Elimination of ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTANTS; PESTICIDES and other waste using living organisms, usually involving intervention of environmental or sanitation engineers.
Substances which pollute the soil. Use for soil pollutants in general or for which there is no specific heading.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in the soil. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
Hydrocarbons are organic compounds consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon atoms, forming the basis of classes such as alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, and aromatic hydrocarbons, which play a vital role in energy production and chemical synthesis.
Naturally occurring complex liquid hydrocarbons which, after distillation, yield combustible fuels, petrochemicals, and lubricants.
Chemical compounds which pollute the water of rivers, streams, lakes, the sea, reservoirs, or other bodies of water.
Phenols substituted with one or more chlorine atoms in any position.
The generic name for the group of aliphatic hydrocarbons Cn-H2n+2. They are denoted by the suffix -ane. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
One of the three domains of life (the others being Eukarya and ARCHAEA), also called Eubacteria. They are unicellular prokaryotic microorganisms which generally possess rigid cell walls, multiply by cell division, and exhibit three principal forms: round or coccal, rodlike or bacillary, and spiral or spirochetal. Bacteria can be classified by their response to OXYGEN: aerobic, anaerobic, or facultatively anaerobic; by the mode by which they obtain their energy: chemotrophy (via chemical reaction) or PHOTOTROPHY (via light reaction); for chemotrophs by their source of chemical energy: CHEMOLITHOTROPHY (from inorganic compounds) or chemoorganotrophy (from organic compounds); and by their source for CARBON; NITROGEN; etc.; HETEROTROPHY (from organic sources) or AUTOTROPHY (from CARBON DIOXIDE). They can also be classified by whether or not they stain (based on the structure of their CELL WALLS) with CRYSTAL VIOLET dye: gram-negative or gram-positive.
Refuse liquid or waste matter carried off by sewers.
The presence of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in water. This term is not restricted to pathogenic organisms.
An antiseptic and disinfectant aromatic alcohol.
Chlorobenzenes are organic compounds consisting of a benzene ring substituted with one or more chlorine atoms, used as solvents, refrigerants, and intermediates in the production of other chemicals, but with limited use due to environmental and health concerns.
Complex petroleum hydrocarbons consisting mainly of residues from crude oil distillation. These liquid products include heating oils, stove oils, and furnace oils and are burned to generate energy.
A widely used industrial solvent.
A greasy substance with a smoky odor and burned taste created by high temperature treatment of BEECH and other WOOD; COAL TAR; or resin of the CREOSOTE BUSH. It contains CRESOLS and POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS which are CARCINOGENS. It has been widely used as wood preservative and in PESTICIDES and had former use medicinally in DISINFECTANTS; LAXATIVES; and DERMATOLOGIC AGENTS.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in nature. Some species are pathogenic for humans, animals, and plants.
A bacterial genus of the order ACTINOMYCETALES.
The chemical alteration of an exogenous substance by or in a biological system. The alteration may inactivate the compound or it may result in the production of an active metabolite of an inactive parent compound. The alterations may be divided into METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE I and METABOLIC DETOXICATION, PHASE II.
'Tert-butyl alcohol' is a type of alcohol, specifically a secondary alcohol, with the chemical formula (CH3)3COH, used as a solvent and synthetic intermediate in organic chemistry and as an antifreeze in industrial applications.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria characterized by an outer membrane that contains glycosphingolipids but lacks lipopolysaccharide. They have the ability to degrade a broad range of substituted aromatic compounds.
Benzoic acid or benzoic acid esters substituted with one or more chlorine atoms.
Adverse effect upon bodies of water (LAKES; RIVERS; seas; groundwater etc.) caused by CHEMICAL WATER POLLUTANTS.
Organic compounds containing carbon and hydrogen in the form of an unsaturated, usually hexagonal ring structure. The compounds can be single ring, or double, triple, or multiple fused rings.
Cresols, also known as hydroxytoluene, are a group of phenolic compounds including ortho-cresol, meta-cresol, and para-cresol, which differ in the position of the hydroxyl group on the benzene ring.
A genus of GREEN ALGAE in the family Scenedesmaceae. It forms colonies of usually four or eight cylindrical cells that are widely distributed in freshwater and SOIL.
A highly volatile inhalation anesthetic used mainly in short surgical procedures where light anesthesia with good analgesia is required. It is also used as an industrial solvent. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of the vapor can lead to cardiotoxicity and neurological impairment.
An insecticide and herbicide that has also been used as a wood preservative. Pentachlorphenol is a widespread environmental pollutant. Both chronic and acute pentachlorophenol poisoning are medical concerns. The range of its biological actions is still being actively explored, but it is clearly a potent enzyme inhibitor and has been used as such as an experimental tool.
Substances or organisms which pollute the water or bodies of water. Use for water pollutants in general or those for which there is no specific heading.
Toxic chlorinated unsaturated hydrocarbons. Include both the 1,1- and 1,2-dichloro isomers. Both isomers are toxic, but 1,1-dichloroethylene is the more potent CNS depressant and hepatotoxin. It is used in the manufacture of thermoplastic polymers.
Agents that modify interfacial tension of water; usually substances that have one lipophilic and one hydrophilic group in the molecule; includes soaps, detergents, emulsifiers, dispersing and wetting agents, and several groups of antiseptics.
A genus in the family BURKHOLDERIACEAE, comprised of many species. They are associated with a variety of infections including MENINGITIS; PERITONITIS; and URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS.
'Benzene derivatives' are organic compounds that contain a benzene ring as the core structure, with various functional groups attached to it, and can have diverse chemical properties and uses, including as solvents, intermediates in chemical synthesis, and pharmaceuticals.
Propane is a colorless, odorless, and chemically simple hydrocarbon (C3H8), commonly used as a fuel for heating, cooking, and engines, which exists as a gas at room temperature but can be liquefied under pressure and stored in cylinders or tanks.
Toxic, volatile, flammable liquid hydrocarbon byproduct of coal distillation. It is used as an industrial solvent in paints, varnishes, lacquer thinners, gasoline, etc. Benzene causes central nervous system damage acutely and bone marrow damage chronically and is carcinogenic. It was formerly used as parasiticide.
Phenanthrenes are aromatic hydrocarbons consisting of three benzene rings fused together in a linear arrangement, commonly found in various plants and some animals, and can act as precursors for certain steroid hormones or exhibit pharmacological activities with potential therapeutic uses.
Life or metabolic reactions occurring in an environment containing oxygen.
A gas that has been used as an aerosol propellant and is the starting material for polyvinyl resins. Toxicity studies have shown various adverse effects, particularly the occurrence of liver neoplasms.
An organochlorine insecticide that has been used as a pediculicide and a scabicide. It has been shown to cause cancer.
Substances or energies, for example heat or light, which when introduced into the air, water, or land threaten life or health of individuals or ECOSYSTEMS.
The complete absence, or (loosely) the paucity, of gaseous or dissolved elemental oxygen in a given place or environment. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
An herbicide with irritant effects on the eye and the gastrointestinal system.
The most abundant natural aromatic organic polymer found in all vascular plants. Lignin together with cellulose and hemicellulose are the major cell wall components of the fibers of all wood and grass species. Lignin is composed of coniferyl, p-coumaryl, and sinapyl alcohols in varying ratios in different plant species. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
The simplest saturated hydrocarbon. It is a colorless, flammable gas, slightly soluble in water. It is one of the chief constituents of natural gas and is formed in the decomposition of organic matter. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)
A family of bracket fungi, order POLYPORALES, living in decaying plant matter and timber.
Non-heme iron-containing enzymes that incorporate two atoms of OXYGEN into the substrate. They are important in biosynthesis of FLAVONOIDS; GIBBERELLINS; and HYOSCYAMINE; and for degradation of AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS.
Benzene derivatives that include one or more hydroxyl groups attached to the ring structure.
A saturated 12-carbon fatty alcohol obtained from coconut oil fatty acids. It has a floral odor and is used in detergents, lubricating oils, and pharmaceuticals. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
Discarded animal and vegetable matter from a kitchen or the refuse from food preparation. (From Random House College Dictionary, 1982)
A species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria isolated from soil and water as well as clinical specimens. Occasionally it is an opportunistic pathogen.
Volative flammable fuel (liquid hydrocarbons) derived from crude petroleum by processes such as distillation reforming, polymerization, etc.
A family of isomeric, colorless aromatic hydrocarbon liquids, that contain the general formula C6H4(CH3)2. They are produced by the destructive distillation of coal or by the catalytic reforming of petroleum naphthenic fractions. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 5th ed)
Aerobic bacteria are types of microbes that require oxygen to grow and reproduce, and use it in the process of respiration to break down organic matter and produce energy, often found in environments where oxygen is readily available such as the human body's skin, mouth, and intestines.
An effective soil fumigant, insecticide, and nematocide. In humans, it causes severe burning of skin and irritation of the eyes and respiratory tract. Prolonged inhalation may cause liver necrosis. It is also used in gasoline. Members of this group have caused liver and lung cancers in rodents. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), 1,2-dibromoethane may reasonably be anticipated to be a carcinogen.
Water containing no significant amounts of salts, such as water from RIVERS and LAKES.
A derivative of acetic acid, N(CH2COOH)3. It is a complexing (sequestering) agent that forms stable complexes with Zn2+. (From Miall's Dictionary of Chemistry, 5th ed.)
A genus of asporogenous bacteria isolated from soil that displays a distinctive rod-coccus growth cycle.
The sodium salt of BENZOIC ACID. It is used as an antifungal preservative in pharmaceutical preparations and foods. It may also be used as a test for liver function.
Halogenated hydrocarbons refer to organic compounds containing carbon and hydrogen atoms, where one or more hydrogen atoms are replaced by halogens such as fluorine, chlorine, bromine, or iodine.
Worthless, damaged, defective, superfluous or effluent material from industrial operations.
Salts and esters of the 10-carbon monocarboxylic acid-decanoic acid.
A phylum of fungi that produce their sexual spores (basidiospores) on the outside of the basidium. It includes forms commonly known as mushrooms, boletes, puffballs, earthstars, stinkhorns, bird's-nest fungi, jelly fungi, bracket or shelf fungi, and rust and smut fungi.
Eight-carbon saturated hydrocarbon group of the methane series. Include isomers and derivatives.
A group of different species of microorganisms that act together as a community.
A copper-containing oxidoreductase enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of 4-benzenediol to 4-benzosemiquinone. It also has activity towards a variety of O-quinols and P-quinols. It primarily found in FUNGI and is involved in LIGNIN degradation, pigment biosynthesis and detoxification of lignin-derived products.
Constituent of 30S subunit prokaryotic ribosomes containing 1600 nucleotides and 21 proteins. 16S rRNA is involved in initiation of polypeptide synthesis.
Toxic, chlorinated, saturated hydrocarbons. Include both the 1,1- and 1,2-dichloro isomers. The latter is considerably more toxic. It has a sweet taste, ethereal odor and has been used as a fumigant and intoxicant among sniffers. Has many household and industrial uses.
Oxidases that specifically introduce DIOXYGEN-derived oxygen atoms into a variety of organic molecules.
Organic polymeric materials which can be broken down by naturally occurring processes. This includes plastics created from bio-based or petrochemical-based materials.
A group of 1,2-benzenediols that contain the general formula R-C6H5O2.
A 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene, which is an explosive chemical that can cause skin irritation and other toxic consequences.
Two-ring crystalline hydrocarbons isolated from coal tar. They are used as intermediates in chemical synthesis, as insect repellents, fungicides, lubricants, preservatives, and, formerly, as topical antiseptics.
A major group of unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons containing two or more rings. The vast number of compounds of this important group, derived chiefly from petroleum and coal tar, are rather highly reactive and chemically versatile. The name is due to the strong and not unpleasant odor characteristic of most substances of this nature. (From Hawley's Condensed Chemical Dictionary, 12th ed, p96)
The discarding or destroying of liquid waste products or their transformation into something useful or innocuous.
The discarding or destroying of garbage, sewage, or other waste matter or its transformation into something useful or innocuous.
A microanalytical technique combining mass spectrometry and gas chromatography for the qualitative as well as quantitative determinations of compounds.
A genus of fungi in the family Corticiaceae, order Stereales, that degrades lignin. The white-rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium is a frequently used species in research.
Benzoic acid or benzoic acid esters substituted with one or more bromine atoms.
Tools or devices for generating products using the synthetic or chemical conversion capacity of a biological system. They can be classical fermentors, cell culture perfusion systems, or enzyme bioreactors. For production of proteins or enzymes, recombinant microorganisms such as bacteria, mammalian cells, or insect or plant cells are usually chosen.
Body of knowledge related to the use of organisms, cells or cell-derived constituents for the purpose of developing products which are technically, scientifically and clinically useful. Alteration of biologic function at the molecular level (i.e., GENETIC ENGINEERING) is a central focus; laboratory methods used include TRANSFECTION and CLONING technologies, sequence and structure analysis algorithms, computer databases, and gene and protein structure function analysis and prediction.
A class in the phylum PROTEOBACTERIA comprised of chemoheterotrophs and chemoautotrophs which derive nutrients from decomposition of organic material.
Release of oil into the environment usually due to human activity.
Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.
The salinated water of OCEANS AND SEAS that provides habitat for marine organisms.
A family of gram-negative, asporogenous rods or ovoid cells, aerobic or facultative anaerobic chemoorganotrophs. They are commonly isolated from SOIL, activated sludge, or marine environments.
A hydrocarbon used as an industrial solvent. It has been used as an aerosal propellent, as a refrigerant and as a local anesthetic. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 31st ed, p1403)
A genus of the family BRUCELLACEAE comprising obligately aerobic gram-negative rods with parallel sides and rounded ends.
A species of gram-negative bacteria in the genus PSEUDOMONAS. It cannot utilize FRUCTOSE; GLUCOSE; or MALTOSE for energy.
A kingdom of eukaryotic, heterotrophic organisms that live parasitically as saprobes, including MUSHROOMS; YEASTS; smuts, molds, etc. They reproduce either sexually or asexually, and have life cycles that range from simple to complex. Filamentous fungi, commonly known as molds, refer to those that grow as multicellular colonies.
A genus of basidiomycetous fungi, family POLYPORACEAE, order POLYPORALES, that grows on logs or tree stumps in shelflike layers. The species P. ostreatus, the oyster mushroom, is a choice edible species and is the most frequently encountered member of the genus in eastern North America. (Alexopoulos et al., Introductory Mycology, 4th ed, p531)
Any liquid or solid preparation made specifically for the growth, storage, or transport of microorganisms or other types of cells. The variety of media that exist allow for the culturing of specific microorganisms and cell types, such as differential media, selective media, test media, and defined media. Solid media consist of liquid media that have been solidified with an agent such as AGAR or GELATIN.
A mass of organic or inorganic solid fragmented material, or the solid fragment itself, that comes from the weathering of rock and is carried by, suspended in, or dropped by air, water, or ice. It refers also to a mass that is accumulated by any other natural agent and that forms in layers on the earth's surface, such as sand, gravel, silt, mud, fill, or loess. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed, p1689)
A chemical reaction in which an electron is transferred from one molecule to another. The electron-donating molecule is the reducing agent or reductant; the electron-accepting molecule is the oxidizing agent or oxidant. Reducing and oxidizing agents function as conjugate reductant-oxidant pairs or redox pairs (Lehninger, Principles of Biochemistry, 1982, p471).
Substances that are energetically unstable and can produce a sudden expansion of the material, called an explosion, which is accompanied by heat, pressure and noise. Other things which have been described as explosive that are not included here are explosive action of laser heating, human performance, sudden epidemiological outbreaks, or fast cell growth.
DNA sequences encoding RIBOSOMAL RNA and the segments of DNA separating the individual ribosomal RNA genes, referred to as RIBOSOMAL SPACER DNA.
A multistage process that includes cloning, physical mapping, subcloning, determination of the DNA SEQUENCE, and information analysis.
The unconsolidated mineral or organic matter on the surface of the earth that serves as a natural medium for the growth of land plants.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria. Organisms in this genus had originally been classified as members of the PSEUDOMONAS genus but overwhelming biochemical and chemical findings indicated the need to separate them from other Pseudomonas species, and hence, this new genus was created.
Total mass of all the organisms of a given type and/or in a given area. (From Concise Dictionary of Biology, 1990) It includes the yield of vegetative mass produced from any given crop.
Partially saturated 1,2,3,4-tetrahydronaphthalene compounds.
Derivatives of adipic acid. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain a 1,6-carboxy terminated aliphatic structure.
Pesticides used to destroy unwanted vegetation, especially various types of weeds, grasses (POACEAE), and woody plants. Some plants develop HERBICIDE RESISTANCE.
A genus of gram-positive BACTERIA in the family Gordoniaceae, isolated from soil and from sputa of patients with chest disorders. It is also used for biotransformation of natural products.
'Anaerobic Bacteria' are types of bacteria that do not require oxygen for growth and can often cause diseases in humans, including dental caries, gas gangrene, and tetanus, among others.
Drugs and their metabolites which are found in the edible tissues and milk of animals after their medication with specific drugs. This term can also apply to drugs found in adipose tissue of humans after drug treatment.
Descriptions of specific amino acid, carbohydrate, or nucleotide sequences which have appeared in the published literature and/or are deposited in and maintained by databanks such as GENBANK, European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL), National Biomedical Research Foundation (NBRF), or other sequence repositories.
A selective triazine herbicide. Inhalation hazard is low and there are no apparent skin manifestations or other toxicity in humans. Acutely poisoned sheep and cattle may show muscular spasms, fasciculations, stiff gait, increased respiratory rates, adrenal degeneration, and congestion of the lungs, liver, and kidneys. (From The Merck Index, 11th ed)
Industrial chemicals which have become widespread environmental pollutants. Each aroclor is a mixture of chlorinated biphenyls (1200 series) or chlorinated terphenyls (5400 series) or a combination of both (4400 series).
Complex sets of enzymatic reactions connected to each other via their product and substrate metabolites.
A broad class of substances containing carbon and its derivatives. Many of these chemicals will frequently contain hydrogen with or without oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, phosphorus, and other elements. They exist in either carbon chain or carbon ring form.
Tricyclic ethylene-bridged naphthalene derivatives. They are found in petroleum residues and coal tar and used as dye intermediates, in the manufacture of plastics, and in insecticides and fungicides.
A genus of fungi in the family Coriolaceae.
Industrial products consisting of a mixture of chlorinated biphenyl congeners and isomers. These compounds are highly lipophilic and tend to accumulate in fat stores of animals. Many of these compounds are considered toxic and potential environmental pollutants.
The extraction and recovery of usable or valuable material from scrap or other discarded materials. (from McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed.)
Aniline compounds, also known as aromatic amines, are organic chemicals derived from aniline (aminobenzene), characterized by the substitution of hydrogen atoms in the benzene ring with amino groups (-NH2).
A colorless, odorless gas that can be formed by the body and is necessary for the respiration cycle of plants and animals.
A family of gram-negative aerobic bacteria in the class BETA PROTEOBACTERIA, encompassing the acidovorans rRNA complex. Some species are pathogenic for PLANTS.
Heterocyclic rings containing three nitrogen atoms, commonly in 1,2,4 or 1,3,5 or 2,4,6 formats. Some are used as HERBICIDES.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria found in wet soil containing decaying organic material and in water. Cells tend to be pleomorphic if grown on media containing succinate or coccoid if grown in the presence of an alcohol as the sole carbon source. (From Bergey's Manual of Determinative Bacteriology, 9th ed)
A group of compounds that has the general structure of a dicarboxylic acid-substituted benzene ring. The ortho-isomer is used in dye manufacture. (Dorland, 28th ed)
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, motile bacteria that occur in water and soil. Some are common inhabitants of the intestinal tract of vertebrates. These bacteria occasionally cause opportunistic infections in humans.
Enzymes that catalyze the cleavage of a carbon-carbon bond by means other than hydrolysis or oxidation. This subclass contains the DECARBOXYLASES, the ALDEHYDE-LYASES, and the OXO-ACID-LYASES. EC 4.1.
An enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of catechol to muconic acid with the use of Fe3+ as a cofactor. This enzyme was formerly characterized as EC 1.13.1.1 and EC 1.99.2.2.
Deoxyribonucleic acid that makes up the genetic material of bacteria.
A vinyl polymer made from ethylene. It can be branched or linear. Branched or low-density polyethylene is tough and pliable but not to the same degree as linear polyethylene. Linear or high-density polyethylene has a greater hardness and tensile strength. Polyethylene is used in a variety of products, including implants and prostheses.
The body of a fungus which is made up of HYPHAE.
Trityl compounds are organic chemical structures where a central atom or group of atoms is bonded to three phenyl groups, each carrying a methyl substituent, forming a bulky and lipophilic moiety often used as a protective group or a label in biochemical and medicinal applications.
Nitrophenols are organic compounds characterized by the presence of a nitro group (-NO2) attached to a phenol molecule, known for their potential use in chemical and pharmaceutical industries, but also recognized as environmental pollutants due to their toxicity and potential carcinogenicity.
Organic compounds containing the carboxy group (-COOH). This group of compounds includes amino acids and fatty acids. Carboxylic acids can be saturated, unsaturated, or aromatic.
The study of microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, algae, archaea, and viruses.
Disposal, processing, controlling, recycling, and reusing the solid, liquid, and gaseous wastes of plants, animals, humans, and other organisms. It includes control within a closed ecological system to maintain a habitable environment.
Contamination of the air, bodies of water, or land with substances that are harmful to human health and the environment.
Sulfonic acid derivatives that are substituted with an aliphatic hydrocarbon group.
Liquid water present beneath the surface of the earth.
An herbicide with strong irritant properties. Use of this compound on rice fields, orchards, sugarcane, rangeland, and other noncrop sites was terminated by the EPA in 1985. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
A nonmetallic element with atomic symbol C, atomic number 6, and atomic weight [12.0096; 12.0116]. It may occur as several different allotropes including DIAMOND; CHARCOAL; and GRAPHITE; and as SOOT from incompletely burned fuel.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria widely distributed in SOIL and WATER. Its organisms are also found in raw meats, MILK and other FOOD, hospital environments, and human clinical specimens. Some species are pathogenic in humans.
Hydrocarbon compounds with one or more of the hydrogens replaced by CHLORINE.
Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.
Native, inorganic or fossilized organic substances having a definite chemical composition and formed by inorganic reactions. They may occur as individual crystals or may be disseminated in some other mineral or rock. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed; McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
Unctuous combustible substances that are liquid or easily liquefiable on warming, and are soluble in ether but insoluble in water. Such substances, depending on their origin, are classified as animal, mineral, or vegetable oils. Depending on their behavior on heating, they are volatile or fixed. (Dorland, 28th ed)
The relationships of groups of organisms as reflected by their genetic makeup.
Chemical substances that are foreign to the biological system. They include naturally occurring compounds, drugs, environmental agents, carcinogens, insecticides, etc.
A gram-positive organism found in dairy products, fresh and salt water, marine organisms, insects, and decaying organic matter.
Microscopy in which the object is examined directly by an electron beam scanning the specimen point-by-point. The image is constructed by detecting the products of specimen interactions that are projected above the plane of the sample, such as backscattered electrons. Although SCANNING TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY also scans the specimen point by point with the electron beam, the image is constructed by detecting the electrons, or their interaction products that are transmitted through the sample plane, so that is a form of TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY.
The rate dynamics in chemical or physical systems.
A carbamate insecticide and parasiticide. It is a potent anticholinesterase agent belonging to the carbamate group of reversible cholinesterase inhibitors. It has a particularly low toxicity from dermal absorption and is used for control of head lice in some countries.
An organochlorine insecticide.
Inorganic or organic salts and esters of nitric acid. These compounds contain the NO3- radical.
A copolymer of polyethylene and polypropylene ether glycol. It is a non-ionic polyol surface-active agent used medically as a fecal softener and in cattle for prevention of bloat.
The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.
Any of several processes in which undesirable impurities in water are removed or neutralized; for example, chlorination, filtration, primary treatment, ion exchange, and distillation. It includes treatment of WASTE WATER to provide potable and hygienic water in a controlled or closed environment as well as provision of public drinking water supplies.
The adhesion of gases, liquids, or dissolved solids onto a surface. It includes adsorptive phenomena of bacteria and viruses onto surfaces as well. ABSORPTION into the substance may follow but not necessarily.
Liquid, solid, or gaseous waste resulting from mining of radioactive ore, production of reactor fuel materials, reactor operation, processing of irradiated reactor fuels, and related operations, and from use of radioactive materials in research, industry, and medicine. (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
A genus of gram-negative, strictly aerobic, non-spore forming rods. Soil and water are regarded as the natural habitat. They are sometimes isolated from a hospital environment and humans.
A methylpentose whose L- isomer is found naturally in many plant glycosides and some gram-negative bacterial lipopolysaccharides.
Flammable, amorphous, vegetable products of secretion or disintegration, usually formed in special cavities of plants. They are generally insoluble in water and soluble in alcohol, carbon tetrachloride, ether, or volatile oils. They are fusible and have a conchoidal fracture. They are the oxidation or polymerization products of the terpenes, and are mixtures of aromatic acids and esters. Most are soft and sticky, but harden after exposure to cold. (From Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed & Dorland, 28th ed)
Phenols substituted in any position by an amino group.
Testing for the amount of biodegradable organic material in a water sample by measuring the quantity of oxygen consumed by biodegradation of those materials over a specific time period.
Peroxidases are enzymes that catalyze the reduction of hydrogen peroxide to water, while oxidizing various organic and inorganic compounds, playing crucial roles in diverse biological processes including stress response, immune defense, and biosynthetic reactions.
The force acting on the surface of a liquid, tending to minimize the area of the surface. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Derivatives of BENZOIC ACID. Included under this heading are a broad variety of acid forms, salts, esters, and amides that contain the carboxybenzene structure.
Contamination of bodies of water (such as LAKES; RIVERS; SEAS; and GROUNDWATER.)
Acetylene is not typically considered a medical term, but rather a chemical compound (C2H2) commonly used in industrial and laboratory settings for its high energy content and reactivity, which may have various applications in medicine such as wound healing and surgical procedures, but it is not a medical diagnosis or disease.
The type species in the genus RALSTONIA. It is often found in the hospital ward as a contaminant of antiseptic and disinfectant solutions.
A colorless liquid made by oxidation of aliphatic hydrocarbons that is used as a solvent and chemical intermediate.
Compounds consisting of two or more fused ring structures.
A genus of gram-negative, aerobic, motile, rod-shaped bacteria formerly classified as part of the genus XANTHOMONAS.
Cyclic amide of caproic acid used in manufacture of synthetic fibers of the polyamide type. Can cause local irritation.
A highly poisonous substance that was formerly used as an insecticide. The manufacture and use has been discontinued in the U.S. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
Herbaceous biennial plants and their edible bulbs, belonging to the Liliaceae.
Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.
The gradual destruction of a metal or alloy due to oxidation or action of a chemical agent. (From McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 6th ed)
Organic esters or salts of sulfonic acid derivatives containing an aliphatic hydrocarbon radical.
A selective pre- and post-emergence herbicide. (From Merck Index, 11th ed)
The spectrum of different living organisms inhabiting a particular region, habitat, or biotope.
A product of hard secondary xylem composed of CELLULOSE, hemicellulose, and LIGNANS, that is under the bark of trees and shrubs. It is used in construction and as a source of CHARCOAL and many other products.
The enrichment of a terrestrial or aquatic ECOSYSTEM by the addition of nutrients, especially nitrogen and phosphorus, that results in a superabundant growth of plants, ALGAE, or other primary producers. It can be a natural process or result from human activity such as agriculture runoff or sewage pollution. In aquatic ecosystems, an increase in the algae population is termed an algal bloom.
Phytol is a diterpene alcohol that is a degradation product of chlorophyll and is used in the synthesis of vitamins E and K and other compounds in animals, but can also act as a phytoestrogen in certain plants.
Unstable isotopes of carbon that decay or disintegrate emitting radiation. C atoms with atomic weights 10, 11, and 14-16 are radioactive carbon isotopes.
Fibrous proteins secreted by INSECTS and SPIDERS. Generally, the term refers to silkworm fibroin secreted by the silk gland cells of SILKWORMS, Bombyx mori. Spider fibroins are called spidroins or dragline silk fibroins.
The first chemical element in the periodic table. It has the atomic symbol H, atomic number 1, and atomic weight [1.00784; 1.00811]. It exists, under normal conditions, as a colorless, odorless, tasteless, diatomic gas. Hydrogen ions are PROTONS. Besides the common H1 isotope, hydrogen exists as the stable isotope DEUTERIUM and the unstable, radioactive isotope TRITIUM.
A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)
The Arctic Ocean and the lands in it and adjacent to it. It includes Point Barrow, Alaska, most of the Franklin District in Canada, two thirds of Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Lapland, Novaya Zemlya, and Northern Siberia. (Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p66)
A group of compounds that contain the general formula R-OCH3.
A species of gram-negative, aerobic rods formerly called Pseudomonas testosteroni. It is differentiated from other Comamonas species by its ability to assimilate testosterone and to utilize phenylacetate or maleate as carbon sources.
"Space maintenance in dentistry refers to the use of an appliance (such as a band or a crown) to maintain the space created by a missing primary tooth, preventing the drifting of adjacent teeth and allowing the correct eruption path for the permanent successor."
Any combustible hydrocarbon deposit formed from the remains of prehistoric organisms. Examples are petroleum, coal, and natural gas.
An organochlorine insecticide that is slightly irritating to the skin. (From Merck Index, 11th ed, p482)
Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).
Biphenyl compounds are organic substances consisting of two phenyl rings connected by a single covalent bond, and can exhibit various properties and uses, including as intermediates in chemical synthesis, components in plastics and dyes, and as additives in fuels.
A non-taxonomic term for unicellular microscopic algae which are found in both freshwater and marine environments. Some authors consider DIATOMS; CYANOBACTERIA; HAPTOPHYTA; and DINOFLAGELLATES as part of microalgae, even though they are not algae.
Microbial, plant, or animal cells which are immobilized by attachment to solid structures, usually a column matrix. A common use of immobilized cells is in biotechnology for the bioconversion of a substrate to a particular product. (From Singleton & Sainsbury, Dictionary of Microbiology and Molecular Biology, 2d ed)
An organochlorine insecticide that is carcinogenic.
Aminobenzenesulfonic acids. Organic acids that are used in the manufacture of dyes and organic chemicals and as reagents.
Biological molecules that possess catalytic activity. They may occur naturally or be synthetically created. Enzymes are usually proteins, however CATALYTIC RNA and CATALYTIC DNA molecules have also been identified.
A man-made compound previously used to control termites and other insects. Even though production of heptachlor was phased out of use in the United States during the late 1980's it remains in soil and hazardous waste sites. It is clearly toxic to animals and humans but, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has determined that heptachlor is not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans. (From ATSDR Public Heath Statement, April 1989)
A spectroscopic technique in which a range of wavelengths is presented simultaneously with an interferometer and the spectrum is mathematically derived from the pattern thus obtained.
Compounds with a benzene ring fused to a thiazole ring.
Compounds which contain the methyl radical substituted with two benzene rings. Permitted are any substituents, but ring fusion to any of the benzene rings is not allowed.
An extensive order of basidiomycetous fungi whose fruiting bodies are commonly called mushrooms.
The property of objects that determines the direction of heat flow when they are placed in direct thermal contact. The temperature is the energy of microscopic motions (vibrational and translational) of the particles of atoms.

Complete sequence of a 184-kilobase catabolic plasmid from Sphingomonas aromaticivorans F199. (1/3156)

The complete 184,457-bp sequence of the aromatic catabolic plasmid, pNL1, from Sphingomonas aromaticivorans F199 has been determined. A total of 186 open reading frames (ORFs) are predicted to encode proteins, of which 79 are likely directly associated with catabolism or transport of aromatic compounds. Genes that encode enzymes associated with the degradation of biphenyl, naphthalene, m-xylene, and p-cresol are predicted to be distributed among 15 gene clusters. The unusual coclustering of genes associated with different pathways appears to have evolved in response to similarities in biochemical mechanisms required for the degradation of intermediates in different pathways. A putative efflux pump and several hypothetical membrane-associated proteins were identified and predicted to be involved in the transport of aromatic compounds and/or intermediates in catabolism across the cell wall. Several genes associated with integration and recombination, including two group II intron-associated maturases, were identified in the replication region, suggesting that pNL1 is able to undergo integration and excision events with the chromosome and/or other portions of the plasmid. Conjugative transfer of pNL1 to another Sphingomonas sp. was demonstrated, and genes associated with this function were found in two large clusters. Approximately one-third of the ORFs (59 of them) have no obvious homology to known genes.  (+info)

Purification and characterization of gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867 and Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9869. (2/3156)

Two 3-hydroxybenzoate-inducible gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases were purified to homogeneity from Pseudomonas alcaligenes NCIB 9867 (P25X) and Pseudomonas putida NCIB 9869 (P35X), respectively. The estimated molecular mass of the purified P25X gentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase was 154 kDa, with a subunit mass of 39 kDa. Its structure is deduced to be a tetramer. The pI of this enzyme was established to be 4.8 to 5.0. The subunit mass of P35X gentisate 1, 2-dioxygenase was 41 kDa, and this enzyme was deduced to exist as a dimer, with a native molecular mass of about 82 kDa. The pI of P35X gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase was around 4.6 to 4.8. Both of the gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases exhibited typical saturation kinetics and had apparent Kms of 92 and 143 microM for gentisate, respectively. Broad substrate specificities were exhibited towards alkyl and halogenated gentisate analogs. Both enzymes had similar kinetic turnover characteristics for gentisate, with kcat/Km values of 44.08 x 10(4) s-1 M-1 for the P25X enzyme and 39.34 x 10(4) s-1 M-1 for the P35X enzyme. Higher kcat/Km values were expressed by both enzymes against the substituted gentisates. Significant differences were observed between the N-terminal sequences of the first 23 amino acid residues of the P25X and P35X gentisate 1,2-dioxygenases. The P25X gentisate 1,2-dioxygenase was stable between pH 5.0 and 7.5, with the optimal pH around 8.0. The P35X enzyme showed a pH stability range between 7.0 and 9.0, and the optimum pH was also 8.0. The optimal temperature for both P25X and P35X gentisate 1, 2-dioxygenases was around 50 degrees C, but the P35X enzyme was more heat stable than that from P25X. Both enzymes were strongly stimulated by 0.1 mM Fe2+ but were completely inhibited by the presence of 5 mM Cu2+. Partial inhibition of both enzymes was also observed with 5 mM Mn2+, Zn2+, and EDTA.  (+info)

Effect of phenylurea herbicides on soil microbial communities estimated by analysis of 16S rRNA gene fingerprints and community-level physiological profiles. (3/3156)

The effect of three phenyl urea herbicides (diuron, linuron, and chlorotoluron) on soil microbial communities was studied by using soil samples with a 10-year history of treatment. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used for the analysis of 16S rRNA genes (16S rDNA). The degree of similarity between the 16S rDNA profiles of the communities was quantified by numerically analysing the DGGE band patterns. Similarity dendrograms showed that the microbial community structures of the herbicide-treated and nontreated soils were significantly different. Moreover, the bacterial diversity seemed to decrease in soils treated with urea herbicides, and sequence determination of several DGGE fragments showed that the most affected species in the soils treated with diuron and linuron belonged to an uncultivated bacterial group. As well as the 16S rDNA fingerprints, the substrate utilization patterns of the microbial communities were compared. Principal-component analysis performed on BIOLOG data showed that the functional abilities of the soil microbial communities were altered by the application of the herbicides. In addition, enrichment cultures of the different soils in medium with the urea herbicides as the sole carbon and nitrogen source showed that there was no difference between treated and nontreated soil in the rate of transformation of diuron and chlorotoluron but that there was a strong difference in the case of linuron. In the enrichment cultures with linuron-treated soil, linuron disappeared completely after 1 week whereas no significant transformation was observed in cultures inoculated with nontreated soil even after 4 weeks. In conclusion, this study showed that both the structure and metabolic potential of soil microbial communities were clearly affected by a long-term application of urea herbicides.  (+info)

Anaerobic oxidation of o-xylene, m-xylene, and homologous alkylbenzenes by new types of sulfate-reducing bacteria. (4/3156)

Various alkylbenzenes were depleted during growth of an anaerobic, sulfate-reducing enrichment culture with crude oil as the only source of organic substrates. From this culture, two new types of mesophilic, rod-shaped sulfate-reducing bacteria, strains oXyS1 and mXyS1, were isolated with o-xylene and m-xylene, respectively, as organic substrates. Sequence analyses of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the isolates affiliated with known completely oxidizing sulfate-reducing bacteria of the delta subclass of the class Proteobacteria. Strain oXyS1 showed the highest similarities to Desulfobacterium cetonicum and Desulfosarcina variabilis (similarity values, 98.4 and 98.7%, respectively). Strain mXyS1 was less closely related to known species, the closest relative being Desulfococcus multivorans (similarity value, 86.9%). Complete mineralization of o-xylene and m-xylene was demonstrated in quantitative growth experiments. Strain oXyS1 was able to utilize toluene, o-ethyltoluene, benzoate, and o-methylbenzoate in addition to o-xylene. Strain mXyS1 oxidized toluene, m-ethyltoluene, m-isoproyltoluene, benzoate, and m-methylbenzoate in addition to m-xylene. Strain oXyS1 did not utilize m-alkyltoluenes, whereas strain mXyS1 did not utilize o-alkyltoluenes. Like the enrichment culture, both isolates grew anaerobically on crude oil with concomitant reduction of sulfate to sulfide.  (+info)

Involvement of two plasmids in the degradation of carbaryl by Arthrobacter sp. strain RC100. (5/3156)

A bacterium capable of utilizing carbaryl (1-naphthyl N-methylcarbamate) as the sole carbon source was isolated from carbaryl-treated soil. This bacterium was characterized taxonomically as Arthrobacter and was designated strain RC100. RC100 hydrolyzes the N-methylcarbamate linkage to 1-naphthol, which was further metabolized via salicylate and gentisate. Strain RC100 harbored three plasmids (designated pRC1, pRC2, and pRC3). Mutants unable to degrade carbaryl arose at a high frequency after treating the culture with mitomycin C. All carbaryl-hydrolysis-deficient mutants (Cah-) lacked pRC1, and all 1-naphthol-utilization-deficient mutants (Nat-) lacked pRC2. The plasmid-free strain RC107 grew on gentisate as a carbon source. These two plasmids could be transferred to Cah- mutants or Nat- mutants by conjugation, resulting in the restoration of the Cah and Nah phenotypes.  (+info)

Purification and characterization of a novel peroxidase from Geotrichum candidum dec 1 involved in decolorization of dyes. (6/3156)

A peroxidase (DyP) involved in the decolorization of dyes and produced by the fungus strain Geotrichum candidum Dec 1 was purified. DyP, a glycoprotein, is glycosylated with N-acetylglucosamine and mannose (17%) and has a molecular mass of 60 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 3.8. The absorption spectrum of DyP exhibited a Soret band at 406 nm corresponding to a hemoprotein, and its Na2S2O4-reduced form revealed a peak at 556 nm that indicates the presence of a protoheme as its prosthetic group. Nine of the 21 types of dyes that were decolorized by Dec 1 cells were decolorized by DyP; in particular, anthraquinone dyes were highly decolorized. DyP also oxidized 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and guaiacol but not veratryl alcohol. The optimal temperature for DyP activity was 30 degrees C, and DyP activity was stable even after incubation at 50 degrees C for 11 h.  (+info)

Decolorization and detoxification of extraction-stage effluent from chlorine bleaching of kraft pulp by Rhizopus oryzae. (7/3156)

Rhizopus oryzae, a zygomycete, was found to decolorize, dechlorinate, and detoxify bleach plant effluent at lower cosubstrate concentrations than the basidiomycetes previously investigated. With glucose at 1 g/liter, this fungus removed 92 to 95% of the color, 50% of the chemical oxygen demand, 72% of the adsorbable organic halide, and 37% of the extractable organic halide in 24 h at temperatures of 25 to 45 degrees C and a pH of 3 to 5. Even without added cosubstrate the fungus removed up to 78% of the color. Monomeric chlorinated aromatic compounds were removed almost completely, and toxicity to zebra fish was eliminated. The fungal mycelium could be immobilized in polyurethane foam and used repeatedly to treat batches of effluent. The residue after treatment was not further improved by exposure to fresh R. oryzae mycelium.  (+info)

Degradation of chloronitrobenzenes by a coculture of Pseudomonas putida and a Rhodococcus sp. (8/3156)

A single microorganism able to mineralize chloronitrobenzenes (CNBs) has not been reported, and degradation of CNBs by coculture of two microbial strains was attempted. Pseudomonas putida HS12 was first isolated by analogue enrichment culture using nitrobenzene (NB) as the substrate, and this strain was observed to possess a partial reductive pathway for the degradation of NB. From high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance analyses, NB-grown cells of P. putida HS12 were found to convert 3- and 4-CNBs to the corresponding 5- and 4-chloro-2-hydroxyacetanilides, respectively, by partial reduction and subsequent acetylation. For the degradation of CNBs, Rhodococcus sp. strain HS51, which degrades 4- and 5-chloro-2-hydroxyacetanilides, was isolated and combined with P. putida HS12 to give a coculture. This coculture was confirmed to mineralize 3- and 4-CNBs in the presence of an additional carbon source. A degradation pathway for 3- and 4-CNBs by the two isolated strains was also proposed.  (+info)

Environmental biodegradation is the breakdown of materials, especially man-made substances such as plastics and industrial chemicals, by microorganisms such as bacteria and fungi in order to use them as a source of energy or nutrients. This process occurs naturally in the environment and helps to break down organic matter into simpler compounds that can be more easily absorbed and assimilated by living organisms.

Biodegradation in the environment is influenced by various factors, including the chemical composition of the substance being degraded, the environmental conditions (such as temperature, moisture, and pH), and the type and abundance of microorganisms present. Some substances are more easily biodegraded than others, and some may even be resistant to biodegradation altogether.

Biodegradation is an important process for maintaining the health and balance of ecosystems, as it helps to prevent the accumulation of harmful substances in the environment. However, some man-made substances, such as certain types of plastics and industrial chemicals, may persist in the environment for long periods of time due to their resistance to biodegradation, leading to negative impacts on wildlife and ecosystems.

In recent years, there has been increasing interest in developing biodegradable materials that can break down more easily in the environment as a way to reduce waste and minimize environmental harm. These efforts have led to the development of various biodegradable plastics, coatings, and other materials that are designed to degrade under specific environmental conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soil pollutants" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Soil pollution refers to the presence or accumulation of hazardous substances, chemicals, or other pollutants in soil that can have negative effects on plant life, human health, and the environment.

However, if you're asking about potential health effects of exposure to soil pollutants, it could include a variety of symptoms or diseases, depending on the specific pollutant. For example, exposure to lead-contaminated soil can lead to developmental delays in children, while exposure to certain pesticides or industrial chemicals can cause neurological problems, respiratory issues, and even cancer.

If you have more specific information about a particular substance or context, I may be able to provide a more precise answer.

I apologize, but there seems to be a misunderstanding. "Soil microbiology" is not a medical term; rather, it is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms in soil. It involves understanding the diversity, ecology, and biochemistry of bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa, and other microscopic life forms found in soil. This field has applications in agriculture, environmental science, and waste management but is not directly related to medical definitions or human health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "hydrocarbons" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. Hydrocarbons are organic compounds consisting entirely of hydrogen and carbon. They are primarily used in industry as fuel, lubricants, and as raw materials for the production of plastics, fibers, and other chemicals.

However, in a broader scientific context, hydrocarbons can be relevant to medical discussions. For instance, in toxicology, exposure to certain types of hydrocarbons (like those found in gasoline or solvents) can lead to poisoning and related health issues. In environmental medicine, the pollution of air, water, and soil with hydrocarbons is a concern due to potential health effects.

But in general clinical medicine, 'hydrocarbons' wouldn't have a specific definition.

Petroleum is not a medical term, but it is a term used in the field of geology and petrochemicals. It refers to a naturally occurring liquid found in rock formations, which is composed of a complex mixture of hydrocarbons, organic compounds consisting primarily of carbon and hydrogen.

Petroleum is not typically associated with medical definitions; however, it's worth noting that petroleum and its derivatives are widely used in the production of various medical supplies, equipment, and pharmaceuticals. Some examples include plastic syringes, disposable gloves, catheters, lubricants for medical devices, and many active ingredients in medications.

In a broader sense, environmental or occupational exposure to petroleum and its byproducts could lead to health issues, but these are not typically covered under medical definitions of petroleum itself.

Chemical water pollutants refer to harmful chemicals or substances that contaminate bodies of water, making them unsafe for human use and harmful to aquatic life. These pollutants can come from various sources, including industrial and agricultural runoff, sewage and wastewater, oil spills, and improper disposal of hazardous materials.

Examples of chemical water pollutants include heavy metals (such as lead, mercury, and cadmium), pesticides and herbicides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and petroleum products. These chemicals can have toxic effects on aquatic organisms, disrupt ecosystems, and pose risks to human health through exposure or consumption.

Regulations and standards are in place to monitor and limit the levels of chemical pollutants in water sources, with the aim of protecting public health and the environment.

Chlorophenols are a group of chemical compounds that consist of a phenol ring substituted with one or more chlorine atoms. They are widely used as pesticides, disinfectants, and preservatives. Some common examples of chlorophenols include pentachlorophenol, trichlorophenol, and dichlorophenol.

Chlorophenols can be harmful to human health and the environment. They have been linked to a variety of adverse health effects, including skin and eye irritation, respiratory problems, damage to the liver and kidneys, and an increased risk of cancer. Exposure to chlorophenols can occur through contact with contaminated soil, water, or air, as well as through ingestion or absorption through the skin.

It is important to handle chlorophenols with care and to follow proper safety precautions when using them. If you are concerned about exposure to chlorophenols, it is recommended that you speak with a healthcare professional for further guidance.

Alkanes are a group of saturated hydrocarbons, which are characterized by the presence of single bonds between carbon atoms in their molecular structure. The general formula for alkanes is CnH2n+2, where n represents the number of carbon atoms in the molecule.

The simplest and shortest alkane is methane (CH4), which contains one carbon atom and four hydrogen atoms. As the number of carbon atoms increases, the length and complexity of the alkane chain also increase. For example, ethane (C2H6) contains two carbon atoms and six hydrogen atoms, while propane (C3H8) contains three carbon atoms and eight hydrogen atoms.

Alkanes are important components of fossil fuels such as natural gas, crude oil, and coal. They are also used as starting materials in the production of various chemicals and materials, including plastics, fertilizers, and pharmaceuticals. In the medical field, alkanes may be used as anesthetics or as solvents for various medical applications.

Bacteria are single-celled microorganisms that are among the earliest known life forms on Earth. They are typically characterized as having a cell wall and no membrane-bound organelles. The majority of bacteria have a prokaryotic organization, meaning they lack a nucleus and other membrane-bound organelles.

Bacteria exist in diverse environments and can be found in every habitat on Earth, including soil, water, and the bodies of plants and animals. Some bacteria are beneficial to their hosts, while others can cause disease. Beneficial bacteria play important roles in processes such as digestion, nitrogen fixation, and biogeochemical cycling.

Bacteria reproduce asexually through binary fission or budding, and some species can also exchange genetic material through conjugation. They have a wide range of metabolic capabilities, with many using organic compounds as their source of energy, while others are capable of photosynthesis or chemosynthesis.

Bacteria are highly adaptable and can evolve rapidly in response to environmental changes. This has led to the development of antibiotic resistance in some species, which poses a significant public health challenge. Understanding the biology and behavior of bacteria is essential for developing strategies to prevent and treat bacterial infections and diseases.

Sewage is not typically considered a medical term, but it does have relevance to public health and medicine. Sewage is the wastewater that is produced by households and industries, which contains a variety of contaminants including human waste, chemicals, and other pollutants. It can contain various pathogens such as bacteria, viruses, and parasites, which can cause diseases in humans if they come into contact with it or consume contaminated food or water. Therefore, the proper treatment and disposal of sewage is essential to prevent the spread of infectious diseases and protect public health.

Water microbiology is not a formal medical term, but rather a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms found in water. It involves the identification, enumeration, and characterization of bacteria, viruses, parasites, and other microscopic organisms present in water sources such as lakes, rivers, oceans, groundwater, drinking water, and wastewater.

In a medical context, water microbiology is relevant to public health because it helps to assess the safety of water supplies for human consumption and recreational activities. It also plays a critical role in understanding and preventing waterborne diseases caused by pathogenic microorganisms that can lead to illnesses such as diarrhea, skin infections, and respiratory problems.

Water microbiologists use various techniques to study water microorganisms, including culturing, microscopy, genetic analysis, and biochemical tests. They also investigate the ecology of these organisms, their interactions with other species, and their response to environmental factors such as temperature, pH, and nutrient availability.

Overall, water microbiology is a vital field that helps ensure the safety of our water resources and protects public health.

Phenol, also known as carbolic acid, is an organic compound with the molecular formula C6H5OH. It is a white crystalline solid that is slightly soluble in water and has a melting point of 40-42°C. Phenol is a weak acid, but it is quite reactive and can be converted into a variety of other chemicals.

In a medical context, phenol is most commonly used as a disinfectant and antiseptic. It has a characteristic odor that is often described as "tarry" or " medicinal." Phenol is also used in some over-the-counter products, such as mouthwashes and throat lozenges, to help kill bacteria and freshen breath.

However, phenol is also a toxic substance that can cause serious harm if it is swallowed, inhaled, or absorbed through the skin. It can cause irritation and burns to the eyes, skin, and mucous membranes, and it can damage the liver and kidneys if ingested. Long-term exposure to phenol has been linked to an increased risk of cancer.

Because of its potential for harm, phenol is regulated as a hazardous substance in many countries, and it must be handled with care when used in medical or industrial settings.

Chlorobenzenes are a group of chemical compounds that consist of a benzene ring (a cyclic structure with six carbon atoms in a hexagonal arrangement) substituted with one or more chlorine atoms. They have the general formula C6H5Clx, where x represents the number of chlorine atoms attached to the benzene ring.

Chlorobenzenes are widely used as industrial solvents, fumigants, and intermediates in the production of other chemicals. Some common examples of chlorobenzenes include monochlorobenzene (C6H5Cl), dichlorobenzenes (C6H4Cl2), trichlorobenzenes (C6H3Cl3), and tetrachlorobenzenes (C6H2Cl4).

Exposure to chlorobenzenes can occur through inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion. They are known to be toxic and can cause a range of health effects, including irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, headaches, dizziness, nausea, and vomiting. Long-term exposure has been linked to liver and kidney damage, neurological effects, and an increased risk of cancer.

It is important to handle chlorobenzenes with care and follow appropriate safety precautions to minimize exposure. If you suspect that you have been exposed to chlorobenzenes, seek medical attention immediately.

I must clarify that "Fuel Oils" is not a term typically used in medical definitions. Fuel oils are types of oil used as fuel, and they include various distillates of petroleum. They are commonly used for heating purposes or to generate electricity in industrial plants and ships.

However, if you're asking about the medical implications of exposure to fuel oils, it can cause respiratory irritation, headaches, dizziness, and nausea, especially if inhaled in large quantities or in a poorly ventilated space. Long-term exposure may lead to more severe health issues, such as bronchitis, heart disease, and cancer.

Toluene is not a medical condition or disease, but it is a chemical compound that is widely used in various industrial and commercial applications. Medically, toluene can be relevant as a substance of abuse due to its intoxicating effects when inhaled or sniffed. It is a colorless liquid with a distinctive sweet aroma, and it is a common solvent found in many products such as paint thinners, adhesives, and rubber cement.

In the context of medical toxicology, toluene exposure can lead to various health issues, including neurological damage, cognitive impairment, memory loss, nausea, vomiting, and hearing and vision problems. Chronic exposure to toluene can also cause significant harm to the developing fetus during pregnancy, leading to developmental delays, behavioral problems, and physical abnormalities.

Creosote is a thick, dark brown or black liquid that has a strong, tarry odor and is produced when wood, coal, or other organic materials are burned or distilled. It is a complex mixture of chemicals, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which have been linked to an increased risk of cancer.

In the medical context, creosote is not typically used as a treatment for any condition. However, it has been used historically as a topical antiseptic and wound dressing, due to its antibacterial properties. However, its use in this way has largely been replaced by more modern and effective treatments.

It's important to note that creosote is considered a hazardous substance and can be harmful if swallowed, inhaled, or comes into contact with the skin. It can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure has been linked to an increased risk of cancer. Therefore, it should be handled with care and used only under the supervision of a medical professional.

"Pseudomonas" is a genus of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely found in soil, water, and plants. Some species of Pseudomonas can cause disease in animals and humans, with P. aeruginosa being the most clinically relevant as it's an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing various types of infections, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems.

P. aeruginosa is known for its remarkable ability to resist many antibiotics and disinfectants, making infections caused by this bacterium difficult to treat. It can cause a range of healthcare-associated infections, such as pneumonia, bloodstream infections, urinary tract infections, and surgical site infections. In addition, it can also cause external ear infections and eye infections.

Prompt identification and appropriate antimicrobial therapy are crucial for managing Pseudomonas infections, although the increasing antibiotic resistance poses a significant challenge in treatment.

Rhodococcus is a genus of gram-positive, aerobic, actinomycete bacteria that are widely distributed in the environment, including soil and water. Some species of Rhodococcus can cause opportunistic infections in humans and animals, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems. These infections can affect various organs and tissues, such as the lungs, skin, and brain, and can range from mild to severe.

Rhodococcus species are known for their ability to degrade a wide variety of organic compounds, including hydrocarbons, making them important players in bioremediation processes. They also have complex cell walls that make them resistant to many antibiotics and disinfectants, which can complicate treatment of Rhodococcus infections.

Biotransformation is the metabolic modification of a chemical compound, typically a xenobiotic (a foreign chemical substance found within an living organism), by a biological system. This process often involves enzymatic conversion of the parent compound to one or more metabolites, which may be more or less active, toxic, or mutagenic than the original substance.

In the context of pharmacology and toxicology, biotransformation is an important aspect of drug metabolism and elimination from the body. The liver is the primary site of biotransformation, but other organs such as the kidneys, lungs, and gastrointestinal tract can also play a role.

Biotransformation can occur in two phases: phase I reactions involve functionalization of the parent compound through oxidation, reduction, or hydrolysis, while phase II reactions involve conjugation of the metabolite with endogenous molecules such as glucuronic acid, sulfate, or acetate to increase its water solubility and facilitate excretion.

Tert-butyl alcohol, also known as t-butanol or 2-methylpropan-2-ol, is not a medication or a substance used in medical treatments. Therefore, it does not have a specific medical definition. However, I can provide you with a general chemical definition:

Tert-butyl alcohol is a primary alcohol with the molecular formula (CH3)3COH. It is a colorless and flammable liquid with a characteristic camphor-like odor. Tert-butyl alcohol is used as a solvent, denaturant for alcohols, and an intermediate in chemical synthesis. It is less toxic than other common alcohols like ethanol or methanol, but it can still cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract.

Sphingomonas is a genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that are widely distributed in the environment. They are known for their ability to degrade various organic compounds and are often found in water, soil, and air samples. The cells of Sphingomonas species are typically straight or slightly curved rods, and they do not form spores.

One distinctive feature of Sphingomonas species is the presence of a unique lipid called sphingolipid in their cell membranes. This lipid contains a long-chain base called sphingosine, which is not found in the cell membranes of other gram-negative bacteria. The genus Sphingomonas includes several species that have been associated with human infections, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. These infections can include bacteremia, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. However, Sphingomonas species are generally considered to be of low virulence and are not typically regarded as major pathogens.

Chlorobenzoates are a group of chemical compounds that consist of a benzene ring substituted with one or more chlorine atoms and a carboxylate group. They are derivatives of benzoic acid, where one or more hydrogen atoms on the benzene ring have been replaced by chlorine atoms.

Chlorobenzoates can be found in various industrial applications, such as solvents, plasticizers, and pesticides. Some chlorobenzoates also have medical uses, for example, as antimicrobial agents or as intermediates in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals.

However, some chlorobenzoates can be toxic and harmful to the environment, so their use is regulated in many countries. It's important to handle and dispose of these substances properly to minimize potential health and environmental risks.

Chemical water pollution is the contamination of water bodies (such as lakes, rivers, oceans, and groundwater) with harmful chemicals or substances that negatively impact water quality and pose a threat to human health, aquatic life, and the environment. These chemical pollutants can come from various sources, including industrial and agricultural activities, waste disposal, oil spills, and chemical accidents. Examples of chemical pollutants include heavy metals (such as mercury, lead, and cadmium), pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and other hazardous substances. These chemicals can have toxic, carcinogenic, mutagenic, or teratogenic effects on living organisms and can disrupt ecosystems, leading to decreased biodiversity and impaired ecological functions.

Aromatic hydrocarbons, also known as aromatic compounds or arenes, are a class of organic compounds characterized by a planar ring structure with delocalized electrons that give them unique chemical properties. The term "aromatic" was originally used to describe their distinctive odors, but it now refers to their characteristic molecular structure and stability.

Aromatic hydrocarbons contain one or more benzene rings, which are cyclic structures consisting of six carbon atoms arranged in a planar hexagonal shape. Each carbon atom in the benzene ring is bonded to two other carbon atoms and one hydrogen atom, forming alternating double and single bonds between the carbon atoms. However, the delocalized electrons in the benzene ring are evenly distributed around the ring, leading to a unique electronic structure that imparts stability and distinctive chemical properties to aromatic hydrocarbons.

Examples of aromatic hydrocarbons include benzene, toluene, xylene, and naphthalene. These compounds have important uses in industry, but they can also pose health risks if not handled properly. Exposure to high levels of aromatic hydrocarbons has been linked to various health effects, including cancer, neurological damage, and respiratory problems.

Cresols are a group of chemical compounds that are phenolic derivatives of benzene, consisting of methyl substituted cresidines. They have the formula C6H4(OH)(\_3CH3). There are three isomers of cresol, depending on the position of the methyl group: ortho-cresol (m-cresol), meta-cresol (p-cresol), and para-cresol (o-cresol). Cresols are used as disinfectants, antiseptics, and preservatives in various industrial and commercial applications. They have a characteristic odor and are soluble in alcohol and ether. In medical terms, cresols may be used as topical antiseptic agents, but they can also cause skin irritation and sensitization.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Scenedesmus" is not a medical term. It is actually the name of a genus of green algae that are commonly found in freshwater environments. These algae are single-celled, but they can exist in colonies, and they are often used in research and industry due to their ability to produce various useful compounds. If you have any questions about biology or another non-medical topic, I'd be happy to try to help!

Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a volatile, colorless liquid with a chloroform-like odor. In the medical field, it is primarily used as a surgical anesthetic and an analgesic. However, its use in medicine has significantly decreased due to the availability of safer alternatives.

In a broader context, TCE is widely used in various industries as a solvent for cleaning metal parts, degreasing fabrics and other materials, and as a refrigerant. It's also present in some consumer products like paint removers, adhesives, and typewriter correction fluids.

Prolonged or repeated exposure to TCE can lead to various health issues, including neurological problems, liver and kidney damage, and an increased risk of certain cancers. Therefore, its use is regulated by environmental and occupational safety agencies worldwide.

Pentachlorophenol is not primarily a medical term, but rather a chemical compound with some uses and applications in the medical field. Medically, it's important to understand what pentachlorophenol is due to its potential health implications.

Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is an organochlorine compound that has been widely used as a pesticide, wood preservative, and disinfectant. Its chemical formula is C6HCl5O. It is a white crystalline solid with a distinct, somewhat unpleasant odor. In the environment, pentachlorophenol can be found in soil, water, and air as well as in various organisms, including humans.

Pentachlorophenol has been associated with several potential health risks. It is classified as a probable human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and as a possible human carcinogen by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Exposure to pentachlorophenol can occur through inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion. Potential health effects include irritation of the skin, eyes, and respiratory tract; damage to the liver and kidneys; neurological issues; and reproductive problems.

In a medical context, pentachlorophenol might be relevant in cases where individuals have been exposed to this compound through occupational or environmental sources. Medical professionals may need to assess potential health risks, diagnose related health issues, and provide appropriate treatment.

Water pollutants refer to any substances or materials that contaminate water sources and make them unsafe or unsuitable for use. These pollutants can include a wide range of chemicals, microorganisms, and physical particles that can have harmful effects on human health, aquatic life, and the environment as a whole. Examples of water pollutants include heavy metals like lead and mercury, industrial chemicals such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and dioxins, agricultural runoff containing pesticides and fertilizers, sewage and wastewater, oil spills, and microplastics. Exposure to water pollutants can cause a variety of health problems, ranging from minor irritations to serious illnesses or even death in extreme cases. Additionally, water pollution can have significant impacts on the environment, including harming or killing aquatic life, disrupting ecosystems, and reducing biodiversity.

Dichloroethylenes are a group of chemical compounds that contain two chlorine atoms and two hydrogen atoms bonded to a pair of carbon atoms. The two carbon atoms are arranged in a double-bonded configuration, resulting in a geometric isomerism known as cis-trans isomerism.

Therefore, there are two main types of dichloroethylenes:

1. cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene (also known as (Z)-1,2-dichloroethylene): This is a colorless liquid with a mild sweet odor. It is used as a solvent and in the production of other chemicals.
2. trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (also known as (E)-1,2-dichloroethylene): This is also a colorless liquid with a mild sweet odor. It is used as a refrigerant, solvent, and in the production of other chemicals.

Both cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylenes can be harmful if ingested, inhaled, or come into contact with the skin. They can cause irritation to the eyes, nose, throat, and lungs, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects such as damage to the liver and kidneys.

Surfactants, also known as surface-active agents, are amphiphilic compounds that reduce the surface tension between two liquids or between a liquid and a solid. They contain both hydrophilic (water-soluble) and hydrophobic (water-insoluble) components in their molecular structure. This unique property allows them to interact with and stabilize interfaces, making them useful in various medical and healthcare applications.

In the medical field, surfactants are commonly used in pulmonary medicine, particularly for treating respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in premature infants. The lungs of premature infants often lack sufficient amounts of natural lung surfactant, which can lead to RDS and other complications. Exogenous surfactants, derived from animal sources or synthetically produced, are administered to replace the missing or dysfunctional lung surfactant, improving lung compliance and gas exchange.

Surfactants also have applications in topical formulations for dermatology, as they can enhance drug penetration into the skin, reduce irritation, and improve the spreadability of creams and ointments. Additionally, they are used in diagnostic imaging to enhance contrast between tissues and improve visualization during procedures such as ultrasound and X-ray examinations.

"Ralstonia" is a genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that are commonly found in soil and water. Some species of Ralstonia are known to cause healthcare-associated infections, particularly in patients with compromised immune systems. These infections can include pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis. One notable species, Ralstonia solanacearum, is a plant pathogen that causes bacterial wilt in a wide range of plants.

Ralstonia bacteria are known for their ability to form biofilms, which can make them resistant to antibiotics and disinfectants. They can also survive in harsh environments, such as those with low nutrient availability and high salt concentrations. These characteristics make Ralstonia a challenging organism to control in healthcare settings and in the environment.

It's important to note that while Ralstonia bacteria can cause serious infections, they are not typically considered highly virulent or contagious. Instead, infections are often associated with contaminated medical equipment or solutions, such as intravenous fluids, respiratory therapy equipment, and contaminated water sources. Proper infection control practices, including environmental cleaning and disinfection, can help prevent the spread of Ralstonia in healthcare settings.

Benzene derivatives are chemical compounds that are derived from benzene, which is a simple aromatic hydrocarbon with the molecular formula C6H6. Benzene has a planar, hexagonal ring structure, and its derivatives are formed by replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms in the benzene molecule with other functional groups.

Benzene derivatives have a wide range of applications in various industries, including pharmaceuticals, dyes, plastics, and explosives. Some common examples of benzene derivatives include toluene, xylene, phenol, aniline, and nitrobenzene. These compounds can have different physical and chemical properties depending on the nature and position of the substituents attached to the benzene ring.

It is important to note that some benzene derivatives are known to be toxic or carcinogenic, and their production, use, and disposal must be carefully regulated to ensure safety and protect public health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Propane" is not a medical term. It is a chemical compound commonly used as a fuel for heating, cooking, and engines. Propane is a gas at room temperature and pressure, but it can be liquefied under moderate pressure and stored in cylinders or tanks.

If you have any questions about a medical term or concept, I'd be happy to try to help answer those for you!

Benzene is a colorless, flammable liquid with a sweet odor. It has the molecular formula C6H6 and is composed of six carbon atoms arranged in a ring, bonded to six hydrogen atoms. Benzene is an important industrial solvent and is used as a starting material in the production of various chemicals, including plastics, rubber, resins, and dyes. It is also a natural component of crude oil and gasoline.

In terms of medical relevance, benzene is classified as a human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Long-term exposure to high levels of benzene can cause various health effects, including anemia, leukemia, and other blood disorders. Occupational exposure to benzene is regulated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to protect workers from potential health hazards.

It's important to note that while benzene has legitimate uses in industry, it should be handled with care due to its known health risks. Exposure to benzene can occur through inhalation, skin contact, or accidental ingestion, so appropriate safety measures must be taken when handling this chemical.

Phenanthrenes are not typically defined in a medical context, but they are a class of organic compounds that have a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon structure consisting of three benzene rings fused together. They can be found in some natural products and have been studied for their potential pharmacological properties. Some phenanthrenes have shown anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and cytotoxic activities, among others. However, more research is needed to fully understand their therapeutic potential and safety profile.

Aerobiosis is the process of living, growing, and functioning in the presence of oxygen. It refers to the metabolic processes that require oxygen to break down nutrients and produce energy in cells. This is in contrast to anaerobiosis, which is the ability to live and grow in the absence of oxygen.

In medical terms, aerobiosis is often used to describe the growth of microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, that require oxygen to survive and multiply. These organisms are called aerobic organisms, and they play an important role in many biological processes, including decomposition and waste breakdown.

However, some microorganisms are unable to grow in the presence of oxygen and are instead restricted to environments where oxygen is absent or limited. These organisms are called anaerobic organisms, and their growth and metabolism are referred to as anaerobiosis.

Vinyl Chloride is not a medical term, but rather a chemical compound. It's an organochloride with the formula C2H3Cl, and it's a colorless gas at room temperature that is used primarily in the production of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastics.

However, Vinyl Chloride is relevant to medical professionals because exposure to this compound has been linked to an increased risk of a rare form of liver cancer called hepatic angiosarcoma, as well as other health problems such as neurological damage and immune system suppression. Therefore, occupational exposure to Vinyl Chloride is regulated by organizations like the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) in the United States.

Lindane is defined in medical terms as an agricultural and pharmaceutical compound that contains thegamma-isomer of hexachlorocyclohexane (γ-HCH). It has been used as a topical treatment for scabies and lice infestations, although its use is now limited due to concerns about toxicity and environmental persistence. Lindane works by disrupting the nervous system of insects, leading to paralysis and death. However, it can also have similar effects on mammals, including humans, at high doses or with prolonged exposure. Therefore, its use is restricted and alternatives are recommended for the treatment of scabies and lice.

Environmental pollutants are defined as any substances or energy (such as noise, heat, or light) that are present in the environment and can cause harm or discomfort to humans or other living organisms, or damage the natural ecosystems. These pollutants can come from a variety of sources, including industrial processes, transportation, agriculture, and household activities. They can be in the form of gases, liquids, solids, or radioactive materials, and can contaminate air, water, and soil. Examples include heavy metals, pesticides, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), particulate matter, and greenhouse gases.

It is important to note that the impact of environmental pollutants on human health and the environment can be acute (short-term) or chronic (long-term) and it depends on the type, concentration, duration and frequency of exposure. Some common effects of environmental pollutants include respiratory problems, cancer, neurological disorders, reproductive issues, and developmental delays in children.

It is important to monitor, control and reduce the emissions of these pollutants through regulations, technology advancements, and sustainable practices to protect human health and the environment.

Anaerobiosis is a state in which an organism or a portion of an organism is able to live and grow in the absence of molecular oxygen (O2). In biological contexts, "anaerobe" refers to any organism that does not require oxygen for growth, and "aerobe" refers to an organism that does require oxygen for growth.

There are two types of anaerobes: obligate anaerobes, which cannot tolerate the presence of oxygen and will die if exposed to it; and facultative anaerobes, which can grow with or without oxygen but prefer to grow in its absence. Some organisms are able to switch between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism depending on the availability of oxygen, a process known as "facultative anaerobiosis."

Anaerobic respiration is a type of metabolic process that occurs in the absence of molecular oxygen. In this process, organisms use alternative electron acceptors other than oxygen to generate energy through the transfer of electrons during cellular respiration. Examples of alternative electron acceptors include nitrate, sulfate, and carbon dioxide.

Anaerobic metabolism is less efficient than aerobic metabolism in terms of energy production, but it allows organisms to survive in environments where oxygen is not available or is toxic. Anaerobic bacteria are important decomposers in many ecosystems, breaking down organic matter and releasing nutrients back into the environment. In the human body, anaerobic bacteria can cause infections and other health problems if they proliferate in areas with low oxygen levels, such as the mouth, intestines, or deep tissue wounds.

2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) is a type of synthetic auxin, which is a plant growth regulator. It is a white crystalline powder with a sour taste and mild characteristic odor. It is soluble in water, alcohol, and acetone, and has a melting point of 130-140°C.

2,4-D is a widely used herbicide that is primarily used to control broadleaf weeds in a variety of settings, including agriculture, lawns, and golf courses. It works by mimicking the natural plant hormone auxin, which causes uncontrolled growth in susceptible plants leading to their death.

In medicine, 2,4-D has been used experimentally as a cytotoxic agent for the treatment of cancer, but its use is not widespread due to its toxicity and potential carcinogenicity. It is important to handle this chemical with care, as it can cause skin and eye irritation, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Lignin" is not a medical term. It is a term used in the field of biology and chemistry, particularly in botany and wood science. Lignin is a complex organic polymer that binds cellulose fibers together, providing strength and rigidity to the cell walls of plants. It is a major component of wood and bark.

If you have any medical terms you would like defined or any other questions, please let me know!

Methane is not a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that is often mentioned in the context of medicine and health. Medically, methane is significant because it is one of the gases produced by anaerobic microorganisms during the breakdown of organic matter in the gut, leading to conditions such as bloating, cramping, and diarrhea. Excessive production of methane can also be a symptom of certain digestive disorders like irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO).

In broader terms, methane is a colorless, odorless gas that is the primary component of natural gas. It is produced naturally by the decomposition of organic matter in anaerobic conditions, such as in landfills, wetlands, and the digestive tracts of animals like cows and humans. Methane is also a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential 25 times greater than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time frame.

I apologize for any confusion, but "Polyporaceae" is not a medical term. It is a taxonomic category in mycology, which is the branch of biology that deals with the study of fungi.

Polyporaceae is a family of fungi that includes various types of polypores, which are characterized by having pores on the underside of their fruiting bodies (the above-ground reproductive structures) instead of gills. These fungi are mostly saprotrophic, meaning they decompose dead or decaying organic matter to obtain nutrients. Some species can also be parasitic and cause diseases in living trees.

Examples of genera within Polyporaceae include Trametes, Ganoderma, Fomes, and Irpex, among others. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, please feel free to ask!

Dioxygenases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the incorporation of both atoms of molecular oxygen (O2) into their substrates. They are classified based on the type of reaction they catalyze and the number of iron atoms in their active site. The two main types of dioxygenases are:

1. Intradiol dioxygenases: These enzymes cleave an aromatic ring by inserting both atoms of O2 into a single bond between two carbon atoms, leading to the formation of an unsaturated diol (catechol) intermediate and the release of CO2. They contain a non-heme iron(III) center in their active site.

An example of intradiol dioxygenase is catechol 1,2-dioxygenase, which catalyzes the conversion of catechol to muconic acid.

2. Extradiol dioxygenases: These enzymes cleave an aromatic ring by inserting one atom of O2 at a position adjacent to the hydroxyl group and the other atom at a more distant position, leading to the formation of an unsaturated lactone or cyclic ether intermediate. They contain a non-heme iron(II) center in their active site.

An example of extradiol dioxygenase is homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, which catalyzes the conversion of homogentisate to maleylacetoacetate in the tyrosine degradation pathway.

Dioxygenases play important roles in various biological processes, including the metabolism of aromatic compounds, the biosynthesis of hormones and signaling molecules, and the detoxification of xenobiotics.

Phenols, also known as phenolic acids or phenol derivatives, are a class of chemical compounds consisting of a hydroxyl group (-OH) attached to an aromatic hydrocarbon ring. In the context of medicine and biology, phenols are often referred to as a type of antioxidant that can be found in various foods and plants.

Phenols have the ability to neutralize free radicals, which are unstable molecules that can cause damage to cells and contribute to the development of chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and neurodegenerative disorders. Some common examples of phenolic compounds include gallic acid, caffeic acid, ferulic acid, and ellagic acid, among many others.

Phenols can also have various pharmacological activities, including anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, and analgesic effects. However, some phenolic compounds can also be toxic or irritating to the body in high concentrations, so their use as therapeutic agents must be carefully monitored and controlled.

Dodecanol is a fatty alcohol with the chemical formula C12H27OH. It is a straight-chain saturated alcohol with twelve carbon atoms, and it is a white, waxy solid at room temperature. Dodecanol is used in a variety of applications, including as an emollient in skin care products, a fragrance ingredient in cosmetics, and a raw material in the production of other chemicals. It is also used as a fuel additive to increase the cetane number of diesel fuel and improve its performance. Dodecanol is not known to have any specific medical uses, but it is considered safe for use in consumer products.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "garbage" is not a term that has a specific medical definition. In general, it refers to waste material or discarded matter that is no longer needed or wanted. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you!

"Pseudomonas putida" is a species of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that is commonly found in soil and water environments. It is a non-pathogenic, opportunistic microorganism that is known for its versatile metabolism and ability to degrade various organic compounds. This bacterium has been widely studied for its potential applications in bioremediation and industrial biotechnology due to its ability to break down pollutants such as toluene, xylene, and other aromatic hydrocarbons. It is also known for its resistance to heavy metals and antibiotics, making it a valuable tool in the study of bacterial survival mechanisms and potential applications in bioremediation and waste treatment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "gasoline" is not a medical term. It is a petroleum-derived liquid used as fuel in internal combustion engines. If you have any questions about medical terms or concepts, I would be happy to help with those!

Xylenes are aromatic hydrocarbons that are often used as solvents in the industrial field. They are composed of two benzene rings with methyl side groups (-CH3) and can be found as a mixture of isomers: ortho-xylene, meta-xylene, and para-xylene.

In a medical context, xylenes may be relevant due to their potential for exposure in occupational settings or through environmental contamination. Short-term exposure to high levels of xylenes can cause irritation of the eyes, nose, throat, and lungs, as well as symptoms such as headache, dizziness, and nausea. Long-term exposure has been linked to neurological effects, including memory impairment, hearing loss, and changes in behavior and mood.

It is worth noting that xylenes are not typically considered a direct medical diagnosis, but rather a potential exposure hazard or environmental contaminant that may have health impacts.

Aerobic bacteria are a type of bacteria that require oxygen to live and grow. These bacteria use oxygen as the final electron acceptor in their respiratory chain to generate energy in the form of ATP (adenosine triphosphate). Aerobic bacteria can be found in various environments, including soil, water, and the air, as well as on the surfaces of living things. Some examples of aerobic bacteria include species of Pseudomonas, Bacillus, and Staphylococcus.

It's worth noting that some bacteria can switch between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism depending on the availability of oxygen. These bacteria are called facultative anaerobes. In contrast, obligate anaerobes are bacteria that cannot tolerate oxygen and will die in its presence.

Ethylene dibromide (EDB) is an organic compound with the formula C2H4Br2. It is a colorless, volatile liquid with a chloroform-like odor. Ethylene dibromide is a member of the family of organobromine compounds.

Ethylene dibromide has been used as a pesticide, a fumigant, and a lead scavenger in gasoline. However, due to its toxicity and environmental persistence, its use has been largely phased out in many countries. It is still used in some industrial applications, such as the production of other chemicals.

Ethylene dibromide is a known human carcinogen and can cause a variety of health effects, including respiratory irritation, nausea, vomiting, and damage to the nervous system. Long-term exposure has been linked to an increased risk of cancer, particularly of the liver and kidneys. Therefore, it is important to handle this chemical with care and to use appropriate personal protective equipment when working with it.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Fresh Water" is not a medical term. It is a term used to describe water that contains low concentrations of dissolved salts and other dissolved minerals. It is distinguished from saline water, which includes saltwater found in the ocean and brackish water found in estuaries. Fresh water is essential for many biological processes and is the primary source of water for human consumption, agriculture, and industrial use.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but Nitrilotriacetic Acid (NTA) is not a medical term. It is a chemical compound with the formula N(CH2CO2H)3. It's a white water-soluble solid used as a chelating agent, which can form stable complexes with various metal ions.

However, in a broader scientific context, it might be relevant to note that NTA has been used in biochemical research and medical fields for purposes such as metal ion removal or immobilization. But it's not a term that would typically be used in a patient-facing medical context.

Arthrobacter is a genus of Gram-positive, catalase-positive, aerobic bacteria that are commonly found in soil and water. These bacteria are known for their ability to degrade various organic compounds, including hydrocarbons, and are often used in bioremediation applications. The cells of Arthrobacter species are typically rod-shaped and may appear slightly curved or irregular. They can form dormant structures called exospores that allow them to survive in harsh environments. Arthrobacter species are not considered human pathogens and do not cause disease in humans.

Sodium benzoate is a chemical compound with the formula NaC7H5O2. It is a white crystalline powder that is readily soluble in water and alcohol. Sodium benzoate is a preservative commonly added to foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals to inhibit microbial growth.

In medical terms, sodium benzoate may also be used as a medication to treat certain metabolic disorders such as hyperammonemia, which can occur in conditions like urea cycle disorders or liver disease. In these cases, sodium benzoate acts by binding with excess ammonia in the body and converting it into a compound that can be excreted through the kidneys.

It is important to note that people with a rare genetic disorder called benzoic aciduria should avoid foods or medications containing sodium benzoate, as they are unable to metabolize this compound properly.

Halogenated hydrocarbons are organic compounds containing carbon (C), hydrogen (H), and one or more halogens, such as fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br), or iodine (I). These compounds are formed when halogens replace one or more hydrogen atoms in a hydrocarbon molecule.

Halogenated hydrocarbons can be further categorized into two groups:

1. Halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons: These include alkanes, alkenes, and alkynes with halogen atoms replacing hydrogen atoms. Examples include chloroform (trichloromethane, CHCl3), methylene chloride (dichloromethane, CH2Cl2), and trichloroethylene (C2HCl3).
2. Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons: These consist of aromatic rings, such as benzene, with halogen atoms attached. Examples include chlorobenzene (C6H5Cl), bromobenzene (C6H5Br), and polyhalogenated biphenyls like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs).

Halogenated hydrocarbons have various industrial applications, including use as solvents, refrigerants, fire extinguishing agents, and intermediates in chemical synthesis. However, some of these compounds can be toxic, environmentally persistent, and bioaccumulative, posing potential health and environmental risks.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "industrial waste" is not a term that has a medical definition. Industrial waste is a term used to describe waste produced by industrial activities, such as manufacturing, mining, and construction. It can include a wide variety of materials, including chemicals, metals, soil, and water. Proper management and disposal of industrial waste are important for protecting the environment and public health. If you have any questions related to healthcare or medical terminology, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

Decanoates are a type of esterified form of certain drugs or medications, particularly in the case of testosterone. The decanoate ester is attached to the testosterone molecule to create a longer-acting formulation. Testosterone decanoate is a slow-release form of testosterone that is used as a replacement therapy for individuals who have low levels of natural testosterone. It is administered through intramuscular injection and has a duration of action of approximately 2-3 weeks.

Other medications may also be available in decanoate ester form, but testosterone decanoate is one of the most commonly used. As with any medication or treatment plan, it's important to consult with a healthcare provider to determine the best course of action based on individual needs and medical history.

Basidiomycota is a phylum in the kingdom Fungi that consists of organisms commonly known as club fungi or club mushrooms. The name Basidiomycota is derived from the presence of a characteristic reproductive structure called a basidium, which is where spores are produced.

The basidiomycetes include many familiar forms such as mushrooms, toadstools, bracket fungi, and other types of polypores. They have a complex life cycle that involves both sexual and asexual reproduction. The sexual reproductive stage produces a characteristic fruiting body, which may be microscopic or highly visible, depending on the species.

Basidiomycota fungi play important ecological roles in decomposing organic matter, forming mutualistic relationships with plants, and acting as parasites on other organisms. Some species are economically important, such as edible mushrooms, while others can be harmful or even deadly to humans and animals.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "octanes" is not a medical term. It is a term used in chemistry and physics, particularly in reference to fuel. Octane is a hydrocarbon molecule found in gasoline, and it is used as a measure of the fuel's ability to resist engine knocking or pinging during combustion.

The octane rating of gasoline typically ranges from 87 (regular) to 91-93 (premium). Higher-octane fuels are often recommended for high-performance vehicles that have higher compression ratios in their engines. If you have any questions related to medical terminology, I'd be happy to help!

Microbial consortia refer to a group or community of microorganisms, including bacteria, archaea, fungi, and viruses, that naturally exist together in a specific environment and interact with each other. These interactions can be synergistic, where the organisms benefit from each other's presence, or competitive, where they compete for resources.

Microbial consortia play important roles in various biological processes, such as biogeochemical cycling, plant growth promotion, and wastewater treatment. The study of microbial consortia is essential to understanding the complex interactions between microorganisms and their environment, and has implications for fields such as medicine, agriculture, and environmental science.

Laccase is an enzyme (specifically, a type of oxidoreductase) that is widely distributed in plants, fungi, and bacteria. It catalyzes the oxidation of various phenolic compounds, including polyphenols, methoxy-substituted phenols, aromatic amines, and some inorganic ions, while reducing molecular oxygen to water. This enzyme plays a crucial role in lignin degradation, as well as in the detoxification of xenobiotic compounds and in the synthesis of various pigments and polymers. The medical relevance of laccase is linked to its potential applications in bioremediation, biofuel production, and biotechnology.

Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) is a type of RNA that combines with proteins to form ribosomes, which are complex structures inside cells where protein synthesis occurs. The "16S" refers to the sedimentation coefficient of the rRNA molecule, which is a measure of its size and shape. In particular, 16S rRNA is a component of the smaller subunit of the prokaryotic ribosome (found in bacteria and archaea), and is often used as a molecular marker for identifying and classifying these organisms due to its relative stability and conservation among species. The sequence of 16S rRNA can be compared across different species to determine their evolutionary relationships and taxonomic positions.

Ethylene dichloride, also known as 1,2-dichloroethane, is an organic compound with the formula ClCH2CH2Cl. It is a colorless liquid with a chloroform-like odor. Ethylene dichloride is used in the production of vinyl chloride, which is used to make polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic.

Ethylene dichloride is also an intermediate in the production of other chemicals and is used as a solvent for various industrial applications. It is highly toxic and exposure can cause a range of adverse health effects, including irritation of the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and potentially more serious issues such as liver and kidney damage. Long-term exposure has been linked to an increased risk of certain types of cancer.

It is important to handle ethylene dichloride with care and to use appropriate personal protective equipment when working with this chemical. It should be stored in a cool, well-ventilated area away from heat sources and open flames.

Oxygenases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the incorporation of molecular oxygen (O2) into their substrates. They play crucial roles in various biological processes, including the biosynthesis of many natural products, as well as the detoxification and degradation of xenobiotics (foreign substances).

There are two main types of oxygenases: monooxygenases and dioxygenases. Monooxygenases introduce one atom of molecular oxygen into a substrate while reducing the other to water. An example of this type of enzyme is cytochrome P450, which is involved in drug metabolism and steroid hormone synthesis. Dioxygenases, on the other hand, incorporate both atoms of molecular oxygen into their substrates, often leading to the formation of new carbon-carbon bonds or the cleavage of existing ones.

It's important to note that while oxygenases are essential for many life-sustaining processes, they can also contribute to the production of harmful reactive oxygen species (ROS) during normal cellular metabolism. An imbalance in ROS levels can lead to oxidative stress and damage to cells and tissues, which has been linked to various diseases such as cancer, neurodegeneration, and cardiovascular disease.

Biodegradable plastics are a type of plastic that can be broken down naturally by microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, into water, carbon dioxide, and biomass under specific conditions. This process of breakdown is known as biodegradation. The term "biodegradable" does not necessarily mean that the plastic will break down quickly or safely in all environments, and it is important to note that some plastics marketed as biodegradable may still take a long time to degrade and can still have negative impacts on the environment if not disposed of properly.

Biodegradable plastics are often made from renewable resources such as corn starch, sugarcane, or other plant-based materials, although some may also be made from petroleum-based materials. They are designed to break down more quickly and safely than traditional plastics, which can take hundreds of years to degrade and can persist in the environment, causing harm to wildlife and ecosystems.

Biodegradable plastics have potential applications in a variety of industries, including packaging, agriculture, and medical devices. However, it is important to consider the specific conditions required for biodegradation and the potential impacts on the environment when using these materials.

Catechols are a type of chemical compound that contain a benzene ring with two hydroxyl groups (-OH) attached to it in the ortho position. The term "catechol" is often used interchangeably with "ortho-dihydroxybenzene." Catechols are important in biology because they are produced through the metabolism of certain amino acids, such as phenylalanine and tyrosine, and are involved in the synthesis of various neurotransmitters and hormones. They also have antioxidant properties and can act as reducing agents. In chemistry, catechols can undergo various reactions, such as oxidation and polymerization, to form other classes of compounds.

Trinitrotoluene (TNT) is not typically considered a medical term, but it is a chemical compound with the formula C6H2(NO2)3CH3. It is a yellow, odorless solid that is used as an explosive. It is not a substance that would be encountered in a medical context, unless discussing topics such as military injuries or environmental exposures.

Naphthalene is not typically referred to as a medical term, but it is a chemical compound with the formula C10H8. It is a white crystalline solid that is aromatic and volatile, and it is known for its distinctive mothball smell. In a medical context, naphthalene is primarily relevant as a potential toxin or irritant.

Naphthalene can be found in some chemical products, such as mothballs and toilet deodorant blocks. Exposure to high levels of naphthalene can cause symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and headaches. Long-term exposure has been linked to anemia and damage to the liver and nervous system.

In addition, naphthalene is a known environmental pollutant that can be found in air, water, and soil. It is produced by the combustion of fossil fuels and is also released from some industrial processes. Naphthalene has been shown to have toxic effects on aquatic life and may pose a risk to human health if exposure levels are high enough.

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of organic compounds characterized by the presence of two or more fused benzene rings. They are called "polycyclic" because they contain multiple cyclic structures, and "aromatic" because these structures contain alternating double bonds that give them distinctive chemical properties and a characteristic smell.

PAHs can be produced from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Natural sources include wildfires, volcanic eruptions, and the decomposition of organic matter. Anthropogenic sources include the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, such as coal, oil, and gasoline, as well as tobacco smoke, grilled foods, and certain industrial processes.

PAHs are known to be environmental pollutants and can have harmful effects on human health. They have been linked to an increased risk of cancer, particularly lung, skin, and bladder cancers, as well as reproductive and developmental toxicity. PAHs can also cause skin irritation, respiratory problems, and damage to the immune system.

PAHs are found in a variety of environmental media, including air, water, soil, and food. They can accumulate in the food chain, particularly in fatty tissues, and have been detected in a wide range of foods, including meat, fish, dairy products, and vegetables. Exposure to PAHs can occur through inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact.

It is important to limit exposure to PAHs by avoiding tobacco smoke, reducing consumption of grilled and smoked foods, using ventilation when cooking, and following safety guidelines when working with industrial processes that produce PAHs.

Fluid waste disposal in a medical context refers to the proper and safe management of liquid byproducts generated during medical procedures, patient care, or research. These fluids can include bodily excretions (such as urine, feces, or vomit), irrigation solutions, blood, or other biological fluids.

The process of fluid waste disposal involves several steps:

1. Collection: Fluid waste is collected in appropriate containers that are designed to prevent leakage and contamination.
2. Segregation: Different types of fluid waste may require separate collection and disposal methods based on their infectious or hazardous nature.
3. Treatment: Depending on the type and volume of fluid waste, various treatments can be applied, such as disinfection, sterilization, or chemical neutralization, to reduce the risk of infection or harm to the environment and personnel.
4. Disposal: Treated fluid waste is then disposed of according to local regulations, which may involve transporting it to a designated waste management facility for further processing or disposal in a safe and environmentally friendly manner (e.g., deep well injection, incineration, or landfilling).
5. Documentation and tracking: Proper records should be maintained to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements and to enable effective monitoring and auditing of the waste disposal process.

It is essential to handle fluid waste disposal carefully to minimize the risk of infection, protect the environment, and maintain regulatory compliance. Healthcare facilities must adhere to strict guidelines and regulations regarding fluid waste management to ensure the safety of patients, staff, and the community.

I'm happy to help, but it seems there might be some confusion in your question. "Refuse disposal" is not a medical term per se, but rather a term used in waste management and public health. It refers to the process of getting rid of waste materials generated from human activities, such as household trash or clinical waste from hospitals and healthcare facilities.

However, if you are referring to the medical management of patients who refuse treatment or disposal of their remains after death, here are some relevant definitions:

* "Refusal of treatment" is a term used in medical ethics and law to describe a situation where a patient declines medical intervention or care. This can occur for various reasons, including lack of consent, lack of decision-making capacity, or religious or cultural beliefs.
* "Disposition of human remains" refers to the handling, processing, and final placement of a deceased person's body. In the context of patients who refuse treatment and die, this may involve arranging for their bodies to be transported to a funeral home, crematorium, or other designated facility for disposal.

I hope this clarifies any confusion. Let me know if you have any further questions!

Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) is a powerful analytical technique that combines the separating power of gas chromatography with the identification capabilities of mass spectrometry. This method is used to separate, identify, and quantify different components in complex mixtures.

In GC-MS, the mixture is first vaporized and carried through a long, narrow column by an inert gas (carrier gas). The various components in the mixture interact differently with the stationary phase inside the column, leading to their separation based on their partition coefficients between the mobile and stationary phases. As each component elutes from the column, it is then introduced into the mass spectrometer for analysis.

The mass spectrometer ionizes the sample, breaks it down into smaller fragments, and measures the mass-to-charge ratio of these fragments. This information is used to generate a mass spectrum, which serves as a unique "fingerprint" for each compound. By comparing the generated mass spectra with reference libraries or known standards, analysts can identify and quantify the components present in the original mixture.

GC-MS has wide applications in various fields such as forensics, environmental analysis, drug testing, and research laboratories due to its high sensitivity, specificity, and ability to analyze volatile and semi-volatile compounds.

"Phanerochaete" is a genus of saprotrophic fungi in the family Phanerochaetaceae. These fungi are characterized by their ability to degrade lignocellulosic materials, making them important decomposers in many ecosystems. They produce various extracellular enzymes that break down complex polymers such as cellulose and lignin, which are abundant in plant biomass. The genus Phanerochaete includes several species with medical relevance due to their potential role in human health and disease. For instance, some species have been studied for their ability to produce bioactive compounds with antimicrobial or anti-inflammatory properties. However, it is important to note that most Phanerochaete species are not typically associated with human diseases and are generally considered to be beneficial organisms in natural environments.

Bromobenzoates are a group of chemical compounds that consist of a benzene ring substituted with one or more bromine atoms and a carboxylic acid group. They are used in various applications, including as pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and intermediates in organic synthesis.

In the medical field, some bromobenzoates have been used as antimicrobial agents, while others have been investigated for their potential therapeutic benefits in treating conditions such as anxiety, insomnia, and epilepsy. However, many of these compounds have fallen out of use due to their side effects or the development of safer and more effective treatments.

It's important to note that bromobenzoates can be harmful if ingested, inhaled, or absorbed through the skin, and they may pose environmental hazards as well. Therefore, they should be handled with care and used only under the supervision of a qualified healthcare professional.

A bioreactor is a device or system that supports and controls the conditions necessary for biological organisms, cells, or tissues to grow and perform their specific functions. It provides a controlled environment with appropriate temperature, pH, nutrients, and other factors required for the desired biological process to occur. Bioreactors are widely used in various fields such as biotechnology, pharmaceuticals, agriculture, and environmental science for applications like production of therapeutic proteins, vaccines, biofuels, enzymes, and wastewater treatment.

Biotechnology is defined in the medical field as a branch of technology that utilizes biological processes, organisms, or systems to create products that are technologically useful. This can include various methods and techniques such as genetic engineering, cell culture, fermentation, and others. The goal of biotechnology is to harness the power of biology to produce drugs, vaccines, diagnostic tests, biofuels, and other industrial products, as well as to advance our understanding of living systems for medical and scientific research.

The use of biotechnology has led to significant advances in medicine, including the development of new treatments for genetic diseases, improved methods for diagnosing illnesses, and the creation of vaccines to prevent infectious diseases. However, it also raises ethical and societal concerns related to issues such as genetic modification of organisms, cloning, and biosecurity.

Betaproteobacteria is a class of proteobacteria, a group of gram-negative bacteria. This class includes several genera of bacteria that are widely distributed in the environment, and can be found in soil, water, and various organisms including humans. Some members of Betaproteobacteria are important pathogens, causing diseases such as meningitis, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. Other members of this class are capable of breaking down environmental pollutants, making them useful in bioremediation applications.

Petroleum pollution is not a medical term per se, but it is an environmental and public health issue. It refers to the contamination of the environment, particularly water bodies, soil, and air, by petroleum products or hydrocarbons. These pollutants can originate from various sources, including oil spills, leaks from underground storage tanks, runoff from roads, and improper disposal of industrial waste.

The health effects of petroleum pollution can vary depending on the type and amount of exposure. Short-term exposure to high levels of hydrocarbons can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, while long-term exposure has been linked to more severe health problems such as neurological damage, cancer, and reproductive issues. Therefore, it is crucial to prevent and mitigate petroleum pollution to protect both the environment and public health.

Absorbable implants are medical devices that are designed to be placed inside the body during a surgical procedure, where they provide support, stabilization, or other functions, and then gradually break down and are absorbed by the body over time. These implants are typically made from materials such as polymers, proteins, or ceramics that have been engineered to degrade at a controlled rate, allowing them to be resorbed and eliminated from the body without the need for a second surgical procedure to remove them.

Absorbable implants are often used in orthopedic, dental, and plastic surgery applications, where they can help promote healing and support tissue regeneration. For example, absorbable screws or pins may be used to stabilize fractured bones during the healing process, after which they will gradually dissolve and be absorbed by the body. Similarly, absorbable membranes may be used in dental surgery to help guide the growth of new bone and gum tissue around an implant, and then be resorbed over time.

It's important to note that while absorbable implants offer several advantages over non-absorbable materials, such as reduced risk of infection and improved patient comfort, they may also have some limitations. For example, the mechanical properties of absorbable materials may not be as strong as those of non-absorbable materials, which could affect their performance in certain applications. Additionally, the degradation products of absorbable implants may cause local inflammation or other adverse reactions in some patients. As with any medical device, the use of absorbable implants should be carefully considered and discussed with a qualified healthcare professional.

Seawater is not a medical term, but it is a type of water that covers more than 70% of the Earth's surface. Medically, seawater can be relevant in certain contexts, such as in discussions of marine biology, environmental health, or water safety. Seawater has a high salt content, with an average salinity of around 3.5%, which is much higher than that of freshwater. This makes it unsuitable for drinking or irrigation without desalination.

Exposure to seawater can also have medical implications, such as in cases of immersion injuries, marine envenomations, or waterborne illnesses. However, there is no single medical definition of seawater.

Sphingomonadaceae is a family of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that are commonly found in various environments such as soil, water, and clinical samples. They are characterized by the presence of sphingophospholipids in their outer membrane, which differentiates them from other gram-negative bacteria.

Members of this family are often rod-shaped or coccoid and may be motile or nonmotile. Some species have the ability to degrade various organic compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other aromatic hydrocarbons.

Sphingomonadaceae includes several genera of medical importance, such as Sphingomonas, Sphingopyxis, and Novosphingobium. These bacteria have been associated with various infections in humans, including bacteremia, pneumonia, meningitis, and urinary tract infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients. However, they are generally considered to be opportunistic pathogens, and their clinical significance is not well understood.

Methyl chloride, also known as methyl chloride or chloromethane, is not typically considered a medical term. However, it is a chemical compound with the formula CH3Cl. It is a colorless and extremely volatile liquid that easily evaporates at room temperature.

In terms of potential health impacts, methyl chloride can be harmful if inhaled, swallowed, or comes into contact with the skin. Exposure to high levels can cause symptoms such as headache, dizziness, irritation of the eyes, nose, and throat, nausea, vomiting, and difficulty breathing. Prolonged exposure or significant inhalation can lead to more severe health effects, including damage to the nervous system, liver, and kidneys.

It is essential to handle methyl chloride with care, following appropriate safety measures and guidelines, to minimize potential health risks.

Ochrobactrum is a genus of gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in various environments such as soil, water, and clinical samples. The bacteria are often resistant to multiple antibiotics and can cause opportunistic infections in humans, particularly in immunocompromised individuals.

Ochrobactrum species have been isolated from a variety of clinical specimens, including blood, urine, respiratory tract secretions, wounds, and the genitourinary tract. They have been associated with various types of infections, such as bacteremia, pneumonia, meningitis, endocarditis, and catheter-related infections.

The clinical significance of Ochrobactrum infections is not well understood due to their low virulence and the difficulty in distinguishing them from other gram-negative bacteria. However, they can be challenging to treat due to their resistance to multiple antibiotics, including beta-lactams, aminoglycosides, and fluoroquinolones.

In summary, Ochrobactrum is a genus of environmental bacteria that can cause opportunistic infections in humans, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. The clinical significance of these infections is not well understood, but they can be challenging to treat due to their antibiotic resistance.

"Pseudomonas alcaligenes" is a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium that is widely distributed in nature, commonly found in soil, water, and various clinical environments. It is a non-fermentative, aerobic organism that can utilize a wide range of organic compounds as its energy source.

The bacterium is motile and possesses a single polar flagellum for locomotion. It is known to be resistant to many antibiotics and disinfectants, making it a potential cause of nosocomial infections in hospital settings. However, "P. alcaligenes" is not typically considered a significant human pathogen and is rarely associated with serious diseases.

It's worth noting that there has been some controversy over the taxonomy of this bacterium, and some researchers have suggested that it may actually represent multiple distinct species. Therefore, the exact medical definition of "P. alcaligenes" may vary depending on the source and year of publication.

Fungi, in the context of medical definitions, are a group of eukaryotic organisms that include microorganisms such as yeasts and molds, as well as the more familiar mushrooms. The study of fungi is known as mycology.

Fungi can exist as unicellular organisms or as multicellular filamentous structures called hyphae. They are heterotrophs, which means they obtain their nutrients by decomposing organic matter or by living as parasites on other organisms. Some fungi can cause various diseases in humans, animals, and plants, known as mycoses. These infections range from superficial, localized skin infections to systemic, life-threatening invasive diseases.

Examples of fungal infections include athlete's foot (tinea pedis), ringworm (dermatophytosis), candidiasis (yeast infection), histoplasmosis, coccidioidomycosis, and aspergillosis. Fungal infections can be challenging to treat due to the limited number of antifungal drugs available and the potential for drug resistance.

"Pleurotus" is not a medical term, but a genus of fungi commonly known as oyster mushrooms. These mushrooms are often consumed for their nutritional and potential medicinal benefits. However, in a medical context, if someone is referring to "pleural," it relates to the pleura, which is the double-layered serous membrane that surrounds the lungs and lines the inside of the chest wall. Any medical condition or disease affecting this area may be described as "pleural."

Culture media is a substance that is used to support the growth of microorganisms or cells in an artificial environment, such as a petri dish or test tube. It typically contains nutrients and other factors that are necessary for the growth and survival of the organisms being cultured. There are many different types of culture media, each with its own specific formulation and intended use. Some common examples include blood agar, which is used to culture bacteria; Sabouraud dextrose agar, which is used to culture fungi; and Eagle's minimum essential medium, which is used to culture animal cells.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "geologic sediments" is not a term used in medical definitions. Geological sediments are deposits of material that accumulate over time, usually in layers, as a result of natural geological processes such as weathering, erosion, and deposition. These sediments can eventually become rock formations and provide important clues about the Earth's history, including information about past climates, environments, and life on Earth.

Oxidation-Reduction (redox) reactions are a type of chemical reaction involving a transfer of electrons between two species. The substance that loses electrons in the reaction is oxidized, and the substance that gains electrons is reduced. Oxidation and reduction always occur together in a redox reaction, hence the term "oxidation-reduction."

In biological systems, redox reactions play a crucial role in many cellular processes, including energy production, metabolism, and signaling. The transfer of electrons in these reactions is often facilitated by specialized molecules called electron carriers, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+/NADH) and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD/FADH2).

The oxidation state of an element in a compound is a measure of the number of electrons that have been gained or lost relative to its neutral state. In redox reactions, the oxidation state of one or more elements changes as they gain or lose electrons. The substance that is oxidized has a higher oxidation state, while the substance that is reduced has a lower oxidation state.

Overall, oxidation-reduction reactions are fundamental to the functioning of living organisms and are involved in many important biological processes.

Explosive agents are substances or materials that can undergo rapid chemical reactions, leading to a sudden release of gas and heat, resulting in a large increase in pressure and volume. This rapid expansion creates an explosion, which can cause significant damage to surrounding structures and pose serious risks to human health and safety.

Explosive agents are typically classified into two main categories: low explosives and high explosives. Low explosives burn more slowly than high explosives and rely on the confinement of the material to build up pressure and cause an explosion. Examples of low explosives include black powder, smokeless powder, and certain types of pyrotechnics.

High explosives, on the other hand, decompose rapidly and can detonate with great speed and force. They are often used in military applications such as bombs, artillery shells, and demolitions. Examples of high explosives include TNT (trinitrotoluene), RDX (cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine), and PETN (pentaerythritol tetranitrate).

It is important to note that the handling, storage, and use of explosive agents require specialized training and strict safety protocols, as they can pose significant risks if not managed properly.

Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) refers to the specific regions of DNA in a cell that contain the genes for ribosomal RNA (rRNA). Ribosomes are complex structures composed of proteins and rRNA, which play a crucial role in protein synthesis by translating messenger RNA (mRNA) into proteins.

In humans, there are four types of rRNA molecules: 18S, 5.8S, 28S, and 5S. These rRNAs are encoded by multiple copies of rDNA genes that are organized in clusters on specific chromosomes. In humans, the majority of rDNA genes are located on the short arms of acrocentric chromosomes 13, 14, 15, 21, and 22.

Each cluster of rDNA genes contains both transcribed and non-transcribed spacer regions. The transcribed regions contain the genes for the four types of rRNA, while the non-transcribed spacers contain regulatory elements that control the transcription of the rRNA genes.

The number of rDNA copies varies between species and even within individuals of the same species. The copy number can also change during development and in response to environmental factors. Variations in rDNA copy number have been associated with various diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders.

DNA Sequence Analysis is the systematic determination of the order of nucleotides in a DNA molecule. It is a critical component of modern molecular biology, genetics, and genetic engineering. The process involves determining the exact order of the four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and thymine (T) - in a DNA molecule or fragment. This information is used in various applications such as identifying gene mutations, studying evolutionary relationships, developing molecular markers for breeding, and diagnosing genetic diseases.

The process of DNA Sequence Analysis typically involves several steps, including DNA extraction, PCR amplification (if necessary), purification, sequencing reaction, and electrophoresis. The resulting data is then analyzed using specialized software to determine the exact sequence of nucleotides.

In recent years, high-throughput DNA sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field of genomics, enabling the rapid and cost-effective sequencing of entire genomes. This has led to an explosion of genomic data and new insights into the genetic basis of many diseases and traits.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "soil" is not a term that has a medical definition. Soil is defined as the top layer of earth in which plants grow, a mixture of organic material, clay, sand, and silt. If you have any questions related to medicine or health, I would be happy to try to help answer them for you.

Burkholderia is a genus of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in the environment, including soil, water, and associated with plants. Some species of Burkholderia are opportunistic pathogens, meaning they can cause infection in individuals with weakened immune systems or underlying medical conditions.

One of the most well-known species of Burkholderia is B. cepacia, which can cause respiratory infections in people with cystic fibrosis and chronic granulomatous disease. Other notable species include B. pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, a potentially serious infection that primarily affects the respiratory system; and B. mallei, which causes glanders, a rare but severe disease that can affect humans and animals.

Burkholderia species are known for their resistance to many antibiotics, making them difficult to treat in some cases. Proper identification of the specific Burkholderia species involved in an infection is important for determining the most appropriate treatment approach.

Biomass is defined in the medical field as a renewable energy source derived from organic materials, primarily plant matter, that can be burned or converted into fuel. This includes materials such as wood, agricultural waste, and even methane gas produced by landfills. Biomass is often used as a source of heat, electricity, or transportation fuels, and its use can help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and dependence on fossil fuels.

In the context of human health, biomass burning can have both positive and negative impacts. On one hand, biomass can provide a source of heat and energy for cooking and heating, which can improve living standards and reduce exposure to harmful pollutants from traditional cooking methods such as open fires. On the other hand, biomass burning can also produce air pollution, including particulate matter and toxic chemicals, that can have negative effects on respiratory health and contribute to climate change.

Therefore, while biomass has the potential to be a sustainable and low-carbon source of energy, it is important to consider the potential health and environmental impacts of its use and implement appropriate measures to minimize any negative effects.

Tetrahydronaphthalenes are organic compounds that consist of a naphthalene ring with two hydrogens replaced by saturated carbon chains. It is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) with a chemical formula C10H12. Tetrahydronaphthalenes can be found in various natural sources, including coal tar and some essential oils. They also have potential applications in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals and other organic compounds.

Adipates are a group of chemical compounds that are esters of adipic acid. Adipic acid is a dicarboxylic acid with the formula (CH₂)₄(COOH)₂. Adipates are commonly used as plasticizers in the manufacture of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) products, such as pipes, cables, and flooring. They can also be found in cosmetics, personal care products, and some food additives.

Adipates are generally considered to be safe for use in consumer products, but like all chemicals, they should be used with caution and in accordance with recommended guidelines. Some adipates have been shown to have potential health effects, such as endocrine disruption and reproductive toxicity, at high levels of exposure. Therefore, it is important to follow proper handling and disposal procedures to minimize exposure.

Herbicides are a type of pesticide used to control or kill unwanted plants, also known as weeds. They work by interfering with the growth processes of the plant, such as inhibiting photosynthesis, disrupting cell division, or preventing the plant from producing certain essential proteins.

Herbicides can be classified based on their mode of action, chemical composition, and the timing of their application. Some herbicides are selective, meaning they target specific types of weeds while leaving crops unharmed, while others are non-selective and will kill any plant they come into contact with.

It's important to use herbicides responsibly and according to the manufacturer's instructions, as they can have negative impacts on the environment and human health if not used properly.

Gordonia bacterium is a type of gram-positive, aerobic bacteria that belongs to the family Gordoniaceae. These bacteria are typically found in soil, water, and clinical specimens such as respiratory secretions, wounds, and blood. They are catalase-positive and oxidase-negative, and many species can produce colonies with a distinctive orange or pink color due to the production of pigments such as gordoniabactin.

Gordonia species are generally considered to be low-virulence organisms, but they have been associated with various types of infections, particularly in immunocompromised individuals. These infections can include respiratory tract infections, catheter-related bloodstream infections, and skin and soft tissue infections.

Gordonia species are often resistant to many antibiotics, including beta-lactams, macrolides, and aminoglycosides. Therefore, identification of the specific Gordonia species and susceptibility testing are important for guiding appropriate antimicrobial therapy.

Anaerobic bacteria are a type of bacteria that do not require oxygen to grow and survive. Instead, they can grow in environments that have little or no oxygen. Some anaerobic bacteria can even be harmed or killed by exposure to oxygen. These bacteria play important roles in many natural processes, such as decomposition and the breakdown of organic matter in the digestive system. However, some anaerobic bacteria can also cause disease in humans and animals, particularly when they infect areas of the body that are normally oxygen-rich. Examples of anaerobic bacterial infections include tetanus, gas gangrene, and dental abscesses.

Drug residues refer to the remaining amount of a medication or drug that remains in an animal or its products after the treatment period has ended. This can occur when drugs are not properly metabolized and eliminated by the animal's body, or when withdrawal times (the recommended length of time to wait before consuming or selling the animal or its products) are not followed.

Drug residues in animals can pose a risk to human health if consumed through the consumption of animal products such as meat, milk, or eggs. For this reason, regulatory bodies set maximum residue limits (MRLs) for drug residues in animal products to ensure that they do not exceed safe levels for human consumption.

It is important for farmers and veterinarians to follow label instructions and recommended withdrawal times to prevent the accumulation of drug residues in animals and their products, and to protect public health.

Molecular sequence data refers to the specific arrangement of molecules, most commonly nucleotides in DNA or RNA, or amino acids in proteins, that make up a biological macromolecule. This data is generated through laboratory techniques such as sequencing, and provides information about the exact order of the constituent molecules. This data is crucial in various fields of biology, including genetics, evolution, and molecular biology, allowing for comparisons between different organisms, identification of genetic variations, and studies of gene function and regulation.

Atrazine is a herbicide that is widely used to control broadleaf and grassy weeds in crops such as corn, sorghum, and sugarcane. It belongs to a class of chemicals called triazines. Atrazine works by inhibiting the photosynthesis process in plants, which ultimately leads to their death.

Here is the medical definition of Atrazine:

Atrazine: A selective systemic herbicide used for pre- and postemergence control of broadleaf weeds and grasses in corn, sorghum, sugarcane, and other crops. It acts by inhibiting photosynthesis in susceptible plants. Exposure to atrazine can occur through skin or eye contact, ingestion, or inhalation during its use or after its application. Short-term exposure to high levels of atrazine can cause irritation to the skin, eyes, and mucous membranes, while long-term exposure has been linked to reproductive effects in both humans and animals. It is classified as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

Aroclors are a series of polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) mixtures that were manufactured by the Monsanto Company. They were widely used as cooling and insulating fluids in electrical equipment, such as transformers and capacitors, due to their non-flammability, chemical stability, and electrical insulating properties.

The term "Aroclor" is followed by a four-digit number that indicates the specific mixture and its average degree of chlorination. For example, Aroclor 1242 contains approximately 42% chlorine by weight, while Aroclor 1260 contains approximately 60% chlorine by weight.

Because of their persistence in the environment and potential toxicity to humans and wildlife, the production and use of PCBs, including Aroclors, were banned in the United States in 1979 under the Toxic Substances Control Act. However, due to their widespread historical use, PCBs continue to be a significant environmental pollutant and can still be found in many older electrical equipment, building materials, and soil and water samples.

Metabolic networks and pathways refer to the complex interconnected series of biochemical reactions that occur within cells to maintain life. These reactions are catalyzed by enzymes and are responsible for the conversion of nutrients into energy, as well as the synthesis and breakdown of various molecules required for cellular function.

A metabolic pathway is a series of chemical reactions that occur in a specific order, with each reaction being catalyzed by a different enzyme. These pathways are often interconnected, forming a larger network of interactions known as a metabolic network.

Metabolic networks can be represented as complex diagrams or models, which show the relationships between different pathways and the flow of matter and energy through the system. These networks can help researchers to understand how cells regulate their metabolism in response to changes in their environment, and how disruptions to these networks can lead to disease.

Some common examples of metabolic pathways include glycolysis, the citric acid cycle (also known as the Krebs cycle), and the pentose phosphate pathway. Each of these pathways plays a critical role in maintaining cellular homeostasis and providing energy for cellular functions.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Organic chemicals" is a broad term that refers to chemical compounds containing carbon, often bonded to hydrogen. These can include natural substances like sugars and proteins, as well as synthetic materials like plastics and pharmaceuticals.

However, if you're asking about "organic" in the context of farming or food production, it refers to things that are produced without the use of synthetic pesticides, fertilizers, genetically modified organisms, irradiation, and sewage sludge.

In the field of medicine, there isn't a specific definition for 'organic chemicals'. If certain organic chemicals are used in medical contexts, they would be defined by their specific use or function (like a specific drug name).

Acenaphthene is an organic compound that is classified as a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH). It is made up of four benzene rings arranged in a specific structure. Acenaphthene is not typically used in medical applications, but it can be found in some industrial products and may be produced as a byproduct of certain chemical reactions or processes.

In the environment, acenaphthene can be released into the air, water, and soil through various sources, including the burning of coal and oil, the exhaust from vehicles, and the incineration of waste. It is not considered to be highly toxic to humans, but long-term exposure to high levels of acenaphthene has been linked to an increased risk of cancer in laboratory animals.

There are no specific medical definitions associated with acenaphthene, as it is not a substance that is typically used in medical treatments or procedures. However, it is important for healthcare professionals and researchers to be aware of the potential presence of acenaphthene and other PAHs in the environment, as these substances can have harmful effects on human health.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Trametes" is not a medical term. It is a genus name in the fungal kingdom, specifically referring to a group of wood-decay fungi commonly known as "tough polypores." These fungi are often found growing on dead or dying trees and contribute to the decomposition process in natural ecosystems. They are not associated with human diseases or medical conditions.

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a group of man-made organic chemicals consisting of 209 individual compounds, known as congeners. The congeners are formed by the combination of two benzene rings with varying numbers and positions of chlorine atoms.

PCBs were widely used in electrical equipment, such as transformers and capacitors, due to their non-flammability, chemical stability, and insulating properties. They were also used in other applications, including coolants and lubricants, plasticizers, pigments, and copy oils. Although PCBs were banned in many countries in the 1970s and 1980s due to their toxicity and environmental persistence, they still pose significant health and environmental concerns because of their continued presence in the environment and in products manufactured before the ban.

PCBs are known to have various adverse health effects on humans and animals, including cancer, immune system suppression, reproductive and developmental toxicity, and endocrine disruption. They can also cause neurological damage and learning and memory impairment in both human and animal populations. PCBs are highly persistent in the environment and can accumulate in the food chain, leading to higher concentrations in animals at the top of the food chain, including humans.

"Recycling" is not a term used in medicine. It generally refers to the process of converting waste materials into reusable products, but it does not have a specific medical definition. If you have any questions related to health or medicine, I'd be happy to help with those!

Aniline compounds, also known as aromatic amines, are organic compounds that contain a benzene ring substituted with an amino group (-NH2). Aniline itself is the simplest and most common aniline compound, with the formula C6H5NH2.

Aniline compounds are important in the chemical industry and are used in the synthesis of a wide range of products, including dyes, pharmaceuticals, and rubber chemicals. They can be produced by reducing nitrobenzene or by directly substituting ammonia onto benzene in a process called amination.

It is important to note that aniline compounds are toxic and can cause serious health effects, including damage to the liver, kidneys, and central nervous system. They can also be absorbed through the skin and are known to have carcinogenic properties. Therefore, appropriate safety measures must be taken when handling aniline compounds.

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a colorless, odorless gas that is naturally present in the Earth's atmosphere. It is a normal byproduct of cellular respiration in humans, animals, and plants, and is also produced through the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas.

In medical terms, carbon dioxide is often used as a respiratory stimulant and to maintain the pH balance of blood. It is also used during certain medical procedures, such as laparoscopic surgery, to insufflate (inflate) the abdominal cavity and create a working space for the surgeon.

Elevated levels of carbon dioxide in the body can lead to respiratory acidosis, a condition characterized by an increased concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood and a decrease in pH. This can occur in conditions such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), asthma, or other lung diseases that impair breathing and gas exchange. Symptoms of respiratory acidosis may include shortness of breath, confusion, headache, and in severe cases, coma or death.

Comamonadaceae is a family of gram-negative, aerobic or facultatively anaerobic bacteria that are commonly found in various environments such as soil, water, and the rhizosphere of plants. The name Comamonadaceae comes from the type genus Comamonas. Members of this family are known to be metabolically versatile and can degrade a wide range of organic compounds, including aromatic compounds and polysaccharides. Some species in this family are also known to be opportunistic pathogens in humans, causing infections such as pneumonia, bacteremia, and meningitis.

Triazines are not a medical term, but a class of chemical compounds. They have a six-membered ring containing three nitrogen atoms and three carbon atoms. Some triazine derivatives are used in medicine as herbicides, antimicrobials, and antitumor agents.

I apologize for the confusion, but "Xanthobacter" is not a medical term or concept. It is actually a genus name in the family of bacteria known as Xanthobacteraceae. These are aerobic, gram-negative bacteria that can be found in various environments such as soil and water. They have the ability to fix nitrogen and degrade certain organic compounds, making them important members of soil microbial communities. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I would be happy to help.

Phthalic acids are organic compounds with the formula C6H4(COOH)2. They are white crystalline solids that are slightly soluble in water and more soluble in organic solvents. Phthalic acids are carboxylic acids, meaning they contain a functional group consisting of a carbon atom double-bonded to an oxygen atom and single-bonded to a hydroxyl group (-OH).

Phthalic acids are important intermediates in the chemical industry and are used to produce a wide range of products, including plastics, resins, and personal care products. They are also used as solvents and as starting materials for the synthesis of other chemicals.

Phthalic acids can be harmful if swallowed, inhaled, or absorbed through the skin. They can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects. Some phthalates, which are compounds that contain phthalic acid, have been linked to reproductive and developmental problems in animals and are considered to be endocrine disruptors. As a result, the use of certain phthalates has been restricted in some countries.

'Alcaligenes' is a genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that are commonly found in soil, water, and the respiratory and intestinal tracts of animals. These bacteria are capable of using a variety of organic compounds as their sole source of carbon and energy. Some species of Alcaligenes have been known to cause opportunistic infections in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems. However, they are not considered major human pathogens.

The name 'Alcaligenes' comes from the Latin word "alcali," meaning "alkali," and the Greek word "genos," meaning "kind" or "race." This is because many species of Alcaligenes can grow in alkaline environments with a pH above 7.

It's worth noting that while Alcaligenes species are not typically harmful to healthy individuals, they may be resistant to certain antibiotics and can cause serious infections in people with compromised immune systems. Therefore, it is important for healthcare professionals to consider the possibility of Alcaligenes infection in patients who are at risk and to choose appropriate antibiotic therapy based on laboratory testing.

Carbon-carbon lyases are a class of enzymes that catalyze the breaking of carbon-carbon bonds in a substrate, resulting in the formation of two molecules with a double bond between them. This reaction is typically accompanied by the release or addition of a cofactor such as water or a coenzyme.

These enzymes play important roles in various metabolic pathways, including the breakdown of carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids. They are also involved in the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, such as terpenoids and alkaloids.

Carbon-carbon lyases are classified under EC number 4.1.2. in the Enzyme Commission (EC) system. This classification includes a wide range of enzymes with different substrate specificities and reaction mechanisms. Examples of carbon-carbon lyases include decarboxylases, aldolases, and dehydratases.

It's worth noting that the term "lyase" refers to any enzyme that catalyzes the removal of a group of atoms from a molecule, leaving a double bond or a cycle, and it does not necessarily imply the formation of carbon-carbon bonds.

Catechol 1,2-dioxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of catechols to muconic acids as part of the meta-cleavage pathway in the breakdown of aromatic compounds in bacteria. The enzyme requires iron as a cofactor and functions by cleaving the aromatic ring between the two hydroxyl groups in the catechol molecule. This reaction is an important step in the degradation of various environmental pollutants, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and lignin, by certain bacterial species.

Bacterial DNA refers to the genetic material found in bacteria. It is composed of a double-stranded helix containing four nucleotide bases - adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), and cytosine (C) - that are linked together by phosphodiester bonds. The sequence of these bases in the DNA molecule carries the genetic information necessary for the growth, development, and reproduction of bacteria.

Bacterial DNA is circular in most bacterial species, although some have linear chromosomes. In addition to the main chromosome, many bacteria also contain small circular pieces of DNA called plasmids that can carry additional genes and provide resistance to antibiotics or other environmental stressors.

Unlike eukaryotic cells, which have their DNA enclosed within a nucleus, bacterial DNA is present in the cytoplasm of the cell, where it is in direct contact with the cell's metabolic machinery. This allows for rapid gene expression and regulation in response to changing environmental conditions.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyethylene" is not a medical term. It is a type of synthetic plastic that is commonly used in various industrial and consumer products. Medical definitions typically refer to substances or conditions related to human health, treatment, or disease processes. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help!

Mycelium is not a specifically medical term, but it is a biological term used in fungi and other organisms. Medically, it might be relevant in certain contexts such as discussing fungal infections. Here's the general definition:

Mycelium (my-SEE-lee-um) is the vegetative part of a fungus, consisting of a mass of branching, thread-like hyphae. It is the underground portion of the fungus that supports the growth of the organism and is often responsible for the decomposition of organic material. Mycelium can be found in various environments, including soil, water, and dead or living organisms.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Trityl compounds" are not a recognized medical term or concept in the field of medicine. Trityl groups or compounds are terms used in chemistry and biochemistry to refer to organic compounds that contain a trityl group (Ph3C=), where Ph represents a phenyl group (a benzene ring).

Trityl groups are often used as protecting groups in chemical reactions, particularly in the synthesis of complex carbohydrates, nucleotides, and other biomolecules. They can also be used in various applications such as radiopharmaceuticals for medical imaging. However, they do not have a specific medical definition or relevance on their own.

If you have any questions related to the chemistry or use of trityl compounds, I would recommend consulting a chemistry or biochemistry resource or expert.

Nitrophenols are organic compounds that contain a hydroxyl group (-OH) attached to a phenyl ring (aromatic hydrocarbon) and one or more nitro groups (-NO2). They have the general structure R-C6H4-NO2, where R represents the hydroxyl group.

Nitrophenols are known for their distinctive yellow to brown color and can be found in various natural sources such as plants and microorganisms. Some common nitrophenols include:

* p-Nitrophenol (4-nitrophenol)
* o-Nitrophenol (2-nitrophenol)
* m-Nitrophenol (3-nitrophenol)

These compounds are used in various industrial applications, including dyes, pharmaceuticals, and agrochemicals. However, they can also be harmful to human health and the environment, as some nitrophenols have been identified as potential environmental pollutants and may pose risks to human health upon exposure.

Carboxylic acids are organic compounds that contain a carboxyl group, which is a functional group made up of a carbon atom doubly bonded to an oxygen atom and single bonded to a hydroxyl group. The general formula for a carboxylic acid is R-COOH, where R represents the rest of the molecule.

Carboxylic acids can be found in various natural sources such as in fruits, vegetables, and animal products. Some common examples of carboxylic acids include formic acid (HCOOH), acetic acid (CH3COOH), propionic acid (C2H5COOH), and butyric acid (C3H7COOH).

Carboxylic acids have a variety of uses in industry, including as food additives, pharmaceuticals, and industrial chemicals. They are also important intermediates in the synthesis of other organic compounds. In the body, carboxylic acids play important roles in metabolism and energy production.

Microbiology is the branch of biology that deals with the study of microorganisms, which are tiny living organisms including bacteria, viruses, fungi, parasites, algae, and some types of yeasts and molds. These organisms are usually too small to be seen with the naked eye and require the use of a microscope for observation.

Microbiology encompasses various subdisciplines, including bacteriology (the study of bacteria), virology (the study of viruses), mycology (the study of fungi), parasitology (the study of parasites), and protozoology (the study of protozoa).

Microbiologists study the structure, function, ecology, evolution, and classification of microorganisms. They also investigate their role in human health and disease, as well as their impact on the environment, agriculture, and industry. Microbiology has numerous applications in medicine, including the development of vaccines, antibiotics, and other therapeutic agents, as well as in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases.

I'm happy to help, but I must clarify that I can't provide a "medical definition" of waste management since it is not a medical term per se. Waste management is a broader environmental and public health issue. However, I can offer a definition related to healthcare facilities:

Waste management in the context of healthcare facilities refers to the practices, processes, and systems used to collect, transport, treat, dispose, recycle, or reuse waste materials generated from healthcare activities. This includes various types of waste such as hazardous (e.g., infectious, chemical, pharmaceutical), non-hazardous, and radioactive waste. Proper management is crucial to prevent infection, protect the environment, conserve resources, and ensure occupational safety for healthcare workers and the public.

Environmental pollution is the introduction or presence of harmful substances, energies, or objects in the environment that can cause adverse effects on living organisms and ecosystems. These pollutants can be in the form of chemical, physical, or biological agents that contaminate air, water, soil, or noise levels, exceeding safe limits established by environmental regulations.

Examples of environmental pollution include:

1. Air pollution: The presence of harmful substances such as particulate matter, sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the air that can cause respiratory and other health problems.
2. Water pollution: Contamination of water sources with chemicals, heavy metals, pathogens, or other pollutants that can harm aquatic life and make the water unsafe for human consumption or recreational use.
3. Soil pollution: The presence of harmful substances such as heavy metals, pesticides, and industrial waste in soil that can reduce soil fertility, contaminate crops, and pose a risk to human health.
4. Noise pollution: Excessive noise levels from transportation, industrial activities, or other sources that can cause stress, sleep disturbances, and hearing loss in humans and animals.
5. Light pollution: The excessive use of artificial light that can disrupt ecosystems, affect human circadian rhythms, and contribute to energy waste.

Environmental pollution is a significant global health issue that requires urgent attention and action from governments, industries, and individuals to reduce pollutant emissions, promote sustainable practices, and protect the environment for future generations.

Alkanesulfonic acids are a type of organic compound that consist of an alkane chain, which is a saturated hydrocarbon, with a sulfonic acid group (-SO3H) attached to one end of the chain. The general formula for an alkanesulfonic acid is CnH2n+1SO3H, where n represents the number of carbon atoms in the alkane chain.

Alkanesulfonic acids are strong acids and are highly soluble in water. They are commonly used as detergents, catalysts, and intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals. Some examples of alkanesulfonic acids include methanesulfonic acid (CH3SO3H), ethanesulfonic acid (C2H5SO3H), and p-toluensulfonic acid (C6H4CH3SO3H).

Groundwater, in the context of environmental or public health, is often referred to in relation to potential sources of drinking water or as a potential route of exposure for contaminants. However, groundwater itself is not a medical term, but rather a geological one. Here's a simple definition:

Groundwater is the water that saturates the pore spaces within soil and rock formations below the land surface of Earth. It's a significant source of fresh water for many uses, including drinking, agriculture, and industry. However, it can also be vulnerable to contamination from various sources, such as agricultural runoff, industrial discharge, or improper waste disposal. Therefore, protecting groundwater quality is a critical public health issue.

2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T) is a synthetic auxin, or plant growth regulator, that has been used as an herbicide. It was a component of Agent Orange, which was used as a defoliant during the Vietnam War. 2,4,5-T has been banned in many countries due to concerns about its toxicity and potential health effects.

It is important to note that exposure to 2,4,5-T has been linked to various health issues, including developmental and reproductive problems, as well as an increased risk of cancer. It is classified as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

It's also important to note that 2,4,5-T is not used in medical field, it's mainly used as herbicide and defoliant.

In the context of medical definitions, 'carbon' is not typically used as a standalone term. Carbon is an element with the symbol C and atomic number 6, which is naturally abundant in the human body and the environment. It is a crucial component of all living organisms, forming the basis of organic compounds, such as proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA).

Carbon forms strong covalent bonds with various elements, allowing for the creation of complex molecules that are essential to life. In this sense, carbon is a fundamental building block of life on Earth. However, it does not have a specific medical definition as an isolated term.

Flavobacterium is a genus of Gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that are widely distributed in various environments such as water, soil, and associated with plants and animals. They are facultative anaerobes, which means they can grow in the presence or absence of oxygen. Some species of Flavobacterium are known to cause opportunistic infections in humans, particularly in individuals with compromised immune systems. These infections can include respiratory tract infections, wound infections, and bacteremia (bloodstream infections). However, Flavobacterium infections are relatively rare in healthy individuals.

It's worth noting that while some species of Flavobacterium have been associated with human disease, many others are important members of the microbial community in various environments and play beneficial roles in biogeochemical cycles and food webs.

Chlorinated hydrocarbons are a group of organic compounds that contain carbon (C), hydrogen (H), and chlorine (Cl) atoms. These chemicals are formed by replacing one or more hydrogen atoms in a hydrocarbon molecule with chlorine atoms. The properties of chlorinated hydrocarbons can vary widely, depending on the number and arrangement of chlorine and hydrogen atoms in the molecule.

Chlorinated hydrocarbons have been widely used in various industrial applications, including as solvents, refrigerants, pesticides, and chemical intermediates. Some well-known examples of chlorinated hydrocarbons are:

1. Methylene chloride (dichloromethane) - a colorless liquid with a mild sweet odor, used as a solvent in various industrial applications, including the production of pharmaceuticals and photographic films.
2. Chloroform - a heavy, volatile, and sweet-smelling liquid, used as an anesthetic in the past but now mainly used in chemical synthesis.
3. Carbon tetrachloride - a colorless, heavy, and nonflammable liquid with a mildly sweet odor, once widely used as a solvent and fire extinguishing agent but now largely phased out due to its ozone-depleting properties.
4. Vinyl chloride - a flammable, colorless gas, used primarily in the production of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastic and other synthetic materials.
5. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) - a group of highly stable and persistent organic compounds that were widely used as coolants and insulating fluids in electrical equipment but are now banned due to their toxicity and environmental persistence.

Exposure to chlorinated hydrocarbons can occur through inhalation, skin contact, or ingestion, depending on the specific compound and its physical state. Some chlorinated hydrocarbons have been linked to various health effects, including liver and kidney damage, neurological disorders, reproductive issues, and cancer. Therefore, proper handling, use, and disposal of these chemicals are essential to minimize potential health risks.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Polyesters" is not a medical term. It is a term used in materials science and textile industry to describe a type of synthetic fiber made from polymers characterized by the presence of ester groups in their main chain. If you have any questions related to medical terminology or concepts, I'd be happy to help with those instead!

In the context of nutrition and health, minerals are inorganic elements that are essential for various bodily functions, such as nerve impulse transmission, muscle contraction, maintaining fluid and electrolyte balance, and bone structure. They are required in small amounts compared to macronutrients (carbohydrates, proteins, and fats) and are obtained from food and water.

Some of the major minerals include calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, and chloride, while trace minerals or microminerals are required in even smaller amounts and include iron, zinc, copper, manganese, iodine, selenium, and fluoride.

It's worth noting that the term "minerals" can also refer to geological substances found in the earth, but in medical terminology, it specifically refers to the essential inorganic elements required for human health.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, oils are typically defined as lipid-based substances that are derived from plants or animals. They are made up of molecules called fatty acids, which can be either saturated or unsaturated. Oils are often used in medical treatments and therapies due to their ability to deliver active ingredients through the skin, as well as their moisturizing and soothing properties. Some oils, such as essential oils, are also used in aromatherapy for their potential therapeutic benefits. However, it's important to note that some oils can be toxic or irritating if ingested or applied to the skin in large amounts, so they should always be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional.

Phylogeny is the evolutionary history and relationship among biological entities, such as species or genes, based on their shared characteristics. In other words, it refers to the branching pattern of evolution that shows how various organisms have descended from a common ancestor over time. Phylogenetic analysis involves constructing a tree-like diagram called a phylogenetic tree, which depicts the inferred evolutionary relationships among organisms or genes based on molecular sequence data or other types of characters. This information is crucial for understanding the diversity and distribution of life on Earth, as well as for studying the emergence and spread of diseases.

Xenobiotics are substances that are foreign to a living organism and usually originate outside of the body. This term is often used in the context of pharmacology and toxicology to refer to drugs, chemicals, or other agents that are not naturally produced by or expected to be found within the body.

When xenobiotics enter the body, they undergo a series of biotransformation processes, which involve metabolic reactions that convert them into forms that can be more easily excreted from the body. These processes are primarily carried out by enzymes in the liver and other organs.

It's worth noting that some xenobiotics can have beneficial effects on the body when used as medications or therapeutic agents, while others can be harmful or toxic. Therefore, understanding how the body metabolizes and eliminates xenobiotics is important for developing safe and effective drugs, as well as for assessing the potential health risks associated with exposure to environmental chemicals and pollutants.

Brevibacterium is a genus of Gram-positive, rod-shaped bacteria that are commonly found in nature, particularly in soil, water, and various types of decaying organic matter. Some species of Brevibacterium can also be found on the skin of animals and humans, where they play a role in the production of body odor.

Brevibacterium species are known for their ability to produce a variety of enzymes that allow them to break down complex organic compounds into simpler molecules. This makes them useful in a number of industrial applications, such as the production of cheese and other fermented foods, as well as in the bioremediation of contaminated environments.

In medical contexts, Brevibacterium species are rarely associated with human disease. However, there have been occasional reports of infections caused by these bacteria, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or who have undergone surgical procedures. These infections can include bacteremia (bloodstream infections), endocarditis (inflammation of the heart valves), and soft tissue infections. Treatment typically involves the use of antibiotics that are effective against Gram-positive bacteria, such as vancomycin or teicoplanin.

Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) is a type of electron microscopy that uses a focused beam of electrons to scan the surface of a sample and produce a high-resolution image. In SEM, a beam of electrons is scanned across the surface of a specimen, and secondary electrons are emitted from the sample due to interactions between the electrons and the atoms in the sample. These secondary electrons are then detected by a detector and used to create an image of the sample's surface topography. SEM can provide detailed images of the surface of a wide range of materials, including metals, polymers, ceramics, and biological samples. It is commonly used in materials science, biology, and electronics for the examination and analysis of surfaces at the micro- and nanoscale.

In the context of medicine and pharmacology, "kinetics" refers to the study of how a drug moves throughout the body, including its absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (often abbreviated as ADME). This field is called "pharmacokinetics."

1. Absorption: This is the process of a drug moving from its site of administration into the bloodstream. Factors such as the route of administration (e.g., oral, intravenous, etc.), formulation, and individual physiological differences can affect absorption.

2. Distribution: Once a drug is in the bloodstream, it gets distributed throughout the body to various tissues and organs. This process is influenced by factors like blood flow, protein binding, and lipid solubility of the drug.

3. Metabolism: Drugs are often chemically modified in the body, typically in the liver, through processes known as metabolism. These changes can lead to the formation of active or inactive metabolites, which may then be further distributed, excreted, or undergo additional metabolic transformations.

4. Excretion: This is the process by which drugs and their metabolites are eliminated from the body, primarily through the kidneys (urine) and the liver (bile).

Understanding the kinetics of a drug is crucial for determining its optimal dosing regimen, potential interactions with other medications or foods, and any necessary adjustments for special populations like pediatric or geriatric patients, or those with impaired renal or hepatic function.

Carbaryl is a carbamate pesticide that is used to control a wide variety of insects, including fleas, ticks, and mosquitoes. It works by inhibiting the action of an enzyme called cholinesterase, which is necessary for the proper functioning of the nervous system in insects. This leads to paralysis and death of the pests. Carbaryl is also used in some veterinary products to treat parasitic infestations. It can be found in various forms, such as powders, granules, and solutions, and can be applied to plants, animals, and indoor/outdoor surfaces. However, it can be harmful to non-target organisms, including humans, if not used properly. Therefore, it is important to follow the label instructions carefully when using carbaryl products.

Dicofol is an organic compound that is primarily used as a pesticide, specifically as an acaricide to control mites in various crops. It is a technical grade of the chemical compound, which means it may contain small amounts of other related compounds. Dicofol is an organochlorine insecticide, and its chemical structure is similar to that of DDT.

The medical definition of Dicofol relates to its potential health effects on humans. It has been classified as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) based on limited evidence in experimental animals. Exposure to Dicofol may cause irritation to the skin, eyes, and respiratory tract. Long-term exposure may also affect the nervous system and reproductive system. However, it is important to note that the use of Dicofol as a pesticide is regulated by various governmental agencies worldwide, and its use is subject to strict guidelines and safety measures to minimize human exposure.

Nitrates are chemical compounds that consist of a nitrogen atom bonded to three oxygen atoms (NO3-). In the context of medical science, nitrates are often discussed in relation to their use as medications or their presence in food and water.

As medications, nitrates are commonly used to treat angina (chest pain) caused by coronary artery disease. Nitrates work by relaxing and widening blood vessels, which improves blood flow and reduces the workload on the heart. Some examples of nitrate medications include nitroglycerin, isosorbide dinitrate, and isosorbide mononitrate.

In food and water, nitrates are naturally occurring compounds that can be found in a variety of vegetables, such as spinach, beets, and lettuce. They can also be present in fertilizers and industrial waste, which can contaminate groundwater and surface water sources. While nitrates themselves are not harmful, they can be converted into potentially harmful compounds called nitrites under certain conditions, particularly in the digestive system of young children or in the presence of bacteria such as those found in unpasteurized foods. Excessive levels of nitrites can react with hemoglobin in the blood to form methemoglobin, which cannot transport oxygen effectively and can lead to a condition called methemoglobinemia.

Poloxalene is not a medical term, but a chemical compound. It's an ether used as a non-ionic surfactant and emulsifying agent in the pharmaceutical industry. Poloxalene is also known for its ability to reduce the severity of bloat (gas distention) in animals, particularly in ruminants like cows, when included in their feed. However, it's not typically used as a human medication.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "materials testing" is not a medical term per se. It is a term used in various fields, including engineering and materials science, to describe the process of subjecting materials to different tests to evaluate their properties and performance under various conditions.

In the context of medical devices or implants, materials testing may refer to the evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in their construction. These tests can include assessments of strength, durability, biocompatibility, and other factors that are critical to ensuring the safety and efficacy of medical devices.

Medical device manufacturers must comply with regulatory standards for materials testing to ensure that their products meet specific requirements for performance, safety, and quality. These standards may vary depending on the type of device, its intended use, and the country or region in which it will be marketed and sold.

Water purification is the process of removing or reducing contaminants in water to make it safe and suitable for specific uses, such as drinking, cooking, irrigation, or medical purposes. This is typically achieved through physical, chemical, or biological methods, or a combination thereof. The goal is to eliminate or reduce harmful substances like bacteria, viruses, parasites, heavy metals, pesticides, and other pollutants that can cause illness or negatively impact human health, aquatic life, or the environment.

The specific purification methods used may vary depending on the nature of the contaminants and the desired level of purity for the intended use. Common techniques include filtration (using various types of filters like activated carbon, ceramic, or reverse osmosis), disinfection (using chemicals like chlorine or UV light to kill microorganisms), sedimentation (allowing particles to settle and be removed), and distillation (heating water to create steam, which is then condensed back into pure water).

Adsorption is a process in which atoms, ions, or molecules from a gas, liquid, or dissolved solid accumulate on the surface of a material. This occurs because the particles in the adsorbate (the substance being adsorbed) have forces that attract them to the surface of the adsorbent (the material that the adsorbate is adhering to).

In medical terms, adsorption can refer to the use of materials with adsorptive properties to remove harmful substances from the body. For example, activated charcoal is sometimes used in the treatment of poisoning because it can adsorb a variety of toxic substances and prevent them from being absorbed into the bloodstream.

It's important to note that adsorption is different from absorption, which refers to the process by which a substance is taken up and distributed throughout a material or tissue.

Radioactive waste is defined in the medical context as any material that contains radioactive nuclides in sufficient concentrations or for such durations that it is considered a threat to human health and the environment. It includes materials ranging from used hospital supplies, equipment, and substances contaminated with radionuclides, to liquids and gases released during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel.

Radioactive waste can be classified into two main categories:

1. Exempt waste: Waste that does not require long-term management as a radioactive waste due to its low activity and short half-life.
2. Radioactive waste: Waste that requires long-term management as a radioactive waste due to its higher activity or longer half-life, which can pose a threat to human health and the environment for many years.

Radioactive waste management is a critical aspect of nuclear medicine and radiation safety, with regulations in place to ensure proper handling, storage, transportation, and disposal of such materials.

Achromobacter is a genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that are commonly found in various environments such as soil, water, and clinical settings. The cells of Achromobacter are typically rod-shaped and motile, with polar flagella. Some species of Achromobacter have been known to cause opportunistic infections in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or underlying medical conditions. These infections can include pneumonia, bacteremia, and urinary tract infections. It is important to note that Achromobacter is generally resistant to many antibiotics, which can make treatment of infections caused by these bacteria challenging.

Rhamnose is a naturally occurring sugar or monosaccharide, that is commonly found in various plants and some fruits. It is a type of deoxy sugar, which means it lacks one hydroxyl group (-OH) compared to a regular hexose sugar. Specifically, rhamnose has a hydrogen atom instead of a hydroxyl group at the 6-position of its structure.

Rhamnose is an essential component of various complex carbohydrates and glycoconjugates found in plant cell walls, such as pectins and glycoproteins. It also plays a role in bacterial cell wall biosynthesis and is used in the production of some antibiotics.

In medical contexts, rhamnose may be relevant to research on bacterial infections, plant-derived medicines, or the metabolism of certain sugars. However, it is not a commonly used term in clinical medicine.

In a medical context, "resins, plant" refer to the sticky, often aromatic substances produced by certain plants. These resins are typically composed of a mixture of volatile oils, terpenes, and rosin acids. They may be present in various parts of the plant, including leaves, stems, and roots, and are often found in specialized structures such as glands or ducts.

Plant resins have been used for centuries in traditional medicine and other applications. Some resins have antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, or analgesic properties and have been used to treat a variety of ailments, including skin conditions, respiratory infections, and pain.

Examples of plant resins with medicinal uses include:

* Frankincense (Boswellia spp.) resin has been used in traditional medicine to treat inflammation, arthritis, and asthma.
* Myrrh (Commiphora spp.) resin has been used as an antiseptic, astringent, and anti-inflammatory agent.
* Pine resin has been used topically for its antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory properties.

It's important to note that while some plant resins have demonstrated medicinal benefits, they should be used with caution and under the guidance of a healthcare professional. Some resins can have adverse effects or interact with medications, and it's essential to ensure their safe and effective use.

Aminophenols are organic compounds that consist of an amino group (-NH2) attached to a phenol group (aromatic ring with a hydroxyl group, -OH). There are two primary aminophenols: para-aminophenol (PAP) and ortho-aminophenol (OAP), which differ in the position of the amino group on the aromatic ring.

Para-aminophenol (PAP):
Chemical formula: C6H5NOH
IUPAC name: 4-Aminophenol

Ortho-aminophenol (OAP):
Chemical formula: C6H5NOH
IUPAC name: 2-Aminophenol

These compounds have various applications, including pharmaceuticals, dyes, and chemical intermediates. However, they can also be toxic and pose health risks if not handled properly. For instance, PAP is a metabolite of the analgesic drug paracetamol (acetaminophen), and overexposure to it can lead to liver damage.

Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD) analysis is a laboratory test used to determine the amount of oxygen consumed by microorganisms during the decomposition of organic matter in a sample of water. It is a measure of the pollution potential of a wastewater, with higher BOD values indicating greater pollution. The test involves measuring the difference in dissolved oxygen (DO) levels between a controlled incubation period (usually five days) and the initial DO level. The difference is reported as the BOD, typically expressed in milligrams per liter (mg/L) or parts per million (ppm). This information helps in assessing the effectiveness of wastewater treatment processes and monitoring water quality in rivers, streams, and other bodies of water.

Peroxidases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of various substrates using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as the electron acceptor. These enzymes contain a heme prosthetic group, which plays a crucial role in their catalytic activity. Peroxidases are widely distributed in nature and can be found in plants, animals, and microorganisms. They play important roles in various biological processes, including defense against oxidative stress, lignin degradation, and host-pathogen interactions. Some common examples of peroxidases include glutathione peroxidase, which helps protect cells from oxidative damage, and horseradish peroxidase, which is often used in laboratory research.

Surface tension is not a term that has a specific medical definition. However, it is a physical chemistry concept that relates to the cohesive force between liquid molecules, causing the surface of the liquid to contract and have a higher intermolecular force than its bulk.

In a broader sense, surface tension can have implications in certain medical or biological contexts, such as the movement of liquids in the lungs or the stability of lipid bilayers in cell membranes. But it is not a term that is typically used to describe medical conditions or treatments.

Benzoates are the salts and esters of benzoic acid. They are widely used as preservatives in foods, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals to prevent the growth of microorganisms. The chemical formula for benzoic acid is C6H5COOH, and when it is combined with a base (like sodium or potassium), it forms a benzoate salt (e.g., sodium benzoate or potassium benzoate). When benzoic acid reacts with an alcohol, it forms a benzoate ester (e.g., methyl benzoate or ethyl benzoate).

Benzoates are generally considered safe for use in food and cosmetics in small quantities. However, some people may have allergies or sensitivities to benzoates, which can cause reactions such as hives, itching, or asthma symptoms. In addition, there is ongoing research into the potential health effects of consuming high levels of benzoates over time, particularly in relation to gut health and the development of certain diseases.

In a medical context, benzoates may also be used as a treatment for certain conditions. For example, sodium benzoate is sometimes given to people with elevated levels of ammonia in their blood (hyperammonemia) to help reduce those levels and prevent brain damage. This is because benzoates can bind with excess ammonia in the body and convert it into a form that can be excreted in urine.

Water pollution is defined medically as the contamination of water sources by harmful or sufficient amounts of foreign substances (pathogens, chemicals, toxic compounds, etc.) which tend to interfere with its normal functioning and can have negative effects on human health. Such pollutants can find their way into water bodies through various means including industrial waste disposal, agricultural runoff, oil spills, sewage and wastewater discharges, and accidental chemical releases, among others.

Exposure to polluted water can lead to a range of health issues, from minor problems like skin irritation or stomach upset, to severe conditions such as neurological disorders, reproductive issues, cancer, and even death in extreme cases. It also poses significant risks to aquatic life, disrupting ecosystems and leading to the decline or extinction of various species. Therefore, maintaining clean and safe water supplies is critical for both human health and environmental preservation.

Acetylene is defined as a colorless, highly flammable gas with a distinctive odor, having the chemical formula C2H2. It is the simplest and lightest hydrocarbon in which two carbon atoms are bonded together by a triple bond. Acetylene is used as a fuel in welding and cutting torches, and it can also be converted into other chemicals, such as vinyl acetate and acetic acid. In medical terms, acetylene is not a substance that is commonly used or discussed.

"Ralstonia pickettii" is a species of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that is commonly found in various environments such as soil, water, and clinical settings. It is a non-motile, rod-shaped bacterium that can form biofilms and is resistant to many disinfectants. "Ralstonia pickettii" has been associated with healthcare-associated infections, particularly in immunocompromised patients, and has been isolated from respiratory secretions, blood, and urine samples. It can cause a range of clinical manifestations, including pneumonia, bacteremia, and urinary tract infections. Proper identification and implementation of infection control measures are crucial to prevent the spread of this organism in healthcare settings.

1-Propanol is a primary alcohol with the chemical formula CH3CH2CH2OH. It is also known as n-propanol or propan-1-ol. It is a colorless, flammable liquid that is used as a solvent and in the production of other chemicals. 1-Propanol has a wide range of applications including as a disinfectant, an intermediate in the synthesis of other chemicals, and as a component in various industrial and consumer products such as cosmetics, cleaning agents, and pharmaceuticals. It is also used as a fuel additive to increase the octane rating of gasoline.

Medical definitions typically focus on the relevance of a term to medicine or healthcare, so here's a medical perspective on polycyclic compounds:

Polycyclic compounds are organic substances that contain two or more chemical rings in their structure. While not all polycyclic compounds are relevant to medicine, some can have significant medical implications. For instance, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a type of polycyclic compound that can be found in tobacco smoke and certain types of air pollution. PAHs have been linked to an increased risk of cancer, particularly lung cancer, due to their ability to damage DNA.

Another example is the class of drugs called steroids, which include hormones like cortisol and sex hormones like testosterone and estrogen. These compounds are polycyclic because they contain several interconnected rings in their structure. Steroid medications are used to treat a variety of medical conditions, including inflammation, asthma, and Addison's disease.

In summary, while not all polycyclic compounds are relevant to medicine, some can have important medical implications, either as harmful environmental pollutants or as useful therapeutic agents.

Stenotrophomonas is a genus of gram-negative, aerobic bacteria that are commonly found in various environments such as water, soil, and healthcare settings. The most well-known species within this genus is Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, which is an opportunistic pathogen that can cause serious infections in humans, particularly in those who are immunocompromised or have underlying medical conditions.

S. maltophilia infections can occur in various parts of the body, including the lungs, bloodstream, urinary tract, and skin. This bacterium is resistant to many antibiotics, making it difficult to treat infections caused by this organism. Proper identification and targeted antimicrobial therapy are essential for managing S. maltophilia infections.

Caprolactam is a chemical compound with the formula (CH2)5CNH. It is a white solid that is used in the industrial synthesis of nylon-6, a type of polyamide. Caprolactam is produced from cyclohexanone and ammonia in a two-step process: first, cyclohexanone oxime is formed, which is then converted to caprolactam through a Beckmann rearrangement.

Caprolactam has a six-membered ring structure with an amide functional group. It is a versatile intermediate in the chemical industry and is also used in the production of other polymers, resins, and pharmaceuticals. Caprolactam is not naturally occurring and is produced through chemical synthesis.

Aldrin is a chemical compound with the formula C12H15ClN2. It is an organochlorine insecticide that was widely used in the past for agricultural and household pest control. Aldrin is a gray, crystalline solid that is almost insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents.

Aldrin is a persistent organic pollutant (POP) that can accumulate in the fatty tissues of living organisms and pose a risk to human health and the environment. It has been banned or restricted in many countries due to its toxicity and environmental persistence.

In humans, exposure to aldrin can cause a range of health effects, including headaches, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, muscle weakness, tremors, and convulsions. Long-term exposure has been linked to damage to the nervous system, liver, and kidneys, as well as an increased risk of cancer.

It's important to note that Aldrin is not a medical term, but a chemical one. Therefore, it doesn't have a medical definition in terms of a condition or disease, but rather as a chemical compound with certain properties and uses, as well as potential health risks.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "onions" are not a medical term. They are a type of vegetable, specifically a variety of bulb vegetables, known scientifically as Allium cepa. Onions are widely used in cooking and have been cultivated for centuries for their unique, pungent flavor and potential health benefits. If you have any questions about onions in a culinary or nutritional context, I'd be happy to try to help answer those!

Biocompatible materials are non-toxic and non-reacting substances that can be used in medical devices, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems without causing harm or adverse reactions to living tissues or organs. These materials are designed to mimic the properties of natural tissues and are able to integrate with biological systems without being rejected by the body's immune system.

Biocompatible materials can be made from a variety of substances, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. The specific properties of these materials, such as their mechanical strength, flexibility, and biodegradability, are carefully selected to meet the requirements of their intended medical application.

Examples of biocompatible materials include titanium used in dental implants and joint replacements, polyethylene used in artificial hips, and hydrogels used in contact lenses and drug delivery systems. The use of biocompatible materials has revolutionized modern medicine by enabling the development of advanced medical technologies that can improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

Corrosion is a process of deterioration or damage to a material, usually a metal, caused by chemical reactions with its environment. In the medical context, corrosion may refer to the breakdown and destruction of living tissue due to exposure to harsh substances or environmental conditions. This can occur in various parts of the body, such as the skin, mouth, or gastrointestinal tract, and can be caused by factors like acid reflux, infection, or exposure to chemicals.

In the case of medical devices made of metal, corrosion can also refer to the degradation of the device due to chemical reactions with bodily fluids or tissues. This can compromise the function and safety of the device, potentially leading to complications or failure. Therefore, understanding and preventing corrosion is an important consideration in the design and use of medical devices made of metal.

Alkanesulfonates are organic compounds that consist of a hydrocarbon chain, typically consisting of alkane molecules, which is bonded to a sulfonate group. The sulfonate group (-SO3-) consists of a sulfur atom bonded to three oxygen atoms, with one of the oxygen atoms carrying a negative charge.

Alkanesulfonates are commonly used as detergents and surfactants due to their ability to reduce surface tension and improve the wetting, emulsifying, and dispersing properties of liquids. They are also used in various industrial applications, such as in the production of paper, textiles, and leather.

In medical terms, alkanesulfonates may be used as topical antimicrobial agents or as ingredients in personal care products. However, some alkanesulfonates have been found to have potential health and environmental hazards, such as irritation of the skin and eyes, respiratory effects, and potential toxicity to aquatic life. Therefore, their use is subject to regulatory oversight and safety assessments.

Linuron is a type of pesticide called a selective herbicide, which is used to control weeds in various crops such as corn, soybeans, and vegetables. It works by inhibiting the growth of susceptible plants, causing them to die. Linuron is absorbed by the leaves and roots of the plants and moves throughout the plant to provide long-lasting control of weeds.

It is important to note that linuron can be harmful if swallowed, inhaled, or comes into contact with the skin. It can cause irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract, and prolonged exposure can lead to more serious health effects. Therefore, it is essential to follow all safety guidelines when using linuron or any other pesticide.

'Biota' is a term that refers to the total collection of living organisms in a particular habitat, ecosystem, or region. It includes all forms of life such as plants, animals, fungi, bacteria, and other microorganisms. Biota can be used to describe the communities of living things in a specific area, like a forest biota or marine biota, and it can also refer to the study of these organisms and their interactions with each other and their environment. In medical contexts, 'biota' may specifically refer to the microorganisms that inhabit the human body, such as the gut microbiota.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Wood" is not a medical term. It is a common name for various hard, fibrous tissues that make up the trunks and branches of trees and shrubs, as well as a term used for a wide range of items made from these materials. If you have any medical concerns or questions, I would be happy to try and help answer those for you.

Eutrophication is the process of excessive nutrient enrichment in bodies of water, which can lead to a rapid growth of aquatic plants and algae. This overgrowth can result in decreased levels of oxygen in the water, harming or even killing fish and other aquatic life. The primary cause of eutrophication is the addition of nutrients, particularly nitrogen and phosphorus, from human activities such as agricultural runoff, sewage and wastewater discharge, and air pollution.

In advanced stages, eutrophication can lead to a shift in the dominant species in the aquatic ecosystem, favoring those that are better adapted to the high-nutrient conditions. This can result in a loss of biodiversity and changes in water quality, making it difficult for many organisms to survive.

Eutrophication is a significant global environmental problem, affecting both freshwater and marine ecosystems. It can lead to harmful algal blooms (HABs), which can produce toxins that are dangerous to humans and animals. In addition, eutrophication can impact water use for drinking, irrigation, recreation, and industry, making it a critical issue for public health and economic development.

Phytol is not a medical term, but rather a chemical compound. It is a diterpene alcohol that is a breakdown product of chlorophyll and is found in green plants. It is used in the synthesis of various compounds, including vitamins E and K, and is also used in the production of perfumes and fragrances. In the context of human health, phytol has been studied for its potential anti-cancer properties.

Carbon radioisotopes are radioactive isotopes of carbon, which is an naturally occurring chemical element with the atomic number 6. The most common and stable isotope of carbon is carbon-12 (^12C), but there are also several radioactive isotopes, including carbon-11 (^11C), carbon-14 (^14C), and carbon-13 (^13C). These radioisotopes have different numbers of neutrons in their nuclei, which makes them unstable and causes them to emit radiation.

Carbon-11 has a half-life of about 20 minutes and is used in medical imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) scans. It is produced by bombarding nitrogen-14 with protons in a cyclotron.

Carbon-14, also known as radiocarbon, has a half-life of about 5730 years and is used in archaeology and geology to date organic materials. It is produced naturally in the atmosphere by cosmic rays.

Carbon-13 is stable and has a natural abundance of about 1.1% in carbon. It is not radioactive, but it can be used as a tracer in medical research and in the study of metabolic processes.

Fibroins are a type of protein that make up the structural component of silk fibers produced by certain insects and arachnids, such as silkworms and spiders. These proteins are characterized by their repetitive amino acid sequences, which give silk its unique properties of strength, flexibility, and toughness. Fibroins have been studied for their potential applications in biomedicine, including tissue engineering, drug delivery, and medical textiles.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Hydrogen" is not a medical term. It is a chemical element with the symbol H and atomic number 1. It is the lightest and most abundant chemical element in the universe, making up about 75% of its elemental mass.

In a medical context, hydrogen can be discussed in terms of molecular hydrogen (H2) which has been studied for potential therapeutic benefits. Some research explores its use as an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory agent, but more studies are needed to confirm these effects and understand the mechanisms behind them.

An "ecosystem" is not a term that has a specific medical definition, as it is a concept that is more commonly used in the fields of ecology and environmental science. However, I can provide you with the general ecological definition of an ecosystem:

An ecosystem is a community of living organisms interacting with each other and their non-living environment, including both biotic factors (plants, animals, microorganisms) and abiotic factors (climate, soil, water, and air). These interactions create a complex network of relationships that form the foundation of ecological processes, such as energy flow, nutrient cycling, and population dynamics.

While there is no direct medical definition for an ecosystem, understanding the principles of ecosystems can have important implications for human health. For example, healthy ecosystems can provide clean air and water, regulate climate, support food production, and offer opportunities for recreation and relaxation, all of which contribute to overall well-being. Conversely, degraded ecosystems can lead to increased exposure to environmental hazards, reduced access to natural resources, and heightened risks of infectious diseases. Therefore, maintaining the health and integrity of ecosystems is crucial for promoting human health and preventing disease.

The Arctic region is not a medical term per se, but it is a geographical and environmental term that can have health-related implications. The Arctic is defined as the region surrounding the North Pole, encompassing the Arctic Ocean and parts of Canada, Greenland (Denmark), Russia, the United States (Alaska), Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Iceland. It is characterized by its cold climate, permafrost, and unique ecosystems.

Exposure to the harsh Arctic environment can pose significant health risks, such as hypothermia, frostbite, and other cold-related injuries. Additionally, the Arctic region has been impacted by climate change, leading to changes in the distribution of wildlife, which can have implications for food security and infectious disease transmission.

Therefore, while not a medical term itself, understanding the Arctic regions and their unique environmental and health challenges is important in fields such as wilderness medicine, environmental health, and public health.

Methyl ethers are a type of organic compound where a methyl group (CH3-) is attached to an oxygen atom, which in turn is connected to another carbon atom. They are formed by the process of methylation, where a methyl group replaces a hydrogen atom in another molecule.

Methyl ethers can be found in various natural and synthetic substances. For example, dimethyl ether (CH3-O-CH3) is a common fuel used in refrigeration systems and as a propellant in aerosol sprays. Anisole (CH3-O-C6H5), another methyl ether, is found in anise oil and is used as a flavoring agent and solvent.

It's worth noting that some methyl ethers have been associated with potential health risks, particularly when they are volatile and can be inhaled or ingested. For example, exposure to high levels of dimethyl ether can cause respiratory irritation, headaches, and dizziness. Therefore, it's important to handle these substances with care and follow appropriate safety guidelines.

*Comamonas testosteroni* is a species of gram-negative, rod-shaped bacteria that is commonly found in the environment, such as in soil and water. It is capable of degrading various organic compounds, including steroids like testosterone, which is how it gets its name. This bacterium is not typically associated with human disease, but there have been rare cases of infections reported in people with weakened immune systems.

In dental terminology, "space maintenance" refers to the use of a device or appliance to maintain the proper space between teeth following the loss of a primary (baby) tooth. This is especially important when the lost tooth is a molar, as it plays a crucial role in maintaining the alignment and spacing of the remaining teeth and the eruption path for the developing permanent tooth.

Space maintainers can be fixed or removable and are typically made from materials such as stainless steel, plastic, or acrylic. They help prevent dental issues like crowding, misalignment, and impaction of adjacent and/or succeeding teeth, which may lead to more complex orthodontic treatments in the future. It is essential that space maintainers are custom-made and properly fitted by a dentist or an orthodontist to ensure their effectiveness and avoid potential damage to surrounding tissues.

Fossil fuels are not a medical term, but rather a term used in the field of earth science and energy production. They refer to fuels formed by natural processes such as anaerobic decomposition of buried dead organisms. The age of the organisms and their resulting fossil fuels is typically millions of years, and sometimes even hundreds of millions of years.

There are three main types of fossil fuels: coal, petroleum, and natural gas. Coal is primarily composed of carbon and hydrogen, and it is formed from the remains of plants that lived hundreds of millions of years ago in swamps and peat bogs. Petroleum, also known as crude oil, is a liquid mixture of hydrocarbons and other organic compounds, formed from the remains of marine organisms such as algae and zooplankton. Natural gas is primarily composed of methane and other light hydrocarbons, and it is found in underground reservoirs, often in association with petroleum deposits.

Fossil fuels are a major source of energy for transportation, heating, and electricity generation, but their combustion also releases large amounts of carbon dioxide and other pollutants into the atmosphere, contributing to climate change and air pollution.

Dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane (DDT) is a synthetic insecticide that was widely used in the 20th century to control agricultural pests and vector-borne diseases such as malaria. It is a colorless, odorless crystalline solid with a weak sweetish taste. DDT has high toxicity to many insects, but relatively low toxicity to mammals and birds. However, its persistence in the environment and bioaccumulation in the food chain have raised significant environmental and health concerns.

DDT was first synthesized in 1874, but its insecticidal properties were not discovered until 1939. During World War II, it was used extensively to control typhus and malaria-carrying mosquitoes, saving countless lives. After the war, DDT became a popular agricultural pesticide, leading to widespread use in agriculture and public health programs.

However, in the 1960s, studies began to reveal the negative impacts of DDT on wildlife, particularly birds. Rachel Carson's book "Silent Spring" (1962) brought these issues to public attention and helped launch the modern environmental movement. Research showed that DDT caused thinning of eggshells in birds, leading to reproductive failure and population declines.

In 1972, the United States banned the use of DDT for most purposes due to its environmental persistence, bioaccumulation, and toxicity to wildlife. Many other countries followed suit, and international agreements were established to limit its production and use. However, DDT is still used in some countries to control vector-borne diseases such as malaria, despite concerns about its long-term impacts on human health and the environment.

DDT has been linked to several potential health effects in humans, including cancer, reproductive problems, and developmental issues. However, the evidence for these risks is not conclusive, and more research is needed to fully understand the potential health impacts of DDT exposure.

In the context of medical definitions, polymers are large molecules composed of repeating subunits called monomers. These long chains of monomers can have various structures and properties, depending on the type of monomer units and how they are linked together. In medicine, polymers are used in a wide range of applications, including drug delivery systems, medical devices, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Some examples of polymers used in medicine include polyethylene, polypropylene, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and biodegradable polymers such as polylactic acid (PLA) and polycaprolactone (PCL).

Biphenyl compounds, also known as diphenyls, are a class of organic compounds consisting of two benzene rings linked by a single carbon-carbon bond. The chemical structure of biphenyl compounds can be represented as C6H5-C6H5. These compounds are widely used in the industrial sector, including as intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals, as solvents, and in the production of plastics and dyes. Some biphenyl compounds also have biological activity and can be found in natural products. For example, some plant-derived compounds that belong to this class have been shown to have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anticancer properties.

Microalgae are microscopic, simple, thalloid, often unicellular organisms that belong to the kingdom Protista. They can be found in freshwater and marine environments, and they are capable of photosynthesis, which allows them to convert light energy, carbon dioxide, and water into organic compounds such as carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.

Microalgae are a diverse group of organisms that include various taxonomic groups such as cyanobacteria (also known as blue-green algae), diatoms, dinoflagellates, and euglenoids. They have important ecological roles in the global carbon cycle, oxygen production, and nutrient recycling.

In addition to their ecological significance, microalgae have gained attention for their potential applications in various industries, including food and feed, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, biofuels, and environmental bioremediation. Some species of microalgae contain high levels of valuable compounds such as omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants, pigments, and bioactive molecules that have potential health benefits for humans and animals.

"Immobilized cells" is a term used in biotechnology and cell biology to describe situations where living cells are confined or restricted in their movement within a defined space. This can be achieved through various methods such as entrapment within a gel, adsorption onto a surface, or encapsulation within a semi-permeable membrane. The immobilization of cells allows for their repeated use in biochemical reactions, such as fermentation or waste treatment, while also providing stability and ease of separation from the reaction products. Additionally, immobilized cells can be used to study cellular processes and functions under controlled conditions.

Mirex is not typically defined in a medical context as it is not a medical term. However, Mirex is a chemical compound that was previously used as an insecticide and flame retardant. It is a colorless solid with a weak chemical odor and is highly stable, which led to its use in various applications.

In the medical field, Mirex may be mentioned in relation to environmental health or toxicology due to its potential harmful effects on human health. Exposure to Mirex can occur through contaminated food, water, or air, and it has been linked to several adverse health outcomes, including neurological damage, reproductive problems, and cancer. However, the use of Mirex as an insecticide has been banned in many countries due to its environmental and health hazards.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Sulfanilic Acids" is not a recognized medical term or a specific medical condition. Sulfanilic acid is a chemical compound with the formula H2SO3NCH2COOH. It is used in various industrial applications such as dye and drug synthesis, but it is not a term that would be commonly used in medical contexts.

If you have any questions related to medical topics or conditions, I'd be happy to help! Please provide more information so I can give you a relevant and accurate response.

Enzymes are complex proteins that act as catalysts to speed up chemical reactions in the body. They help to lower activation energy required for reactions to occur, thereby enabling the reaction to happen faster and at lower temperatures. Enzymes work by binding to specific molecules, called substrates, and converting them into different molecules, called products. This process is known as catalysis.

Enzymes are highly specific and will only catalyze one particular reaction with a specific substrate. The shape of the enzyme's active site, where the substrate binds, determines this specificity. Enzymes can be regulated by various factors such as temperature, pH, and the presence of inhibitors or activators. They play a crucial role in many biological processes, including digestion, metabolism, and DNA replication.

Heptachlor is a synthetic, chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticide that was widely used in the past for agricultural and residential pest control. It is a colorless to white crystalline solid with a mild chemical odor. Heptachlor is highly toxic to both insects and mammals, including humans. It can cause damage to the liver and nervous system, and long-term exposure has been linked to cancer in animals.

Heptachlor was banned for most uses in the United States in 1978 due to its persistence in the environment and potential health risks. However, it can still be found in some older pesticide formulations and in contaminated soil, water, and air. Heptachlor is highly persistent in the environment and can accumulate in the food chain, posing a risk to wildlife and human health.

Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a type of infrared spectroscopy that uses the Fourier transform mathematical technique to convert the raw data obtained from an interferometer into a more interpretable spectrum. This technique allows for the simultaneous collection of a wide range of wavelengths, resulting in increased sensitivity and speed compared to traditional dispersive infrared spectroscopy.

FTIR spectroscopy measures the absorption or transmission of infrared radiation by a sample as a function of frequency, providing information about the vibrational modes of the molecules present in the sample. This can be used for identification and quantification of chemical compounds, analysis of molecular structure, and investigation of chemical interactions and reactions.

In summary, FTIR spectroscopy is a powerful analytical technique that uses infrared radiation to study the vibrational properties of molecules, with increased sensitivity and speed due to the use of Fourier transform mathematical techniques and an interferometer.

Benzothiazoles are a class of heterocyclic organic compounds that contain a benzene fused to a thiazole ring. They have the chemical formula C7H5NS. Benzothiazoles and their derivatives have a wide range of applications in various industries, including pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, dyes, and materials science.

In the medical field, benzothiazoles have been studied for their potential therapeutic properties. Some benzothiazole derivatives have shown promising results as anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antiviral, and anticancer agents. However, more research is needed to fully understand the medical potential of these compounds and to develop safe and effective drugs based on them.

It's important to note that while benzothiazoles themselves have some biological activity, most of the medical applications come from their derivatives, which are modified versions of the basic benzothiazole structure. These modifications can significantly alter the properties of the compound, leading to new therapeutic possibilities.

Benzhydryl compounds are organic chemical compounds that contain the benzhydryl group, which is a functional group consisting of a diphenylmethane moiety. The benzhydryl group can be represented by the formula Ph2CH, where Ph represents the phenyl group (C6H5).

Benzhydryl compounds are characterized by their unique structure, which consists of two aromatic rings attached to a central carbon atom. This structure gives benzhydryl compounds unique chemical and physical properties, such as stability, rigidity, and high lipophilicity.

Benzhydryl compounds have various applications in organic synthesis, pharmaceuticals, and materials science. For example, they are used as building blocks in the synthesis of complex natural products, drugs, and functional materials. They also serve as useful intermediates in the preparation of other chemical compounds.

Some examples of benzhydryl compounds include diphenylmethane, benzphetamine, and diphenhydramine. These compounds have been widely used in medicine as stimulants, appetite suppressants, and antihistamines. However, some benzhydryl compounds have also been associated with potential health risks, such as liver toxicity and carcinogenicity, and their use should be carefully monitored and regulated.

Agaricales is an order of fungi that includes mushrooms, toadstools, and other gilled fungi. These fungi are characterized by their distinctive fruiting bodies, which have a cap (pileus) and stem (stipe), and gills (lamellae) on the underside of the cap where the spores are produced. Agaricales contains many well-known and economically important genera, such as Agaricus (which includes the common button mushroom), Amanita (which includes the deadly "death cap" mushroom), and Coprinus (which includes the inky cap mushrooms). The order was established by the Swedish mycologist Elias Magnus Fries in 1821.

Temperature, in a medical context, is a measure of the degree of hotness or coldness of a body or environment. It is usually measured using a thermometer and reported in degrees Celsius (°C), degrees Fahrenheit (°F), or kelvin (K). In the human body, normal core temperature ranges from about 36.5-37.5°C (97.7-99.5°F) when measured rectally, and can vary slightly depending on factors such as time of day, physical activity, and menstrual cycle. Elevated body temperature is a common sign of infection or inflammation, while abnormally low body temperature can indicate hypothermia or other medical conditions.

Anisoles are organic compounds that consist of a phenyl ring (a benzene ring with a hydroxyl group replaced by a hydrogen atom) attached to a methoxy group (-O-CH3). The molecular formula for anisole is C6H5OCH3. Anisoles are aromatic ethers and can be found in various natural sources, including anise plants and some essential oils. They have a wide range of applications, including as solvents, flavoring agents, and intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals.

Actinomycetales is an order of Gram-positive bacteria that are characterized by their filamentous morphology and branching appearance, resembling fungi. These bacteria are often found in soil and water, and some species can cause diseases in humans and animals. The name "Actinomycetales" comes from the Greek words "actis," meaning ray or beam, and "mykes," meaning fungus.

The order Actinomycetales includes several families of medical importance, such as Mycobacteriaceae (which contains the tuberculosis-causing Mycobacterium tuberculosis), Corynebacteriaceae (which contains the diphtheria-causing Corynebacterium diphtheriae), and Actinomycetaceae (which contains the actinomycosis-causing Actinomyces israelii).

Actinomycetales are known for their complex cell walls, which contain a unique type of lipid called mycolic acid. This feature makes them resistant to many antibiotics and contributes to their ability to cause chronic infections. They can also form resistant structures called spores, which allow them to survive in harsh environments and contribute to their ability to cause disease.

Overall, Actinomycetales are important both as beneficial soil organisms and as potential pathogens that can cause serious diseases in humans and animals.

Polyglycolic acid (PGA) is a synthetic polymer of glycolic acid, which is commonly used in surgical sutures. It is a biodegradable material that degrades in the body through hydrolysis into glycolic acid, which can be metabolized and eliminated from the body. PGA sutures are often used for approximating tissue during surgical procedures due to their strength, handling properties, and predictable rate of absorption. The degradation time of PGA sutures is typically around 60-90 days, depending on factors such as the size and location of the suture.

Butylene glycols are a type of organic compounds that belong to the class of diols, which are chemical compounds containing two hydroxyl groups. Specifically, butylene glycols are composed of a four-carbon chain with two hydroxyl groups located on adjacent carbon atoms.

There are two isomeric forms of butylene glycol: 1,2-butanediol and 1,3-butanediol.

* 1,2-Butanediol (also known as 1,2-butylene glycol) has the hydroxyl groups on the first and second carbon atoms of the chain. It is a colorless, viscous liquid that is used as a solvent, humectant, and antifreeze in various industrial and cosmetic applications.
* 1,3-Butanediol (also known as 1,3-butylene glycol) has the hydroxyl groups on the first and third carbon atoms of the chain. It is also a colorless, viscous liquid that is used as a solvent, humectant, and antifreeze in various industrial and cosmetic applications.

Butylene glycols are generally considered to be safe for use in cosmetics and other consumer products, although they may cause skin irritation or allergic reactions in some individuals. They are also used as intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals, such as polyesters and polyurethanes.

Halogens are a group of nonmetallic elements found in the seventh group of the periodic table. They include fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br), iodine (I), and astatine (At). Tennessine (Ts) is sometimes also classified as a halogen, although it has not been extensively studied.

In medical terms, halogens have various uses in medicine and healthcare. For example:

* Chlorine is used for disinfection and sterilization of surgical instruments, drinking water, and swimming pools. It is also used as a medication to treat certain types of anemia.
* Fluoride is added to drinking water and toothpaste to prevent dental caries (cavities) by strengthening tooth enamel.
* Iodine is used as a disinfectant, in medical imaging, and in the treatment of thyroid disorders.
* Bromine has been used in the past as a sedative and anticonvulsant, but its use in medicine has declined due to safety concerns.

Halogens are highly reactive and can be toxic or corrosive in high concentrations, so they must be handled with care in medical settings.

High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a type of chromatography that separates and analyzes compounds based on their interactions with a stationary phase and a mobile phase under high pressure. The mobile phase, which can be a gas or liquid, carries the sample mixture through a column containing the stationary phase.

In HPLC, the mobile phase is a liquid, and it is pumped through the column at high pressures (up to several hundred atmospheres) to achieve faster separation times and better resolution than other types of liquid chromatography. The stationary phase can be a solid or a liquid supported on a solid, and it interacts differently with each component in the sample mixture, causing them to separate as they travel through the column.

HPLC is widely used in analytical chemistry, pharmaceuticals, biotechnology, and other fields to separate, identify, and quantify compounds present in complex mixtures. It can be used to analyze a wide range of substances, including drugs, hormones, vitamins, pigments, flavors, and pollutants. HPLC is also used in the preparation of pure samples for further study or use.

Methanol, also known as methyl alcohol or wood alcohol, is a volatile, colorless, flammable liquid with a distinctive odor similar to that of ethanol (drinking alcohol). It is used in various industrial applications such as the production of formaldehyde, acetic acid, and other chemicals. In the medical field, methanol is considered a toxic alcohol that can cause severe intoxication and metabolic disturbances when ingested or improperly consumed. Methanol poisoning can lead to neurological symptoms, blindness, and even death if not treated promptly and effectively.

Methylene chloride, also known as dichloromethane, is an organic compound with the formula CH2Cl2. It is a colorless, volatile liquid with a mild sweet aroma. In terms of medical definitions, methylene chloride is not typically included due to its primarily industrial uses. However, it is important to note that exposure to high levels of methylene chloride can cause harmful health effects, including irritation to the eyes, skin, and respiratory tract; headaches; dizziness; and, at very high concentrations, unconsciousness and death. Chronic exposure to methylene chloride has been linked to liver toxicity, and it is considered a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC).

Chrysosporium is a genus of saprophytic fungi that are commonly found in soil, organic debris, and water. The name "Chrysosporium" comes from the Greek words "chryso," meaning gold, and "sporios," meaning seed or spore, referring to the golden-colored spores produced by these fungi.

Chrysosporium species are filamentous fungi that produce septate hyphae and asexual spores called conidia. The conidia are typically round, oval, or cylindrical in shape and are produced in various arrangements on specialized structures called conidiophores.

Chrysosporium species are generally considered to be non-pathogenic and are not associated with human disease. However, some species have been reported to cause rare opportunistic infections in immunocompromised individuals. In addition, Chrysosporium species are commonly used as model organisms in studies of fungal biology and ecology.

Sericin is not a medical term per se, but it is a term used in the field of biochemistry and materials science. Sericins are a group of proteins that are found in silk fibers produced by certain insects, particularly silkworms (Bombyx mori). These proteins make up about 25-30% of the total weight of silk fibers and are responsible for the adhesive properties that allow silk fibers to stick together.

Sericins have been studied for their potential medical applications due to their unique chemical and physical properties. They have been found to possess various biological activities, such as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and wound healing properties. Some research has suggested that sericins may be useful in the development of new biomaterials for tissue engineering, drug delivery systems, and medical devices.

However, it is important to note that while sericins have shown promise in preclinical studies, more research is needed to establish their safety and efficacy in humans before they can be widely used in medical applications.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Pyrenes" is not a medical term. It is a term used in chemistry and materials science, referring to a type of aromatic hydrocarbon molecule that consists of two benzene rings fused together. If you have a different term or concept in mind, please provide it so I can give you an accurate definition or information.

Alicyclic hydrocarbons are a subclass of hydrocarbons that contain one or more rings consisting of carbon atoms connected by single bonds, but unlike aromatic hydrocarbons, these rings do not have a planar, conjugated system of alternating double and single bonds. Instead, the carbon atoms in alicyclic hydrocarbons are bonded in a way that allows for greater flexibility and three-dimensional structure.

Examples of alicyclic hydrocarbons include cyclohexane, decalin, and norbornane. These compounds have important applications in the chemical industry, particularly as intermediates in the synthesis of other chemicals and materials. However, some alicyclic hydrocarbons can also be found in natural sources such as crude oil and coal.

It's worth noting that the term "alicyclic" is not commonly used in medical contexts, but rather in chemistry and biochemistry. Nevertheless, understanding the properties and behavior of alicyclic hydrocarbons can be important for understanding certain biological processes and developing drugs or other therapeutic agents.

In the context of medicine and biology, sulfates are ions or compounds that contain the sulfate group (SO4−2). Sulfate is a polyatomic anion with the structure of a sphere. It consists of a central sulfur atom surrounded by four oxygen atoms in a tetrahedral arrangement.

Sulfates can be found in various biological molecules, such as glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans, which are important components of connective tissue and the extracellular matrix. Sulfate groups play a crucial role in these molecules by providing negative charges that help maintain the structural integrity and hydration of tissues.

In addition to their biological roles, sulfates can also be found in various medications and pharmaceutical compounds. For example, some laxatives contain sulfate salts, such as magnesium sulfate (Epsom salt) or sodium sulfate, which work by increasing the water content in the intestines and promoting bowel movements.

It is important to note that exposure to high levels of sulfates can be harmful to human health, particularly in the form of sulfur dioxide (SO2), a common air pollutant produced by burning fossil fuels. Prolonged exposure to SO2 can cause respiratory problems and exacerbate existing lung conditions.

Oxidoreductases are a class of enzymes that catalyze oxidation-reduction reactions, which involve the transfer of electrons from one molecule (the reductant) to another (the oxidant). These enzymes play a crucial role in various biological processes, including energy production, metabolism, and detoxification.

The oxidoreductase-catalyzed reaction typically involves the donation of electrons from a reducing agent (donor) to an oxidizing agent (acceptor), often through the transfer of hydrogen atoms or hydride ions. The enzyme itself does not undergo any permanent chemical change during this process, but rather acts as a catalyst to lower the activation energy required for the reaction to occur.

Oxidoreductases are classified and named based on the type of electron donor or acceptor involved in the reaction. For example, oxidoreductases that act on the CH-OH group of donors are called dehydrogenases, while those that act on the aldehyde or ketone groups are called oxidases. Other examples include reductases, peroxidases, and catalases.

Understanding the function and regulation of oxidoreductases is important for understanding various physiological processes and developing therapeutic strategies for diseases associated with impaired redox homeostasis, such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and cardiovascular disease.

Hazardous waste, as defined in the medical context, refers to any waste that poses a substantial danger to public health or the environment. These wastes can be generated from various sources, including industrial processes, healthcare activities, and household items. They often contain properties that make them harmful, such as being toxic, corrosive, reactive, or ignitable.

In the medical field, hazardous waste may include:

1. Infectious waste: Waste contaminated with potentially infectious materials, such as used needles, surgical instruments, and cultures from medical laboratories.
2. Pathological waste: Human or animal tissues, organs, or fluids that may pose a risk of infection.
3. Pharmaceutical waste: Expired, unused, or contaminated medications, including both prescription and over-the-counter drugs.
4. Chemical waste: Including solvents, disinfectants, heavy metals, and other chemicals used in medical laboratories, research facilities, and healthcare settings.
5. Radioactive waste: Materials that emit radiation, such as those used in medical imaging or cancer treatments.

Proper handling, treatment, and disposal of hazardous waste are crucial to minimize the risks they pose to human health and the environment. Regulations governing hazardous waste management vary by country and region but generally require proper labeling, containment, transportation, and disposal methods to ensure safety.

'Daphnia' is not a medical term, but rather it refers to a group of small, planktonic crustaceans commonly known as water fleas. They are widely distributed in various freshwater environments and play an important role in the aquatic food chain as they serve as a food source for many larger animals such as fish.

While Daphnia may not have a direct medical definition, there has been some research into their potential use in biomedical applications due to their sensitivity to environmental changes. For instance, they have been used as indicators of water quality and toxicity levels in ecotoxicological studies. However, it is important to note that Daphnia itself is not a medical term or concept.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but the term "Gulf of Mexico" is not a medical concept or condition. The Gulf of Mexico is a large gulf located in the North American continent, surrounded by the United States to the north, Mexico to the west and south, and Cuba to the east. It's a geographical feature, specifically an oceanic gulf, and not related to medical terminology or healthcare.

"Pseudomonas fluorescens" is a gram-negative, rod-shaped bacterium found in various environments such as soil, water, and some plants. It is a non-pathogenic species of the Pseudomonas genus, which means it does not typically cause disease in humans. The name "fluorescens" comes from its ability to produce a yellow-green pigment that fluoresces under ultraviolet light. This bacterium is known for its versatility and adaptability, as well as its ability to break down various organic compounds, making it useful in bioremediation and other industrial applications.

Dinitrobenzenes are a group of organic compounds that contain two nitro groups (-NO2) attached to a benzene ring. There are three isomers of dinitrobenzenes, depending on the position of the nitro groups on the benzene ring:
1. 1,2-Dinitrobenzene: This isomer has both nitro groups attached to adjacent carbon atoms on the benzene ring. It is a yellow crystalline solid with a melting point of 89-90°C and is soluble in organic solvents such as ethanol, ether, and benzene.
2. 1,3-Dinitrobenzene: This isomer has the nitro groups attached to carbon atoms separated by one carbon atom on the benzene ring. It is a white crystalline solid with a melting point of 90°C and is soluble in organic solvents such as ethanol, ether, and benzene.
3. 1,4-Dinitrobenzene: This isomer has the nitro groups attached to opposite carbon atoms on the benzene ring. It is a white crystalline solid with a melting point of 169°C and is soluble in organic solvents such as ethanol, ether, and benzene.
Dinitrobenzenes are used in chemical synthesis, particularly in the production of dyes, pharmaceuticals, and explosives. However, they are also known to be toxic and can cause skin irritation, respiratory problems, and damage to the liver and kidneys if ingested or inhaled in large quantities. Therefore, handling and use of these compounds should be done with caution and appropriate safety measures.

Methylococcaceae is a family of bacteria that have the ability to oxidize methane as their source of carbon and energy. These bacteria are also known as methanotrophs. They are gram-negative, aerobic, and typically occur in freshwater and marine environments. The family includes several genera such as Methylococcus, Methylomonas, and Methylothermus. These bacteria play an important role in the global carbon cycle by converting methane, a potent greenhouse gas, into carbon dioxide.

Environmental monitoring is the systematic and ongoing surveillance, measurement, and assessment of environmental parameters, pollutants, or other stressors in order to evaluate potential impacts on human health, ecological systems, or compliance with regulatory standards. This process typically involves collecting and analyzing data from various sources, such as air, water, soil, and biota, and using this information to inform decisions related to public health, environmental protection, and resource management.

In medical terms, environmental monitoring may refer specifically to the assessment of environmental factors that can impact human health, such as air quality, water contamination, or exposure to hazardous substances. This type of monitoring is often conducted in occupational settings, where workers may be exposed to potential health hazards, as well as in community-based settings, where environmental factors may contribute to public health issues. The goal of environmental monitoring in a medical context is to identify and mitigate potential health risks associated with environmental exposures, and to promote healthy and safe environments for individuals and communities.

Sulfatases are a group of enzymes that play a crucial role in the metabolism of sulfated steroids, glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), and other sulfated molecules. These enzymes catalyze the hydrolysis of sulfate groups from these substrates, converting them into their respective unsulfated forms.

The human genome encodes for several different sulfatases, each with specificity towards particular types of sulfated substrates. For instance, some sulfatases are responsible for removing sulfate groups from steroid hormones and neurotransmitters, while others target GAGs like heparan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, and keratan sulfate.

Defects in sulfatase enzymes can lead to various genetic disorders, such as multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD), X-linked ichthyosis, and mucopolysaccharidosis (MPS) type IIIC (Sanfilippo syndrome type C). These conditions are characterized by the accumulation of sulfated molecules in different tissues, resulting in progressive damage to multiple organs and systems.

'Aspergillus niger' is a species of fungi that belongs to the genus Aspergillus. It is a ubiquitous microorganism that can be found in various environments, including soil, decaying vegetation, and indoor air. 'Aspergillus niger' is a black-colored mold that produces spores that are easily dispersed in the air.

This fungus is well known for its ability to produce a variety of enzymes and metabolites, some of which have industrial applications. For example, it is used in the production of citric acid, which is widely used as a food additive and preservative.

However, 'Aspergillus niger' can also cause health problems in humans, particularly in individuals with weakened immune systems or underlying lung conditions. It can cause allergic reactions, respiratory symptoms, and invasive aspergillosis, a serious infection that can spread to other organs in the body.

In addition, 'Aspergillus niger' can produce mycotoxins, which are toxic compounds that can contaminate food and feed and cause various health effects in humans and animals. Therefore, it is important to prevent the growth and proliferation of this fungus in indoor environments and food production facilities.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "paper" is not a medical term. In general, it refers to a thin material made from pulp derived from wood, rags, or other fibrous substances, which is used for writing, printing, drawing, or packaging. If you have a question about a specific medical concept or condition, I'd be happy to help if I can!

Environmental Microbiology is a branch of microbiology that deals with the study of microorganisms, including bacteria, fungi, viruses, and other microscopic entities, that are found in various environments such as water, soil, air, and organic matter. This field focuses on understanding how these microbes interact with their surroundings, their role in various ecological systems, and their impact on human health and the environment. It also involves studying the genetic and biochemical mechanisms that allow microorganisms to survive and thrive in different environmental conditions, as well as the potential uses of microbes for bioremediation, bioenergy, and other industrial applications.

Bisphenol A-Glycidyl Methacrylate (BPAGM) is a type of chemical compound that belongs to the class of organic compounds known as glycidyl methacrylates. It is created by the reaction between bisphenol A and glycidyl methacrylate.

BPAGM is used in various industrial applications, including the production of coatings, adhesives, and resins. In the medical field, it has been used as a component in some dental materials, such as bonding agents and composite resins. However, due to concerns about its potential health effects, including its possible estrogenic activity and potential to cause reproductive toxicity, its use in dental materials has become more restricted in recent years.

It is important to note that exposure to BPAGM should be limited as much as possible, and appropriate safety measures should be taken when handling this chemical compound.

Microspectrophotometry (MSP) is a microanalytical technique that combines microspectroscopy and photometry to measure the absorption, reflection, or fluorescence spectra of extremely small samples, typically in the range of micrometers to sub-micrometers. This technique is often used in biomedical research and clinical settings for the analysis of cellular and subcellular structures, such as organelles, inclusion bodies, and single molecules.

MSP can provide detailed information about the chemical composition, molecular structure, and spatial distribution of biological samples, making it a valuable tool for studying various physiological and pathological processes, including gene expression, protein function, and cell-cell interactions. Additionally, MSP has been used in diagnostic applications to identify abnormalities in tissues and cells, such as cancerous or precancerous lesions, and to monitor the efficacy of therapeutic interventions.

The technique involves using a microscope equipped with a high-resolution objective lens and a spectrophotometer to measure the intensity of light transmitted through or reflected from a sample at different wavelengths. The resulting spectra can be used to identify specific chemical components or molecular structures based on their characteristic absorption, reflection, or fluorescence patterns.

MSP is a powerful tool for studying biological systems at the microscopic level and has contributed significantly to our understanding of cellular and molecular biology. However, it requires specialized equipment and expertise to perform and interpret the data, making it a relatively complex and sophisticated technique.

Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase is an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of catechols to muconic acids as part of the meta-cleavage pathway in the breakdown of aromatic compounds. This enzyme plays a crucial role in the degradation of various aromatic hydrocarbons, including lignin and environmental pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Catechol 2,3-dioxygenase requires Fe(II) as a cofactor for its activity. The gene that encodes this enzyme is often used as a bioremediation marker to monitor the degradation of aromatic pollutants in the environment.

I'm sorry for any confusion, but "Rivers" is not a medical term or concept. It is a geographical term referring to large, flowing bodies of water that usually empty into a sea or an ocean. If you have any medical questions or terms you would like defined, I'd be happy to help!

Batch cell culture techniques refer to a method of growing cells in which all the necessary nutrients are added to the culture medium at the beginning of the growth period. The cells are allowed to grow and multiply until they exhaust the available nutrients, after which the culture is discarded. This technique is relatively simple and inexpensive but lacks the ability to continuously produce cells over an extended period.

In batch cell culture, cells are grown in a closed system with a fixed volume of medium, and no additional nutrients or fresh medium are added during the growth phase. The cells consume the available nutrients as they grow, leading to a decrease in pH, accumulation of waste products, and depletion of essential factors required for cell growth. As a result, the cells eventually stop growing and enter a stationary phase, after which they begin to die due to lack of nutrients and buildup of toxic metabolites.

Batch cell culture techniques are commonly used in research settings where large quantities of cells are needed for experiments or analysis. However, this method is not suitable for the production of therapeutic proteins or other biologics that require continuous cell growth and protein production over an extended period. For these applications, more complex culture methods such as fed-batch or perfusion culture techniques are used.

Hydrolases are a class of enzymes that help facilitate the breakdown of various types of chemical bonds through a process called hydrolysis, which involves the addition of water. These enzymes catalyze the cleavage of bonds in substrates by adding a molecule of water, leading to the formation of two or more smaller molecules.

Hydrolases play a crucial role in many biological processes, including digestion, metabolism, and detoxification. They can act on a wide range of substrates, such as proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids, breaking them down into smaller units that can be more easily absorbed or utilized by the body.

Examples of hydrolases include:

1. Proteases: enzymes that break down proteins into smaller peptides or amino acids.
2. Lipases: enzymes that hydrolyze lipids, such as triglycerides, into fatty acids and glycerol.
3. Amylases: enzymes that break down complex carbohydrates, like starches, into simpler sugars, such as glucose.
4. Nucleases: enzymes that cleave nucleic acids, such as DNA or RNA, into smaller nucleotides or oligonucleotides.
5. Phosphatases: enzymes that remove phosphate groups from various substrates, including proteins and lipids.
6. Esterases: enzymes that hydrolyze ester bonds in a variety of substrates, such as those found in some drugs or neurotransmitters.

Hydrolases are essential for maintaining proper cellular function and homeostasis, and their dysregulation can contribute to various diseases and disorders.

I believe there may be some confusion in your question. "Rubber" is not a medical term, but rather a common term used to describe a type of material that is elastic and can be stretched or deformed and then return to its original shape when the force is removed. It is often made from the sap of rubber trees or synthetically.

However, in a medical context, "rubber" might refer to certain medical devices or supplies made from rubber materials, such as rubber gloves used for medical examinations or procedures, or rubber stoppers used in laboratory equipment. But there is no medical definition specifically associated with the term 'Rubber' itself.

Medical definitions of water generally describe it as a colorless, odorless, tasteless liquid that is essential for all forms of life. It is a universal solvent, making it an excellent medium for transporting nutrients and waste products within the body. Water constitutes about 50-70% of an individual's body weight, depending on factors such as age, sex, and muscle mass.

In medical terms, water has several important functions in the human body:

1. Regulation of body temperature through perspiration and respiration.
2. Acting as a lubricant for joints and tissues.
3. Facilitating digestion by helping to break down food particles.
4. Transporting nutrients, oxygen, and waste products throughout the body.
5. Helping to maintain healthy skin and mucous membranes.
6. Assisting in the regulation of various bodily functions, such as blood pressure and heart rate.

Dehydration can occur when an individual does not consume enough water or loses too much fluid due to illness, exercise, or other factors. This can lead to a variety of symptoms, including dry mouth, fatigue, dizziness, and confusion. Severe dehydration can be life-threatening if left untreated.

Hydrogen-ion concentration, also known as pH, is a measure of the acidity or basicity of a solution. It is defined as the negative logarithm (to the base 10) of the hydrogen ion activity in a solution. The standard unit of measurement is the pH unit. A pH of 7 is neutral, less than 7 is acidic, and greater than 7 is basic.

In medical terms, hydrogen-ion concentration is important for maintaining homeostasis within the body. For example, in the stomach, a high hydrogen-ion concentration (low pH) is necessary for the digestion of food. However, in other parts of the body such as blood, a high hydrogen-ion concentration can be harmful and lead to acidosis. Conversely, a low hydrogen-ion concentration (high pH) in the blood can lead to alkalosis. Both acidosis and alkalosis can have serious consequences on various organ systems if not corrected.

Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) is a laboratory technique used in molecular biology to separate and analyze DNA fragments (or PCR products) based on their melting behavior. This technique is particularly useful for the analysis of complex DNA mixtures, such as those found in environmental samples or in studies of microbial communities.

In DGGE, the DNA samples are subjected to an increasing gradient of denaturing agents (such as urea and formamide) during electrophoresis. As the DNA fragments migrate through the gel, they begin to denature (or melt) at specific points along the gradient, depending on their sequence and base composition. This results in a distinct melting profile for each DNA fragment, which can be visualized as a band on the gel.

The technique allows for the separation of DNA fragments that differ by only a few base pairs, making it a powerful tool for identifying and comparing different DNA sequences within a mixture. DGGE is often used in conjunction with PCR to amplify specific regions of interest in the DNA sample, such as genes or operons involved in specific metabolic pathways. The resulting PCR products can then be analyzed by DGGE to identify and compare different sequence variants (or "types") within a population.

Overall, DGGE is a valuable tool for studying the diversity and composition of complex DNA mixtures, and has applications in fields such as microbial ecology, molecular biology, and genetic engineering.

Nitrogen is not typically referred to as a medical term, but it is an element that is crucial to medicine and human life.

In a medical context, nitrogen is often mentioned in relation to gas analysis, respiratory therapy, or medical gases. Nitrogen (N) is a colorless, odorless, and nonreactive gas that makes up about 78% of the Earth's atmosphere. It is an essential element for various biological processes, such as the growth and maintenance of organisms, because it is a key component of amino acids, nucleic acids, and other organic compounds.

In some medical applications, nitrogen is used to displace oxygen in a mixture to create a controlled environment with reduced oxygen levels (hypoxic conditions) for therapeutic purposes, such as in certain types of hyperbaric chambers. Additionally, nitrogen gas is sometimes used in cryotherapy, where extremely low temperatures are applied to tissues to reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation.

However, it's important to note that breathing pure nitrogen can be dangerous, as it can lead to unconsciousness and even death due to lack of oxygen (asphyxiation) within minutes.

... environmental benignity, low cost, easy use, and tunable properties. This chapter covers an overview of biodegradation, factors ... and challenges associated with biodegradation processes, involvement of nanotechnology and nanomaterials in biodegradation, and ... environmental remediation, and nanomedicine. Overall, this chapter provides a synopsis of how the involvement of nanotechnology ... Biodegradation is the most viable alternative for numerous health and environmental issues associated with non-biodegradable ...
"OPA responds to MacArthur report , Symphony Environmental Technologies Plc". Symphony Environmental Technologies Plc. 13 ... Biodegradation of up to 92.74% has been observed by Interek within 180 days, when tested in accordance with ASTM D6954(4). OXO- ... biodegradation has also been studied at the Eurofins laboratory in Spain, where on 25 July 2017 they noted 88.9% biodegradation ... OXO-biodegradation is a process of plastic degradation that involves oxidation until the plastics molecular weight is reduced ...
Sesquiterpenes are ubiquitous in essential oils but an assessment of their environmental behavior is still required for their ... Sesquiterpenes are ubiquitous in essential oils but an assessment of their environmental behavior is still required for their ... ultimate biodegradation. Although germacrene D only achieved 24% ultimate biodegradation, specific analysis at the end of the ... Current biodegradation prediction models (BioWin™, BioHCwin, and Catalogic) were found to be of limited use because most of the ...
Below are MeSH descriptors whose meaning is related to "Biodegradation, Environmental".. *Environmental Restoration and ... Environmental" by people in this website by year, and whether "Biodegradation, Environmental" was a major or minor topic of ... "Biodegradation, Environmental" is a descriptor in the National Library of Medicines controlled vocabulary thesaurus, MeSH ( ... Below are the most recent publications written about "Biodegradation, Environmental" by people in Profiles. ...
... to demonstrate the isotopic techniques as a method to verify perchlorate biodegradation in the field. ... Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). Environmental Security Technology Certification Program ( ... which will not change appreciably during biodegradation). Biodegradation is also unlikely to lead to errors in source ... Thus, biodegradation will not obscure differences between these two major sources, when considered with the large differences ...
Environmental fate & pathways Biodegradation in soil. Currently viewing: S-01 , Summary. 001 No specified study adequacy , No ...
Environmental fate & pathways Biodegradation in soil. Currently viewing: S-01 , Summary. 001 No specified study adequacy , No ...
Environmental fate & pathways Biodegradation in soil. Currently viewing: S-01 , Summary. 001 Key , Calculation. ... biodegradation in soil: simulation testing. Type of information:. calculation (if not (Q)SAR). Adequacy of study:. key study. ... Biodegradation half-life of test substance Pentyl formate in soil was estimated to be 17.33 days (416 hrs).. Executive summary: ... Parameter followed for biodegradation estimation:. test mat. analysis. Details on experimental conditions:. Level III Fugacity ...
Environmental fate & pathways Biodegradation in soil. Currently viewing: S-01 , Summary. 001 No specified study adequacy , No ...
Environmental Pollution, 157 (10). pp. 2678-2683. ISSN 0269-7491 ... HP-beta-CD into soils did not enhance the biodegradation of the ... Influence of hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin on the biodegradation of C-14-phenanthrene and C-14-hexadecane in soil ... Influence of hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin on the biodegradation of C-14-phenanthrene and C-14-hexadecane in soil. ...
What is Biodegradation and Why it Matters. $230.00. - $362.00. Select options. * Construction and Demolition Waste Management ... Algal Biorefining: Resource Expenditure and Exergo-Environmental Sustainability. $230.00. - $362.00. Select options ...
Biodegradation of Coproducts of Commercial Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate Home/Biodegradation of Coproducts of Commercial Linear ... Porous Pot Biodegradation Test System. The porous pot method for assessing biodegradation of the test compound in a simulated ... Biodegradation of Coproducts of Commercial Linear Alkylbenzene Sulfonate. Allen M. Nielsen, Larry N. Britton, Charles E. Beall ... the initial objective was to evaluate the potential ultimate biodegradation of DATS and iso-LAS in receiving environmental ...
Biodegradation is a significant environmental process in soil.. Biologic changes. The chemical changes causing damage to ... Environmental fate and transport [see fate and transport]. Environmental Media Evaluation Guides (EMEGs). ATSDR comparison ... Environmental sampling data. Data obtained by sampling environmental media, such as soil, water, air, or biota (plants and ... For environmental scientists, this typically refers to a physical quantity of an environmental medium - soil, water, air, and ...
Oil Biodegradation and Bioremediation: A Tale of the Two Worst Spills in U.S. History. Posted by Courtney Hill On April 12, ... "The devastating environmental impacts of the Exxon Valdez spill in 1989 and its media notoriety made it a frequent comparison ... Atlas, R. M., & Hazen, T. C. (2011). Oil biodegradation and bioremediation: A tale of the two worst spills in U.S. history. ... "Oil Biodegradation and Bioremediation: A Tale of the Two Worst Spills in U.S. History" ...
6.25 million for environmental projects to settle allegations by the Environmental Protection Agency that the company hid ... has agreed to pay $10.25 million in fines and $6.25 million for environmental projects. ... Biodegradation Of Chemical Such As PFOA. The supplemental environmental projects involved in the settlement include funding for ... 6.25 million for environmental projects to settle allegations by the Environmental Protection Agency that the company hid ...
The environmental contamination has resulted in urgency for. developing new strategies for degrading plastics. In recent years ... Biodegradation of Plastic by Fungi. Author(s): Dibyajit Lahiri, Moupriya Nag, Sougata Ghosh and *Department of Biotechnology, ... biodegradation of synthetic plastics by microorganisms or microbial enzymes have. sprung up, and these offer a possibility to ... Biodegradation of Plastic by Fungi, Sustainable Utilization of Fungi in Agriculture and Industry Mycology: Current and Future ...
"Dynamics of ibuprofen biodegradation by Bacillus sp. B1(2015b)." Archives of Environmental Protection 43.2 (2017).. Reference ... Dynamics of ibuprofen biodegradation by Bacillus sp. B1(2015b). Dynamics of ibuprofen biodegradation by Bacillus sp. B1(2015b) ... Dynamics of ibuprofen biodegradation by Bacillus sp. B1(2015b). Marchlewicz, Ariel; Guzik, Urszula; Wojcieszyńska, Danuta ... Occurrence and environmental behavior of the chiral pharmaceutical drug ibuprofen in surface waters and in wastewater and ...
Lacerda, C. M. R. & Reardon, K. F. Environmental proteomics: applications of proteome profiling in environmental microbiology ... Microbial biodegradation and toxicity of vinclozolin and its toxic metabolite 3,5-dichloroaniline. J. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 18 ... Kim, S. I., Choi, J.-S. & Kahng, H.-Y. A proteomics strategy for the analysis of bacterial biodegradation pathways. OMICS 11, ... Biodegradation is not always synonymous to detoxification; instead it occasionally leads to the formation of metabolic products ...
The effect of temperature on the biodegradation of different types of packaging materials under test conditions. ... The effect of temperature on the biodegradation of different types of packaging materials under test conditions ...
This has been shown in published pathways of phenanthrene biodegradation implicating various intermediary metabolites, ... including microbial biodegradation. Diverse species of bacteria and fungi metabolize phenanthrenes as their sole source of ... And to reduce its concentration is a concern to environmental experts. Like other PAH pollutants, different means are available ... This has been shown in published pathways of phenanthrene biodegradation implicating various intermediary metabolites, ...
Biodegradation, aerobic, anaerobic 12 COD mgO2/ l SM 142, 220 Z x/2/76 DIN 38409-H41 and -A30 ARAVwV1) no.303 Biodegradation, ... environmental impact after treatment (a) Wood Annual plants Wood Annual plants Wood Annual plants Wood Annual plants Wood ... Table 3.1.1 Methods of Waste Water Analysis, and Possibilities for Reducing Environmental Impact Page 3 ... Table 3.1.1 Methods of Wastewater Analysis and Possibilities for Reducing Environmental Impact Page 1 ...
... the empirical data suggest that biodegradation is likely to be slow (half-life =182 days) under environmental conditions. ... Biodegradation. 0.50. Biodegradation (%, in 14 days). MITI 1992. Water. Biodegradation. 18. Biodegradation in sterile microcosm ... Biodegradation. 2. Adapted organisms, complete biodegradation (weeks). Struijs and Stoltenkamp 1986. Sludge. Biodegradation. ... Biodegradation in non-sterile microcosm (%, in 36 days). Water. Biodegradation. ,,4. Non-adapted inocula (half-life; weeks). ...
Biodegradation and detoxification of environmental pollutants /. 1982. 2. Biotechnology and biodegradation. 1989. ...
Biodegradation of polyester polyurethane by endophytic fungi. Applied and Environmental Microbiology. July 2011, doi: 10.1128/​ ... Agriculture Animals Birds Climate Change Conservation Deforestation Energy Featured Forests Happy-upbeat Environmental Herps ... Mongabay is a U.S.-based non-profit conservation and environmental science news platform. Our EIN or tax ID is 45-3714703. ...
Topic 12¾Environmental Biology Resources. 73. Biodegradation of the Gasoline Oxygenate Methyl tert-Butyl Ether (MTBE. Envirogen ... 6. Chemical Sensors Based on Dendritic Polymers for Detection of Environmental Pollutants. Dendritech, Inc.. 3110 Schuette ... Ozone Sensor for Environmental Monitoring. Giner, Inc.. 14 Spring Street. Waltham, MA 02154-4497. tel: 781-899-7270; fax: 781- ... Additional environmental sensing applications can be developed rapidly using the design methodology outlined in the research ...
Inclusion of seasonal variation in river system microbial communities and phototroph activity increases environmental relevance ... Temporal variation in pesticide biodegradation Dataset homepage. Citation. MGnify (2020). Temporal variation in pesticide ... biodegradation. Sampling event dataset https://doi.org/10.15468/hyihdp accessed via GBIF.org on 2023-10-02. Description. ...
Biodegradation; Respirable dust; Oxidative stress; Immune reaction; Cellular reactions; Cytotoxicity; Author Keywords: Green ... Environmental protection; Gender factors; Respiratory health; Pulmonary disorders; Pulmonary system; Pulmonary system disorders ... development of renewable polymeric materials have received great public attention due to the growing demand for environmental ...
Relationship between biodegradation and sorption of phthalate esters and their metabolites in natural sediments. Environ. ... Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 26(5): 829-836.. Cheng, W.W.L. and F.A.P.C. Gobas. 2007. Assessment of Human Health ... Environmental Reviews 14: 257-297.. Macintosh, C. E., J. A. Maldonado, M. G. Ikonomou and F. A. P. C. Gobas. 2006. Sorption of ... Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 22: 50-58.. Eickhoff, C.V., F.A.P.C. Gobas and F.C.P. Law. (2003). Screening Pyrene ...
now banned in most countries due to their environmental persistence (facilitated at least in part by ... Biodegradation of imidacloprid in liquid media by an isolated wastewater fungus Aspergillus ... One health relationships between human, animal, and environmental microbiomes: a mini-review. Front Public Health 2018;6:235. ... exposure while minimizing environmental contamination. However, neonicotinoids also accumulate in the plant root exudate and ...
  • Environmental Isotopes in Biodegradation and Bioremediation. (koeltz.com)
  • The results warrant further studies of environmental biostimulation with glycerol to advance bioremediation technologies and increase soil availability for agricultural purposes. (cdc.gov)
  • Featuring coverage on a broad range of topics such as pollution of microorganisms, phytoremediation, and bioremediation, this book is geared towards academics, professionals, graduate students, and practitioners interested in emerging techniques for environmental decontamination. (hazmatmag.com)
  • Strategies for Biodegradation and Bioremediation of Pesticides in the Environment. (routledge.com)
  • Pesticide Bioremediation: An Approach for Environmental Cleanup Using Microbial Consortia. (routledge.com)
  • Effects of Environmental Factors on Bioremediation of Co-Contaminated Soils Using a Multiresistant Bacterium. (routledge.com)
  • The contents of book are organized in various sections which deal about microbial biodegradation, phytoremediation and emerging technology of nanocompounds in agriculture sector. (hazmatmag.com)
  • In the last decades, environmental pollutants have been directly connected to the increase in human diseases, particularly those involved with the immune system. (hindawi.com)
  • The combination of strategies helps in efficient removal of pollutants generated from anthropogenic activities with minimal environmental impact. (routledge.com)
  • It will do this without hindering biodegradation of retained pollutants by pollutant degrading bacteria. (ncl.ac.uk)
  • In accordance with Annex IX section 9.2.1.3 column 2 simulation tests on the biodegradation in soil are not necessary, because L-arginine-HCl is readily biodegradable. (europa.eu)
  • He was involved in some researches on the application of geophysical techniques in environmental and civil engineering and in the development of electrical and electromagnetic methods for the monitoring of soil and groundwater pollution. (polito.it)
  • in Soil, Water, and Environmental Science and B.Sc. (nih.gov)
  • Plastisphere microorganisms have been suggested to play significant roles in pathogen transfer, modulation of particle buoyancy, and biodegradation of plastic polymers and co-contaminants, yet investigation of these topics within freshwater environments is at a very early stage. (springer.com)
  • Some chapters refer to the direct application of products derived from plants and microorganisms for designing strategies of environmental remediation. (routledge.com)
  • The timescale for complete biodegradation at any time or place in the open environment is shorter than for "conventional" plastics, which in normal environments are slow to biodegrade. (wikipedia.org)
  • The timescale for complete biodegradation at any time or place in the open environment is much shorter than for "conventional" plastics at the same time and place. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biodegradation of plastics was tested in the compost stored at âˆ'20 °C, 4 °C and 20 °C for different periods. (uaf.edu)
  • From the point of view that the existing standards for biodegradation tests of plastics in compost accept reproducibility of cellulose biodegradability as a criterion for the validity of the biodegradation tests, a new standard of the compost preparation should be provided to guarantee more reliable results on the biodegradability of plastics. (uaf.edu)
  • The workshop brought together a multidisciplinary group of experts in environmental health, the presence and behavior of plastics in the environment, agriculture, wastewater treatment, and science policy to discuss what is known about microplastics and environmental health, what research is needed to fill gaps in current knowledge, and how emerging science could help address these gaps to provide an improved basis for public policy. (nih.gov)
  • The success and dominance of plastics starting in the early 20th century has caused widespread environmental problems, [3] due to their slow decomposition rate in natural ecosystems. (wikipedia.org)
  • To realize the potential environmental benefits over conventional plastics, they (the authors) recommend supporting the development of coherent testing and certification standards. (plasticstoday.com)
  • Plastics are synthetic polymers derived from fossil oil and largely resistant to biodegradation. (cam.ac.uk)
  • 3-Picoline (3-methylpyridine) was nominated by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) for toxicity and carcinogenicity testing based on its high U.S. production volume and potential for human exposure. (nih.gov)
  • Effect of Rhamnolipids on the Dissolution, Bioavailability, and Biodegradation of Phenanthrene. (ksu.edu.tr)
  • As they are also essential to pollutant biodegradation, an improved knowledge of microbial-microplastic interactions is required to predict the environmental impacts of plastic debris [ 15 ]. (springer.com)
  • C3 in order to degrade DBT in respect to 1) DBT biodegradation kinetics, 2) bacterial growth, 3) rhamnolipid (RL) biosynthesis, and 4) RL secretion. (cdc.gov)
  • Oxo-biodegradable plastic was invented in the 1970s by Professor Gerald Scott and other polymer scientists who were concerned that polyethylene and polypropylene could cause an environmental problem if it escaped from the waste management processes and ended up in the environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • This will again imply a large increase in environmental problems, as the exploitation of mineral resources generally consists of very heavy and energy-consuming production processes. (europa.eu)
  • Following an assessment of recent discoveries concerning the formation and distribution of plastic-associated biofilms, our knowledge concerning their ecological roles and ability to drive processes including polymer biodegradation is considered. (springer.com)
  • Chapter 18, which covers phytoremedation, acknowledges that environmental pollution with xenobiotics is a global problem and development of inventive remediationtechnologies for the decontamination of impacted sites are therefore of paramount importance. (hazmatmag.com)
  • Angelina focused her Ph.D. and Post-Doctoral work on marine microbial community dynamics and functional capacity for biosynthesis and biodegradation of hydrocarbons. (nih.gov)
  • EHP is an open-access journal published with support from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health. (nih.gov)
  • The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) is expanding and accelerating its contributions to scientific knowledge of human health and the environment, and to the health and well-being of people everywhere. (nih.gov)
  • The workshop was sponsored by the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. (nih.gov)
  • In the 27 EU countries plus Norway and Switzerland up to 38% of plastic is discarded in landfills, with the rest utilized for recycling (26%) and energy recovery (36%) via combustion ( www.plasticseurope.org ), carrying a heavy environmental impact. (cam.ac.uk)
  • OXO-biodegradation is a process of plastic degradation that involves oxidation until the plastic's molecular weight is reduced enough to be accessible to bacteria and fungi for recycling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Much of the research into potential environmental impacts of engineered nanoparticles concerns their effects on microbes, especially bacteria. (aiche.org)
  • This book provides useful information on technologies based upon the use of biological agents for environmental clean-up, including bacteria, yeast, fungi, algae, and plants. (routledge.com)
  • Results of recent U.S. monitoring studies also indicate that effective sewage treatment will remove 96 to 99 percent of LAS from wastewater, greatly reducing the amount that enters sediments and eliminating environmental impacts. (cler.com)
  • This is based on present growth rates in South East Asia especially and various forecasts, implying a possible growth factor of 6-10 in global resource consumption and environmental impacts in the next century. (europa.eu)
  • This book is a collection of various eco-friendly technologies which are proposed to under take environmental pollution in a sustainable manner. (hazmatmag.com)
  • Biodegradation is an important mechanism determining the fate of chemicals in the aquatic environment. (iwaponline.com)
  • Globally, increasing waste from food industries generates serious anthropogenic environmental risks that can threaten terrestrial and aquatic organisms and communities. (bas.ac.uk)
  • However, NIEHS was provided latitude to support non-traditional NIH research areas such as fate and transport and remediation strategies for environmental contaminants. (nih.gov)
  • Rhamnolipids induced by glycerol enhance dibenzothiophene biodegradation in Burkholderia sp. (cdc.gov)
  • Explore how microbes deal with tasks involving biodegradation of contaminants. (uaf.edu)
  • With the 1980 passage of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA), better known as Superfund, it soon became clear that the strategies for the cleanup of Superfund sites and the technologies available to implement these cleanups, were inadequate to address the magnitude and complexity of the problem. (nih.gov)
  • Human exposure to hydroquinone can occur by dietary, occupational, and environmental sources. (hindawi.com)
  • Based on the uses of these substances and the overall low volumes of Benzidine-based Substances or Benzidine Derivatives in commerce, exposure from environmental media is not expected. (gc.ca)
  • The NIEHS Superfund Research Program's sister agencies - the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR), and state and regional hazardous waste agencies - are tasked to develop and implement policies that protect health and they depend upon the best science. (nih.gov)
  • Microbial Biotechnology in Environmental Monitoring and Cleanup is a critical scholarly resource that examines the toxic hazardous substances and their impact on the environment. (hazmatmag.com)
  • https://www.biodeg.org/subjects-of-interest/composting/ EN13432 for "compostable" plastic requires biodegradation to be tested in a laboratory (not in a compost heap) but it is sometimes suggested that oxo-biodegradable plastic should be tested in outdoor conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Master's degree is designed as a broad-based curriculum that covers all aspects of environmental engineering. (lsu.edu)
  • Nevertheless, biodegradation of cellulose in the compost was almost independent of the storage time and temperature. (uaf.edu)
  • This presentation will focus mostly on the effects of exposing environmental bacterial communities to engineered nanoparticles, particularly NZVI and silver nanoparticles. (aiche.org)
  • The studies indicated that glycerol enhances DBT biodegradation via increased RL synthesis and bacterial growth. (cdc.gov)
  • NIEHS is committed to conducting the most rigorous research in environmental health sciences, and to communicating the results of this research to the public. (nih.gov)
  • NIEHS research uses state-of-the-art science and technology to investigate the interplay between environmental exposures, human biology, genetics, and common diseases to help prevent disease and improve human health. (nih.gov)
  • NIEHS offers a broad range of job opportunities, career enhancement programs, and research training grants and programs in environmental health sciences and administration. (nih.gov)
  • This document specifies a laboratory test method for determining the degree and rate of the aerobic biodegradation level of plastic materials. (iso.org)
  • Under an optimum glycerol-to-DBT molar ratio, the DBT biodegradation rate constants increased up to 18-fold and enhanced DBT biodegradation by 25%-30% at day 1 relative to cultivation with DBT alone. (cdc.gov)
  • A biodegradation rate law in differential form was proposed and the numerical values of kinetic order and rate constant were determined using initial rate method as 0.994 and 0.3093 mol 0.006 · day -1 , respectively. (scirp.org)
  • W. Wanasolo, S. Manyele and J. Makunza, "A Kinetic Study of Anaerobic Biodegradation of Food and Fruit Residues during Biogas Generation Using Initial Rate Method," Engineering , Vol. 5 No. 7, 2013, pp. 577-586. (scirp.org)
  • Pursuant to section 74 of the Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999), the Ministers of the Environment and of Health have conducted a screening assessment on benzene, 1,3-bis(1-isocyanato-1-methylethyl)- (tetramethyl-m-xylylene diisocyanate), Chemical Abstracts Service Registry Number 2778-42-9. (gc.ca)
  • The Canadian Environmental Protection Act, 1999 (CEPA 1999) (Canada 1999) requires the Minister of the Environment and the Minister of Health to conduct screening assessments of substances that have met the categorization criteria set out in the Act to determine whether these substances present or may present a risk to the environment or human health. (gc.ca)
  • Exploitation of mineral resources causes several different environmental effects. (europa.eu)
  • On January 27-28, 2020, the Standing Committee on the Use of Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop to explore emerging technologies to advance research on and improve decisions about the environmental health effects of microplastics. (nih.gov)
  • Kara Lavender Law of the Sea Education Association gave a keynote address on what is known about microplastics and their effects on environmental health. (nih.gov)
  • The main controls were leachate recirculation and pH adjustments to minimize acid inhibitory effects and accelerate waste biodegradation. (scirp.org)
  • If you are giving a presentation about an environmental health topic or just looking for general information about environmental health research or the institute, this page will help. (nih.gov)
  • If you are giving a presentation about an environmental health topic or just looking for general information about environmental health research or the institute, this webpage will help. (nih.gov)
  • He works as scientific consultant on environmental problems for international company such as Teksid S.p.A. and San Pellegrino S.p.A. He is responsible of the research unit for projects, funded by MIUR (PRIN 2004 - PRIN2006 - FIRB 2003) and has the responsability of a research unit in a project of FP7 funded by EU. (polito.it)
  • P. Sosnowski, A. Wieczorek and S. Ledakowicz, "Anaerobic Co-Digestion of Sewage Sludge and Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Wastes," Advances in Environmental Research, Vol. 7, No. 3, 2003, pp. 609-616. (scirp.org)
  • This book is meant for professionals involved in environmental technology and waste management. (routledge.com)
  • Optimisation of biodegradation conditions for waste canola oil by cold-adapted Rhodococcus sp. (bas.ac.uk)
  • OXO-biodegradation has also been studied at the Eurofins laboratory in Spain, where on 25 July 2017 they noted 88.9% biodegradation in 121 days was observed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biodegradation is determined by measuring the CO 2 evolved from plastic materials when exposed to seawater sampled from coastal areas under laboratory conditions. (iso.org)
  • The conditions described in this document might not always correspond to the optimum conditions for the maximum degree of biodegradation, however this test method is designed to give an indication of the potential biodegradability of plastic materials. (iso.org)
  • Legislation for phasing out microplastics in cosmetic products (e.g., the Microbead-Free Waters Act of 2015 in the USA) can be expected to achieve only a limited reduction in the quantity of environmental plastic debris. (springer.com)
  • A new book on the advances in microbial biotechnology in environmental monitoring and clean-up has just be published by IGI Global. (hazmatmag.com)
  • The book is part of the Advances in Environmental Engineering and Green Technologies Book Series. (hazmatmag.com)
  • Biodegradation occurred in all oxic cultures, except with the sole addition of glucose, but was inhibited by NH 4 + and did not occur under anoxic conditions. (peerj.com)
  • The environmental engineering specialty area within Louisiana State University's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering was developed to train students in the discipline required to improve the infrastructure systems serving the State of Louisiana and the nation. (lsu.edu)
  • he Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers a M.S. and Ph.D. degrees with specialization in environmental engineering. (lsu.edu)
  • 2].USEPA (United States Environmental Protection Agency) (1990). (ksu.edu.tr)
  • The result of this combination is the well-known "factor 10 challenge": it is necessary to increase the environmental performance of all activities in industrial society by a factor of 10 during the coming decades in order to obtain sustainable development on a global scale. (europa.eu)
  • Further, the combination indicates certain focus areas as being especially important in order to preserve the "environmental space" on Earth. (europa.eu)
  • Biodegradation of up to 92.74% has been observed by Interek within 180 days, when tested in accordance with ASTM D6954(4). (wikipedia.org)
  • Readers can consult the NCEH/ATSDR's Environmental Health Thesaurus and CDC's Everyday Words for Public Health Communication for plain language alternatives and explanations for some of these terms. (cdc.gov)
  • The following are related field courses that may be included in a course of study for a graduate degree in Environmental Engineering. (lsu.edu)

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