Materials fabricated by BIOMIMETICS techniques, i.e., based on natural processes found in biological systems.
An interdisciplinary field in materials science, ENGINEERING, and BIOLOGY, studying the use of biological principles for synthesis or fabrication of BIOMIMETIC MATERIALS.
The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.
A group of phosphate minerals that includes ten mineral species and has the general formula X5(YO4)3Z, where X is usually calcium or lead, Y is phosphorus or arsenic, and Z is chlorine, fluorine, or OH-. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Therapeutic technique for replacement of minerals in partially decalcified teeth.
Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.
Generating tissue in vitro for clinical applications, such as replacing wounded tissues or impaired organs. The use of TISSUE SCAFFOLDING enables the generation of complex multi-layered tissues and tissue structures.
Cell growth support structures composed of BIOCOMPATIBLE MATERIALS. They are specially designed solid support matrices for cell attachment in TISSUE ENGINEERING and GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION uses.
Calcium salts of phosphoric acid. These compounds are frequently used as calcium supplements.
The structure of one molecule that imitates or simulates the structure of a different molecule.
Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.
Submicron-sized fibers with diameters typically between 50 and 500 nanometers. The very small dimension of these fibers can generate a high surface area to volume ratio, which makes them potential candidates for various biomedical and other applications.
Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.
Materials which have structured components with at least one dimension in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. These include NANOCOMPOSITES; NANOPARTICLES; NANOTUBES; and NANOWIRES.
'Polyvinyls' is a term that refers to a group of polymers synthesized from vinyl chloride, including polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and polyvinylidene chloride (PVDC), which are widely used in various medical applications such as manufacturing of medical devices, tubing, packaging materials, and pharmaceutical containers due to their chemical resistance, durability, and versatility.
Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).
Water swollen, rigid, 3-dimensional network of cross-linked, hydrophilic macromolecules, 20-95% water. They are used in paints, printing inks, foodstuffs, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.
Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.
The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)
Condition of having pores or open spaces. This often refers to bones, bone implants, or bone cements, but can refer to the porous state of any solid substance.
Nanometer-scale composite structures composed of organic molecules intimately incorporated with inorganic molecules. (Glossary of Biotechnology and Nanobiotechology Terms, 4th ed)
The mineral component of bones and teeth; it has been used therapeutically as a prosthetic aid and in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.
A solution used for irrigating the mouth in xerostomia and as a substitute for saliva.
Electron microscopy in which the ELECTRONS or their reaction products that pass down through the specimen are imaged below the plane of the specimen.
The study of the energy of electrons ejected from matter by the photoelectric effect, i.e., as a direct result of absorption of energy from electromagnetic radiation. As the energies of the electrons are characteristic of a specific element, the measurement of the energy of these electrons is a technique used to determine the chemical composition of surfaces.
Polymers of N-SUBSTITUTED GLYCINES containing chiral centers at the a-position of their side chains. These oligomers lack HYDROGEN BONDING donors, preventing formation of the usual intrachain hydrogen bonds but can form helices driven by the steric influence of chiral side chains.
Cements that act through infiltration and polymerization within the dentinal matrix and are used for dental restoration. They can be adhesive resins themselves, adhesion-promoting monomers, or polymerization initiators that act in concert with other agents to form a dentin-bonding system.
Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.
Acrylic resins, also known as polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), are a type of synthetic resin formed from polymerized methyl methacrylate monomers, used in various medical applications such as dental restorations, orthopedic implants, and ophthalmic lenses due to their biocompatibility, durability, and transparency.
A dark-gray, metallic element of widespread distribution but occurring in small amounts; atomic number, 22; atomic weight, 47.90; symbol, Ti; specific gravity, 4.5; used for fixation of fractures. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A property of the surface of an object that makes it stick to another surface.
Nanometer-sized particles that are nanoscale in three dimensions. They include nanocrystaline materials; NANOCAPSULES; METAL NANOPARTICLES; DENDRIMERS, and QUANTUM DOTS. The uses of nanoparticles include DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS and cancer targeting and imaging.
Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.

Use of a biomimetic chromatographic stationary phase for study of the interactions occurring between inorganic anions and phosphatidylcholine membranes. (1/731)

A liquid chromatographic method for the study of ion-membrane interactions is reported. A phosphatidylcholine biomimetic stationary phase was established by loading dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) onto a reversed-phase octadecylsilica packed column. This column was then used to study the interaction of some inorganic anions with the stationary phase by UV and conductivity detection. Ten inorganic anions were selected as model ions and were analyzed with the proposed chromatographic system. Anion-DMPC interactions of differing magnitudes were observed for all of the model anions. Perchlorate-DMPC interactions were strongest, followed by thiocyanate-DMPC, iodide-DMPC, chlorate-DMPC, nitrate-DMPC, bromide-DMPC, chloride-DMPC, fluoride-DMPC, and then sulfate-DMPC. Cations in the eluent, especially H(+) ions and divalent cations such as Ca(2+), showed strong effects on anion-DMPC interactions. The chromatographic data suggest that DMPC interacts with both the anions and the cations. Anion-DMPC interactions were dependent on the surface potential of the stationary phase: at low surface potentials anion-DMPC interactions were predominantly solvation dependent in nature whereas at more positive surface potentials anion-DMPC interactions were predominantly electrostatic in nature. Cation-DMPC interactions served to raise the surface potential, causing the anion-DMPC interactions to vary from solvation dependent to electrostatic. The chromatographic data were used to provide quantitative estimates of the enthalpies of the anion-DMPC interactions.  (+info)

Nanotubules formed by highly hydrophobic amphiphilic alpha-helical peptides and natural phospholipids. (2/731)

We previously reported that the 18-mer amphiphilic alpha-helical peptide, Hel 13-5, consisting of 13 hydrophobic residues and five hydrophilic amino acid residues, can induce neutral liposomes (egg yolk phosphatidylcholine) to adopt long nanotubular structures and that the interaction of specific peptides with specific phospholipid mixtures induces the formation of membrane structures resembling cellular organelles such as the Golgi apparatus. In the present study we focused our attention on the effects of peptide sequence and chain length on the nanotubule formation occurring in mixture systems of Hel 13-5 and various neutral and acidic lipid species by means of turbidity measurements, dynamic light scattering measurements, and electron microscopy. We designed and synthesized two sets of Hel 13-5 related peptides: 1) Five peptides to examine the role of hydrophobic or hydrophilic residues in amphiphilic alpha-helical structures, and 2) Six peptides to examine the role of peptide length, having even number residues from 12 to 24. Conformational, solution, and morphological studies showed that the amphiphilic alpha-helical structure and the peptide chain length (especially 18 amino acid residues) are critical determinants of very long tubular structures. A mixture of alpha-helix and beta-structures determines the tubular shapes and assemblies. However, we found that the charged Lys residues comprising the hydrophilic regions of amphiphilic structures can be replaced by Arg or Glu residues without a loss of tubular structures. This suggests that the mechanism of microtubule formation does not involve the charge interaction. The immersion of the hydrophobic part of the amphiphilic peptides into liposomes initially forms elliptic-like structures due to the fusion of small liposomes, which is followed by a transformation into tubular structures of various sizes and shapes.  (+info)

High-performance photovoltaic behavior of oriented purple membrane polymer composite films. (3/731)

The photovoltaic behavior of films in which bacteriorhodopsin molecules are embedded in a polyvinyl alcohol matrix has been investigated by using both pulsed laser excitation and regular light illumination. Response times as short as milliseconds, photocurrents as great as 120 micro A/cm(2), and photovoltages as large as 3.8 V have been obtained. A theoretical model has been developed and used to extract several physical parameters and fit the experimental results. Some important intrinsic parameters have been obtained. Theoretical results indicate that the average displacement of the excited protons is on the order of several tens of microns. Other curve fits show that photocurrent and photovoltage increase linearly with external field, but increase exponentially with flash power. These theoretical models and results can be extended to other kinds of photoactive polymeric materials.  (+info)

The flexibility of DNA double crossover molecules. (4/731)

Double crossover molecules are DNA structures containing two Holliday junctions connected by two double helical arms. There are several types of double crossover molecules, differentiated by the relative orientations of their helix axes, parallel or antiparallel, and by the number of double helical half-turns (even or odd) between the two crossovers. They are found as intermediates in meiosis and they have been used extensively in structural DNA nanotechnology for the construction of one-dimensional and two-dimensional arrays and in a DNA nanomechanical device. Whereas the parallel double helical molecules are usually not well behaved, we have focused on the antiparallel molecules; antiparallel molecules with an even number of half-turns between crossovers (termed DAE molecules) produce a reporter strand when ligated, facilitating their characterization in a ligation cyclization assay. Hence, we have estimated the flexibility of antiparallel DNA double crossover molecules by means of ligation-closure experiments. We are able to show that these molecules are approximately twice as rigid as linear duplex DNA.  (+info)

Mobility of taxol in microtubule bundles. (5/731)

Mobility of taxol inside microtubules was investigated using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching on flow-aligned bundles. Bundles were made of microtubules with either GMPCPP or GTP at the exchangeable site on the tubulin dimer. Recovery times were sensitive to bundle thickness and packing, indicating that taxol molecules are able to move laterally through the bundle. The density of open binding sites along a microtubule was varied by controlling the concentration of taxol in solution for GMPCPP samples. With >63% sites occupied, recovery times were independent of taxol concentration and, therefore, inversely proportional to the microscopic dissociation rate, k(off). It was found that 10k(off)(GMPCPP) approximately equal k(off)(GTP), consistent with, but not fully accounting for, the difference in equilibrium constants for taxol on GMPCPP and GTP microtubules. With <63% sites occupied, recovery times decreased as approximately [Tax](-1/5) for both types of microtubules. We conclude that the diffusion of taxol inside the microtubule bundle is hindered by rebinding events when open sites are within approximately 7 nm of each other.  (+info)

Chemical stabilisation of collagen as a biomimetic. (6/731)

Collagen is the most abundant protein in animals and because of its high mechanical strength and good resistance to degradation has been utilized in a wide range of products in industry whilst its low antigenicity has resulted in its widespread use in medicine. Collagen products can be purified from fibres, molecules reconstituted as fibres or from specific recombinant polypeptides with preferred properties. A common feature of all these biomaterials is the need for stable chemical cross-linking to control the mechanical properties and the residence time in the body, and to some extent the immunogenicity of the device. This can be achieved by a number of different cross-linking agents that react with specific amino acid residues on the collagen molecule imparting individual biochemical, thermal and mechanical characteristics to the biomaterial. In this review we have summarised the major techniques for testing these characteristics and the mechanisms involved in the variety of cross-linking reactions to achieve particular properties.  (+info)

Water and proton conduction through carbon nanotubes as models for biological channels. (7/731)

Carbon nanotubes, unmodified (pristine) and modified through charged atoms, were simulated in water, and their water conduction rates determined. The conducted water inside the nanotubes was found to exhibit a strong ordering of its dipole moments. In pristine nanotubes the water dipoles adopt a single orientation along the tube axis with a low flipping rate between the two possible alignments. Modification can induce in nanotubes a bipolar ordering as previously observed in biological water channels. Network thermodynamics was applied to investigate proton conduction through the nanotubes.  (+info)

Ion channels of alamethicin dimer N-terminally linked by disulfide bond. (8/731)

A covalent dimer of alamethicin Rf30 was synthesized by linking the N-termini by a disulfide bond. When the dimer peptides were added to the cis-side of a diphytanoyl PC membrane, macroscopic channel current was induced only at cis positive voltages. The single-channel recordings showed several conductance levels that were alternately stabilized. These results indicate that the dimer peptides form stable channels by N-terminal insertion like alamethicin and that most of the pores are assembled from even numbers of helices. Taking advantages of the long open duration of the dimer peptide channels, the current-voltage (I-V) relations of the single-channels were obtained by applying fast voltage ramps during the open states. The I-V relations showed rectification, such that current from the cis-side toward the trans-side is larger than that in the opposite direction. The intrinsic rectification is mainly attributed to the macro dipoles of parallel peptide helices surrounding a central pore.  (+info)

Biomimetic materials are synthetic or natural substances that mimic the chemical, physical, and biological properties of living systems or tissues. These materials are designed to interact with cells, tissues, and organs in ways that resemble the body's own structures and processes. They can be used in a variety of medical applications, including tissue engineering, drug delivery, and medical devices.

Biomimetic materials may be composed of polymers, ceramics, metals, or composites, and they can be designed to have specific properties such as mechanical strength, biocompatibility, and degradability. They may also incorporate bioactive molecules, such as growth factors or drugs, to promote healing or prevent infection.

The goal of using biomimetic materials is to create medical solutions that are more effective, safer, and more compatible with the body than traditional synthetic materials. By mimicking the body's own structures and processes, these materials can help to reduce inflammation, promote tissue regeneration, and improve overall patient outcomes.

Biomimetics, also known as biomimicry, is the process of mimicking or taking inspiration from nature and biological systems to design materials, structures, or processes that solve human problems. It involves studying the models, systems, and elements of nature and then applying the knowledge gained to create new technologies and solutions.

In a medical context, biomimetics can be used to develop new therapies, medical devices, and diagnostic tools. For example, researchers might look to the structure of a spider's web to design a better surgical mesh or take inspiration from the way a gecko sticks to surfaces to create a new type of adhesive bandage.

Biomimetics is an interdisciplinary field that draws on knowledge from biology, chemistry, physics, engineering, and materials science. It has the potential to lead to innovative solutions in healthcare, sustainability, energy, transportation, and other areas.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "materials testing" is not a medical term per se. It is a term used in various fields, including engineering and materials science, to describe the process of subjecting materials to different tests to evaluate their properties and performance under various conditions.

In the context of medical devices or implants, materials testing may refer to the evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in their construction. These tests can include assessments of strength, durability, biocompatibility, and other factors that are critical to ensuring the safety and efficacy of medical devices.

Medical device manufacturers must comply with regulatory standards for materials testing to ensure that their products meet specific requirements for performance, safety, and quality. These standards may vary depending on the type of device, its intended use, and the country or region in which it will be marketed and sold.

Apatite is a group of phosphate minerals, primarily consisting of fluorapatite, chlorapatite, and hydroxylapatite. They are important constituents of rocks and bones, and they have a wide range of applications in various industries. In the context of medicine, apatites are most notable for their presence in human teeth and bones.

Hydroxylapatite is the primary mineral component of tooth enamel, making up about 97% of its weight. It provides strength and hardness to the enamel, enabling it to withstand the forces of biting and chewing. Fluorapatite, a related mineral that contains fluoride ions instead of hydroxyl ions, is also present in tooth enamel and helps to protect it from acid erosion caused by bacteria and dietary acids.

Chlorapatite has limited medical relevance but can be found in some pathological calcifications in the body.

In addition to their natural occurrence in teeth and bones, apatites have been synthesized for various medical applications, such as bone graft substitutes, drug delivery systems, and tissue engineering scaffolds. These synthetic apatites are biocompatible and can promote bone growth and regeneration, making them useful in dental and orthopedic procedures.

Tooth remineralization is a natural process by which minerals, such as calcium and phosphate, are redeposited into the microscopic pores (hydroxyapatite crystals) in the enamel of a tooth. This process can help to repair early decay and strengthen the teeth. It occurs when the mouth's pH is neutral or slightly alkaline, which allows the minerals in our saliva, fluoride from toothpaste or other sources, and calcium and phosphate ions from foods to be absorbed into the enamel. Remineralization can be promoted through good oral hygiene practices, such as brushing with a fluoride toothpaste, flossing, and eating a balanced diet that includes foods rich in calcium and phosphate.

Biocompatible materials are non-toxic and non-reacting substances that can be used in medical devices, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems without causing harm or adverse reactions to living tissues or organs. These materials are designed to mimic the properties of natural tissues and are able to integrate with biological systems without being rejected by the body's immune system.

Biocompatible materials can be made from a variety of substances, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. The specific properties of these materials, such as their mechanical strength, flexibility, and biodegradability, are carefully selected to meet the requirements of their intended medical application.

Examples of biocompatible materials include titanium used in dental implants and joint replacements, polyethylene used in artificial hips, and hydrogels used in contact lenses and drug delivery systems. The use of biocompatible materials has revolutionized modern medicine by enabling the development of advanced medical technologies that can improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

Tissue engineering is a branch of biomedical engineering that combines the principles of engineering, materials science, and biological sciences to develop functional substitutes for damaged or diseased tissues and organs. It involves the creation of living, three-dimensional structures that can restore, maintain, or improve tissue function. This is typically accomplished through the use of cells, scaffolds (biodegradable matrices), and biologically active molecules. The goal of tissue engineering is to develop biological substitutes that can ultimately restore normal function and structure in damaged tissues or organs.

Tissue scaffolds, also known as bioactive scaffolds or synthetic extracellular matrices, refer to three-dimensional structures that serve as templates for the growth and organization of cells in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. These scaffolds are designed to mimic the natural extracellular matrix (ECM) found in biological tissues, providing a supportive environment for cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and migration.

Tissue scaffolds can be made from various materials, including naturally derived biopolymers (e.g., collagen, alginate, chitosan, hyaluronic acid), synthetic polymers (e.g., polycaprolactone, polylactic acid, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)), or a combination of both. The choice of material depends on the specific application and desired properties, such as biocompatibility, biodegradability, mechanical strength, and porosity.

The primary functions of tissue scaffolds include:

1. Cell attachment: Providing surfaces for cells to adhere, spread, and form stable focal adhesions.
2. Mechanical support: Offering a structural framework that maintains the desired shape and mechanical properties of the engineered tissue.
3. Nutrient diffusion: Ensuring adequate transport of nutrients, oxygen, and waste products throughout the scaffold to support cell survival and function.
4. Guided tissue growth: Directing the organization and differentiation of cells through spatial cues and biochemical signals.
5. Biodegradation: Gradually degrading at a rate that matches tissue regeneration, allowing for the replacement of the scaffold with native ECM produced by the cells.

Tissue scaffolds have been used in various applications, such as wound healing, bone and cartilage repair, cardiovascular tissue engineering, and neural tissue regeneration. The design and fabrication of tissue scaffolds are critical aspects of tissue engineering, aiming to create functional substitutes for damaged or diseased tissues and organs.

Calcium phosphates are a group of minerals that are important components of bones and teeth. They are also found in some foods and are used in dietary supplements and medical applications. Chemically, calcium phosphates are salts of calcium and phosphoric acid, and they exist in various forms, including hydroxyapatite, which is the primary mineral component of bone tissue. Other forms of calcium phosphates include monocalcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate, and tricalcium phosphate, which are used as food additives and dietary supplements. Calcium phosphates are important for maintaining strong bones and teeth, and they also play a role in various physiological processes, such as nerve impulse transmission and muscle contraction.

Molecular mimicry is a phenomenon in immunology where structurally similar molecules from different sources can induce cross-reactivity of the immune system. This means that an immune response against one molecule also recognizes and responds to another molecule due to their structural similarity, even though they may be from different origins.

In molecular mimicry, a foreign molecule (such as a bacterial or viral antigen) shares sequence or structural homology with self-antigens present in the host organism. The immune system might not distinguish between these two similar molecules, leading to an immune response against both the foreign and self-antigens. This can potentially result in autoimmune diseases, where the immune system attacks the body's own tissues or organs.

Molecular mimicry has been implicated as a possible mechanism for the development of several autoimmune disorders, including rheumatic fever, Guillain-Barré syndrome, and multiple sclerosis. However, it is essential to note that molecular mimicry alone may not be sufficient to trigger an autoimmune response; other factors like genetic predisposition and environmental triggers might also play a role in the development of these conditions.

Surface properties in the context of medical science refer to the characteristics and features of the outermost layer or surface of a biological material or structure, such as cells, tissues, organs, or medical devices. These properties can include physical attributes like roughness, smoothness, hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity, and electrical conductivity, as well as chemical properties like charge, reactivity, and composition.

In the field of biomaterials science, understanding surface properties is crucial for designing medical implants, devices, and drug delivery systems that can interact safely and effectively with biological tissues and fluids. Surface modifications, such as coatings or chemical treatments, can be used to alter surface properties and enhance biocompatibility, improve lubricity, reduce fouling, or promote specific cellular responses like adhesion, proliferation, or differentiation.

Similarly, in the field of cell biology, understanding surface properties is essential for studying cell-cell interactions, cell signaling, and cell behavior. Cells can sense and respond to changes in their environment, including variations in surface properties, which can influence cell shape, motility, and function. Therefore, characterizing and manipulating surface properties can provide valuable insights into the mechanisms of cellular processes and offer new strategies for developing therapies and treatments for various diseases.

Nanofibers are defined in the medical field as fibrous structures with extremely small diameters, typically measuring between 100 nanometers to 1 micrometer. They can be made from various materials such as polymers, ceramics, or composites and have a high surface area-to-volume ratio, which makes them useful in a variety of biomedical applications. These include tissue engineering, drug delivery, wound healing, and filtration. Nanofibers can be produced using different techniques such as electrospinning, self-assembly, and phase separation.

Biocompatible coated materials refer to surfaces or substances that are treated or engineered with a layer or film designed to interact safely and effectively with living tissues or biological systems, without causing harm or adverse reactions. The coating material is typically composed of biomaterials that can withstand the conditions of the specific application while promoting a positive response from the body.

The purpose of these coatings may vary depending on the medical device or application. For example, they might be used to enhance the lubricity and wear resistance of implantable devices, reduce the risk of infection, promote integration with surrounding tissues, control drug release, or prevent the formation of biofilms.

Biocompatible coated materials must undergo rigorous testing and evaluation to ensure their safety and efficacy in various clinical settings. This includes assessing potential cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, sensitization, hemocompatibility, carcinogenicity, and other factors that could impact the body's response to the material.

Examples of biocompatible coating materials include:

1. Hydrogels: Cross-linked networks of hydrophilic polymers that can be used for drug delivery, tissue engineering, or as lubricious coatings on medical devices.
2. Self-assembling monolayers (SAMs): Organosilane or thiol-based molecules that form a stable, well-ordered film on surfaces, which can be further functionalized to promote specific biological interactions.
3. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG): A biocompatible polymer often used as a coating material due to its ability to reduce protein adsorption and cell attachment, making it useful for preventing biofouling or thrombosis on medical devices.
4. Bioactive glass: A type of biomaterial composed of silica-based glasses that can stimulate bone growth and healing when used as a coating material in orthopedic or dental applications.
5. Drug-eluting coatings: Biocompatible polymers impregnated with therapeutic agents, designed to release the drug over time to promote healing, prevent infection, or inhibit restenosis in various medical devices.

Nanostructures, in the context of medical and biomedical research, refer to materials or devices with structural features that have at least one dimension ranging between 1-100 nanometers (nm). At this size scale, the properties of these structures can differ significantly from bulk materials, exhibiting unique phenomena that are often influenced by quantum effects.

Nanostructures have attracted considerable interest in biomedicine due to their potential applications in various areas such as drug delivery, diagnostics, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. They can be fabricated from a wide range of materials including metals, polymers, ceramics, and carbon-based materials.

Some examples of nanostructures used in biomedicine include:

1. Nanoparticles: These are tiny particles with at least one dimension in the nanoscale range. They can be made from various materials like metals, polymers, or lipids and have applications in drug delivery, imaging, and diagnostics.
2. Quantum dots: These are semiconductor nanocrystals that exhibit unique optical properties due to quantum confinement effects. They are used as fluorescent labels for bioimaging and biosensing applications.
3. Carbon nanotubes: These are hollow, cylindrical structures made of carbon atoms arranged in a hexagonal lattice. They have exceptional mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and thermal stability, making them suitable for various biomedical applications such as drug delivery, tissue engineering, and biosensors.
4. Nanofibers: These are elongated nanostructures with high aspect ratios (length much greater than width). They can be fabricated from various materials like polymers, ceramics, or composites and have applications in tissue engineering, wound healing, and drug delivery.
5. Dendrimers: These are highly branched, nanoscale polymers with a well-defined structure and narrow size distribution. They can be used as drug carriers, gene delivery vehicles, and diagnostic agents.
6. Nanoshells: These are hollow, spherical nanoparticles consisting of a dielectric core covered by a thin metallic shell. They exhibit unique optical properties that make them suitable for applications such as photothermal therapy, biosensing, and imaging.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyvinyls" is not a medical term. It is a chemical term that refers to polymers made from vinyl chloride, which is used in the production of various plastics and resins. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those!

In the context of medical definitions, polymers are large molecules composed of repeating subunits called monomers. These long chains of monomers can have various structures and properties, depending on the type of monomer units and how they are linked together. In medicine, polymers are used in a wide range of applications, including drug delivery systems, medical devices, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Some examples of polymers used in medicine include polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and biodegradable polymers such as polylactic acid (PLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL).

Hydrogels are defined in the medical and biomedical fields as cross-linked, hydrophilic polymer networks that have the ability to swell and retain a significant amount of water or biological fluids while maintaining their structure. They can be synthesized from natural, synthetic, or hybrid polymers.

Hydrogels are known for their biocompatibility, high water content, and soft consistency, which resemble natural tissues, making them suitable for various medical applications such as contact lenses, drug delivery systems, tissue engineering, wound dressing, and biosensors. The physical and chemical properties of hydrogels can be tailored to specific uses by adjusting the polymer composition, cross-linking density, and network structure.

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a type of electron microscopy that uses a focused beam of electrons to scan the surface of a sample and produce a high-resolution image. In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of a specimen, and secondary electrons are emitted from the sample due to interactions between the electrons and the atoms in the sample. These secondary electrons are then detected by a detector and used to create an image of the sample's surface topography. SEM can provide detailed images of the surface of a wide range of materials, including metals, polymers, ceramics, and biological samples. It is commonly used in materials science, biology, and electronics for the examination and analysis of surfaces at the micro- and nanoscale.

Dental materials are substances that are used in restorative dentistry, prosthodontics, endodontics, orthodontics, and preventive dentistry to restore or replace missing tooth structure, improve the function and esthetics of teeth, and protect the oral tissues from decay and disease. These materials can be classified into various categories based on their physical and chemical properties, including metals, ceramics, polymers, composites, cements, and alloys.

Some examples of dental materials include:

1. Amalgam: a metal alloy used for dental fillings that contains silver, tin, copper, and mercury. It is strong, durable, and resistant to wear but has been controversial due to concerns about the toxicity of mercury.
2. Composite: a tooth-colored restorative material made of a mixture of glass or ceramic particles and a bonding agent. It is used for fillings, veneers, and other esthetic dental treatments.
3. Glass ionomer cement: a type of cement used for dental restorations that releases fluoride ions and helps prevent tooth decay. It is often used for fillings in children's teeth or as a base under crowns and bridges.
4. Porcelain: a ceramic material used for dental crowns, veneers, and other esthetic restorations. It is strong, durable, and resistant to staining but can be brittle and prone to fracture.
5. Gold alloy: a metal alloy used for dental restorations that contains gold, copper, and other metals. It is highly biocompatible, corrosion-resistant, and malleable but can be expensive and less esthetic than other materials.
6. Acrylic resin: a type of polymer used for dental appliances such as dentures, night guards, and orthodontic retainers. It is lightweight, flexible, and easy to modify but can be less durable than other materials.

The choice of dental material depends on various factors, including the location and extent of the restoration, the patient's oral health status, their esthetic preferences, and their budget. Dental professionals must consider these factors carefully when selecting the appropriate dental material for each individual case.

Dentin is the hard, calcified tissue that lies beneath the enamel and cementum of a tooth. It forms the majority of the tooth's structure and is composed primarily of mineral salts (hydroxyapatite), collagenous proteins, and water. Dentin has a tubular structure, with microscopic channels called dentinal tubules that radiate outward from the pulp chamber (the center of the tooth containing nerves and blood vessels) to the exterior of the tooth. These tubules contain fluid and nerve endings that are responsible for the tooth's sensitivity to various stimuli such as temperature changes, pressure, or decay. Dentin plays a crucial role in protecting the dental pulp while also providing support and structure to the overlying enamel and cementum.

In the context of medical terminology, "porosity" is not a term that is frequently used to describe human tissues or organs. However, in dermatology and cosmetics, porosity refers to the ability of the skin to absorb and retain moisture or topical treatments.

A skin with high porosity has larger pores and can absorb more products, while a skin with low porosity has smaller pores and may have difficulty absorbing products. It is important to note that this definition of porosity is not a medical one but is instead used in the beauty industry.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "nanocomposites" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. It is a term used in materials science and engineering to refer to a type of composite material where at least one of the phases has dimensions in the nanoscale (typically less than 100 nanometers). Nanocomposites can have unique properties that make them useful for various applications, including biomedical applications such as drug delivery systems or tissue engineering scaffolds. However, the term itself is not a medical definition.

Dura Mater: The tough, outer membrane that covers the brain and spinal cord.

Hydroxyapatite: A naturally occurring mineral form of calcium apatite, also known as dahllite, with the formula Ca5(PO4)3(OH), is the primary mineral component of biological apatites found in bones and teeth.

Therefore, "Durapatite" isn't a recognized medical term, but it seems like it might be a combination of "dura mater" and "hydroxyapatite." If you meant to ask about a material used in medical or dental applications that combines properties of both dura mater and hydroxyapatite, please provide more context.

Artificial saliva is a synthetic solution that mimics the chemical composition and properties of natural saliva. It is often used for patients with dry mouth (xerostomia) caused by conditions such as Sjögren's syndrome, radiation therapy, or certain medications that reduce saliva production. Artificial saliva may contain ingredients like carboxymethylcellulose, mucin, and electrolytes to provide lubrication, moisture, and pH buffering capacity similar to natural saliva. It can help alleviate symptoms associated with dry mouth, such as difficulty speaking, swallowing, and chewing, as well as protect oral tissues from irritation and infection.

Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a type of microscopy in which an electron beam is transmitted through a ultra-thin specimen, interacting with it as it passes through. An image is formed from the interaction of the electrons with the specimen; the image is then magnified and visualized on a fluorescent screen or recorded on an electronic detector (or photographic film in older models).

TEM can provide high-resolution, high-magnification images that can reveal the internal structure of specimens including cells, viruses, and even molecules. It is widely used in biological and materials science research to investigate the ultrastructure of cells, tissues and materials. In medicine, TEM is used for diagnostic purposes in fields such as virology and bacteriology.

It's important to note that preparing a sample for TEM is a complex process, requiring specialized techniques to create thin (50-100 nm) specimens. These include cutting ultrathin sections of embedded samples using an ultramicrotome, staining with heavy metal salts, and positive staining or negative staining methods.

Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES) is not typically considered a medical definition, but it is a term used in physical and analytical chemistry. However, I can provide a definition for you:

Photoelectron Spectroscopy (PES) is a technique used to study the electronic structure of atoms, molecules, and solids by irradiating them with photons (usually from a laser or a synchrotron light source) and measuring the kinetic energy of the ejected electrons. The technique provides information about the energy levels of the electrons in the sample, which can be used to determine its chemical composition, bonding, and electronic structure. PES is a valuable tool in surface science, materials research, and environmental analysis.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "peptoids" is not a commonly used medical term in the way that we typically define medical conditions or treatments. However, peptoids are a term used in the field of chemistry and biochemistry.

Peptoids, also known as oligourethanes, are a type of organic polymer mimic of peptides (short proteins). They are made up of repeating units called N-substituted glycines, where the side chain is attached to the nitrogen atom rather than the alpha carbon atom as in natural peptides. This structural difference makes peptoids more resistant to degradation and more stable under a wider range of conditions compared to their peptide counterparts.

Peptoids have been explored for various applications, including drug discovery, where they can be designed to bind specifically to certain proteins or receptors, potentially leading to the development of new therapeutic agents.

Dentin-bonding agents are substances used in dentistry to create a strong and durable bond between the dental restoration material (such as composite resin, glass ionomer cement, or crowns) and the dentin surface of a tooth. Dentin is the hard tissue that lies beneath the enamel and consists of microscopic tubules filled with fluid.

The primary function of dentin-bonding agents is to improve the adhesion of restorative materials to the tooth structure, enhancing the retention and durability of dental fillings, crowns, veneers, and other types of restorations. These agents typically contain one or more types of bonding resins, such as hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), 4-methacryloxyethyl trimellitate anhydride (4-META), and/or phosphoric acid ester monomers.

The application process for dentin-bonding agents usually involves several steps, including:

1. Etching the dentin surface with a mild acid to remove the smear layer and expose the collagen network within the dentin tubules.
2. Applying a primer that penetrates into the etched dentin and promotes the infiltration of bonding resins into the dentinal tubules.
3. Applying an adhesive, which is typically a mixture of hydrophilic and hydrophobic monomers, to form a stable bond between the tooth structure and the restoration material.
4. Light-curing the adhesive to polymerize the resin and create a strong mechanical bond with the dentin surface.

Dentin-bonding agents have significantly improved the clinical success of various dental restorations by enhancing their retention, reducing microleakage, and minimizing postoperative sensitivity. However, they may still be susceptible to degradation over time due to factors such as moisture contamination, enzymatic degradation, or hydrolysis, which can lead to the failure of dental restorations. Therefore, continuous advancements in dentin-bonding technology are essential for improving the long-term success and durability of dental restorations.

Bone substitutes are materials that are used to replace missing or damaged bone in the body. They can be made from a variety of materials, including natural bone from other parts of the body or from animals, synthetic materials, or a combination of both. The goal of using bone substitutes is to provide structural support and promote the growth of new bone tissue.

Bone substitutes are often used in dental, orthopedic, and craniofacial surgery to help repair defects caused by trauma, tumors, or congenital abnormalities. They can also be used to augment bone volume in procedures such as spinal fusion or joint replacement.

There are several types of bone substitutes available, including:

1. Autografts: Bone taken from another part of the patient's body, such as the hip or pelvis.
2. Allografts: Bone taken from a deceased donor and processed to remove any cells and infectious materials.
3. Xenografts: Bone from an animal source, typically bovine or porcine, that has been processed to remove any cells and infectious materials.
4. Synthetic bone substitutes: Materials such as calcium phosphate ceramics, bioactive glass, and polymer-based materials that are designed to mimic the properties of natural bone.

The choice of bone substitute material depends on several factors, including the size and location of the defect, the patient's medical history, and the surgeon's preference. It is important to note that while bone substitutes can provide structural support and promote new bone growth, they may not have the same strength or durability as natural bone. Therefore, they may not be suitable for all applications, particularly those that require high load-bearing capacity.

Acrylic resins are a type of synthetic polymer made from methacrylate monomers. They are widely used in various industrial, commercial, and medical applications due to their unique properties such as transparency, durability, resistance to breakage, and ease of coloring or molding. In the medical field, acrylic resins are often used to make dental restorations like false teeth and fillings, medical devices like intraocular lenses, and surgical instruments. They can also be found in orthopedic implants, bone cement, and other medical-grade plastics. Acrylic resins are biocompatible, meaning they do not typically cause adverse reactions when in contact with living tissue. However, they may release small amounts of potentially toxic chemicals over time, so their long-term safety in certain applications is still a subject of ongoing research.

Titanium is not a medical term, but rather a chemical element (symbol Ti, atomic number 22) that is widely used in the medical field due to its unique properties. Medically, it is often referred to as a biocompatible material used in various medical applications such as:

1. Orthopedic implants: Titanium and its alloys are used for making joint replacements (hips, knees, shoulders), bone plates, screws, and rods due to their high strength-to-weight ratio, excellent corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility.
2. Dental implants: Titanium is also commonly used in dental applications like implants, crowns, and bridges because of its ability to osseointegrate, or fuse directly with bone tissue, providing a stable foundation for replacement teeth.
3. Cardiovascular devices: Titanium alloys are used in the construction of heart valves, pacemakers, and other cardiovascular implants due to their non-magnetic properties, which prevent interference with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.
4. Medical instruments: Due to its resistance to corrosion and high strength, titanium is used in the manufacturing of various medical instruments such as surgical tools, needles, and catheters.

In summary, Titanium is a chemical element with unique properties that make it an ideal material for various medical applications, including orthopedic and dental implants, cardiovascular devices, and medical instruments.

'Adhesiveness' is a term used in medicine and biology to describe the ability of two surfaces to stick or adhere to each other. In medical terms, it often refers to the property of tissues or cells to adhere to one another, as in the case of scar tissue formation where healing tissue adheres to adjacent structures.

In the context of microbiology, adhesiveness can refer to the ability of bacteria or other microorganisms to attach themselves to surfaces, such as medical devices or human tissues, which can lead to infection and other health problems. Adhesives used in medical devices, such as bandages or wound dressings, also have adhesiveness properties that allow them to stick to the skin or other surfaces.

Overall, adhesiveness is an important property in many areas of medicine and biology, with implications for wound healing, infection control, and the design and function of medical devices.

Nanoparticles are defined in the field of medicine as tiny particles that have at least one dimension between 1 to 100 nanometers (nm). They are increasingly being used in various medical applications such as drug delivery, diagnostics, and therapeutics. Due to their small size, nanoparticles can penetrate cells, tissues, and organs more efficiently than larger particles, making them ideal for targeted drug delivery and imaging.

Nanoparticles can be made from a variety of materials including metals, polymers, lipids, and dendrimers. The physical and chemical properties of nanoparticles, such as size, shape, charge, and surface chemistry, can greatly affect their behavior in biological systems and their potential medical applications.

It is important to note that the use of nanoparticles in medicine is still a relatively new field, and there are ongoing studies to better understand their safety and efficacy.

Methacrylates are a group of chemical compounds that contain the methacrylate functional group, which is a vinyl group (CH2=CH-) with a carbonyl group (C=O) at the β-position. This structure gives them unique chemical and physical properties, such as low viscosity, high reactivity, and resistance to heat and chemicals.

In medical terms, methacrylates are used in various biomedical applications, such as dental restorative materials, bone cements, and drug delivery systems. For example, methacrylate-based resins are commonly used in dentistry for fillings, crowns, and bridges due to their excellent mechanical properties and adhesion to tooth structures.

However, there have been concerns about the potential toxicity of methacrylates, particularly their ability to release monomers that can cause allergic reactions, irritation, or even mutagenic effects in some individuals. Therefore, it is essential to use these materials with caution and follow proper handling and safety protocols.

Biomimetic materials are materials developed using inspiration from nature. This may be useful in the design of composite ... Biomimetic materials in tissue engineering are materials that have been designed such that they elicit specified cellular ... The idea is that the biomimetic material will mimic some of the roles that an ECM plays in neural tissue. In addition to ... Many studies utilize laminin-1 when designing a biomimetic material. Laminin is a component of the extracellular matrix that is ...
Whilst there, she contributed to the book Biomimetic Materials Chemistry. Meldrum was a Humboldt Research Fellow at the Max ... Mann, Stephen (1995-12-28). Biomimetic Materials Chemistry. John Wiley & Sons. ISBN 9780471185970. Sciences, Faculty of ... Fendler, Janos H.; Meldrum, Fiona C. (1995). "The Colloid Chemical Approach to Nanostructured Materials**". Advanced Materials ... Chemistry of Materials. 19 (5): 1111-1119. doi:10.1021/cm0620640. ISSN 0897-4756. "Research Overview Materials Chemistry". chem ...
Many biomaterials used for nerve guidance conduits are biomimetic materials. Biomimetic materials are materials that have been ... neurotrophic factors and biomimetic materials. The choice of which physical, chemical and biological cues to use is based on ... and biomimetic materials. Investigation of synergism is the next step after individual techniques have proven to be successful ... "Biomimetic materials for tissue engineering". Biomaterials. 24 (24): 4353-4364. doi:10.1016/S0142-9612(03)00339-9. PMID ...
Physical immobilization is simply coating a material with a biomimetic material without changing the structure of either. ... Various biomimetic materials with cell adhesive proteins (such as collagen or laminin) have been used in vitro to direct new ... H. Shin; S. Jo & A. G. Mikos (2003). "Biomimetic materials for tissue engineering". Biomaterials. 24 (24): 4353-4364. doi: ... It is a requirement of biomaterials in which the surface modified material will cause no harm to the host, and the material ...
Guo, Z.; Zhou, F.; Hao, J.; Liu, W. (2005). "Stable Biomimetic Super-Hydrophobic Engineering Materials". J. Am. Chem. Soc. 127 ... The materials are uniformly black at any angle, which combined with the self-cleaning properties might produce very low ... Solga, A.; Cerman, Z.; Striffler, B. F.; Spaeth, M.; Barthlott, W. (2007). "The dream of staying clean: Lotus and biomimetic ... Barthlott, W. (2023): "The Discovery of the Lotus Effect as a Key Innovation for Biomimetic Technologies" - in: Handbook of ...
"Merger of structure and material in nacre and bone - Perspectives on de novo biomimetic materials". Progress in Materials ... Thus, biomimetic mineralization is an obvious and effective process for building synthetic materials with superior mechanical ... The Biomimetic Materials Laboratory Barthelat, F.; Espinosa, H. D. (2007). "An Experimental Investigation of Deformation and ... While natural materials are made up of a limited number of components, a larger variety of material chemistries can be used to ...
Journal of Biomimetic Systems and Materials. He is currently an associate editor of the IEEE Proceedings. Sastry was elected a ...
"Biomimetic peptide self-assembly for functional materials". Nature Reviews Chemistry. 4 (11): 615-634. doi:10.1038/s41570-020- ... He co-founded a startup company 3DMatrix that brings the self-assembling peptide materials to human clinical for treatment of ... including peptide hydrogels in materials science, 3D tissue cell culture and tissue engineering, nanomedicine, sustained ...
Yaraghi, Nicholas A.; Kisailus, David (20 April 2018). "Biomimetic Structural Materials: Inspiration from Design and Assembly ... This design methodology can be applied to the creation of materials, products, and solutions for a wide variety of fields and ... "10 Biomimetic Innovations Poised to Tackle Countless Climate, Biodiversity, Business Challenges". Sustainable Brands. 16 August ... Petrisor/Pexels, Published 2 months ago About a 7 minute read Image: Cosmin (2022-08-16). "10 Biomimetic Innovations Poised to ...
Her research considers nano indentation and biomimetic materials. Oyen was an undergraduate student in materials science at ... She worked on the development of biomimetic materials to improve human health. For example, she was interested in making ... erratum) M. L. Oyen (5 December 2013). "Mechanical characterisation of hydrogel materials". International Materials Reviews. 59 ... Michelle Lynn Oyen is an American materials scientist who is a Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Washington University in ...
"Biomimetic optical materials: Integration of nature's design for manipulation of light". Progress in Materials Science. 58 (6 ... February 2021). "Biomimetic design of photonic materials for biomedical applications". Acta Biomaterialia. 121: 143-179. doi: ... Responsive materials are materials or devices that can respond to external stimuli as they occur. A little bit of time is taken ... Materials based on the multi-layer stacking of guanine molecular crystals found in living organisms (e.g. fish and chameleons) ...
ISBN 978-0-19-850882-3. Mann, Stephen (7 October 1993). "Molecular tectonics in biomineralization and biomimetic materials ... His research activities include biomineralization, biomimetic materials chemistry, synthesis and self-assembly of nanoscale ... Nature Materials. 8 (10): 781-792. Bibcode:2009NatMa...8..781M. doi:10.1038/nmat2496. ISSN 1476-1122. PMID 19734883. Brogan, ...
Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. 724. Biological and Biomimetic Materials - Properties to Function. Archived ( ... Journal of Materials Chemistry B. 1 (2): 132-148. doi:10.1039/C2TB00071G. PMC 3660738. PMID 23710326. "bioee.ee.columbia.edu" ( ...
This material is formed into sheets and loaded in tension perpendicular to the desired bending crease. The material is then ... Sydney Gladman, A.; Matsumoto, Elisabetta A.; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mahadevan, L.; Lewis, Jennifer A. (2016-04-01). "Biomimetic 4D ... The active agent that induces bending in the material is heat transmitted by intense light. The material itself is made of ... within the material. This stress can later be released, causing an overall material shape change. This type of polymeric ...
The lotus effect has applications in biomimetic technical materials. Dehydration protection provided by a maternal cuticle ...
The project was followed up with an EPSRC Programme Grant on resilient materials for life. Amongst other biomimetic materials, ... She serves on the editorial board of the American Society of Civil Engineers Journal of Materials in Civil Engineering. She is ... Her work concentrates on the development and testing of materials for civil engineering. She is interested in low-carbon ... She works on intelligent materials for infrastructure. She is the Director of the Future Infrastructure and Built Environment ...
... and macromolecules having biomimetic functions. Biomimetic Materials Materials that imitate, copy, or learn from nature. ... Smart material Materials and products capable of relatively complex behavior due to the incorporation of nanocomputers and ... Biomimetic Chemistry Knowledge of biochemistry, analytical chemistry, polymer science, and biomimetic chemistry is linked and ... Nanophase Carbon Materials A form of matter in which small clusters of atoms form the building blocks of a larger structure. ...
For example, developing a biomimetic material system after the quantitative analysis of the mechanical, physical, and chemical ... Speck, Thomas; Speck, Olga (2019), Wegner, Lars H.; Lüttge, Ulrich (eds.), "Emergence in Biomimetic Materials Systems", ... Biomimetic architecture is a branch of the new science of biomimicry defined and popularized by Janine Benyus in her 1997 book ... Biomimetic architecture is one of these multi-disciplinary approaches to sustainable design that follows a set of principles ...
These synthetic materials are applied for biomimetic biological (distribution, sensing, and imaging), industrial ( ... "Functional and Biomimetic Materials for Engineering of the Three-Dimensional Cell Microenvironment". Chemical Reviews. 117 (20 ... Niveen M. Khashab has obtained many patents for her inventions including: Compositions of graphene materials with metal ... "Cell-Type-Specific CRISPR/Cas9 Delivery by Biomimetic Metal Organic Frameworks". ACS Publications. Niveen Khashab's page on ...
MOPs are biomimetic materials that have potential for biomedical and biochemical applications. In order for the cage to work ... This close-faced cage was designed to potentially encapsulate other materials such as proteins and metal nanoparticles. Ahmad, ... and materials science". Chemical Society Reviews. 45 (22): 6213-6249. doi:10.1039/C6CS00177G. PMID 27426103. Büttner, Katharina ...
"Functional and Biomimetic Materials for Engineering of the Three-Dimensional Cell Microenvironment". Chemical Reviews. 117 (20 ... "In situ formed collagen-hyaluronic acid hydrogel as biomimetic dressing for promoting spontaneous wound healing". Materials ... Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine. 20 (11): 2353-2360. doi:10.1007/s10856-009-3795-0. ISSN 0957-4530. PMC ... Hydrogels respond elastically to applied stress; gels made from materials like collagen exhibit high toughness and low sliding ...
An example of a biomimetic superhydrophobic material in nanotechnology is nanopin film. In one study a vanadium pentoxide V2O5 ... Many very hydrophobic materials found in nature rely on Cassie's law and are biphasic on the submicrometer level. The fine ... The contact angles of a water droplet on an ultrahydrophobic material exceed 150°. This is also referred to as the lotus effect ... In chemistry and materials science, ultrahydrophobic (or superhydrophobic) surfaces are highly hydrophobic, i.e., extremely ...
"A Biomimetic, Self-Pumping Membrane". Advanced Materials. Wiley. 22 (43): 4823-4825. Bibcode:2010AdM....22.4823J. doi:10.1002/ ... These problems can be alleviated by using alternative electrode materials such as conjugated polymers which can undergo the ... is the material derivative, μ is the viscosity of the fluid, ρe is the electric charge density, ϕ is the applied electric field ... is the motion of liquid induced by an applied potential across a porous material, capillary tube, membrane, microchannel, or ...
A chemical sensor based on recognition material of biological nature is a biosensor. However, as synthetic biomimetic materials ... Typical biomimetic materials used in sensor development are molecularly imprinted polymers and aptamers. In biomedicine and ... There is a wide range of other sensors that measure chemical and physical properties of materials, including optical sensors ... Lyon, Richard F. (2014). "The Optical Mouse: Early Biomimetic Embedded Vision". Advances in Embedded Computer Vision. Springer ...
Biomimetic materials are gaining increasing attention in the field of optics and photonics. There are still little known ... strong materials are brittle and tough materials are weak. However, natural materials with complex and hierarchical material ... Such materials would need to be manufactured into bulk materials with complex shapes at high volume and low cost and would ... For example, developing a biomimetic material system after the quantitative analysis of the mechanical, physical, and chemical ...
He calls building with synthetic materials according to nature's design principles biomimetic nanotechnology. Using these ... For the most part, wet engineering deals with "soft" materials that allow for flexibility which is vital at the nanoscale in ... Brownian motion as nature does or find a way to work around it by using materials that are rigid enough to stand up to these ... to self-replicate themselves as long as they are designed in an environment with copious amount of the needed materials. ...
She has also developed protein-engineered hydrogels that could be used as biomimetic materials. Instead of synthetically ... retrieved 2019-02-17 Protein polymer gold nanoparticle hybrid materials for small molecule delivery, retrieved 2019-02-17 ... from self-assembling pentamers 2017 Engineered fluorinated biomaterials 2017 Protein polymer gold nanoparticle hybrid materials ...
An example of a bionic or biomimetic superhydrophobic material in nanotechnology is nanopin film.[citation needed] One study ... Many hydrophobic materials found in nature rely on Cassie's law and are biphasic on the submicrometer level with one component ... Hydrophobic materials are used for oil removal from water, the management of oil spills, and chemical separation processes to ... Methods have been developed to measure the hydrophobicity of pharmaceutical materials. The development of hydrophobic passive ...
2013-09-08). "Accelerating the design of biomimetic materials by integrating RNA-seq with proteomics and materials science". ... functional materials synthesis and fabrication for designing novel engineering materials to produce next generation materials ... Lloyd and Dorothy Foehr Huck Chair in Biomimetic Materials and director of the Center for Advanced Fiber Technologies, Penn ... "Bioinspired protein creates stretchable 2D layered materials". sciencedaily.com. Pennsylvania State University. July 25, 2022. ...
Perspectives on de novo biomimetic materials". Progress in Materials Science. 54 (8): 1059-1100. doi:10.1016/j.pmatsci.2009.05. ... Meyers, Marc A. (2014-07-31). Biological materials science : biological materials, bioinspired materials, and biomaterials. ... The material must be ductile for a similar reason that the tensile strength cannot be too high, ductility allows the material ... Biodegradable materials have an advantage over other materials, as they have lower risk of harmful effects long term. In ...
Biomimetic materials are materials developed using inspiration from nature. This may be useful in the design of composite ... Biomimetic materials in tissue engineering are materials that have been designed such that they elicit specified cellular ... The idea is that the biomimetic material will mimic some of the roles that an ECM plays in neural tissue. In addition to ... Many studies utilize laminin-1 when designing a biomimetic material. Laminin is a component of the extracellular matrix that is ...
... Publication from Materials ... MATERIALS () MATERIALS - Institute for Sensors, Photonics and Manufacturing Technologies. The Institute Management Staff ... Surface, film and material characterisation methods Optical Analytics Light and Integration Laboratory Electronics Laboratory ...
Biomimetic Materials Market size was valued at USD 7.1 Billion in 2022 and is expected to reach USD 18.3 Billion by 2032, ... The building industry is also a prominent user of biomimetic materials. Biomimetic materials are being used more frequently in ... the medical sector dominated the global market for biomimetic materials in 2022. The growing use of biomimetic materials in ... Europes market for biomimetic materials is anticipated to expand moderately. The demand for biomimetic materials in the UKs ...
The global biomimetic materials market is set to register a staggering growth during the forecast period, attributed to ... Biomimetic Materials Market Size & Trends, Industry Report, 2019-2025 GVR Report cover Biomimetic Materials Market Size, Share ... Biomimetic materials are a class of such products that are capable of performing basic functions based on properties such as ... The global biomimetic materials market is expected to register a notable CAGR over the forecast period. Increasing demand for ...
Laser fabrication of biomimetic materials for tissue engineering and bioelectronics. Add to your list(s) Download to your ... University of Cambridge , Talks.cam , Electrical Engineering , Laser fabrication of biomimetic materials for tissue engineering ... FORTH working on the ultrafast laser engineering of materials and as an Adjunct Professor at the Department of Materials ... His research interests are in the fields of ultrafast laser interactions with materials for (a) Biomimetic micro- and nano- ...
The subject materials can be materials with biological origin (protein materials, cellulose, chitin, DNA etc.) and well as ... The complexity of biological materials commonly arises from the seamless integration of multiple material components and ... and materials, acting as both an astute materials scientist and efficient engineer. At the molecular scale, for example, semi- ... Understanding how such materials are composed and behave at the nanoscale and mesoscale is critical if we wish to advance the ...
Enabling technologies for biofabrication of functional materials and biomimetic environments. Dr. Alvaro Mata, Director of the ... IBEC Seminar: Enabling technologies for biofabrication of functional materials and biomimetic environments. Divendres, novembre ... novel self-assembling and printing technologies enabling the fabrication of 2D and 3D bioactive and/or biomimetic materials for ...
Biomimetic Materials I Time Wednesday, October 19, 2011 - 1:46pm to 2:05pm ... 502e) Biomimetic Self-Assembling Copolymer-Hydroxyapatite Nanocomposites with the Nanocrystal Size Controlled by Citrate. ... In this work, biomimetic self-assembled copolymer-HAp nanocomposites were synthesized using a bottom-up approach from aqueous ... Citrate was added as a biomimetic regulatory element to control of the size and stability of HAp nanocrystals in synthetic ...
Biomimetic Materials Market is segmented by Application (Medical, Information Technology, Robotics, Defense, Telecommunication ... Biomimetic Materials Market is segmented by Application (Medical, Information Technology, Robotics, Defense, Telecommunication ... Healthcare Pharmaceuticals Chemicals & Materials Manufacturing & Construction Power & Energy Automotive & Transportation ...
Copyright © 2023 Douglas Biomimetic Materials Lab , Designed by ITG Copyright © 2023 The Trustees of Indiana University, ... Reversal of Catalytic Material Substrate Selectivity through Partitioning of Polymers in Hierarchically Ordered Virus-like ... Kraj, P., Hewagama, N. D., Lee, B., Douglas, T. Reversal of Catalytic Material Substrate Selectivity through Partitioning of ...
Joseph Willardsen, a dentist in Las Vegas, utilizes the innovative nature of biomimetic dentistry to help strengthen and ... Las Vegas Dentist Uses Biomimetic Materials To Conserve Natural Tooth Structure. Dr. Joseph Willardsen is specially trained in ... Joseph Willardsen, a cosmetic dentist in Las Vegas, is using innovative biomimetic materials and techniques at True Dentistry ... Home●Main Blog ● Las Vegas Dentist Uses Biomimetic Materials To Conserve Natural Tooth Structure ...
Copyright © 2023 Douglas Biomimetic Materials Lab , Designed by ITG Copyright © 2023 The Trustees of Indiana University, ... Enhancing Multistep Reactions: Biomimetic Design of Substrate Channeling Using P22 Virus-Like Particles. ... Wang, Y., Selivanovitch, E., Douglas, T. Enhancing Multistep Reactions: Biomimetic Design of Substrate Channeling Using P22 ...
Our materials exploit the natural ability for proteins to selectively and reversibly bind to targeted molecules and incorporate ... Capitalizing on this expertise, we are now designing material systems that use biological inspiration to target, capture, and ... The Tirrell group has well-established expertise in designing biomimetic systems that target and bind to specific ...
Scientists mimic the extracellular matrix with novel biomimetic material. Sep 20, 2023 ... Graphene-based biomimetic soft robotics platform. (Nanowerk Spotlight) Due to its excellent electrical and thermal conductivity ... Green flexible electronics based on natural materials. Jul 17, 2023. Rapid at-home molecular diagnostics is the future of ... In a new paper published in Advanced Functional Materials, the researchers present a soft and light-driven robotic platform ( ...
M. Vallet-Regí and D. Arcos, in Biomimetic Nanoceramics in Clinical Use: From Materials to Applications, ed. H. Kroto, P. ...
FRG: Mechanically- and Biologically-Active Nickel-Titanium Foam as Biomimetic Material for Skeletal Repair. *Brinson, L ...
Carbon-based nanoscale materials and devices. *Biomimetic materials. *Nanobiotechnology/bionanomaterials. *Nanomedicine. * ... quantum materials and quantum technology, including the areas of physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, materials, energy/ ... If a significant amount of other peoples material is to be used, either textual or image-based, permission must be sought by ... Nanoscale is part of RSC Gold and Materials Science subscription packages.. Online only 2024: ISSN 2040-3372, £2,014 / $3,282 ...
DEAE-chitosan nanoparticles as a pneumococcus-biomimetic material for the development of antipneumococcal therapeutics. ICTP. 2 ... Vázquez, R. et al. DEAE-chitosan nanoparticles as a pneumococcus-biomimetic material for the development of antipneumococcal ... 20pneumococcus-biomimetic%20material%20for%20the%20development%20of%20antipneumococcal%20therapeutics%3C%5C%2Fa%3E.%20%3Ci% ... 20pneumococcus-biomimetic%20material%20for%20the%20development%20of%20antipneumococcal%20therapeutics%22%2C%22creators%22%3A%5B ...
Biomimetic Materials for Bone Regeneration. * September , 2022. Bioconjugation and cross-linkage of diene-modified ...
Biomimetic autocrine waxy materials (AWMs) inspired by renewable epidermal waxes are attracting increasing attention. However, ... Multi-stimulus Response Behavior of Biomimetic Autocrine Waxy Materials for Potential Self-Constructing Surface Microstructures ... Multi-stimulus Response Behavior of Biomimetic Autocrine Waxy Materials for Potential Self ... Yan M; Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective ...
MATERIALS AND METHODS. Media and Culture Conditions for Human Foreskin-Derived MSCs. hMSCs were cultured either in culture ... Impact of biomimetic collagen to enhance expression of corneal endothelial cell (CEC)-typical markers. A, hMSCs were incubated ... Initially, when we explored the material effect, we were impressed that in contrast to silicone, adhesion of 3000 hMSCs/mm2 to ... In vitro expansion of corneal endothelial cells on biomimetic substrates. Scientific Rep. 2015;5:7955.. * Cited Here , ...
Biomimetic agro-based materials for food safety-(Abstract Only) Appell, M., Jackson, M.A., Evans, K.O., Compton, D.L., Bosma, W ... Biomimetic agro-based materials for food safety [abstract].. *Charged phospholipid effects on AAPH oxidation assay as ... New family of surfactants from biobased materials. -(Peer Reviewed Journal) Jackson, M.A., Evans, K.O., Price, N.P.J., ... Production of BSA-poly(ethyl cyanoacrylate) nanoparticles as a coating material that improves wetting property-(Peer Reviewed ...
"Biomimetic Modular Adhesive Complex: Materials, Methods and Applications Therefore". US Patent 8,563,117 (issued 2013). ... advanced and functional materials for various biomedical applications. Current projects include applying biomimetic structural ... "Biomimetic Compounds and Synthetic Methods Therefore". US Patents 7,622,533 (issued 2009), 8,030,413 (issued 2011), 8,575,276 ( ... Lee helped found a start-up company, Nerites Corporation, which aimed at commercializing biomimetic bioadhesive and antifouling ...
High-yield production of a super-soluble miniature spidroin for biomimetic high-performance materials. Volume 50, Pages 16-23 ... About Materials Today. Materials Today is a community dedicated to the creation and sharing of materials science knowledge and ... This natural material boasts a range of unique mechanical properties, as well as biocompatibility, limited immunogenicity, and ... "One of the beauties of silk-based materials is that they can be introduced into different medical devices through various ...
... which could improve the processing of synthetic materials. ... miniature spidroin for biomimetic high-performance materials. ... About Materials Today. Materials Today is a community dedicated to the creation and sharing of materials science knowledge and ... This story is adapted from material from the University of Sheffield, with editorial changes made by Materials Today. The views ... A material created by mixing an amino acid with a fluorinated oil can switch between a film and a bead to remove fluorine-based ...
In a recent study, researchers at the University of Ottawa showed that biomimetic materials activated with low-energy blue ... Data showed that the materials used to obtain experimental test results could remain in an animal model for several weeks. As a ... pulsed light irradiation allows the researchers to safely use photocuring to photo-crosslink the biomimetic materials designed ... The research was published in Advanced Functional Materials (www.doi.org/10.1002/adfm.202302721). ...
From macro to micro: structural biomimetic materials by electrospinning. RSC Adv. 2014, 4 (75) , 39704-39724. https://doi.org/ ... Kesong Liu and Lei Jiang . Multifunctional Integration: From Biological to Bio-Inspired Materials. ACS Nano 2011, 5 (9) , 6786- ... B. Sarrat, C. Pécheyran, S. Bourrigaud, and L. Billon . Bioinspired Material Based on Femtosecond Laser Machining of Cast Sheet ... Directional shedding-off of water on natural/bio-mimetic taper-ratchet array surfaces. Soft Matter 2012, 8 (6) , 1770-1775. ...
Antonietti, M.; Fratzl, P.: Biomimetic principles in polymer and material science. Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics 211 (2 ...
MATERIALS SCIENCE & ENGINEERING C-BIOMIMETIC AND SUPRAMOLECULAR SYSTEMS. , Vol. 25(5-8) (pp 779-783) ... Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Electronics. , 34(6). *Lee S, Jin X, Jung H, Lewis H, Liu Y, Guo B, Kodati SH, ... Microscopy of Semiconducting Materials 2003. (pp. 107-110). *Finley JJ & David JPR (2005) SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS , GaAs Based ... MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING B-SOLID STATE MATERIALS FOR ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY. , Vol. 35(1-3) (pp 42-46) ...
Biomimetic and Surrogate Materials. *Force Generation in Biological Machinery. *Multiscale Tissue Mechanics ... Biological Systems and Materials - Best Papers. 2018. Paper Title: Measurements of Adhesion between Polymer Nanofibers. Author( ... Biological Systems and Materials - Best Student Papers. 2018. Paper Title: A Probability Density Function for Polycrystalline ... The purpose of the Technical Division on Biological Systems and Materials is to provide technical benefit to its members by: ...
  • The global biomimetic materials market size was valued at USD 7.1 Billion in 2022 and is expected to reach USD 18.3 Billion by 2032, growing at a CAGR of 9.5% during the forecast period. (reportsanddata.com)
  • The global biomimetic materials market is expected to register a notable CAGR over the forecast period. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • Rising demand for biomimetic materials in various applications, including building, medical, and defense, as well as increasing consumer awareness of ecologically friendly and sustainable materials are major factors driving market revenue growth. (reportsanddata.com)
  • The development of green buildings and the increased emphasis on sustainable building methods are also anticipated to increase demand for biomimetic materials. (reportsanddata.com)
  • The exponential growth of these industries is anticipated to drive the demand for biomimetic materials over the forecast period. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • The talk will present novel self-assembling and printing technologies enabling the fabrication of 2D and 3D bioactive and/or biomimetic materials for potential application in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and in vitro models. (ibecbarcelona.eu)
  • Artificial substances known as 'biomimetic materials' are those that closely match the structure and behavior of natural chemicals found in living creatures. (reportsanddata.com)
  • Understanding how such materials are composed and behave at the nanoscale and mesoscale is critical if we wish to advance the development of biocompatible materials, de novo biomimetic systems, and understand the behavior of biological organs. (purdue.edu)
  • Multi-stimulus Response Behavior of Biomimetic Autocrine Waxy Materials for Potential Self-Constructing Surface Microstructures. (bvsalud.org)
  • Such multi-stimulus response behavior described here provides a platform for the discovery of more functional materials and microstructural self - construction techniques and can also serve as a basis for their applications. (bvsalud.org)
  • "Effect of fresh bed materials on alkali release and thermogravimetric behavior during straw gasification," Fuel , vol. 336, 2023. (kth.se)
  • Development of experimental tools and computational methods for modeling, analysis and synthesis of biomolecular materials. (purdue.edu)
  • Modeling and computer-based materials design algorithms will become mandatory tools in testing our understanding of nanoscale processes and phenomena, which can be used in the development of tailored synthesis of nanomaterials, inhibition of degradation processes, and the planning of experimental programs for nanomaterials development and assessment. (nanowerk.com)
  • Hannes Mutschler, head of the research group 'Biomimetic Systems' at the MPI for Biochemistry, and his team are dedicated to imitate the replication of genomes and protein synthesis with a "bottom-up" approach. (mpg.de)
  • Rational design of biomimetic molecularly imprinted materials: theoretical and computational strategies for guiding nanoscale structured polymer development. (nih.gov)
  • The idea is that the biomimetic material will mimic some of the roles that an ECM plays in neural tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rising use of biomimetic materials in medical implants and devices, Tissue Engineering , and drug delivery systems is driving revenue growth of the market. (reportsanddata.com)
  • For the manufacture of medical devices, drug delivery, and Tissue Engineering , organic biomimetic materials are frequently used in the healthcare sector. (reportsanddata.com)
  • The growing use of biomimetic materials in medical applications like tissue engineering, drug delivery, and medical implants can be credited with this increase. (reportsanddata.com)
  • His research interests are in the fields of ultrafast laser interactions with materials for (a) Biomimetic micro- and nano- structuring (b) Biomaterials processing for tissue engineering and c) Advanced photonic processes for photovoltaics and energy storage. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Current projects include applying biomimetic structural designs to create tough hydrogels that can potentially function as tissue adhesives or extracellular matrices for tissue repair and regeneration, and coatings to control biointerface of biomaterials that can prevent non-specific absorption of proteins, cells, and bacteria. (mtu.edu)
  • Researchers have introduced a unique micro-robotic technique to assemble the components of complex materials, the foundation of tissue engineering. (materialstoday.com)
  • In a recent study, researchers at the University of Ottawa showed that biomimetic materials activated with low-energy blue light can reshape and thicken damaged corneal tissue to promote healing and recovery. (photonics.com)
  • Such a biomimetic structure serves as a promising bone scaffold material for tissue engineering. (aps.org)
  • In 2022, the organic biomimetic materials market contributed significantly to total revenue. (reportsanddata.com)
  • In terms of revenue, the medical sector dominated the global market for biomimetic materials in 2022. (reportsanddata.com)
  • "Effects of used bed materials on char gasification : Investigating the role of element migration using online alkali measurements," Fuel processing technology , vol. 238, pp. 107491-107491, 2022. (kth.se)
  • In addition to modifying the surface, biomaterials can be modified in bulk, meaning that the cell signaling peptides and recognition sites are present not just on the surface but also throughout the bulk of the material. (wikipedia.org)
  • This symposium aims to bring together researchers investigating various aspects of multi-scale mechanics of materials for application in science and engineering, as well as demonstrate the understanding of biological materials, biomolecules, biomaterials, bioinspired engineered systems, and the potential integration of biological and non-biological materials. (purdue.edu)
  • Silk is one of the most promising green biomaterials, and could be the perfect replacement for nylon and polyester based clothing,' said lead author Jamie Sparkes, a PhD student in the University of Sheffield's Natural Materials Group. (materialstoday.com)
  • Nano and Mesoscale Organization and Mechanics ofBiomolecular and Bioinspired Materials This symposium will focus on multi-scale mechanics in biomolecular materials as found in natural and living systems and/or bioinspired engineered material systems. (purdue.edu)
  • The inorganic biomimetic materials segment is predicted to achieve the quickest revenue CAGR throughout the forecast period. (reportsanddata.com)
  • In a new paper published in Advanced Functional Materials , the researchers present a soft and light-driven robotic platform ( 'Photoresponsive Soft-Robotic Platform: Biomimetic Fabrication and Remote Actuation' ). (nanowerk.com)
  • In their work, Jiang and his team demonstrate an effective method for the fabrication of a polymeric bilayer biomimetic platform, which can be light-actuated both in air and water. (nanowerk.com)
  • The Lee group research is focused on applying biologically-inspired molecular designs with chemistry, polymer engineering and materials science principles in developing advanced and functional materials for various biomedical applications. (mtu.edu)
  • The subject materials can be materials with biological origin (protein materials, cellulose, chitin, DNA etc.) and well as synthetic macromolecules that aim to mimic biological structure and/or functionality. (purdue.edu)
  • To demonstrate the capabilities of their bilayer soft robotics platform, the team designed biomimetic microfish which can move forward, backward, and turn around in water under nIR irradiation, to mimic fish swimming in nature (see figure above). (nanowerk.com)
  • No synthetic materials can mimic natural bone with controlled mineral orientation and periodicity. (aps.org)
  • Our materials exploit the natural ability for proteins to selectively and reversibly bind to targeted molecules and incorporate these essential binding abilities into tunable, synthetic systems. (uchicago.edu)
  • The major applications of the Biomimetic materials market include scaffolds, which react to temperature, pressure, and account the use of electricity in human neural networks. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • This study was designed to determine the in vivo performance of three different materials as scaffolds for dental pulp stem cells (DPSC) undergoing induced odontogenic differentiation. (scielo.br)
  • In this work, biomimetic self-assembled copolymer-HAp nanocomposites were synthesized using a bottom-up approach from aqueous solutions. (aiche.org)
  • Citrate was added as a biomimetic regulatory element to control of the size and stability of HAp nanocrystals in synthetic nanocomposites. (aiche.org)
  • Furthermore, lack of awareness among end users of the advantages of biomimetic materials is another factor, which could hamper revenue growth of the market to some extent. (reportsanddata.com)
  • When a filling is needed, Dr. Willardsen explains that biomimetic materials have many advantages over traditional metal amalgams. (truedentistry.com)
  • The ideal vascular graft has yet to be developed, and all materials have advantages and disadvantages. (medscape.com)
  • A material created by mixing an amino acid with a fluorinated oil can switch between a film and a bead to remove fluorine-based pollutants from water. (materialstoday.com)
  • L-proline, an amino acid, represents a class of biomimetic catalytic materials called organocatalysts. (aiche.org)
  • To date, all L-proline assisted aldol-type reactions are considered to proceed via the same biomimetic catalytic cycle involving the formation of an enamine intermediate. (aiche.org)
  • Gelatin microgel incorporated poly(ethylene glycol)-based bioadhesive with enhanced adhesive property and bioactivity" ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces ,8, 11980-9, (2016). (mtu.edu)
  • Injectable dopamine-modified poly(ethylene glycol) nanocomposite hydrogel with enhanced adhesive property and bioactivity" ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces , 6 , 16982-16992, (2014). (mtu.edu)
  • ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 2020 , 12 (9) , 11273-11286. (acs.org)
  • ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 2014 , 6 (15) , 12737-12743. (acs.org)
  • ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces 2013 , 5 (15) , 6777-6792. (acs.org)
  • "Impacts of fresh bed materials on alkali release and fuel conversion rate during wood pyrolysis and char gasification," Fuel , vol. 353, 2023. (kth.se)
  • A desirable alternative to conventional materials, biomimetic materials have special qualities including self-healing and biodegradability. (reportsanddata.com)
  • These advanced materials are more functional than conventional products such as polymers/plastics, ceramics , glass, and metals. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • Soft robotics represents an exciting new paradigm in engineering that challenges researchers to re-examine the materials and mechanisms that they use to make conventional hard robots so that they are more versatile, life-like, and compatible for human interaction. (nanowerk.com)
  • The construction and electronics sectors generally use inorganic biomimetic materials, which are produced through chemical or physical processes. (reportsanddata.com)
  • Through continuous processes of trial and error and self-selectivity (more commonly known as evolution), Nature has successfully refined living organisms, processes, and materials, acting as both an astute materials scientist and efficient engineer. (purdue.edu)
  • One of the beauties of silk-based materials is that they can be introduced into different medical devices through various processes, rendering them useful for other medical applications such as orthopedics," she adds. (materialstoday.com)
  • The current catalyst range for these processes extends from traditional strong acids and bases, transition metals, and heterogeneous materials to environmentally friendly enzymes and catalytic antibodies. (aiche.org)
  • Materials fabricated by BIOMIMETICS techniques, i.e., based on natural processes found in biological systems. (bvsalud.org)
  • It is possible to study the underlying biological processes for conditions that affect human health, and characterise materials on both atomic, micro- and nano-structure level, such as implant structures and how to increase their longevity. (lu.se)
  • The market for biomimetic materials has been divided into a number of application categories, including architecture, robotics, energy, and medicine. (reportsanddata.com)
  • Besides applications in flexible electronics, energy storage, and anti-corrosion coatings, just to name a few, graphene-based nanomaterials have been used in the construction of smart materials for instance for soft robotics, which can be actuated by various external stimuli, i.e., stimulated by electrical, electrochemical, and optical energy. (nanowerk.com)
  • As the key part in soft robotics platforms, stimuli-responsive materials have drawn enormous attention due to their brilliant intriguing shape or volume recovery properties under different external stimuli, which are helpful for creating mechanical motion rapidly and precisely. (nanowerk.com)
  • Biomimetic materials exhibit adhesive properties, termed as Gecko-effect. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • pH responsive and oxidation resistant wet adhesive based on reversible catechol-boronate complexation" Chemistry of Materials , 28, 5432-5439, (2016). (mtu.edu)
  • Biomimetic principles in polymer and material science. (mpg.de)
  • The sensing and balancing application of biomimetic materials include the development of electroactive polymers , shaping memory alloys, and piezoelectric devices. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • Reversal of Catalytic Material Substrate Selectivity through Partitioning of Polymers in Hierarchically Ordered Virus-like Particle Frameworks. (indiana.edu)
  • For instance, money from the European Union's Horizon 2020 initiative is used to investigate and develop biomimetic materials and technology. (reportsanddata.com)
  • He is a National Representative to the High-Level Group of EU on Nanosciences, Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials and a National Expert for the Horizon 2020 committee configurations on: Nanotechnologies, Advanced materials, Biotechnology, Advanced Manufacturing and Processing. (cam.ac.uk)
  • C. Zhou, C. Rosén and K. Engvall, "Fragmentation of dolomite bed material at elevated temperature in the presence of H2O & CO2 : Implications for fluidized bed gasification," Fuel , vol. 260, 2020. (kth.se)
  • According to Dr. Willardsen, his Las Vegas dentistry patients suffering from chipped, worn, damaged, or decaying teeth can benefit from these biomimetic techniques and address structural concerns more conservatively and effectively than ever before. (truedentistry.com)
  • Organic biomimetic materials are made from natural resources and have several uses in the healthcare, energy, and materials science sectors. (reportsanddata.com)
  • Recent studies in material science have led to the development of advanced products for specific applications. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • FORTH working on the ultrafast laser engineering of materials and as an Adjunct Professor at the Department of Materials Science and Technology, University of Crete. (cam.ac.uk)
  • Materials Today is a community dedicated to the creation and sharing of materials science knowledge and experience. (materialstoday.com)
  • In a paper in Nature Communications , researchers from the University of Sheffield's Department of Material Science and Engineering report that animals spin silk by pulling rather than pushing it out of their bodies. (materialstoday.com)
  • This symposium is motivated by the need for cross talk between experimental mechanics, materials science, biology, and medicine. (sem.org)
  • Advanced Polymer Materials Group, Department of Bioresources and Polymer Science, University Politehnica of Bucharest, 1-7 Gh. (mdpi.com)
  • Preparation, analysis, understanding and exploitation of functional molecules and materials with applications from materials science to the life sciences. (durham.ac.uk)
  • In: European White Book on Fundamental Research in Materials Science, pp. 78 - 82. (mpg.de)
  • I study the theory behind the ionisation process via different modelling techniques and also look experimentally at the ionisation coefficients in different semiconductor materials and device structures. (sheffield.ac.uk)
  • Tailoring the properties of materials on a molecular level offers the potential for improvement in device performance for applications across the entire range of human activity: from medicine to cosmetics and food, from information and communication to entertainment, from earth-bound transport to aerospace, from future energy concepts to environment and climate change, from security to cultural heritage. (nanowerk.com)
  • Biomimetic in vitro/in vivo models for assessment of hazardous pulmonary effects of nanoparticle s. (cdc.gov)
  • The market for biomimetic materials is expanding as a result of the rising demand for environmentally friendly and sustainable materials. (reportsanddata.com)
  • They suggest that if this process can be copied in an industrial setting, it could improve how synthetic materials are processed and offer more environmentally-friendly alternatives. (materialstoday.com)
  • Another factor driving use of biomimetic materials is the public's rising awareness of environment-friendly and sustainable materials. (reportsanddata.com)
  • The Sustainable Materials track will prepare engineers to use and manage materials that will have the least impact on our environment and economy. (villanova.edu)
  • The complexity of biological materials commonly arises from the seamless integration of multiple material components and precise pairing of molecular components via self-assembly. (purdue.edu)
  • The Tirrell group has well-established expertise in designing biomimetic systems that target and bind to specific macromolecules in biological systems. (uchicago.edu)
  • In dental orthopedics and implants, a more traditional strategy to improve the density of the underlying jaw bone is via the in situ application of calcium phosphate materials. (wikipedia.org)
  • 19. Holy CE, Fialkov J A, Davies JE, Shoichet MS. Use of a biomimetic strategy to engineer bone. (bvsalud.org)
  • Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Related Technologies, Zhejiang Key Laboratory of Marine Materials and Protective Technologies, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201, China. (bvsalud.org)
  • In 2004 I became Professor of Semiconductor Materials and Devices, and between 2009 to 2013 served as Head of Department. (sheffield.ac.uk)
  • Dr. Willardsen also attended Arrowhead International to train with The Dr. Dick Barnes Group, graduated from Occlusion Connections, and is a certified biomimetic instructor trained at the Alleman-Deliperi Center for Biomimetics. (truedentistry.com)
  • While it is easy to assume that silk is propelled out of the body like we see in comic books, we wanted to put that to the test,' said Chris Holland, head of the Natural Materials Group. (materialstoday.com)
  • Biomimetic materials are being used more frequently in building design, insulation, and energy management systems due to their ability to reduce energy use and provide sustainable solutions. (reportsanddata.com)
  • Capitalizing on this expertise, we are now designing material systems that use biological inspiration to target, capture, and recycle critical resources for water purification. (uchicago.edu)
  • The scope includes experimental, imaging, numerical and mathematical techniques and tools spanning various length and time scales which provide insight into biological systems and materials. (sem.org)
  • Biomimetic materials and transport systems. (mpg.de)
  • Devices fabricated with materials from biological systems. (bvsalud.org)
  • Commonly used materials include hydroxylapatite, tricalcium phosphate, and calcium phosphate cement. (wikipedia.org)
  • The color-changing properties of biomimetic materials can be used in the development of color-changing clothing. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • However, the growth properties of the wax layer remain unclear, limiting the development of this promising material. (bvsalud.org)
  • Building a Functional Neuron in the Lab Dr Alan Jacobs reviews the results of a recent study reporting the development of a biomimetic neuron that can function and communicate like a human neuron. (medscape.com)
  • 2. Develop new research strengths in switchable molecular materials and their applications. (durham.ac.uk)
  • The researchers examined how animals, including silkworms and spiders, push materials like silk out of their bodies. (materialstoday.com)
  • The use of low-energy pulsed light irradiation allows the researchers to safely use photocuring to photo-crosslink the biomimetic materials designed for injection into thinning corneas. (photonics.com)
  • As a result, professor Emilio Alarcon and the other researchers anticipate that the material will remain stable and be nontoxic in human corneas. (photonics.com)
  • Biomimetic recyclable microgels for on-demand generation of hydrogen peroxide and antipathogenic application" Acta Biomaterialia , 83, 109-118, (2019). (mtu.edu)
  • In addition, this effect allows the material applications in nano-surgeries and repairing cracks in bridges, peers, and ships. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • M. Vallet-Regí and D. Arcos, in Biomimetic Nanoceramics in Clinical Use: From Materials to Applications, ed. (rsc.org)
  • This may be useful in the design of composite materials. (wikipedia.org)
  • Numerous negatively charged oxygen atoms of EDTA molecules and 6.0 Å two-dimensional (2D) sub-nanochannel of MXene nanosheets enable biomimetic channel size, chemical groups and tunable charge density for the resulting membranes. (nature.com)
  • Nanomaterials will lead to a radically new approach to manufacturing materials and devices. (nanowerk.com)
  • The Functional Molecules and Materials Research Grouping addresses many of the major challenges concerning the preparation, analysis and exploitation of functional molecules and materials across the chemical spectrum. (durham.ac.uk)
  • 3. Strengthen energy materials research strands including enhanced training through the Renewable Energy CDT (ReNu). (durham.ac.uk)
  • Dr. Joseph Willardsen, a cosmetic dentist in Las Vegas , is using innovative biomimetic materials and techniques at True Dentistry to help preserve and protect the natural structure of teeth and prevent the need for these more invasive procedures. (truedentistry.com)
  • As a cosmetic dentist, Dr. Willardsen uses biomimetic techniques to preserve as much of the patient's natural tooth structure as possible when remedying substantial tooth decay. (truedentistry.com)
  • This natural material boasts a range of unique mechanical properties, as well as biocompatibility, limited immunogenicity, and controllable degradability. (materialstoday.com)
  • in addition, it is expected that the military sector's use of biomimetic materials for armor, camouflage, and other reasons will drive revenue growth of the market. (reportsanddata.com)
  • However, high manufacturing costs, lack of standardization, and constrained supply of raw materials are major factors, which could restrain revenue growth of the market. (reportsanddata.com)
  • Both organic and inorganic product categories are represented in the market for biomimetic materials. (reportsanddata.com)
  • Based on region, the biomimetic materials market can be segmented into North America, Europe, Central and South America, Asia Pacific, and Middle East and Africa. (grandviewresearch.com)
  • Data showed that the materials used to obtain experimental test results could remain in an animal model for several weeks. (photonics.com)
  • Traditional production process for silk is both arduous and time-consuming, but if we can bypass that by mimicking nature in an industrial setting, we could improve not only silk, but also how we process our synthetic materials. (materialstoday.com)