Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.
The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.
Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.

Association of plasma fibrinogen concentration with vascular access failure in hemodialysis patients. (1/3384)

BACKGROUND: Elevated plasma fibrinogen is an important risk factor for coronary artery disease in the general population and patients with chronic renal failure. High plasma fibrinogen may trigger thrombus formation in arteriovenous fistulas. We performed a prospective, cohort study to evaluate the association of plasma fibrinogen concentration with vascular access failure in patients undergoing long-term haemodialysis. METHODS: Between September 1989 and October 1995, 144 patients underwent a vascular access operation. In March 1997, 102 patients (56 M, 46 F) who had been followed up for more than 18 months (median; 37 months, range; 18-102 months) were included in the study. The median age of the patients was 52 years (range; 19-78 years). In 35 patients, renal disease was secondary to diabetes mellitus. The type of vascular access was a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) graft in 17 patients. Seventy-seven patients received recombinant human erythropoietin (r-HuEPO) therapy during the follow-up period. Plasma fibrinogen, albumin, total cholesterol, hematocrit, platelets and creatinine were measured at the time of operation. Vascular access failure was defined as the occurrence of complications requiring transluminal angioplasty, thrombolytic therapy or surgical repair. RESULTS: Thirty-eight patients had at least one vascular access failure and the incidence was 0.3 (range; 0-2.4) episodes per patient-year. The survival rate of vascular access was 78% (native fistula; 80%, PTFE graft; 71%) after 12 months and 70% (native fistula; 73%, PTFE graft; 51%) after 24 months. Older age, a PTFE graft, r-HuEPO therapy, higher hematocrit, lower albumin and higher fibrinogen levels were significantly associated with vascular access failure, whereas gender, diabetes mellitus, total cholesterol and platelet count were not. Plasma fibrinogen was inversely correlated with albumin (r=-0.38, P=0.001). The cumulative vascular access survival was significantly lower in patients with high plasma fibrinogen levels (> or = 460 mg/dl) compared with patients with low levels (< 460 mg/dl) (P=0.007). Independent risk factors for vascular access failure analysed by Cox's proportional hazards model were older age (RR; 1.36 by 10-year increment), higher fibrinogen level (RR; 1.20 by 100 mg/dl increment), PTFE graft (RR; 2.28) and r-HuEPO therapy (RR; 3.79). CONCLUSION: High plasma fibrinogen level is an independent risk factor for vascular access failure in haemodialysis patients.  (+info)

Transdermal photopolymerization for minimally invasive implantation. (2/3384)

Photopolymerizations are widely used in medicine to create polymer networks for use in applications such as bone restorations and coatings for artificial implants. These photopolymerizations occur by directly exposing materials to light in "open" environments such as the oral cavity or during invasive procedures such as surgery. We hypothesized that light, which penetrates tissue including skin, could cause a photopolymerization indirectly. Liquid materials then could be injected s.c. and solidified by exposing the exterior surface of the skin to light. To test this hypothesis, the penetration of UVA and visible light through skin was studied. Modeling predicted the feasibility of transdermal polymerization with only 2 min of light exposure required to photopolymerize an implant underneath human skin. To establish the validity of these modeling studies, transdermal photopolymerization first was applied to tissue engineering by using "injectable" cartilage as a model system. Polymer/chondrocyte constructs were injected s.c. and transdermally photopolymerized. Implants harvested at 2, 4, and 7 weeks demonstrated collagen and proteoglycan production and histology with tissue structure comparable to native neocartilage. To further examine this phenomenon and test the applicability of transdermal photopolymerization for drug release devices, albumin, a model protein, was released for 1 week from photopolymerized hydrogels. With further study, transdermal photpolymerization potentially could be used to create a variety of new, minimally invasive surgical procedures in applications ranging from plastic and orthopedic surgery to tissue engineering and drug delivery.  (+info)

Defensins impair phagocytic killing by neutrophils in biomaterial-related infection. (3/3384)

The implantation of foreign material carries a risk of infection which frequently is resistant to all treatment short of removing the implant. We have previously shown that these materials activate neutrophils by contact, leading to production of oxygen free radicals accompanied by release of granule products. Such activation further results in depletion of local host defenses, including the capacity of biomaterial-activated neutrophils to kill bacteria. Among the granule products released from neutrophils are small cationic antibacterial peptides (human neutrophil peptides [HNP]) known as defensins. Here we tested the hypothesis that defensins, released from activated neutrophils onto the surface of biomaterials, might play a role in the deactivation of subsequent neutrophil populations. Incubation of neutrophils with purified HNP resulted in a dose-related impairment of stimulus-induced oxygen radical production and of phagocytic killing. Furthermore, fresh neutrophils added to biomaterial-associated neutrophils exhibited impaired phagocytic killing. This impairment could be abrogated by antibody to HNP but not by an irrelevant antibody. Taken together, these observations support the idea that neutrophils activated at a material surface can create, by means of HNP release, an environment hostile to their microbicidal function and that of their infiltrating brethren.  (+info)

Cylindrical or T-shaped silicone rubber stents for microanastomosis--technical note. (4/3384)

The ostium of the recipient artery and the orifice of the donor artery must be clearly visualized for the establishment of microvascular anastomosis. Specially designed colored flexible cylindrical or T-shaped silicone rubber stents were made in various sizes (400 or 500 microns diameter and 5 mm length) and applied to bypass surgery in patients with occlusive cerebrovascular disease such as moyamoya disease and internal carotid artery occlusion. The colored flexible stents facilitated confirmation of the ostium of the artery even in patients with moyamoya disease and allowed precise microvascular anastomosis without problems caused by the stent.  (+info)

Effect of dialyser biocompatibility on recovery from acute renal failure after cadaver renal transplantation. (5/3384)

BACKGROUND: It has been reported that patients with acute renal failure (ARF) requiring haemodialysis show an improved recovery of renal function when the dialysis treatment is performed using a biocompatible membrane rather than a bioincompatible membrane. However, most recent published human trials have not been able to confirm these findings. METHOD: Over a 2-year period, we prospectively studied 53 patients with ARF after cadaver renal transplantation who required haemodialysis and randomized them into two treatment groups. One group underwent dialysis with a cuprophane membrane and the other group underwent haemodialysis with a more biocompatible membrane, polysulfone. All patients received an immunosuppressive regimen which included azathioprine, prednisone and cyclosporine. RESULTS: There was no difference by patient characteristics or immunosuppressive regimen before acute tubular necrosis (ATN) recovery. In both groups the number of haemodialysis sessions required prior to the recovery of renal function (6.57+/-2.79 vs 6.05+/-2.40), the number of oliguric days (16.25+/-5.14 vs 14.40+/-4.67) and the number of hospital days (33.38+/-12.85 vs 30.10+/-11.00), were not statistically different. There was also no difference in long-term allograft outcome. CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that the use of a more biocompatible membrane had no influence on the recovery from acute renal failure after renal transplantation.  (+info)

Noninvasive measurement of anatomic structure and intraluminal oxygenation in the gastrointestinal tract of living mice with spatial and spectral EPR imaging. (6/3384)

EPR imaging has emerged as an important tool for noninvasive three-dimensional (3D) spatial mapping of free radicals in biological tissues. Spectral-spatial EPR imaging enables mapping of the spectral information at each spatial position, and, from the observed line width, the localized tissue oxygenation can be mapped. We report the development of EPR imaging instrumentation enabling 3D spatial and spectral-spatial EPR imaging of small animals. This instrumentation, along with the use of a biocompatible charcoal oximetry-probe suspension, enabled 3D spatial imaging of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, along with mapping of oxygenation in living mice. By using these techniques, the oxygen tension was mapped at different levels of the GI tract from the stomach to the rectum. The results clearly show the presence of a marked oxygen gradient from the proximal to the distal GI tract, which decreases after respiratory arrest. This technique for in vivo mapping of oxygenation is a promising method, enabling the noninvasive imaging of oxygen within the normal GI tract. This method should be useful in determining the alterations in oxygenation associated with disease.  (+info)

Functional arteries grown in vitro. (7/3384)

A tissue engineering approach was developed to produce arbitrary lengths of vascular graft material from smooth muscle and endothelial cells that were derived from a biopsy of vascular tissue. Bovine vessels cultured under pulsatile conditions had rupture strengths greater than 2000 millimeters of mercury, suture retention strengths of up to 90 grams, and collagen contents of up to 50 percent. Cultured vessels also showed contractile responses to pharmacological agents and contained smooth muscle cells that displayed markers of differentiation such as calponin and myosin heavy chains. Tissue-engineered arteries were implanted in miniature swine, with patency documented up to 24 days by digital angiography.  (+info)

Thrombopoietin stimulates endothelial cell motility and neoangiogenesis by a platelet-activating factor-dependent mechanism. (8/3384)

In this study, we demonstrate that human umbilical cord vein-derived endothelial cells (HUVECs) expressed c-Mpl, the thrombopoietin (TPO) receptor, and that TPO activates HUVECs in vitro, as indicated by directional migration, synthesis of 1-alkyl-/1-acyl-platelet-activating factor (PAF) and interleukin-8 (IL-8), and phosphorylation of the signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT) STAT1 and STAT5B. The observation that WEB 2170 and CV3988, 2 structurally unrelated PAF receptor antagonists, prevented the motility of HUVECs induced by TPO suggests a role of PAF as secondary mediator. Moreover, kinetic analysis of TPO-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT demonstrated that STAT5B activation temporally correlated with the synthesis of PAF. PAF, in turn, induced a rapid tyrosine phosphorylation of STAT5B and PAF receptor blockade, by WEB 2170, preventing both TPO- and PAF-mediated STAT5B activation. The in vivo angiogenic effect of TPO, studied in a mouse model of Matrigel implantation, demonstrated that TPO induced a dose-dependent angiogenic response that required the presence of heparin. Moreover, the in vivo angiogenic effect of TPO was inhibited by the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2170 but not by the anti-basic fibroblast growth factor neutralizing antibody. These results indicate that the effects of TPO are not restricted to cells of hematopoietic lineages, because TPO is able to activate endothelial cells and to induce an angiogenic response in which the recruitment of endothelial cells is mediated by the synthesis of PAF. Moreover, biochemical analysis supports the hypothesis that STAT5B may be involved in the signaling pathway leading to PAF-dependent angiogenesis.  (+info)

Biocompatible materials are non-toxic and non-reacting substances that can be used in medical devices, tissue engineering, and drug delivery systems without causing harm or adverse reactions to living tissues or organs. These materials are designed to mimic the properties of natural tissues and are able to integrate with biological systems without being rejected by the body's immune system.

Biocompatible materials can be made from a variety of substances, including metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. The specific properties of these materials, such as their mechanical strength, flexibility, and biodegradability, are carefully selected to meet the requirements of their intended medical application.

Examples of biocompatible materials include titanium used in dental implants and joint replacements, polyethylene used in artificial hips, and hydrogels used in contact lenses and drug delivery systems. The use of biocompatible materials has revolutionized modern medicine by enabling the development of advanced medical technologies that can improve patient outcomes and quality of life.

I'm happy to help! However, I must clarify that "materials testing" is not a medical term per se. It is a term used in various fields, including engineering and materials science, to describe the process of subjecting materials to different tests to evaluate their properties and performance under various conditions.

In the context of medical devices or implants, materials testing may refer to the evaluation of the physical and mechanical properties of materials used in their construction. These tests can include assessments of strength, durability, biocompatibility, and other factors that are critical to ensuring the safety and efficacy of medical devices.

Medical device manufacturers must comply with regulatory standards for materials testing to ensure that their products meet specific requirements for performance, safety, and quality. These standards may vary depending on the type of device, its intended use, and the country or region in which it will be marketed and sold.

Biocompatible coated materials refer to surfaces or substances that are treated or engineered with a layer or film designed to interact safely and effectively with living tissues or biological systems, without causing harm or adverse reactions. The coating material is typically composed of biomaterials that can withstand the conditions of the specific application while promoting a positive response from the body.

The purpose of these coatings may vary depending on the medical device or application. For example, they might be used to enhance the lubricity and wear resistance of implantable devices, reduce the risk of infection, promote integration with surrounding tissues, control drug release, or prevent the formation of biofilms.

Biocompatible coated materials must undergo rigorous testing and evaluation to ensure their safety and efficacy in various clinical settings. This includes assessing potential cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, sensitization, hemocompatibility, carcinogenicity, and other factors that could impact the body's response to the material.

Examples of biocompatible coating materials include:

1. Hydrogels: Cross-linked networks of hydrophilic polymers that can be used for drug delivery, tissue engineering, or as lubricious coatings on medical devices.
2. Self-assembling monolayers (SAMs): Organosilane or thiol-based molecules that form a stable, well-ordered film on surfaces, which can be further functionalized to promote specific biological interactions.
3. Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG): A biocompatible polymer often used as a coating material due to its ability to reduce protein adsorption and cell attachment, making it useful for preventing biofouling or thrombosis on medical devices.
4. Bioactive glass: A type of biomaterial composed of silica-based glasses that can stimulate bone growth and healing when used as a coating material in orthopedic or dental applications.
5. Drug-eluting coatings: Biocompatible polymers impregnated with therapeutic agents, designed to release the drug over time to promote healing, prevent infection, or inhibit restenosis in various medical devices.

Responsive materials are materials or devices that can respond to external stimuli as they occur. A little bit of time is taken ... Parker ST, Domachuk P, Amsden J, Bressner J, Lewis JA, Kaplan DL, Omenetto FG (2009). "Biocompatible Silk Printed Optical ... Materials based on the multi-layer stacking of guanine molecular crystals found in living organisms (e.g. fish and chameleons) ... These biologically inspired materials can be applied in many different circumstances. This technology can be used to camouflage ...
Fabrication material is crucial as not all polymers are biocompatible, with some materials such as PDMS causing undesirable ... Folch A, Toner M (1998-01-01). "Cellular micropatterns on biocompatible materials". Biotechnology Progress. 14 (3): 388-92. doi ... Poly(methyl pentene) (PMP) may be an alternative material, because it has high oxygen permeability and biocompatibility like ... Therefore, open microfluidic devices made of polystyrene (PS), a well-established cell culture material, started to emerge. The ...
"AMSilk Develops Spidersilk, a Biocompatible Material for Use in Cosmetic Formulations". cosmetics.specialchem.com. Retrieved ... "AMSilk Develops Spidersilk, a Biocompatible Material for Use in Cosmetic Formulations". cosmetics.specialchem.com. Retrieved ... Materials science organizations, Natural materials, Polyamides, Silk, Spider anatomy). ... The polymers are biocompatible and breathable. The company was founded in 2008 and has its headquarters at the IZB in Planegg ...
The selection of the scaffold material is perhaps the most important decision to be made. It must be biocompatible and ... Many biomaterials used for nerve guidance conduits are biomimetic materials. Biomimetic materials are materials that have been ... Polysialic acid (PSA) is a relatively new biocompatible and bioresorbable material for artificial nerve conduits. It is a ... "Use of spider silk fibres as an innovative material in a biocompatible artificial nerve conduit". Journal of Cellular and ...
Many of them are used for body jewelry, but only a few specific grades are proven biocompatible" Titanium body jewelry is often ... Biological organic materials seem to allow your body to "breathe". They get less cold than other hard solid materials due to ... The material has a smooth surface that is kind to the skin, but tends to be a little fragile and can't handle heat very well, ... Badly cleaned materials can transfer remaining bacteria and such to the body of the jewelry-wearer, so therefore it is very ...
Nanoparticles and biocompatible matrices for biotechnological applications. Silica-based ordered mesoporous materials as ... mesoporous materials for gene therapy and transfection, organic-inorganic hybrid materials. María Vallet-Reg is Fellow of ... She was the most-cited Spanish scientist, according to ISI Web of Knowledge, in the field of Materials Science in these past ... Bioceramic-based bone-grafting materials and scaffolds for regenerative biomedicine. Production and study of bioceramic systems ...
The first requirement is that the material must be biocompatible; it means that the organism should not treat it as a foreign ... Secondly, the material should be biodegradable (for in-graft only); the material should harmlessly degrade or dissolve in the ... These force-bearing materials require high elastic modulus with low deflection. As the elastic modulus of material increases, ... Thirdly, the material should be mechanically sound; for the replacement of load-bearing structures, the material should possess ...
Topical coverage includes biomedical and biocompatible materials. Formats of publication include original research reports, ... Materials Society. The journal was established in January 2005. The editor-in-chief is W.R. Wagner (University of Pittsburgh). ... Materials science journals, Monthly journals, Academic journals established in 2005, Biotechnology journals, English-language ... Chemical Abstracts Service EMBASE EMBiology Elsevier BIOBASE MEDLINE/PubMed Materials Science Citation Index Science Citation ...
"Biocompatible Material Contains Sunscreen From The Sea". Chemical & Engineering News. "INDO-UK WORKSHOP" (PDF). RSC. 2016. ... "Materials Horizons: From Nature to Nanomaterials". Springer Nature. 2018. "Gels Horizons: From Science to Smart Materials". ... "European Materials Research Society". ECNF. 2018. "Advance Materials in Science and Technology-2020". Nirma University, India. ... He did his post-doctoral study in Materials Science and Engineering at Iowa State University and received a PhD in Polymer ...
Collagen hydrogels would be nontoxic and biocompatible. Hybrid hydrogels combine synthetic and biological materials and take ... the materials selected must be factored for pH response when selecting the scaffolding material. The swelling and bioadhesion ... Self-healing refers to the spontaneous formation of new bonds when old bonds are broken within a material. The structure of the ... The surface tension (γ) of a material is directly related to its intramolecular and intermolecular forces. The stronger the ...
Fluoropolymers have also been produced with the material via a photoinitiated mechanism. Production of biocompatible materials ...
... even for materials that are highly biocompatible - are the primary concerns. Degradation, however, is still undesirable because ... Few materials are completely bioinert, as in they trigger no bodily reaction. Some material that may be bioinert in theory ... Bulk material properties are important when considering applications, however, it is the materials' surface (top several layers ... One method to increase this area is coating the electrode surfaces with a variety of materials. Many new materials and ...
A biocompatible material may not be completely "inert"; in fact, the appropriateness of the host response is decisive. The ... Biocompatible material Biomaterial Medical device ISO 10993 Medical implant Medical grade silicone Bovine submaxillary mucin ... Much of the pre-clinical testing of the materials is not conducted on the devices but rather the material itself. But at some ... Homsy, Charles (1970). "Bio-Compatibility in selection of materials for implantation". Journal of Biomedical Materials Research ...
Chen, Hong; Yuan, Lin; Song, Wei; Wu, Shongkui; Li, Dan (2008). "Biocompatible Polymer Materials: Role of Protein-surface ... The ability to deposit single layers of material allows for a great deal of control over the material. Except for some issues ... and Quaternary Materials by Atomic Layer Deposition: A Review". Chemistry of Materials. 31 (4): 1142-1183. doi:10.1021/acs. ... "Nanoporous Materials for Biomedical Devices". Biological Materials Science. 60 (3): 26-32. Bibcode:2008JOM....60c..26A. doi: ...
... and Biocompatible Graphene Paper". Advanced Materials. 20 (18): 3557-3561. Bibcode:2008AdM....20.3557C. doi:10.1002/adma. ... and Biocompatible Graphene Paper" - Advanced Materials (2008) "Carbon Nanotube Actuators" - Science (1999) "ARC Centre of ... "Materials Node , www.anff.org.au". www.anff.org.au. Retrieved 19 May 2017. "University of Wollongong, Australia". www.uow.edu. ... He has developed new approaches to fabrication that allow material properties discovered in the nano world to be translated ...
Cass Materials in Perth, Australia is using a dietary fibre called Nata de Coco (derived from coconuts) to create nanocellulose ... Nata de Coco is biocompatible, has high porosity, facilitates cell adhesion and is biodegradable. Immersion Jet Spinning is a ... Alternatively, the material should be able to blend with other substances which have these functional qualities. The degree of ... This material has been extensively studied by the Pelling and Gaudette Groups at University of Ottawa and Worcester Polytechnic ...
Momtazi L, Sønsteby HH, Nilsen O (2019-02-08). "Biocompatible organic-inorganic hybrid materials based on nucleobases and ... However, since this materials are more brittle, organic polymers are also added, providing the hybrid material with low ... Bioactive materials involve materials for regenerative medicine, tissue engineering (tissue scaffolds), biosensors etc. The ... Shamiryan D, Abell T, Iacopi F, Maex K (January 2004). "Low-k dielectric materials". Materials Today. 7 (1): 34-39. doi:10.1016 ...
... procedure whereby a tooth's root tip is removed and a root end cavity is prepared and filled with a biocompatible material. It ... Failure is often due to leakage, and therefore any materials used to seal the end of the root must provide a good seal. It is ... It has proven very popular as a root-end filling material and has shown generally high success rates. MTA produces a high pH ... Studies generally focus on one material or method of treatment compared to another, so it can be difficult to obtain any good ...
They are biocompatible with the dental pulp to some extent. Clinically, this material was initially used as a biomaterial to ... Some dental restorative materials, such as acrylic monomers in resin-based materials and phosphoric acid in silicate materials ... Lining materials protect the tooth from such irritants. Lining materials serve as an insulating layer to the tooth pulp from ... PEX-based materials do not contain Bisphenol A and are the least cytotoxic material available. Most modern composite resins are ...
It is a biocompatible material and is completely resorbed following implantation. It does not evoke a significant host response ... This material has the formula CaSO4·(nH2O), where 0.5 ≤ n ≤ 0.8. Temperatures between 100 and 150 °C (212-302 °F) are required ... It has been used in bone regeneration as a graft material and graft binder (or extender) and as a barrier in guided bone tissue ...
The process is important for making biomaterials more biocompatible. When materials are introduced to the body it is important ... as the body is a harsh environment for materials and materials can damage the body through leaching and corrosion. All of the ... passivation is considered to be a process that creates a non-reactive layer at the surface of materials, such that the material ... but also removes Ni atoms from the surface of the material. Removing certain elements from the surface of materials is another ...
"Selected laser methods for surface structuring of biocompatible diamond-like carbon layers". Diamond and Related Materials. 67 ... to Mücklich and the Material Engineering Center Saarland (MECS) together with TE Connectivity Materials Science and Technology ... The material is melted or evaporated in areas of constructive interference, depending on the pulse length, while it remains ... In materials science, direct laser interference patterning (DLIP) is a laser-based technology that uses the physical principle ...
Silicon carbide is a potential interesting material for realizing biocompatible semiconductor devices. The primary findings ... "Microelectrodes". Saddow SE (2011). Silicon Carbide Biotechnology: A Biocompatible Semiconductor for Advanced Biomedical ... and an insulation material. In cochlear implants, microelectrodes are formed from platinum-iridium alloy. State-of-the-art ... long-term biocompatibility of the material, mechanically durable in order to reach the target without being damaged during ...
Applications in this field include: super water absorbent material (e.g. for incontinence pads material), nanocellulose used ... "Injectable Biocompatible Hydrogels from Cellulose Nanocrystals for Locally Targeted Sustained Drug Release". ACS Applied ... "Wood-based composite materials for ultralight lens antennas in 6G systems". Materials Advances. 3 (3): 1687-1694. doi:10.1039/ ... CNF is a material composed of nanosized cellulose fibrils with a high aspect ratio (length to width ratio). Typical fibril ...
In the mid-1970s, Kyocera began expanding its material technologies to produce a diverse range of applied ceramic products, ... including solar photovoltaic modules; biocompatible tooth- and joint-replacement systems; industrial cutting tools; consumer ...
Bone cavities can be filled by polymerizing materials when injected and adaptation to the shape of the cavity can be provided. ... Fibrin scaffold has many aspects like being biocompatible, biodegradable and easily processable. Furthermore, it has an ... Fibrin scaffold is an important element in tissue engineering approaches as a scaffold material. It is advantageous opposed to ... interference of new cells and biological cues is provided by a scaffold material. ...
... use tubular fabrics with carefully chosen materials that are biocompatible, nonallergic, and nontoxic. For ... Materials in surgical sutures are textile based products. Suture material is frequently subdivided into absorbable thread and ... xxxiii The advancement of materials science and related research has resulted in the introduction of new fiber materials and ... and carbon fiber-based goods offer numerous advantages over conventional materials. Materials used in wound care also include ...
3D printing of PDCs can facilitate the fabrication and integration of advanced ceramic materials. Biocompatible PDCs and PDC- ... PDC-based composite materials can extend functions and usages of PDCs to a wide range of areas, for example, in biological, ... The key advantage of this type of ceramic material is the versatility afforded by the use of polymeric precursors in terms of ... Hybrid PDC materials are feasible and tunable for substrate manufacturing in lithium ion batteries, sensors, actuators, high ...
In 2011, she started working on biocompatible luminogens which demonstrate aggregation-induced emission. Such materials are non ... Her early work considered novel materials for high efficiency solar cells. In particular, she focused on the design of hole ... She made use of machine learning to accelerate materials design. The algorithms created by Liu can predict the properties of ... Liu was awarded the Royal Society of Chemistry Centenary Prize in recognition of her work in organic materials and ...
Dental materials, Biomaterials, United States Navy, Materials science, Solid-state chemistry, Smart materials, Nickel-titanium ... Nitinol is highly biocompatible and has properties suitable for use in orthopedic implants. Due to nitinol's unique properties ... and the application of new materials and material structures, such hybrid shape memory materials (SMMs) and shape memory ... Khan, M. I.; Zhou Y. N. (2011), Methods and Systems for Processing Materials, Including Shape Memory Materials, WO Patent WO/ ...
Jan W. Gooch (23 August 2010). Biocompatible Polymeric Materials and Tourniquets for Wounds. Springer. p. 35. ISBN 978-1-4419- ... A Maximum Absorbency Garment (MAG) is an adult-sized diaper with extra absorption material that NASA astronauts wear during ...
Hench was intrigued and began to investigate materials that would be biocompatible. The final product was a new material which ... Bioceramics and bioglasses are ceramic materials that are biocompatible. Bioceramics are an important subset of biomaterials. ... The ceramic materials used are not the same as porcelain type ceramic materials. Rather, bioceramics are closely related to ... Alternatively, the bioceramic materials can be doped with β-emitting materials and implanted into the cancerous area. Other ...
Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine. 18 (11): 2123-2129. doi:10.1007/s10856-007-3012-y. PMID 17619983. S2CID ... When titanium gains a coating to make it more bioactive, it can turn the already biocompatible titanium surface into an ... These materials are ideally suited for applications within the aerospace industry. An inherent resistance to corrosion allows ... As with other metal foams, the properties of titanium foams depend mostly on the properties of the starting material and the ...
Tissue engineering principles are used in order to create a non-degradable and biocompatible material that can replace ... Scaffolds must be biocompatible and have high compressive strength. Scaffolds can be created from hydrogels, polymers or other ... Bioinks can be composed solely of cells, but are usually a combination of cells and a carrier material, often a biopolymer gel ... The implant is made of saline and a bio-compatible polymer, and is inserted through an incision between the metatarsophalangeal ...
Besides the engineering grade materials like the ABS-like or PP-like resin, there exist bio-compatible ones used for medical ... Each nozzle can extrude a different material, which allows for the creation of multi-material parts. The droplets of material ... Through the use of multi-material printing they create biocompatible structures that can interact with the human body on a ... The materials supported by the material jetting printing process are similar to the ones of the SLA process and hence share ...
He is best known for his pioneering work in developing electrical and optical materials and devices, as well as for his ... ". "Biocompatible article for the treatment of water and production of energy". "Press Release". "Press Release". "Press ... doi:10.1016/0379-6779(82)90007-8. Hoffman, Robert C.; Potember, Richard S. (1989). "Organometallic materials for erasable ... Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in 1989 for his work on optical switching materials. Potember served as a trustee at Goucher ...
"Helen Tran: This polymer designer creates biocompatible, biodegradable materials for sensors". cen.acs.org. Retrieved July 25, ... Tran's research considers next-generation materials that are stimuli-responsive for novel technologies. She started her ... November 1, 2013). "One-dimensional electrical contact to a two-dimensional material". Science. 342 (6158): 614-617. doi: ...

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