, post docs and faculty.. ...
Students typically persue research in biomolecular structure, molecular biophysics, protein design and engineering, protein ... The Biomolecular Structure and Design Graduate Program at the University of Washington accepts students persuing a Ph.D. degree ... folding, drug design, and biomolecular interactions using techniques such as xray crystallography, NMR, electron microscopy, ... The Biomolecular Structure & Design (BMSD) Program at the University of Washington is an interdisciplinary graduate training ...
This work presents a snapshot of the state of the art of modern biomolecular crystallography, from crystallisation through ... This work presents a snapshot of the state of the art of modern biomolecular crystallography, from crystallisation through ...
Biomolecular NMR data analysis.. Gryk MR1, Vyas J, Maciejewski MW.. Author information. 1. Department of Molecular, Microbial ...
Longevity: epigenetic and biomolecular aspects by Taormina, Giusi and Mirisola, Mario G. ... The human β-amyloid precursor protein: biomolecular and epigenetic aspects. Nguyen, Khue Vu ...
Prices in US$ apply to orders placed in the Americas only. Prices in GBP apply to orders placed in Great Britain only. Prices in € represent the retail prices valid in Germany (unless otherwise indicated). Prices are subject to change without notice. Prices do not include postage and handling if applicable. RRP: Recommended Retail Price ...
The Amber biomolecular simulation programs.. Case DA1, Cheatham TE 3rd, Darden T, Gohlke H, Luo R, Merz KM Jr, Onufriev A, ...
... The Journal of Biomolecular NMR provides a forum for publishing research on ...
Disotell T.R. (2015) Phylogenetic Relationships of Hominids: Biomolecular Approach. In: Henke W., Tattersall I. (eds) Handbook ...
The scientific activities in the department of biological chemistry span several areas in the Life Sciences. The common thread is the study of the biochemistry of life and disease. Emphasis is given to the examination of proteins, whether soluble or membrane-bound, and their key biological functions and we seek a molecular understanding of their evolution, cellular interactions, structures and functions. A variety of biochemical, biophysical, structural, molecular-biological, and state of the art imaging methodologies are employed in our department. Overlapping interests and inter-group cooperations signify the spirit of our research. The department has more than 20 research groups whose activities are centered around the following foci of interest:. ...
We are interested in transport processes and in photosynthesis. Within the realm of photosynthesis we are mainly concerned with dynamic processes that accompany the life cycle of the thylakoid network, including its response to different stresses and its formation and dismantling. Regarding nucleo-cytoplasmic transport, we are particularly interested in its selectivity, the behavior of the ensemble of transporting molecules as it relates to the transport of a single molecule and in applications to gene therapy. In both fields of study, we combine different approaches and methodologies including ensemble and single-molecule biophysical methods, biochemical and molecular biology techniques, statistical mechanical modeling and state-of-the-art electron microscopy.. ...
Biomolecular Research Program Extended at Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center. Results to date include new insights into protein ... Insights into biomolecular structure and function facilitated by the use of Anton could potentially lead to the development of ...
A fine example is that of biomolecular motor proteins, designed by nature to carry out critical functions in the cell. Most of ... Bio Molecular Analysis. Symposium Chair: Srinivas Iyer, Los Alamos National Laboratory Synopsis. Nanotechnology in the Life- ... A fine example is that of biomolecular motor proteins, designed by nature to carry out critical functions in the cell. Most of ... Alongwith these topics, this symposium will also cover the equally important area of biomolecular analysis, which has reached ...
Recent Developments in Biomolecular NMR Recent Developments in Biomolecular NMR Recent Developments in Biomolecular NMR 01 Aug ... Recent Developments in Biomolecular NMR Recent Developments in Biomolecular NMR Editor(s): Marius Clore, Jennifer Potts ... Biomolecular Sciences Series Set. A collection of books edited and written by leading international scientists working in the ... field, the RSC Biomolecular Sciences Set provides an authoritative and definitive collection of reference guides for graduate ...
From the themed collection: Multivalent Biomolecular Recognition The article was first published on 05 Oct 2015. Org. Biomol. ... From the themed collection: Multivalent Biomolecular Recognition The article was first published on 24 Aug 2015. Org. Biomol. ... From the themed collection: Multivalent Biomolecular Recognition The article was first published on 25 Nov 2015. Org. Biomol. ... From the themed collection: Multivalent Biomolecular Recognition The article was first published on 21 Sep 2015. Org. Biomol. ...
Biocatalysis and Biomolecular Engineering:. * Can be used as a reference by teachers, graduate students, and industrial ... Biocatalysis and Biomolecular Engineering covers subject matter on the latest developments in eco-friendly and energy-saving ... Biocatalysis and Biomolecular Engineering builds a cohesive, well thought out case for nurturing new discoveries in eco- ... Biocatalysis and Biomolecular Engineering. Ching T. Hou (Editor), Jei-Fu Shaw (Editor) ...
Biomolecular NMR Assignments provides a forum for publishing sequence-specific resonance assignments for proteins and nucleic ... Biomolecular NMR Assignments. Editor-in-Chief: Arthur G. Palmer. ISSN: 1874-2718 (print version). ISSN: 1874-270X (electronic ... Biomolecular NMR Assignments provides a forum for publishing sequence-specific resonance assignments for proteins and nucleic ... Biomolecular NMR Assignments provides a forum for publishing sequence-specific resonance assignments for proteins and nucleic ...
BIEN 550 Biomolecular Devices (3 credits) Note: This is the 2016-2017 edition of the eCalendar. Update the year in your ...
This review will concentrate on the immunohistochemical expression of biomolecular markers and their relationships with ... Biomolecular Markers in Cancer of the Tongue. Daris Ferrari. ,1 Carla Codecà. ,1 Jessica Fiore. ,1 Laura Moneghini. ,1 Silvano ... This review will concentrate on the immunohistochemical expression of biomolecular markers and their relationships with ...
  • Biomolecular engineering is the application of engineering principles and practices to the purposeful manipulation of molecules of biological origin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current research focuses on a better understanding of the origin of biomolecular asymmetry by the identification and detection of the possibly first chiral molecules that were involved in the appearance and evolution of life on Earth. (mdpi.com)
  • In partnership with U.S. industry, government agencies, and scientific institutions, the Biomolecular Measurement Division performs fundamental and applied research on the measurement of macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids, as well as peptides, glycans, metabolites, lipids, and natural products. (nist.gov)
  • The Biomolecular Research Group consists of 4 academic staff and associated research staff and students. (dmu.ac.uk)
  • Although first defined as research, biomolecular engineering has since become an academic discipline and a field of engineering practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • This Research Topic collection will focus on the application of machine learning algorithms in biomolecular simulations. (frontiersin.org)
  • Princeton BioMolecular Research is a privately held company established in 1998. (chemspider.com)
  • Princeton BioMolecular Research is committed to provide the industry's highest quality drug discovery services. (chemspider.com)
  • This business strategy allows Princeton BioMolecular Research quality control over all compounds and extends cost savings to our clients. (chemspider.com)
  • Welcome to the Laboratory of Biomolecular Research! (psi.ch)
  • Present research reasons that circularly polarized electromagnetic radiation was identified in interstellar environments and an asymmetric interstellar photon-molecule interaction might have triggered biomolecular symmetry breaking. (mdpi.com)
  • The Gordon Research Seminar on Computational Aspects of Biomolecular NMR is a unique forum for graduate students, post-docs, and other scientists with comparable levels of experience and education to present and exchange new data and cutting edge ideas. (grc.org)
  • This GRS will be held in conjunction with the "Computational Aspects of Biomolecular NMR" Gordon Research Conference (GRC). (grc.org)
  • The Human BioMolecular Atlas Program (HuBMAP) aims to facilitate research on single cells within tissues by supporting data generation and technology development to explore the relationship between cellular organization and function, as well as variability in normal tissue organization at the level of individual cells. (nih.gov)
  • Cell Cycle and Growth Control: Biomolecular Regulation and Cancer, Second Edition provides a solid basis for understanding cell cycle and growth control as it relates to biological regulation, with a special emphasis on examining these processes in the context of cancer. (wiley.com)
  • Plexera LLC has launched the PlexArray HT system, a high-throughput, label-free, surface plasmon resonance-based biomolecular interaction detection system for producing high-quality information on kinetics, affinities and specificities of reactants. (photonics.com)
  • This ERC Starting Grant 2018 aims at the fundamental understanding of ultrafast biomolecular vibrational dynamics in the mid-IR/THz region and respective impact of nonadiabatic effects in dipolar liquids, within nano-confined environments and in the vicinity of biological interfaces. (europa.eu)
  • As such the ERC Starting Grant 2018 transfers the paradigm of nonadiabatic relaxation, that has proven tremendous predictive power for descriptions of ultrafast electronic relaxation, to the low energy mid-IR/THz domain of biomolecular vibrational (energy relaxation) dynamics. (europa.eu)
  • Biomolecular Structure and Biophysics is part of the Purdue University Interdisciplinary Life Science Program (PULSe). (gradschools.com)
  • The Biomolecular Measurement Division provides the measurement science, standards, technology, and data required to support the nation's needs in determining the composition, structure, quantity, and function of biomolecules. (nist.gov)
  • Biomolecular engineering has the potential to become one of the most important scientific disciplines because of its advancements in the analyses of gene expression patterns as well as the purposeful manipulation of many important biomolecules to improve functionality. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biomolecular engineering will produce new designs for therapeutic drugs and high-value biomolecules for treatment or prevention of cancers, genetic diseases, and other types of metabolic diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biomolecular engineering deals with the manipulation of many key biomolecules. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Biomolecular Structure & Design (BMSD) Program at the University of Washington is an interdisciplinary graduate training program. (washington.edu)
  • Insights into biomolecular structure and function facilitated by the use of Anton could potentially lead to the development of new and better therapeutic drugs and other improvements in disease treatment. (psc.edu)
  • This will provide a basis for modelling of this fundamental property of complex biomolecular systems and will therefore be of great importance to biology, medicine and biotechnology. (uni-freiburg.de)
  • Return to Supplement: Biomolecular Feedback Systems . (caltech.edu)
  • Dear Colleagues, Eric Martz and I are happy to announce version 2 of the BioMolecular Explorer 3D web site, (designed to supplement a secondary school biology curriculum) which uses Jmol in place of Chime to present macromolecular structures and tutorials. (bioinformatics.org)
  • All of the Biomedical and Biomolecular science degrees are accredited by the Royal Society of Biology and include the option to take a professional placement year or to spend time studying abroad. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • This review will concentrate on the immunohistochemical expression of biomolecular markers and their relationships with clinical behaviour and prognosis. (hindawi.com)