Dental Materials: Materials used in the production of dental bases, restorations, impressions, prostheses, etc.Biomedical and Dental Materials: Substances used in biomedicine or dentistry predominantly for their physical, as opposed to chemical, properties.Dental Amalgam: An alloy used in restorative dentistry that contains mercury, silver, tin, copper, and possibly zinc.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Pit and Fissure Sealants: Agents used to occlude dental enamel pits and fissures in the prevention of dental caries.Dental Care: The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).Composite Resins: Synthetic resins, containing an inert filler, that are widely used in dentistry.Dental Caries: Localized destruction of the tooth surface initiated by decalcification of the enamel followed by enzymatic lysis of organic structures and leading to cavity formation. If left unchecked, the cavity may penetrate the enamel and dentin and reach the pulp.Resins, Synthetic: Polymers of high molecular weight which at some stage are capable of being molded and then harden to form useful components.Dental Auxiliaries: Personnel whose work is prescribed and supervised by the dentist.Bisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylate: The reaction product of bisphenol A and glycidyl methacrylate that undergoes polymerization when exposed to ultraviolet light or mixed with a catalyst. It is used as a bond implant material and as the resin component of dental sealants and composite restorative materials.Compomers: Composite materials composed of an ion-leachable glass embedded in a polymeric matrix. They differ from GLASS IONOMER CEMENTS in that partially silanized glass particles are used to provide a direct bond to the resin matrix and the matrix is primarily formed by a light-activated, radical polymerization reaction.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Crowns: A prosthetic restoration that reproduces the entire surface anatomy of the visible natural crown of a tooth. It may be partial (covering three or more surfaces of a tooth) or complete (covering all surfaces). It is made of gold or other metal, porcelain, or resin.Glass Ionomer Cements: A polymer obtained by reacting polyacrylic acid with a special anion-leachable glass (alumino-silicate). The resulting cement is more durable and tougher than others in that the materials comprising the polymer backbone do not leach out.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.Dental Restoration, Permanent: A restoration designed to remain in service for not less than 20 to 30 years, usually made of gold casting, cohesive gold, or amalgam. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Zirconium: Zirconium. A rather rare metallic element, atomic number 40, atomic weight 91.22, symbol Zr. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Estrogens, Non-Steroidal: Non-steroidal compounds with estrogenic activity.Hardness: The mechanical property of material that determines its resistance to force. HARDNESS TESTS measure this property.Organically Modified Ceramics: Organic-inorganic hybrid polymers developed primarily for DENTAL RESTORATION. They typically contain a defined mixture of ORGANOSILICON COMPOUNDS; CERAMICS; and organic POLYMERS.Methacrylates: Acrylic acids or acrylates which are substituted in the C-2 position with a methyl group.Benzhydryl Compounds: Compounds which contain the methyl radical substituted with two benzene rings. Permitted are any substituents, but ring fusion to any of the benzene rings is not allowed.Phosphorus Compounds: Inorganic compounds that contain phosphorus as an integral part of the molecule.Dental Care for Chronically Ill: Dental care for patients with chronic diseases. These diseases include chronic cardiovascular, endocrinologic, hematologic, immunologic, neoplastic, and renal diseases. The concept does not include dental care for the mentally or physically disabled which is DENTAL CARE FOR DISABLED.Dental Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions for use in restorative or prosthetic dentistry.Polymethacrylic Acids: Poly-2-methylpropenoic acids. Used in the manufacture of methacrylate resins and plastics in the form of pellets and granules, as absorbent for biological materials and as filters; also as biological membranes and as hydrogens. Synonyms: methylacrylate polymer; poly(methylacrylate); acrylic acid methyl ester polymer.Dental Clinics: Facilities where dental care is provided to patients.Dental Care for Children: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of children, including the prevention of tooth diseases and instruction in dental hygiene and dental health. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Lichen Planus, Oral: Oral lesions accompanying cutaneous lichen planus or often occurring alone. The buccal mucosa, lips, gingivae, floor of the mouth, and palate are usually affected (in a descending order of frequency). Typically, oral lesions consist of radiating white or gray, velvety, threadlike lines, arranged in a reticular pattern, at the intersection of which there may be minute, white, elevated dots or streaks (Wickham's striae). (Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry)Dental Cements: Substances used to bond COMPOSITE RESINS to DENTAL ENAMEL and DENTIN. These bonding or luting agents are used in restorative dentistry, ROOT CANAL THERAPY; PROSTHODONTICS; and ORTHODONTICS.Dental Stress Analysis: The description and measurement of the various factors that produce physical stress upon dental restorations, prostheses, or appliances, materials associated with them, or the natural oral structures.Fluorides: Inorganic salts of hydrofluoric acid, HF, in which the fluorine atom is in the -1 oxidation state. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed) Sodium and stannous salts are commonly used in dentifrices.Dental Pulp: A richly vascularized and innervated connective tissue of mesodermal origin, contained in the central cavity of a tooth and delimited by the dentin, and having formative, nutritive, sensory, and protective functions. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Ceramics: Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of restorations the material is fused porcelain. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed & Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dental Hygienists: Persons trained in an accredited school or dental college and licensed by the state in which they reside to provide dental prophylaxis under the direction of a licensed dentist.Cariostatic Agents: Substances that inhibit or arrest DENTAL CARIES formation. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Dentin: The hard portion of the tooth surrounding the pulp, covered by enamel on the crown and cementum on the root, which is harder and denser than bone but softer than enamel, and is thus readily abraded when left unprotected. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Faculty, Dental: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a dental school.Dental Enamel: A hard thin translucent layer of calcified substance which envelops and protects the dentin of the crown of the tooth. It is the hardest substance in the body and is almost entirely composed of calcium salts. Under the microscope, it is composed of thin rods (enamel prisms) held together by cementing substance, and surrounded by an enamel sheath. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Dental Care for Disabled: Dental care for the emotionally, mentally, or physically disabled patient. It does not include dental care for the chronically ill ( = DENTAL CARE FOR CHRONICALLY ILL).Light-Curing of Dental Adhesives: The hardening or polymerization of bonding agents (DENTAL CEMENTS) via exposure to light.Dental Leakage: The seepage of fluids, debris, and micro-organisms between the walls of a prepared dental cavity and the restoration.Dental Anxiety: Abnormal fear or dread of visiting the dentist for preventive care or therapy and unwarranted anxiety over dental procedures.Insurance, Dental: Insurance providing coverage for dental care.Dental Research: The study of laws, theories, and hypotheses through a systematic examination of pertinent facts and their interpretation in the field of dentistry. (From Jablonski, Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982, p674)Dental Health Services: Services designed to promote, maintain, or restore dental health.Acrylic ResinsResin Cements: Dental cements composed either of polymethyl methacrylate or dimethacrylate, produced by mixing an acrylic monomer liquid with acrylic polymers and mineral fillers. The cement is insoluble in water and is thus resistant to fluids in the mouth, but is also irritating to the dental pulp. It is used chiefly as a luting agent for fabricated and temporary restorations. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p159)Dental Care for Aged: The giving of attention to the special dental needs of the elderly for proper maintenance or treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.Biomedical Engineering: Application of principles and practices of engineering science to biomedical research and health care.Dentin-Bonding Agents: Cements that act through infiltration and polymerization within the dentinal matrix and are used for dental restoration. They can be adhesive resins themselves, adhesion-promoting monomers, or polymerization initiators that act in concert with other agents to form a dentin-bonding system.Dental Arch: The curve formed by the row of TEETH in their normal position in the JAW. The inferior dental arch is formed by the mandibular teeth, and the superior dental arch by the maxillary teeth.Phenols: Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.Dental Plaque: A film that attaches to teeth, often causing DENTAL CARIES and GINGIVITIS. It is composed of MUCINS, secreted from salivary glands, and microorganisms.Dental Offices: The room or rooms in which the dentist and dental staff provide care. Offices include all rooms in the dentist's office suite.Surface Properties: Characteristics or attributes of the outer boundaries of objects, including molecules.Dental Records: Data collected during dental examination for the purpose of study, diagnosis, or treatment planning.Dental Staff: Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.Dental Equipment: The nonexpendable items used by the dentist or dental staff in the performance of professional duties. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p106)Dental Bonding: An adhesion procedure for orthodontic attachments, such as plastic DENTAL CROWNS. This process usually includes the application of an adhesive material (DENTAL CEMENTS) and letting it harden in-place by light or chemical curing.General Practice, Dental: Nonspecialized dental practice which is concerned with providing primary and continuing dental care.Natural Language Processing: Computer processing of a language with rules that reflect and describe current usage rather than prescribed usage.Dental Implants: Biocompatible materials placed into (endosseous) or onto (subperiosteal) the jawbone to support a crown, bridge, or artificial tooth, or to stabilize a diseased tooth.Dental Assistants: Individuals who assist the dentist or the dental hygienist.Education, Dental, Continuing: Educational programs designed to inform dentists of recent advances in their fields.Anesthesia, Dental: A range of methods used to reduce pain and anxiety during dental procedures.Biomedical Technology: The application of technology to the solution of medical problems.Information Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Radiography, Dental: Radiographic techniques used in dentistry.Dental Models: Presentation devices used for patient education and technique training in dentistry.Education, Dental, Graduate: Educational programs for dental graduates entering a specialty. They include formal specialty training as well as academic work in the clinical and basic dental sciences, and may lead to board certification or an advanced dental degree.Vocabulary, Controlled: A specified list of terms with a fixed and unalterable meaning, and from which a selection is made when CATALOGING; ABSTRACTING AND INDEXING; or searching BOOKS; JOURNALS AS TOPIC; and other documents. The control is intended to avoid the scattering of related subjects under different headings (SUBJECT HEADINGS). The list may be altered or extended only by the publisher or issuing agency. (From Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed, p163)Ethics, Dental: The principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the dentist, relations with patients and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the dentist in patient care and interpersonal relations with patient families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Technology, Dental: The field of dentistry involved in procedures for designing and constructing dental appliances. It includes also the application of any technology to the field of dentistry.Dental Service, Hospital: Hospital department providing dental care.Dentists: Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.Societies, Dental: Societies whose membership is limited to dentists.Fluorosis, Dental: A chronic endemic form of hypoplasia of the dental enamel caused by drinking water with a high fluorine content during the time of tooth formation, and characterized by defective calcification that gives a white chalky appearance to the enamel, which gradually undergoes brown discoloration. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p286)Dental Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to dental or oral health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.Licensure, Dental: The granting of a license to practice dentistry.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Laboratories, Dental: Facilities for the performance of services related to dental treatment but not done directly in the patient's mouth.Specialties, Dental: Various branches of dental practice limited to specialized areas.Fees, Dental: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for dental services.Data Mining: Use of sophisticated analysis tools to sort through, organize, examine, and combine large sets of information.Biomedical Enhancement: The use of technology-based interventions to improve functional capacities rather than to treat disease.Dental Technicians: Individuals responsible for fabrication of dental appliances.Dentistry: The profession concerned with the teeth, oral cavity, and associated structures, and the diagnosis and treatment of their diseases including prevention and the restoration of defective and missing tissue.Terminology as Topic: The terms, expressions, designations, or symbols used in a particular science, discipline, or specialized subject area.Practice Management, Dental: The organization and operation of the business aspects of a dental practice.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Dental Sac: Dense fibrous layer formed from mesodermal tissue that surrounds the epithelial enamel organ. The cells eventually migrate to the external surface of the newly formed root dentin and give rise to the cementoblasts that deposit cementum on the developing root, fibroblasts of the developing periodontal ligament, and osteoblasts of the developing alveolar bone.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Biocompatible Materials: Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.Esthetics, Dental: Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)Unified Medical Language System: A research and development program initiated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE to build knowledge sources for the purpose of aiding the development of systems that help health professionals retrieve and integrate biomedical information. The knowledge sources can be used to link disparate information systems to overcome retrieval problems caused by differences in terminology and the scattering of relevant information across many databases. The three knowledge sources are the Metathesaurus, the Semantic Network, and the Specialist Lexicon.Tooth: One of a set of bone-like structures in the mouth used for biting and chewing.Comprehensive Dental Care: Providing for the full range of dental health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up, and rehabilitation of patients.Health Education, Dental: Education which increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of dental health on a personal or community basis.Dental Waste: Any waste product generated by a dental office, surgery, clinic, or laboratory including amalgams, saliva, and rinse water.Dentist-Patient Relations: The psychological relations between the dentist and patient.Infection Control, Dental: Efforts to prevent and control the spread of infections within dental health facilities or those involving provision of dental care.Dental Prosthesis: An artificial replacement for one or more natural teeth or part of a tooth, or associated structures, ranging from a portion of a tooth to a complete denture. The dental prosthesis is used for cosmetic or functional reasons, or both. DENTURES and specific types of dentures are also available. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p244 & Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p643)Dental Papilla: Mesodermal tissue enclosed in the invaginated portion of the epithelial enamel organ and giving rise to the dentin and pulp.Semantics: The relationships between symbols and their meanings.Medical Informatics: The field of information science concerned with the analysis and dissemination of medical data through the application of computers to various aspects of health care and medicine.Dental Instruments: Hand-held tools or implements especially used by dental professionals for the performance of clinical tasks.Tooth DiseasesOral Health: The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.Dental Implantation: The grafting or inserting of a prosthetic device of alloplastic material into the oral tissue beneath the mucosal or periosteal layer or within the bone. Its purpose is to provide support and retention to a partial or complete denture.Dental Audit: A detailed review and evaluation of selected clinical records by qualified professional personnel for evaluating quality of dental care.Database Management Systems: Software designed to store, manipulate, manage, and control data for specific uses.Medical Subject Headings: Controlled vocabulary thesaurus produced by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. It consists of sets of terms naming descriptors in a hierarchical structure that permits searching at various levels of specificity.DMF Index: "Decayed, missing and filled teeth," a routinely used statistical concept in dentistry.Economics, Dental: Economic aspects of the dental profession and dental care.Dental Caries Susceptibility: The predisposition to tooth decay (DENTAL CARIES).Dental Informatics: The application of computer and information sciences to improve dental practice, research, education and management.Dental Occlusion: The relationship of all the components of the masticatory system in normal function. It has special reference to the position and contact of the maxillary and mandibular teeth for the highest efficiency during the excursive movements of the jaw that are essential for mastication. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p556, p472)Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Dental Porcelain: A type of porcelain used in dental restorations, either jacket crowns or inlays, artificial teeth, or metal-ceramic crowns. It is essentially a mixture of particles of feldspar and quartz, the feldspar melting first and providing a glass matrix for the quartz. Dental porcelain is produced by mixing ceramic powder (a mixture of quartz, kaolin, pigments, opacifiers, a suitable flux, and other substances) with distilled water. (From Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Scaling: Removal of dental plaque and dental calculus from the surface of a tooth, from the surface of a tooth apical to the gingival margin accumulated in periodontal pockets, or from the surface coronal to the gingival margin.Oral Hygiene: The practice of personal hygiene of the mouth. It includes the maintenance of oral cleanliness, tissue tone, and general preservation of oral health.Artificial Intelligence: Theory and development of COMPUTER SYSTEMS which perform tasks that normally require human intelligence. Such tasks may include speech recognition, LEARNING; VISUAL PERCEPTION; MATHEMATICAL COMPUTING; reasoning, PROBLEM SOLVING, DECISION-MAKING, and translation of language.Dental Impression Materials: Substances used to create an impression, or negative reproduction, of the teeth and dental arches. These materials include dental plasters and cements, metallic oxide pastes, silicone base materials, or elastomeric materials.Molar: The most posterior teeth on either side of the jaw, totaling eight in the deciduous dentition (2 on each side, upper and lower), and usually 12 in the permanent dentition (three on each side, upper and lower). They are grinding teeth, having large crowns and broad chewing surfaces. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p821)Biological Ontologies: Structured vocabularies describing concepts from the fields of biology and relationships between concepts.Dental Polishing: Creation of a smooth and glossy surface finish on a denture or amalgam.Photography, Dental: Photographic techniques used in ORTHODONTICS; DENTAL ESTHETICS; and patient education.Dentistry, Operative: That phase of clinical dentistry concerned with the restoration of parts of existing teeth that are defective through disease, trauma, or abnormal development, to the state of normal function, health, and esthetics, including preventive, diagnostic, biological, mechanical, and therapeutic techniques, as well as material and instrument science and application. (Jablonski's Dictionary of Dentistry, 2d ed, p237)Dental Devices, Home Care: Devices used in the home by persons to maintain dental and periodontal health. The devices include toothbrushes, dental flosses, water irrigators, gingival stimulators, etc.Dental Facilities: Use for material on dental facilities in general or for which there is no specific heading.Tooth Extraction: The surgical removal of a tooth. (Dorland, 28th ed)National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Preventive Dentistry: The branch of dentistry concerned with the prevention of disease and the maintenance and promotion of oral health.Radiography, Dental, Digital: A rapid, low-dose, digital imaging system using a small intraoral sensor instead of radiographic film, an intensifying screen, and a charge-coupled device. It presents the possibility of reduced patient exposure and minimal distortion, although resolution and latitude are inferior to standard dental radiography. A receiver is placed in the mouth, routing signals to a computer which images the signals on a screen or in print. It includes digitizing from x-ray film or any other detector. (From MEDLINE abstracts; personal communication from Dr. Charles Berthold, NIDR)Algorithms: A procedure consisting of a sequence of algebraic formulas and/or logical steps to calculate or determine a given task.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.Abbreviations as Topic: Shortened forms of written words or phrases used for brevity.United StatesCommunity Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with preventive as well as diagnostic and treatment programs in a circumscribed population.Dentist's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice in dentistry related to diagnosis and treatment.Dental Implantation, Endosseous: Insertion of an implant into the bone of the mandible or maxilla. The implant has an exposed head which protrudes through the mucosa and is a prosthodontic abutment.Pediatric Dentistry: The practice of dentistry concerned with the dental problems of children, proper maintenance, and treatment. The dental care may include the services provided by dental specialists.American Dental Association: Professional society representing the field of dentistry.Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Stomatognathic Diseases: General or unspecified diseases of the stomatognathic system, comprising the mouth, teeth, jaws, and pharynx.Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.Incisor: Any of the eight frontal teeth (four maxillary and four mandibular) having a sharp incisal edge for cutting food and a single root, which occurs in man both as a deciduous and a permanent tooth. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p820)Computational Biology: A field of biology concerned with the development of techniques for the collection and manipulation of biological data, and the use of such data to make biological discoveries or predictions. This field encompasses all computational methods and theories for solving biological problems including manipulation of models and datasets.Dental Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of dental prostheses in general or a specific dental prosthesis. It does not include DENTURE DESIGN. The framework usually consists of metal.Toothache: Pain in the adjacent areas of the teeth.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Dental Impression Technique: Procedure of producing an imprint or negative likeness of the teeth and/or edentulous areas. Impressions are made in plastic material which becomes hardened or set while in contact with the tissue. They are later filled with plaster of Paris or artificial stone to produce a facsimile of the oral structures present. Impressions may be made of a full complement of teeth, of areas where some teeth have been removed, or in a mouth from which all teeth have been extracted. (Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982)Subject Headings: Terms or expressions which provide the major means of access by subject to the bibliographic unit.Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Tooth Abnormalities: Congenital absence of or defects in structures of the teeth.Legislation, Dental: Laws and regulations pertaining to the field of dentistry, proposed for enactment or recently enacted by a legislative body.Dental Cavity Preparation: An operation in which carious material is removed from teeth and biomechanically correct forms are established in the teeth to receive and retain restorations. A constant requirement is provision for prevention of failure of the restoration through recurrence of decay or inadequate resistance to applied stresses. (Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p239-40)Tooth, Deciduous: The teeth of the first dentition, which are shed and replaced by the permanent teeth.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Dental Enamel Hypoplasia: An acquired or hereditary condition due to deficiency in the formation of tooth enamel (AMELOGENESIS). It is usually characterized by defective, thin, or malformed DENTAL ENAMEL. Risk factors for enamel hypoplasia include gene mutations, nutritional deficiencies, diseases, and environmental factors.Libraries, DentalDental Restoration Failure: Inability or inadequacy of a dental restoration or prosthesis to perform as expected.Medical Informatics Applications: Automated systems applied to the patient care process including diagnosis, therapy, and systems of communicating medical data within the health care setting.Medical Informatics Computing: Precise procedural mathematical and logical operations utilized in the study of medical information pertaining to health care.User-Computer Interface: The portion of an interactive computer program that issues messages to and receives commands from a user.Diagnosis, Oral: Examination of the mouth and teeth toward the identification and diagnosis of intraoral disease or manifestation of non-oral conditions.Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Mandible: The largest and strongest bone of the FACE constituting the lower jaw. It supports the lower teeth.Dental Calculus: Abnormal concretion or calcified deposit that forms around the teeth or dental prostheses.Dental Pulp Diseases: Endodontic diseases of the DENTAL PULP inside the tooth, which is distinguished from PERIAPICAL DISEASES of the tissue surrounding the root.Evidence-Based Dentistry: An approach or process of practicing oral health care that requires the judicious integration of systematic assessments of clinical relevant scientific evidence, relating to the patient's oral and medical condition and history, with the dentist's clinical expertise and the patient's treatment needs and preferences. (from J Am Dent Assoc 134: 689, 2003)Toothbrushing: The act of cleaning teeth with a brush to remove plaque and prevent tooth decay. (From Webster, 3d ed)Pattern Recognition, Automated: In INFORMATION RETRIEVAL, machine-sensing or identification of visible patterns (shapes, forms, and configurations). (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Tooth Injuries: Traumatic or other damage to teeth including fractures (TOOTH FRACTURES) or displacements (TOOTH LUXATION).Dental Plaque Index: An index which scores the degree of dental plaque accumulation.Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Dentition: The teeth collectively in the dental arch. Dentition ordinarily refers to the natural teeth in position in their alveoli. Dentition referring to the deciduous teeth is DENTITION, PRIMARY; to the permanent teeth, DENTITION, PERMANENT. (From Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992)Dental Abutments: Natural teeth or teeth roots used as anchorage for a fixed or removable denture or other prosthesis (such as an implant) serving the same purpose.Group Practice, Dental: Any group of three or more full-time dentists, organized in a legally recognized entity for the provision of dental care, sharing space, equipment, personnel and records for both patient care and business management, and who have a predetermined arrangement for the distribution of income.Medical Waste Disposal: Management, removal, and elimination of biologic, infectious, pathologic, and dental waste. The concept includes blood, mucus, tissue removed at surgery or autopsy, soiled surgical dressings, and other materials requiring special control and handling. Disposal may take place where the waste is generated or elsewhere.Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Knowledge Bases: Collections of facts, assumptions, beliefs, and heuristics that are used in combination with databases to achieve desired results, such as a diagnosis, an interpretation, or a solution to a problem (From McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed).Endodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the maintenance of the dental pulp in a state of health and the treatment of the pulp cavity (pulp chamber and pulp canal).Research Support as Topic: Financial support of research activities.National Institutes of Health (U.S.): An operating division of the US Department of Health and Human Services. It is concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to health and medical research. Until 1995, it was an agency of the United States PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE.Dental Pulp CalcificationDental Disinfectants: Chemicals especially for use on instruments to destroy pathogenic organisms. (Boucher, Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed)Prosthodontics: A dental specialty concerned with the restoration and maintenance of oral function by the replacement of missing TEETH and related structures by artificial devices or DENTAL PROSTHESES.Dental Veneers: The use of a layer of tooth-colored material, usually porcelain or acrylic resin, applied to the surface of natural teeth, crowns, or pontics by fusion, cementation, or mechanical retention.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.Systems Integration: The procedures involved in combining separately developed modules, components, or subsystems so that they work together as a complete system. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Periodontal Diseases: Pathological processes involving the PERIODONTIUM including the gum (GINGIVA), the alveolar bone (ALVEOLAR PROCESS), the DENTAL CEMENTUM, and the PERIODONTAL LIGAMENT.Mouth Diseases

Effects of alumina and zirconium dioxide particles on arachidonic acid metabolism and proinflammatory interleukin production in osteoarthritis and rheumatoid synovial cells. (1/3)

We describe a model which can be used for in vitro biocompatibility assays of biomaterials. We studied the in vitro response of human osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis fibroblast-like synoviocytes to Al2O3 or ZrO2 particles by analysing the production of interleukin-1 (IL-1) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and the metabolism of arachidonic acid via lipoxygenase and cyclo-oxygenase pathways. Our results show that, in these cells and under our experimental conditions, Al2O3 and ZrO2 did not significantly modify the synthesis of IL-1 and IL-6 or the metabolism of arachidonic acid.  (+info)

Water-mediated signal multiplication with Y-shaped carbon nanotubes. (2/3)

 (+info)

Advances in anti-adhesive materials in preventing pelvic and abdominal post-operative adhesions. (3/3)

 (+info)

*Taipei Medical University

... biomedical materials, and dental research. The annual funding TMU receives for research exceeds NT$600 million. In 2009, a ...

*Glass ionomer cement

Applied dental materials. p. 254. Anusavice, Kenneth J. Phillips' Science of Dental Materials, Eleventh edition. p. 477. ISBN ... Their Biomedical and Industrial Applications. Chemistry of Solid State Materials 3 (reprint ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge ... A glass ionomer cement is a dental restorative material used in dentistry as a filling material and luting cement, including ... Glass ionomer cement is primarily used in the prevention of dental caries. This dental material has good adhesive bond ...

*Ultrashort pulse

"Femtosecond laser microstructuring of zirconia dental implants". Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied ... Such a chirp may be acquired as a pulse propagates through materials (like glass) and is due to their dispersion. It results in ... State-of-the-art laser processing techniques with ultrashort light pulses can be used to structure materials with a sub- ... that usually leads to nonlinear interactions in various materials, including air. These processes are studied in the field of ...

*Materials science

... or composite materials. They are often intended or adapted for medical applications, such as biomedical devices which perform, ... Biomaterials are also used every day in dental applications, surgery, and drug delivery. For example, a construct with ... Another application of materials science in industry is making composite materials. These are structured materials composed of ... Besides material characterization, the material scientist or engineer also deals with extracting materials and converting them ...

*Ti-6Al-7Nb

"Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy dental castings." Journal of Materials Science: Materials in ... and related materials for biomedical application. Materials Science and Engineering, R47 (2004), pp. 49-121 M.-F. López, A. ... "Mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of Ti-6Al-7Nb alloy dental castings." Journal of Materials Science: Materials in ... Dental application Aircraft materials Ti-6Al-7Nb has a high biocompatibility. The oxides from Ti-6Al-7Nb is saturated in the ...

*Microbubbles

Dental Materials Journal. 31 (5): 821-7. doi:10.4012/dmj.2012-091. PMID 23037846. Agarwal, Ashutosh; Ng, Wun Jern; Liu, Yu, ( ... Sirsi, Shashank; Borden, Mark (2009). "Microbubble compositions, properties and biomedical applications". Bubble Science, ... The composition of the bubble shell and filling material determine important design features such as buoyancy, crush strength, ...

*Periowave

It does not cause damage to root surfaces, dental materials, or surrounding tissues. Periowave does not exhibit many of the ... The Periowave aPDT system was introduced to the market by Ondine Biomedical Inc., Vancouver B.C. in 2006. Periowave is approved ... "Dental Pioneer Professor Michael Wilson Speaking in Vancouver at Pacific Dental Conference". PRWeb May 13,2015. Nicolas G. ... Gingivitis Pericoronitis Endodontic treatment Peri-implantitis Dental caries Photodynamic therapy Methylene blue Reactive ...

*List of MeSH codes

... biomedical and dental materials D15/26 - pharmaceutical preparations D16/27 - chemical actions and uses D20 - complex mixtures ...

*Isra University

Science of Dental Material) Bachelor of Engineering (Electrical) Bachelor of Science (Computer Science) Bachelor of Science ( ... Biomedical) Bachelor of Technology (Electrical, Electronics, Civil & Biomedical) Associate of Applied Science (Software ... Bachelor of Dental Surgery Master of Dental Surgery (Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery, Oral Pathology, Operative Dentistry) M.Sc ( ...

*Bioactive glass

SCHOTT Electronic Packaging The chemistry of medical and dental materials by John W. Nicholson, p. 92, Royal Society of ... 2004 ISBN 3-540-22203-0 Engineering materials for biomedical applications by Swee Hin Teoh, p. 6-21, World Scientific, 2004 ... Composite materials made of Bioglass 45S5 and patient's own bone can be used for bone reconstruction. Bioglass is comparatively ... He was challenged by a MASH army officer to develop a material to help regenerate bone, as many Vietnam war veterans suffered ...

*Materials science

Biomaterials are also used every day in dental applications, surgery, and drug delivery. For example, a construct with ... and thus comprises whole or part of a living structure or biomedical device which performs, augments, or replaces a natural ... Another application of materials science in industry is making composite materials. These are structured materials composed of ... Besides material characterization, the material scientist or engineer also deals with extracting materials and converting them ...

*Osseointegration

These materials are currently deployed in hip replacement, knee replacement and dental implant surgeries. There are a number of ... Journal of Biomedical Materials Research. 43 (2): 192-203. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1097-4636(199822)43:2. 3.0.CO;2-K. PMID 9619438. ... For osseointegrated dental implants, metallic, ceramic, and polymeric materials have been used, in particular titanium. To be ... Dental implants are by far the main field of application Retention of a craniofacial prosthesis such as an artificial ear (ear ...

*Dental implant

The basis for modern dental implants is a biologic process called osseointegration, in which materials such as titanium form an ... Reza, M (2007). Nanomaterials and Nanosystems for Biomedical Applications [Mozafari] (in English). SpringerLink: Springer e- ... Common uses of dental implants The primary use of dental implants is to support dental prosthetics. Modern dental implants make ... Dental implants, in the same way, can also be used to retain a multiple tooth dental prosthesis either in the form of a fixed ...

*University of Birmingham Medical School

Dental Hygiene and Therapy (BSc) and Biomedical Materials Science (BMedSc). These courses are based at the Birmingham Dental ... The College of Medical and Dental Sciences also offers Dental Surgery (BDS), ... With the restructure of the university all these schools now come under the umbrella of the College of Medical and Dental ... Medical and Pharmacy students may also intercalate to the final year of the Biomedical Science course to attain an additional ...

*Mechanical properties of biomaterials

For any material to be classified for biomedical application three requirements must be met. The first requirement is that the ... Dental Materials, 18(1), 12-19. Chen, Q., Zhu, C., & Thouas, G. A. (2012). Progress and challenges in biomaterials used for ... Materials that are used for biomedical or clinical applications are known as biomaterials. The following article deals with ... The biomaterial term is used for materials that can be used in biomedical and clinical applications. They are bioactive and ...

*Tokyo Medical and Dental University

Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences Graduate School of Health Care Sciences Graduate School of Biomedical Science ... along with a research institute dedicated to materials, which was later expanded to the current Institute of Biomaterials and ... The school received university status in 1944 as Tokyo Medical and Dental College. It was renamed to Tokyo Medical and Dental ... 317 dental chair units) Tokyo Medical and Dental University has over 200 international students, mainly from Asian countries. ...

*Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences

Department of Science of Dental Material Department of Oral Biology (Oral Anatomy) Department of Community Dentistry Department ... Establishment of Institute of Biomedical Technology in March 2009 Establishment of Minimal Invasive Surgical Centre in ... Dental Section & BDS Course added in 1963. Atomic Energy Medical Center established in 1965. Eye Hospital at Hyderabad started ... Toxicology Institute of Biomedical Technology The Faculty of Community & Public Health Sciences at Liaquat University of ...

*Derek W. Jones

Journal of Biomedical Materials, 33: 89-100, 1996. °Derek W. Jones "International Dental Standards." JCDA Journal, 73, 10, 882- ... the Dental Materials Group, of the International Association for Dental Research, and served as Chair of the Canadian Dental ... Filler for Dental Composite Materials" (PDF). "Improved customized-shape ceramic fillers for dental composite materials". ... dental cement, bone cement, mercury pollution, biocompatibility of materials and synthesis of glass and polymer materials, as ...

*Bis-HPPP

2,2-Bis[4(2,3-hydroxypropoxy)phenyl]propane (bis-HPPP) is an organic compound that is formed when the dental composite material ... Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part B: Applied Biomaterials: n/a-n/a. doi:10.1002/jbm.b.31645. Finer Y, S.J.; ... degradation of the dental resin since salivary esterases are able to cleave the ester bonds in acrylic polymers of dental ... Santerre, JP (2004). "The influence of resin chemistry on a dental composite's biodegradation". J Biomed Mater Res. 69A (2): ...

*Paladium bahasa Indonesia, ensiklopedia bebas

Dental Materials. 19 (3): 232-9. doi:10.1016/S0109-5641(02)00035-0. PMID 12628436.. ... Wataha, John C; Shor, Kavita (2010). "Palladium alloys for biomedical devices". Expert Review of Medical Devices. 7 (4): 489- ... Wollaston memurnikan material itu secukupnya dan menawarkannya, tanpa menyebut penemunya, di sebuah toko kecil di Soho pada ... Wataha, J. C.; Hanks, C. T. (1996). "Biological effects of palladium and risk of using palladium in dental casting alloys". ...

*Reconstructive surgery

... and private dental companies have collaborated in a number of important advances in dental materials, devices, and analytical ... An overview on the standardization and control of biomedical devices has recently been gathered by D. G. Singleton. Papers have ... Two papers have described how the National Bureau of Standards, American Dental Association, National Institute of Dental ...

*Antimicrobial polymer

... s are powerful candidates for controlled delivery systems and implants in dental restorative materials ... should produce implants and biomedical devices with greater resistance to microbial adhesion and biofilm formation. A number of ... This makes this material a prime candidate for use in areas of medicine as a means to fight infection, in the food industry to ... 3.0.CO;2-2. Cowie, J.M.G. Polymers: Chemistry and Physics of Modern Materials, Chapman and Hall, 3rd edition (2007); United ...

*Palladium

Dental Materials. 19 (3): 232-9. doi:10.1016/S0109-5641(02)00035-0. PMID 12628436.. ... Wataha, John C.; Shor, Kavita (2010). "Palladium alloys for biomedical devices". Expert Review of Medical Devices. 7 (4): 489- ... Wollaston purified enough of the material and offered it, without naming the discoverer, in a small shop in Soho in April 1803 ... Palladium is used in small amounts (about 0.5%) in some alloys of dental amalgam to decrease corrosion and increase the ...

*Bioceramic

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A. doi:10.1002/jbm.a.31943. Market Report: World Medical Ceramics Market. Acmite ... Ceramics are now commonly used in the medical fields as dental and bone implants. Surgical cermets are used regularly. Joint ... The ceramic materials used are not the same as porcelain type ceramic materials. Rather, bioceramics are closely related to ... Alternatively, the bioceramic materials can be doped with β-emitting materials and implanted into the cancerous area. Other ...

*Solid mechanics

As new materials are used and old ones are pushed to their limits, non-linear material models are becoming more common. There ... Solid mechanics is fundamental for civil, aerospace, nuclear, biomedical and mechanical engineering, for geology, and for many ... and the design of dental prostheses and surgical implants. One of the most common practical applications of solid mechanics is ... This implies that the material response has time-dependence. Plastically - Materials that behave elastically generally do so ...

*Medicine

Contemporary medicine applies biomedical sciences, biomedical research, genetics, and medical technology to diagnose, treat, ... Lynch CD, O'Sullivan VR, McGillycuddy CT (2006). "Pierre Fauchard: The 'Father of Modern Dentistry'". British Dental Journal. ... In many cases these materials were used ritually as magical substances by priests, shamans, or medicine men. Well-known ... Biomedical Engineering is a field dealing with the application of engineering principles to medical practice. ...
Y-shaped carbon nanotubes grown with iron-titanium particles are easily made and act as remarkably efficient electronic transistors that are 100 times smaller than the transistors used in todays microprocessors. So they could be used to create microchips several orders of magnitude more powerful than the ones used in computers today, with no increase in chip size. The Y-shaped nanotubes measure just tens of nanometers in size. Eventually, they could… read more. ...
stated that a second operation is not an option because of adhesions. questions: ... specialist who confirms a relapse with presence of adhesions and impossibility of another surgical operation. The doctor, then, .... ...
Page contains details about doxorubicin-loaded amphiphilic Y-shaped copolymer nanoparticles . It has composition images, properties, Characterization methods, synthesis, applications and reference articles : nano.nature.com
Clinical Aspects of Dental Materials 4th Edition PDF Download | Clinical Aspects of Dental Materials Theory, Practice, and Cases 4th Edition PDF M.Stewart, M.Bagby This book is a comprehensive, yet user-friendly,
A dental material based on an organic polymerisable binding agent has a content of A) one or more mixed apatites of the type A1) A10 (XO4)6 Z2 +/B*10-u C*u (Y*)6 Z2 and/or A2) A10-r (XO4)6-s Z2-t +/Br (Y)s Qt -B10-u Cu (Y)6 Z2 and/or A3) A10-r (XO4)6-s Z2-t +/Ar (XO4)s +/B10-u Cu (Y)6 Z2 in which the formulae assume the significance specified in the description, in a quantity that is effective for the absorption of ions from the biological application environment of the dental material. The polymerisable dental material has variably adjustable transparency, good polishability, high strength and the capacity to release and absorb ions into and from a biological environment. Also described is a process for using the mixed apatites A1), A2) and/or A3) in polymerisable dental materials.
Phillips science of dental materials , Phillips science of dental materials , کتابخانه دانشگاه علوم پزشکی و خدمات درمانی زاهدان
Search for jobs related to We are a start up ecommerce company dealing with dental materials trading we are yet to launch our website in india we need work or hire on the worlds largest freelancing marketplace with 13m+ jobs. Its free to sign up and bid on jobs.
... Definition Antibodies, also known as immunoglobulins, are Y-shaped proteins that are produced by the immune system to help stop intruders from harming the body. When an intruder enters the body, the immune system springs into action. These invaders, which are called antigens, can be viruses,
A dental material which is curable in a first stage to an elastic phase in which the material can be worked mechanically or surpluses removed, and in a second stage to its final form, comprising: (a) at least one polyfunctional epimine (aziridine); (b) at least one ethylenically unsaturated monomer; (c) at least one catalyst for the hot, cold, or light polymerization of the ethylenically unsaturated monomer; and (d) at least one catalyst to accelerate the polymerization of epimine (a), but which does not however influence the polymerization of (b).
Antibodies are large Y-shaped proteins. They are recruited by the immune system to identify and neutralize foreign objects like bacteria and viruses.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Immunoglobulin redirects here. For the immunoglobulin family, see Immunoglobulin superfamily. Antibodies redirects here. For the film, see Antibodies (film). For the TV-movie, see Antibody (film). Each antibody binds to a specific antigen; an interaction similar to a lock and key. An antibody (Ab), also known as an immunoglobulin (Ig), is a large Y-shaped protein produced by B-cells that is used by…
China Hot Sale Barbed Broaches of Dental Material, Find details about China Barbed Broaches, Dental Barbed Broach from Hot Sale Barbed Broaches of Dental Material - Ningbo Biaoda Electrical Equipment Co., Ltd.
A bifurcated catheter assembly is provided for treating bifurcated vessels. The bifurcated catheter assembly comprises an elongate main catheter shaft having a stiffer proximal portion, a more flexible distal portion, and a pair of branch catheters attached to the distal portion. An expandable member is located on each of the branch catheters. The balloons are held together to provide a low profile as the device is advanced over the tracking guide wire. Upon reaching the bifurcated vessel, the balloons separated and are advanced over separate guide wires into separate branches of the bifurcated vessel. The bifurcated catheter assembly can be used to dilate a stenoses or deliver and implant a Y-shaped stent in the bifurcation.
We have found several unique keys that lead us to a successful Amalgam Removal and Replacement.. Before the patient comes in for the removal we have them take a special blood test to do a blood serum biocompatible dental material testing which shows the different types of dental materials their unique body composition is compatible with. Also, we can and have used other modalities for determining the proper match up of dental materials to the patient.. Most materials in the mouth have a current that is either positive (+) or negative (-) but the natural tooth does not have a charge. The unique principal we have incorporated into our program is that the currents do not come out when they [the amalgams] are removed. The standard for normal removals is to remove one quadrant (upper right, upper left, lower right, or lower left) at a time. The problem with this is the currents will reattach to the existing metals in the mouth which can create a meridian overload and an electrical short circuiting. ...
A hospital bed supported on a wheeled base, and a ventilator supported on a wheeled cart and docked to the base of the bed, the combination of ventilator and bed capable of being rolled as a single unit. The ventilator cart includes a wheeled base, and supports connected to the base for supporting a ventilator, with the supports providing for selective raising and lowering of the ventilator. The hospital bed base is wheeled and has a generally Y-shaped base frame. The outspread arms of the Y-shaped base frame receive the ventilator cart so that the two may be docked together. The ventilator when docked to the hospital bed base falls within the footprint of the bed as projected downwardly onto the floor. A latch secures the ventilator to the bed base. A disabling switch disables the high/low function of the bed preventing the bed from being lowered downwardly onto the ventilator. A power supply mounted to the bed base provides for uninterrupted operation of the ventilator. A care cart docks to the foot
Microfluidics provides an ideal tool to manipulate small volumes of liquids precisely, typically from the nanoliter to the microliter. Numerous microfluidic platforms have been developed to apply gradients controlled in space and time to cultured cells (Keenan and Folch, 2008; Kim and Wu, 2012), but here we will restrict our discussion to the applications of microfluidic devices in the context of axon guidance. One of the first devices developed and applied for neuronal guidance is composed of free and forced-choice regions (Wittig et al., 2005). The device consists of a Y-shaped microchannel. The forced-choice point is localized at the split in the Y-shaped microchannel. Neuronal cultures are placed in the presentation region, where they encounter a broad range of concentrations before eventually going into the forced-choice region. Gradient slope and shape are quantified and depend on the flow rate in the microchannels. This assay has been used to confirm that neonatal spiral ganglion neurons ...
Within the last 10 years, photochemistry has begun to be used in the field of dental materials for the photocuring of methacrylate monomers. The current applications are the photocuring of 1)...
A number of years ago, I was so sick from environmental exposures that I could not work. Eventually I got better by eliminating chemicals and dental materials (mercury fillings) from my environment which were causing me serious health effects. My...
Acidic polysaccharides crosslinked by reaction with di- or polyanhydrides. The use of anhydride-crosslinked hyaluronic acid as a treatment for arthritis, as a drug delivery vehicle, to reduce the incidence of post-operative adhesion formation, to promote the healing of chronic wounds and ulcers, and as a component of cosmetic formulations.
Reversible deformation is a unique property of elastic materials. Here, we design and fabricate highly stretchable multilayered films by patterning Y-shaped motifs through films of non- elastic materials, e.g. plastics, metals, ceramics. By adjusting the geometry and density of the motif, as well as the thickness of the film(s), the effective spring constant of the engineered film(s) can be tuned. Three-dimensional bending of the patterned film(s) enables macroscopic stretchability and minimizes local film strain fields. The engineered films demonstrate no preferential direction of stretching and the proposed design is versatile. Furthermore our approach is compatible with thin-film processing. We demonstrate the Y-shaped motifs allow for the design of stretchable plastic foils coated with metallic and metal oxide conductors. We anticipate the patterned motifs can be scaled down to offer a wider range of elastic electronic materials to use in stretchable electronics and to create soft bioelectronics. (c
0017] Depending on the circumstances, the apparatus of the invention can comprise one or more of the following features: [0018] the gas-supply main line and the bypass line are ramifications of a bypass line communicating fluidically with the main circuit, and at least a first solenoid valve is arranged at the intersection of said bypass line, the gas-supply main line and the bypass line, and the connection of the bypass line to the main circuit is preferably made on the inhalation branch and/or on the exhalation branch and/or at a site located in immediate proximity to the patients mouth, more preferably in the area of a connection site between the inhalation branch and the exhalation branch of said main circuit, for example in the area of a Y-shaped connector piece or of a bacteriological filter arranged on the main circuit; [0019] at least one hot-wire sensor is arranged directly on the inhalation or exhalation branch of the main circuit, and the gas-supply main line and the bypass line are ...
Peter Ashby ,p-ashby at nimr.MAPS.mrc.ac.uk, wrote (écrivait) : , ...(snip) .........I said that the disappearance can be easily , *accounted for* that is an entirely different thing. The disappearance , takes time obviously, although selective death on a voyage could EASILY do , the same thing quite quickly. , .....(snip)... Although not a specialist of population dynamics, it sounds as an interesting argument. When very few people established somewhere, often after many deadly tries across huge distances, they could represent a peculiar sampling of the starting population, just as my own family is not representative of the average genetic features of my country. Some genes may have been selected by chance. I have read in the past that population tracing by use of blood groups is not quite reliable if not done together with other techniques, such as mtDNA sequencing. The molecular difference between the determinants of A and B groups is tiny. In the Y-shaped surface polysaccharides of red ...
Crime lab equipment, products and supplies for fingerprinting, crime scene investigation, property/evidence room, and narcotics identification. The Safariland Group
Study Flashcards On Dental Materials Science at Cram.com. Quickly memorize the terms, phrases and much more. Cram.com makes it easy to get the grade you want!
Highly effective mixing in microchannels is important for most chemical reactions conducted in microfluidic chips. To obtain a rigid and chemically resistant micromixer system at low cost, we fabricated a Y-shaped microchannel with built-in mixer structures by static liquid photolithography (SLP) from methac
143. Carex vexans F. J. Hermann, Rhodora. 57: 156. 1955. Plants cespitose; rhizomes appearing elongate in old clumps. Culms 25-80 cm; vegetative culms few, inconspicuous, usually fewer than 15 leaves, not strikingly 3-ranked. Leaves: sheaths conspicuously green-veined nearly to collar, narrow hyaline band or sharp Y-shaped region at collar, adaxially firm, summits U-shaped, sheaths sometimes finely papillose; distal ligules 2.4-5.6 mm; blades 2-5 per fertile culm, 10-25 cm × 2-5 mm. Inflorescences dense to open, green or brown, 1.5-4 cm × 10-20 mm; proximal internode 2-12 mm; 2d internode 3-10 mm; proximal bracts scalelike, with bristle tips shorter than inflorescences. Spikes 3-6, distant, distinct, ellipsoid to ovoid-globose, 8-20 × 6-10 mm, base rounded or short-acute, apex broadly obtuse to rounded. Pistillate scales white-hyaline or brown with pale brown or green 1-veined midstripe, lanceolate, 3.3-4 mm, as long as and narrower than perignyia, apex acute or obtuse. Perigynia 15-80 in ...
Implanted rats were trained to collect sucrose solution rewards by approaching and nose poking into a fluid well underneath an illuminated cue light in a fully automated, Y-shaped maze consisting of three identical chambers surrounding an equilateral center platform (Ito et al., 2008; Lansink et al., 2012). Each chamber contained three combinations of a cue light and a fluid well, one on each wall (see Fig. 1A). Nose pokes into the fluid wells were registered by interruption of infrared beams, which could trigger a solenoid valve system to deliver sucrose solution (15%) into the fluid well. The rats movement activity was tracked by 3 infrared beams per chamber, one of which was located at the chambers entrance.. Naive rats learned to associate a discrete cue (i.e., the illumination of a cue light) and reward availability in daily sessions of 135 trials that each started with cue light presentation. In each 9 trial block, cue lights were presented once in random order. Nose poke responses (,500 ...
An orthopaedic method and anchor assemblies for anchoring a linkage such as a rod or cable used for fixation or reduction. One assembly includes an anchor plate and a slotted anchor bolt that captures the plate in a one-piece assembly for convenient installation. The base of the anchor bolt lies below the plate, and a cap or nut tightens down to secure a linking member, e.g., a rod or cable, in the slot, simultaneously clamping the bolt to fix both its position and its orientation on the plate. One occipital plate has lateral arms that hold the anchor bolts, and a Y-shaped embodiment is mounted in an inverted orientation to position the anchor bolts well down in soft tissue for more effective wound closure. A cable connector is used together with an anchor plate, vertebra anchor screws and fixation rods to secure ends of a cable at the level of one or more vertebrae, providing a versatile and highly stable system for alignment, fixation and fusing of the cervical and thoracic spine. The cable connectors
Dental deal provides best quality dental materials,equipments,consumables and products at best prices.dentaldeal has best deals for doctors and dealers
Learn more about the science and clinical application of bioactive dental materials in ACTIVA™ A Closer Look at BioACTIVE Materials ...
Brian Amsden obtained his PhD in Chemical Engineering from Queens University in 1996, in the area of therapeutic protein delivery from hydrogels and polymer microspheres. He worked for Angiotech Pharmaceuticals in Vancouver from 1996-97 as a Research Associate, leading projects involving the formulation of paclitaxel for localized delivery to treat post-operative adhesions and psoriasis, and participating in projects developing degradable microsphere and micellar formulations of paclitaxel for intra-articular delivery and systemic delivery, respectively. He left Angiotech to join the Faculty of Pharmacy at the University of Alberta and is currently a Professor in the Department of Chemical Engineering at Queens University where he has been since July 2000. He is a principal investigator and the Director of the NSERC CREATE Program in Soft Connective Tissue Regeneration and Therapy as well as the Donald and Joan McGeachy Chair in Biomedical Engineering.. Areas of research interest ...
We are supplying the best dental material all over India. Our motive is to provide the best dental products and lab equipment in India. Best dental products
The Great Dyke is a linear geological feature that trends nearly north-south through the centre of Zimbabwe passing just to the west of the capital, Harare. It consists of a band of short, narrow ridges and hills spanning for approximately 550 kilometres (340 mi). The hills become taller as the range goes north, and reach up to 460 metres (1,510 ft) above the Mvurwi Range. The range is host to vast ore deposits, including gold, silver, chromium, platinum, nickel and asbestos. Geologically the Great Dyke is not a dyke, but is lopolithic and Y-shaped in cross-section. It is a group of layered ultramafic intrusions that extend across Zimbabwe with a strike of about N20°E. The width of the intrusions vary from 3 to 12 km (7.5 mi). The Great Dyke is unusual in that most ultramafic layered intrusions display near horizontal sill or sheet forms. The well-layered lower units of ultramafic rocks comprising the Great Dyke are locally overlain by erosional remnants of gabbroic rock. These mark the centres ...
Antibody drug development has traditionally focused on engineering the tops of the "arms" of the Y-shaped antibody - a component known as the Fv domain because this region is responsible for binding to a specific target. This approach has created wildly successful drugs, yet many targets cannot be effectively addressed this way. Indeed, the great majority of successful antibody drugs bind one of a handful of targets because of the often limited impact of simply binding to a target of interest.. Xencor takes a different approach, focusing its antibody engineering on the "stem" of the antibody - a region known as the Fc domain - which has proven to be a powerful new axis for differentiation and novel function. By fine-tuning the functionality of the Fc domain, Xencor develops XmAb antibody drug candidates with significantly improved potency, half-life and stability over existing antibodies, and open doors to biology previously inaccessible with traditional antibodies.. ...
This is a Getz Dixieland Band in a Toffelmeyer Retainer. The next step is to squirt in Injectafil, but obviously Ive got to hold the matrix against 19 while the Injectafil sets up. So I injected it, forced the matrix against 19 with a composite instrument and waited for the Injectafil to reach its gel stage (took about 30 seconds), then Karen zapped it with the Valo light on "plasma mode" for 3 seconds. Then I did need to place a thin layer of Exquisite on top of the Injectafil to complete the occlusal surface ...
De Santis Rwas born in Naples, Italy, in 1966. He received the mechanical engineering degree in 1994, the PhD in Biotechnology of Dental Materials in 1997 and th..
Provided are antibacterial and antimicrobial surface coatings and dental materials by utilizing the antimicrobial properties of copper chalcogenide and/or copper halide (CuQ, where Q=chalcogens includ
Free flashcards to help memorize facts about athletic mouthguards. Other activities to help include hangman, crossword, word scramble, games, matching, quizes, and tests.
Hydrolysis-stable and polymerizable acrylophosphonic acid with the general formula (I) which is particularly suitable as a component of dental materials is disclosed.

Search Results - DrugBankSearch Results - DrugBank

Matched Categories: … Biomedical and Dental Materials ... Chemical Actions and Uses ... Technology, Industry, and Agriculture ... Matched Categories: … Biomedical and Dental Materials ... Chemical Actions and Uses ... Technology, Industry, and Agriculture ... Matched Categories: … Astringents and Deodorants ... Biomedical and Dental Materials ... Chemical Actions and Uses ... ... ZnO is a white powder that is insoluble in water, and it is widely used as an additive in numerous materials and products ...
more infohttps://www.drugbank.ca/unearth/q?query=brand%3Aacet%2A+AND+approved%3Atrue&searcher=drugs

Polymers | Harvard Catalyst Profiles | Harvard CatalystPolymers | Harvard Catalyst Profiles | Harvard Catalyst

Manufactured Materials [J01.637]. *Biomedical and Dental Materials [J01.637.051]. *Polymers [J01.637.051.720] ...
more infohttps://connects.catalyst.harvard.edu/Profiles/display/Concept/Polymers

RxNorm Technical DocumentationRxNorm Technical Documentation

7624,T122,A1.4.1.1.2,Biomedical or Dental Material,,,. 12.7 Related Concepts (File = RXNREL.RRF). This file follows the general ...
more infohttps://www.nlm.nih.gov/research/umls/rxnorm/docs/2014/rxnorm_doco_full_2014-2.html

Skin LubricantSkin Lubricant

Biomedical or Dental Material (T122) MSH. D004643 SnomedCT. 373380003, 48279009. English. Emollients, Emollient - Misc, ...
more infohttps://fpnotebook.com/Derm/Pharm/SknLbrcnt.htm

Skin LubricantSkin Lubricant

Biomedical or Dental Material (T122) MSH. D004643. SnomedCT. 373380003, 48279009. English. Emollients, Emollient - Misc, ...
more infohttp://www.fpnotebook.com/legacy/Derm/Pharm/SknLbrcnt.htm

PneumoniaPneumonia

Biomedical or Dental Material (T122) MSH. D002214 SnomedCT. 385049006, 40973004. HL7. 2.16.840.1.113883.1.11.14507, CAP. ... Capsule shells may be made from gelatin, starch, or cellulose, or other suitable materials, may be soft or hard, and are filled ...
more infohttps://fpnotebook.com/Lung/ID/Pnmn.htm

Advanced Search Results - Public Health Image Library(PHIL)Advanced Search Results - Public Health Image Library(PHIL)

Categories: Biomedical and Dental Materials Image Types: Photo, Illustrations, Video, Color, Black&White, PublicDomain, ...
more infohttps://phil.cdc.gov/AdvancedSearchResults.aspx?Search=Biomedical+and+Dental+Materials&parentid=1504&catid=4376

Alginate DressingAlginate Dressing

Biomedical or Dental Material (T122) , Carbohydrate (T118) MSH. C008970 English. Kaltostat Derived from the NIH UMLS (Unified ... Suture Material Thiopental Thrombin Hemostatic Tissue Adhesive Topical Hemostatic Agent Transparent Film Dressing Ulnar Nerve ...
more infohttp://www.fpnotebook.com/Surgery/Pharm/AlgntDrsng.htm

Bone Cements | Profiles RNSBone Cements | Profiles RNS

Manufactured Materials [J01.637]. *Biomedical and Dental Materials [J01.637.051]. *Polymers [J01.637.051.720] ...
more infohttps://profiles.umassmed.edu/display/119934

Silicone Gels | Profiles RNSSilicone Gels | Profiles RNS

Manufactured Materials [J01.637]. *Biomedical and Dental Materials [J01.637.051]. *Polymers [J01.637.051.720] ...
more infohttps://profiles.umassmed.edu/display/122073

PPT - The Unbearable Lightness of Biomedical Informatics PowerPoint presentation | free to download  - id: 6ed8eb-YjY2NPPT - The Unbearable Lightness of Biomedical Informatics PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 6ed8eb-YjY2N

Chemical Chemical Dental Material 55. This multiple inheritance leads to errors in coding*Gene Ontology will eliminate multiple ... Biomedical Waste Management - www.medalliancewm.com - Of all the places you would have ever visited for biomedical waste ... Global Biomedical Textiles Market, Forecast to 2022 - The biomedical textiles market is calculable to reach USD 14.50 billion ... Biomedical Refrigerators and Freezers Market size worth $3.4bn by 2024 - Biomedical Refrigerators and Freezers Market Size By ...
more infohttps://www.powershow.com/view4/6ed8eb-YjY2N/The_Unbearable_Lightness_of_Biomedical_Informatics_powerpoint_ppt_presentation

Molecules | Free Full-Text | Essential Oil from Berries of Lebanese Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb Displays Similar Antibacterial...Molecules | Free Full-Text | Essential Oil from Berries of Lebanese Juniperus excelsa M. Bieb Displays Similar Antibacterial...

Laboratory of Biomedical and Dental Materials, Department of Health Sciences, University of Piemonte Orientale, via Solaroli 17 ... Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, Milan State University, via Beldiletto 1, Milan 20142, Italy ... Keywords: oral health; dental caries; periodontitis; antibiotic resistance; α-pinene; Streptococcus mutans; Aggregatibacter ... actinomycetemcomitans oral health; dental caries; periodontitis; antibiotic resistance; α-pinene; Streptococcus mutans; ...
more infohttps://www.mdpi.com/1420-3049/20/5/9344

Patent US6143948 - Device for incorporation and release of biologically active agents - Google PatentsPatent US6143948 - Device for incorporation and release of biologically active agents - Google Patents

Novel materials for dental and biomedical application. US20070106138 *. Nov 24, 2006. May 10, 2007. Beiski Ben Z. Intraoral ... Materials for dental and biomedical application. US8546334. Mar 27, 2002. Oct 1, 2013. Scil Technology Gmbh. Device having ... Method of applying opaque dental ceramic material to a metal structure. US4880610 *. Apr 20, 1988. Nov 14, 1989. Norian ... Ceramic materials such as calcium phosphate, alumina or bioglass, as well as composite materials, can also be used as an ...
more infohttp://www.google.com/patents/US6143948?dq=7,444,563

US20060149122A1 - Septum attached ventricular support 
        - Google PatentsUS20060149122A1 - Septum attached ventricular support - Google Patents

The material covering the ventricles may or may not have the same tension and or compliance. The device can be constructed as a ... The material of the device is secured to the heart proximate the septal wall. ... 239000003519 biomedical and dental material Substances 0 claims 2 * 239000008280 blood Substances 0 description 17 ... securing the biomedical material proximate the septum and for said material-to conform to an external geometry of the left ...
more infohttps://patents.google.com/patent/US20060149122A1/en

Recent questions and answers in Chemical Actions and Uses - lookformedical.comRecent questions and answers in Chemical Actions and Uses - lookformedical.com

Biomedical and Dental Materials (9) * Pharmaceutical Preparations (75) * Chemical Actions and Uses (18) * Pharmacologic Actions ...
more infohttps://lookformedical.com/answers/en/chemicals-and-drugs/chemical-actions-and-uses

DeCS Ingl s+escopoDeCS Ingl s+escopo

J01.637 Manufactured Materials .. J01.637.051 Biomedical and Dental Materials .. J01.637.051.720 Polymers .. J01.637.051.720. ... D25 Biomedical and Dental Materials .. D25.720 Polymers .. D25.720.327 Elastomers .. D25.720.327.782 Polyurethanes .. D25.720. ...
more infohttp://trigramas.bireme.br/cgi-bin/mx/cgi=[email protected]?collection=DeCSxi&lang=i&minsim=0.30&maxrel=10&text=Ostomy

Welcome to Intoolab and tzagerWelcome to Intoolab and tzager

Biomedical and Dental Materials (10) , Carbohydrates (51) , Chemical Actions and Uses (75) , ...
more infohttps://intoolab.com/

DeCS Ingl s+escopoDeCS Ingl s+escopo

J01.637 Manufactured Materials .. J01.637.051 Biomedical and Dental Materials .. J01.637.051.720 Polymers .. J01.637.051.720. ... D25 Biomedical and Dental Materials .. D25.720 Polymers .. D25.720.327 Elastomers .. D25.720.327.811 Polyvinyl Chloride .. ... A gas that has been used as an aerosol propellant and is the starting material for polyvinyl resins. Toxicity studies have ...
more infohttp://trigramas.bireme.br/cgi-bin/mx/[email protected]?collection=DeCSxi&lang=i&minsim=0.30&maxrel=10&text=Vinyl%20Compounds

Polyesters | Profiles RNSPolyesters | Profiles RNS

Manufactured Materials [J01.637]. *Biomedical and Dental Materials [J01.637.051]. *Polymers [J01.637.051.720] ...
more infohttps://profiles.rush.edu/display/6806

Ceramics | Profiles RNSCeramics | Profiles RNS

Manufactured Materials [J01.637]. *Biomedical and Dental Materials [J01.637.051]. *Ceramics [J01.637.051.264] ... Products made by baking or firing nonmetallic minerals (clay and similar materials). In making dental restorations or parts of ... Comparison of an absolute and surrogate measure of relative translucency in dental ceramics. Dent Mater. 2013 Jun; 29(6):702-7. ... Material properties and composition of soft-tissue fixation. Arthroscopy. 2010 Jun; 26(6):821-31. ...
more infohttp://profiles.uconn.edu/display/41170

Polyethylene Glycols | Profiles RNSPolyethylene Glycols | Profiles RNS

Manufactured Materials [J01.637]. *Biomedical and Dental Materials [J01.637.051]. *Polymers [J01.637.051.720] ...
more infohttps://profiles.rush.edu/display/15451

adenoma of alveoli 2005:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engineadenoma of alveoli 2005:2010[pubdate] *count=100 - BioMedLib™ search engine

A1.4.1.1.2. Biomedical or Dental Material. A1.4.1.1.3. Biologically Active Substance. A1.4.1.1.3.1. Neuroreactive Substance or ... A2.6.1. Biomedical Occupation or Discipline. A2.7. Organization. A2.7.1. Health Care Related Organization. A2.7.2. Professional ...
more infohttp://www.bmlsearch.com/?kwr=adenoma+of+alveoli+2005:2010%5Bpubdate%5D&cxts=100&stmp=b0
  • The goal of the Dental Laboratory Technology Program is to train students to be capable of the design, fabrication and production of dental prostheses, including full and partial dentures, crowns, bridges and orthodontic appliances. (ecc.edu)
  • Dental laboratory technicians possess the skills, competencies and knowledge that is invaluable to the practice of modern dentistry. (ecc.edu)
  • New state-of-the-art techniques, equipment and materials are emphasized, i.e. implantology, cosmetic dentistry and CAD/CAM technology. (ecc.edu)
  • The National Board for Certification in Dental Laboratory Technology's (NBC) Recognized Graduate (RG) Examination is offered to students during the fourth semester of the program. (ecc.edu)
  • 5. The implantable device according to claim 1, wherein the material is selected from the group consisting of a metal, a metal alloy, a ceramic material, a natural or synthetic polymer and a composite thereof. (google.com)
  • The other composite groups showed lower creep recovery as compared to the conventional material (GR). The creep strain % for all the bulk-fill composites materials were increased during immersion in the liquids. (mdpi.com)
  • Opportunities are available for second-year students to work with doctors in private practice, at hospitals and at commercial dental laboratories as they prepare to join the profession and the oral health team. (ecc.edu)
  • This dental material has good adhesive bond properties to tooth structure, allowing it to form a tight seal between the internal structures of the tooth and the surrounding environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • The acid produced from this metabolism results in the breakdown of tooth enamel and subsequent inner structures of the tooth, if the disease is not intervened by a dental professional, or if the carious lesion does not arrest and/or the enamel re-mineralises by itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reports of the success rate of pulp capping treatments vary greatly and it is clear that in actual dental practice current procedures are not always effective. (marquette.edu)
  • However, it is recommended that the use of fluoride varnish alongside glass ionomer sealants should be applied in practice to further reduce the risk of secondary dental caries. (wikipedia.org)
  • This presentation will describe the design and outcomes of a three-arm cluster randomized trial conducted in dental public health settings in NYC. (upenn.edu)
  • Findings suggest strategies for improving implementation and scale up of tobacco use treatment in dental health care. (upenn.edu)
  • Through the unique Dental Laboratory Technology Program situated at the well equipped laboratories at the SUNY Erie South Campus, students are instructed in all aspects of dental laboratory technology. (ecc.edu)
  • The Dental Laboratory Technology laboratories at the South Campus have been designed to accommodate students confined to wheelchairs. (ecc.edu)
  • Students who complete all the required courses in the Dental Laboratory Technology program and who use their SUNY Erie electives as advised can earn a B.S. in Professional & Technical Studies degree at Canisius. (ecc.edu)
  • While most states set no minimum qualifications for dental lab technicians, some states require technicians to be certified by the National Board for Certification in Dental Laboratory Technology. (ecc.edu)
  • Dental Laboratory Technology courses are offered at South Campus. (ecc.edu)
  • Moreover, increasing dentist population and growing awareness about dental procedures are expected to support the market growth in near future. (marketresearch.com)
  • Some of the attributes of a successful dental lab technician are good manual dexterity, color perception and an aptitude for detail. (ecc.edu)
  • When dental pulp cells are exposed to the environment, whether it is due to trauma, rapidly progressing cavities, or overly aggressive restoration procedures, vital pulp therapy is required to attempt to prevent the death of those cells. (marquette.edu)
  • The information obtained from these studies will provide guidance to determining the most effective pulp capping material to prevent the need for root-canal procedures. (marquette.edu)
  • Growth factors have been shown to induce the formation of reparative dentine and we have shown that they can protect dental pulp cells against toxicity induced by a number of insults. (marquette.edu)
  • Pauly K, Fritz K, Furey A, Lobner D. Insulin-like growth factor 1 and transforming growth factor-b stimulate cystine/glutamate exchange activity in dental pulp cells. (marquette.edu)
  • Furey A, Hjelmhaug J, Lobner D. Flow Line, Durafill VS, and Dycal toxicity to dental pulp cells:effects of growth factors. (marquette.edu)
  • Students are required to purchase a dental tool kit at the approximate cost of $500. (ecc.edu)