Absorbable Implants: Implants constructed of materials designed to be absorbed by the body without producing an immune response. They are usually composed of plastics and are frequently used in orthopedics and orthodontics.Stents: Devices that provide support for tubular structures that are being anastomosed or for body cavities during skin grafting.Drug-Eluting Stents: Stents that are covered with materials that are embedded with chemicals that are gradually released into the surrounding milieu.Suture Anchors: Implants used in arthroscopic surgery and other orthopedic procedures to attach soft tissue to bone. One end of a suture is tied to soft tissue and the other end to the implant. The anchors are made of a variety of materials including titanium, stainless steel, or absorbable polymers.Polymers: Compounds formed by the joining of smaller, usually repeating, units linked by covalent bonds. These compounds often form large macromolecules (e.g., BIOPOLYMERS; PLASTICS).Coated Materials, Biocompatible: Biocompatible materials usually used in dental and bone implants that enhance biologic fixation, thereby increasing the bond strength between the coated material and bone, and minimize possible biological effects that may result from the implant itself.Polyglactin 910: A polyester used for absorbable sutures & surgical mesh, especially in ophthalmic surgery. 2-Hydroxy-propanoic acid polymer with polymerized hydroxyacetic acid, which forms 3,6-dimethyl-1,4-dioxane-dione polymer with 1,4-dioxane-2,5-dione copolymer of molecular weight about 80,000 daltons.Sirolimus: A macrolide compound obtained from Streptomyces hygroscopicus that acts by selectively blocking the transcriptional activation of cytokines thereby inhibiting cytokine production. It is bioactive only when bound to IMMUNOPHILINS. Sirolimus is a potent immunosuppressant and possesses both antifungal and antineoplastic properties.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Coronary Restenosis: Recurrent narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery following surgical procedures performed to alleviate a prior obstruction.Bone Screws: Specialized devices used in ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY to repair bone fractures.Metals: Electropositive chemical elements characterized by ductility, malleability, luster, and conductance of heat and electricity. They can replace the hydrogen of an acid and form bases with hydroxyl radicals. (Grant & Hackh's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Biocompatible Materials: Synthetic or natural materials, other than DRUGS, that are used to replace or repair any body TISSUES or bodily function.Cellulose, Oxidized: A cellulose of varied carboxyl content retaining the fibrous structure. It is commonly used as a local hemostatic and as a matrix for normal blood coagulation.Surgical Sponges: Gauze material used to absorb body fluids during surgery. Referred to as GOSSYPIBOMA if accidentally retained in the body following surgery.Angioplasty, Balloon, Coronary: Dilation of an occluded coronary artery (or arteries) by means of a balloon catheter to restore myocardial blood supply.Guided Tissue Regeneration, Periodontal: Techniques for enhancing and directing cell growth to repopulate specific parts of the PERIODONTIUM that have been damaged by PERIODONTAL DISEASES; TOOTH DISEASES; or TRAUMA, or to correct TOOTH ABNORMALITIES. Repopulation and repair is achieved by guiding the progenitor cells to reproduce in the desired location by blocking contact with surrounding tissue by use of membranes composed of synthetic or natural material that may include growth inducing factors as well.Bone-Patellar Tendon-Bone Grafting: Fixation of the ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT, during surgical reconstruction, by the use of a bone-patellar tendon graft.Bone Nails: Rods of bone, metal, or other material used for fixation of the fragments or ends of fractured bones.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Cardiovascular Agents: Agents that affect the rate or intensity of cardiac contraction, blood vessel diameter, or blood volume.Arthrometry, Articular: Measurements of joint flexibility (RANGE OF MOTION, ARTICULAR), usually by employing an angle-measuring device (arthrometer). Arthrometry is used to measure ligamentous laxity and stability. It is often used to evaluate the outcome of ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT replacement surgery.Lactic Acid: A normal intermediate in the fermentation (oxidation, metabolism) of sugar. The concentrated form is used internally to prevent gastrointestinal fermentation. (From Stedman, 26th ed)Arthroscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy and surgery of the joint.Bone Cysts: Benign unilocular lytic areas in the proximal end of a long bone with well defined and narrow endosteal margins. The cysts contain fluid and the cyst walls may contain some giant cells. Bone cysts usually occur in males between the ages 3-15 years.Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction: Rebuilding of the ANTERIOR CRUCIATE LIGAMENT to restore functional stability of the knee. AUTOGRAFTING or ALLOGRAFTING of tissues is often used.Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of a prosthesis.Coronary Vessels: The veins and arteries of the HEART.Granuloma, Foreign-Body: Histiocytic, inflammatory response to a foreign body. It consists of modified macrophages with multinucleated giant cells, in this case foreign-body giant cells (GIANT CELLS, FOREIGN-BODY), usually surrounded by lymphocytes.Internal Fixators: Internal devices used in osteosynthesis to hold the position of the fracture in proper alignment. By applying the principles of biomedical engineering, the surgeon uses metal plates, nails, rods, etc., for the correction of skeletal defects.Hemostatic Techniques: Techniques for controlling bleeding.Humerus: Bone in humans and primates extending from the SHOULDER JOINT to the ELBOW JOINT.Septal Occluder Device: A CATHETER-delivered implant used for closing abnormal holes in the cardiovascular system, especially HEART SEPTAL DEFECTS; or passageways intentionally made during cardiovascular surgical procedures.Anterior Cruciate Ligament: A strong ligament of the knee that originates from the posteromedial portion of the lateral condyle of the femur, passes anteriorly and inferiorly between the condyles, and attaches to the depression in front of the intercondylar eminence of the tibia.Alloys: A mixture of metallic elements or compounds with other metallic or metalloid elements in varying proportions.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Materials Testing: The testing of materials and devices, especially those used for PROSTHESES AND IMPLANTS; SUTURES; TISSUE ADHESIVES; etc., for hardness, strength, durability, safety, efficacy, and biocompatibility.Polyglycolic Acid: A biocompatible polymer used as a surgical suture material.Bone Substitutes: Synthetic or natural materials for the replacement of bones or bone tissue. They include hard tissue replacement polymers, natural coral, hydroxyapatite, beta-tricalcium phosphate, and various other biomaterials. The bone substitutes as inert materials can be incorporated into surrounding tissue or gradually replaced by original tissue.Paclitaxel: A cyclodecane isolated from the bark of the Pacific yew tree, TAXUS BREVIFOLIA. It stabilizes MICROTUBULES in their polymerized form leading to cell death.Coronary Thrombosis: Coagulation of blood in any of the CORONARY VESSELS. The presence of a blood clot (THROMBUS) often leads to MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION.Polyesters: Polymers of organic acids and alcohols, with ester linkages--usually polyethylene terephthalate; can be cured into hard plastic, films or tapes, or fibers which can be woven into fabrics, meshes or velours.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Joint Instability: Lack of stability of a joint or joint prosthesis. Factors involved are intra-articular disease and integrity of extra-articular structures such as joint capsule, ligaments, and muscles.Membranes, Artificial: Artificially produced membranes, such as semipermeable membranes used in artificial kidney dialysis (RENAL DIALYSIS), monomolecular and bimolecular membranes used as models to simulate biological CELL MEMBRANES. These membranes are also used in the process of GUIDED TISSUE REGENERATION.Reconstructive Surgical Procedures: Procedures used to reconstruct, restore, or improve defective, damaged, or missing structures.Surgical Mesh: Any woven or knit material of open texture used in surgery for the repair, reconstruction, or substitution of tissue. The mesh is usually a synthetic fabric made of various polymers. It is occasionally made of metal.Coronary Angiography: Radiography of the vascular system of the heart muscle after injection of a contrast medium.Bone Plates: Implantable fracture fixation devices attached to bone fragments with screws to bridge the fracture gap and shield the fracture site from stress as bone heals. (UMDNS, 1999)Fracture Fixation, Internal: The use of internal devices (metal plates, nails, rods, etc.) to hold the position of a fracture in proper alignment.Coronary Stenosis: Narrowing or constriction of a coronary artery.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Coronary Artery Disease: Pathological processes of CORONARY ARTERIES that may derive from a congenital abnormality, atherosclerotic, or non-atherosclerotic cause.Swine: Any of various animals that constitute the family Suidae and comprise stout-bodied, short-legged omnivorous mammals with thick skin, usually covered with coarse bristles, a rather long mobile snout, and small tail. Included are the genera Babyrousa, Phacochoerus (wart hogs), and Sus, the latter containing the domestic pig (see SUS SCROFA).Postoperative Complications: Pathologic processes that affect patients after a surgical procedure. They may or may not be related to the disease for which the surgery was done, and they may or may not be direct results of the surgery.Thrombosis: Formation and development of a thrombus or blood clot in the blood vessel.Ultrasonography, Interventional: The use of ultrasound to guide minimally invasive surgical procedures such as needle ASPIRATION BIOPSY; DRAINAGE; etc. Its widest application is intravascular ultrasound imaging but it is useful also in urology and intra-abdominal conditions.Graft Occlusion, Vascular: Obstruction of flow in biological or prosthetic vascular grafts.Stainless Steel: Stainless steel. A steel containing Ni, Cr, or both. It does not tarnish on exposure and is used in corrosive environments. (Grant & Hack's Chemical Dictionary, 5th ed)Drug Implants: Small containers or pellets of a solid drug implanted in the body to achieve sustained release of the drug.Tubulin Modulators: Agents that interact with TUBULIN to inhibit or promote polymerization of MICROTUBULES.Tibia: The second longest bone of the skeleton. It is located on the medial side of the lower leg, articulating with the FIBULA laterally, the TALUS distally, and the FEMUR proximally.Angioplasty, Balloon: Use of a balloon catheter for dilation of an occluded artery. It is used in treatment of arterial occlusive diseases, including renal artery stenosis and arterial occlusions in the leg. For the specific technique of BALLOON DILATION in coronary arteries, ANGIOPLASTY, BALLOON, CORONARY is available.Constriction, Pathologic: The condition of an anatomical structure's being constricted beyond normal dimensions.Myocardial Infarction: NECROSIS of the MYOCARDIUM caused by an obstruction of the blood supply to the heart (CORONARY CIRCULATION).Immunosuppressive Agents: Agents that suppress immune function by one of several mechanisms of action. Classical cytotoxic immunosuppressants act by inhibiting DNA synthesis. Others may act through activation of T-CELLS or by inhibiting the activation of HELPER CELLS. While immunosuppression has been brought about in the past primarily to prevent rejection of transplanted organs, new applications involving mediation of the effects of INTERLEUKINS and other CYTOKINES are emerging.Neointima: The new and thickened layer of scar tissue that forms on a PROSTHESIS, or as a result of vessel injury especially following ANGIOPLASTY or stent placement.Iliac Artery: Either of two large arteries originating from the abdominal aorta; they supply blood to the pelvis, abdominal wall and legs.Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors: Drugs or agents which antagonize or impair any mechanism leading to blood platelet aggregation, whether during the phases of activation and shape change or following the dense-granule release reaction and stimulation of the prostaglandin-thromboxane system.Tunica Intima: The innermost layer of an artery or vein, made up of one layer of endothelial cells and supported by an internal elastic lamina.Percutaneous Coronary Intervention: A family of percutaneous techniques that are used to manage CORONARY OCCLUSION, including standard balloon angioplasty (PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL CORONARY ANGIOPLASTY), the placement of intracoronary STENTS, and atheroablative technologies (e.g., ATHERECTOMY; ENDARTERECTOMY; THROMBECTOMY; PERCUTANEOUS TRANSLUMINAL LASER ANGIOPLASTY). PTCA was the dominant form of PCI, before the widespread use of stenting.Chromium Alloys: Specific alloys not less than 85% chromium and nickel or cobalt, with traces of either nickel or cobalt, molybdenum, and other substances. They are used in partial dentures, orthopedic implants, etc.Equipment Design: Methods of creating machines and devices.Retreatment: The therapy of the same disease in a patient, with the same agent or procedure repeated after initial treatment, or with an additional or alternate measure or follow-up. It does not include therapy which requires more than one administration of a therapeutic agent or regimen. Retreatment is often used with reference to a different modality when the original one was inadequate, harmful, or unsuccessful.Blood Vessel Prosthesis: Device constructed of either synthetic or biological material that is used for the repair of injured or diseased blood vessels.Blood Vessel Prosthesis Implantation: Surgical insertion of BLOOD VESSEL PROSTHESES to repair injured or diseased blood vessels.Hyperplasia: An increase in the number of cells in a tissue or organ without tumor formation. It differs from HYPERTROPHY, which is an increase in bulk without an increase in the number of cells.Coronary Disease: An imbalance between myocardial functional requirements and the capacity of the CORONARY VESSELS to supply sufficient blood flow. It is a form of MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIA (insufficient blood supply to the heart muscle) caused by a decreased capacity of the coronary vessels.Vascular Patency: The degree to which BLOOD VESSELS are not blocked or obstructed.Registries: The systems and processes involved in the establishment, support, management, and operation of registers, e.g., disease registers.Myocardial Revascularization: The restoration of blood supply to the myocardium. (From Dorland, 28th ed)Tracheal StenosisEsophageal Stenosis: A stricture of the ESOPHAGUS. Most are acquired but can be congenital.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Drug Delivery Systems: Systems for the delivery of drugs to target sites of pharmacological actions. Technologies employed include those concerning drug preparation, route of administration, site targeting, metabolism, and toxicity.Prosthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Catheterization: Use or insertion of a tubular device into a duct, blood vessel, hollow organ, or body cavity for injecting or withdrawing fluids for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. It differs from INTUBATION in that the tube here is used to restore or maintain patency in obstructions.Angioplasty: Reconstruction or repair of a blood vessel, which includes the widening of a pathological narrowing of an artery or vein by the removal of atheromatous plaque material and/or the endothelial lining as well, or by dilatation (BALLOON ANGIOPLASTY) to compress an ATHEROMA. Except for ENDARTERECTOMY, usually these procedures are performed via catheterization as minimally invasive ENDOVASCULAR PROCEDURES.Ticlopidine: An effective inhibitor of platelet aggregation commonly used in the placement of STENTS in CORONARY ARTERIES.Kaplan-Meier Estimate: A nonparametric method of compiling LIFE TABLES or survival tables. It combines calculated probabilities of survival and estimates to allow for observations occurring beyond a measurement threshold, which are assumed to occur randomly. Time intervals are defined as ending each time an event occurs and are therefore unequal. (From Last, A Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1995)Arterial Occlusive Diseases: Pathological processes which result in the partial or complete obstruction of ARTERIES. They are characterized by greatly reduced or absence of blood flow through these vessels. They are also known as arterial insufficiency.Foreign-Body Migration: Migration of a foreign body from its original location to some other location in the body.Plastics: Polymeric materials (usually organic) of large molecular weight which can be shaped by flow. Plastic usually refers to the final product with fillers, plasticizers, pigments, and stabilizers included (versus the resin, the homogeneous polymeric starting material). (McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)Equipment Failure: Failure of equipment to perform to standard. The failure may be due to defects or improper use.Coronary Occlusion: Complete blockage of blood flow through one of the CORONARY ARTERIES, usually from CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROSIS.Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Palliative Care: Care alleviating symptoms without curing the underlying disease. (Stedman, 25th ed)Gastric Outlet Obstruction: The hindering of output from the STOMACH into the SMALL INTESTINE. This obstruction may be of mechanical or functional origin such as EDEMA from PEPTIC ULCER; NEOPLASMS; FOREIGN BODIES; or AGING.Device Removal: Removal of an implanted therapeutic or prosthetic device.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Aspirin: The prototypical analgesic used in the treatment of mild to moderate pain. It has anti-inflammatory and antipyretic properties and acts as an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase which results in the inhibition of the biosynthesis of prostaglandins. Aspirin also inhibits platelet aggregation and is used in the prevention of arterial and venous thrombosis. (From Martindale, The Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed, p5)Femoral Artery: The main artery of the thigh, a continuation of the external iliac artery.Polytetrafluoroethylene: Homopolymer of tetrafluoroethylene. Nonflammable, tough, inert plastic tubing or sheeting; used to line vessels, insulate, protect or lubricate apparatus; also as filter, coating for surgical implants or as prosthetic material. Synonyms: Fluoroflex; Fluoroplast; Ftoroplast; Halon; Polyfene; PTFE; Tetron.Swine, Miniature: Genetically developed small pigs for use in biomedical research. There are several strains - Yucatan miniature, Sinclair miniature, and Minnesota miniature.Angiography: Radiography of blood vessels after injection of a contrast medium.Coronary Artery Bypass: Surgical therapy of ischemic coronary artery disease achieved by grafting a section of saphenous vein, internal mammary artery, or other substitute between the aorta and the obstructed coronary artery distal to the obstructive lesion.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Foreign-Body Reaction: Chronic inflammation and granuloma formation around irritating foreign bodies.Intubation: Introduction of a tube into a hollow organ to restore or maintain patency if obstructed. It is differentiated from CATHETERIZATION in that the insertion of a catheter is usually performed for the introducing or withdrawing of fluids from the body.Ureteral Diseases: Pathological processes involving the URETERS.Angioscopy: Endoscopic examination, therapy or surgery performed on the interior of blood vessels.Equipment Failure Analysis: The evaluation of incidents involving the loss of function of a device. These evaluations are used for a variety of purposes such as to determine the failure rates, the causes of failures, costs of failures, and the reliability and maintainability of devices.Propensity Score: Conditional probability of exposure to a treatment given observed covariates.Silicones: A broad family of synthetic organosiloxane polymers containing a repeating silicon-oxygen backbone with organic side groups attached via carbon-silicon bonds. Depending on their structure, they are classified as liquids, gels, and elastomers. (From Merck Index, 12th ed)Radiology, Interventional: Subspecialty of radiology that combines organ system radiography, catheter techniques and sectional imaging.Biodegradable Plastics: Organic polymeric materials which can be broken down by naturally occurring processes. This includes plastics created from bio-based or petrochemical-based materials.Diabetic Angiopathies: VASCULAR DISEASES that are associated with DIABETES MELLITUS.Jaundice, Obstructive: Jaundice, the condition with yellowish staining of the skin and mucous membranes, that is due to impaired BILE flow in the BILIARY TRACT, such as INTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS, or EXTRAHEPATIC CHOLESTASIS.Duodenal Obstruction: Hindrance of the passage of luminal contents in the DUODENUM. Duodenal obstruction can be partial or complete, and caused by intrinsic or extrinsic factors. Simple obstruction is associated with diminished or stopped flow of luminal contents. Strangulating obstruction is associated with impaired blood flow to the duodenum in addition to obstructed flow of luminal contents.Ureter: One of a pair of thick-walled tubes that transports urine from the KIDNEY PELVIS to the URINARY BLADDER.Cholangiopancreatography, Endoscopic Retrograde: Fiberoptic endoscopy designed for duodenal observation and cannulation of VATER'S AMPULLA, in order to visualize the pancreatic and biliary duct system by retrograde injection of contrast media. Endoscopic (Vater) papillotomy (SPHINCTEROTOMY, ENDOSCOPIC) may be performed during this procedure.Proportional Hazards Models: Statistical models used in survival analysis that assert that the effect of the study factors on the hazard rate in the study population is multiplicative and does not change over time.Popliteal Artery: The continuation of the femoral artery coursing through the popliteal fossa; it divides into the anterior and posterior tibial arteries.
  • The encouraging results from the first 30 patients of ABSORB suggest that drug-eluting bioabsorbable stent technologies may be a promising future therapy option for physicians treating patients with heart disease," said Patrick W. Serruys, M.D., Ph.D., professor of interventional cardiology at the Thoraxcentre, Erasmus University Hospital, Rotterdam, who is co-principal investigator of the study. (medgadget.com)
  • For instance, in May 2015, Abbott received CE mark approval for Absorb GT1, which is the world s first fully bioresorbable stent system. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Guidant Corporation has announced enrollment of the first patient into the ABSORB study, to evaluate the safety of Guidant's proprietary fully bioabsorbable everolimus eluting stent for the treatment of coronary artery disease. (medgadget.com)
  • We are highly encouraged by the progress thus far with Guidant's bioabsorbable technology, and look forward to further exploring its potential as part of the ABSORB trial. (medgadget.com)
  • Results from clinical trials, such as the second phase of Abbott Laboratories's ABSORB trial, showed a low rate of major acute coronary events and no evidence of the formation of thrombus or the need for a repeat procedure when using the bioabsorbable stents. (cardiovascularbusiness.com)
  • The Absorb stent, manufactured by Abbott, is made of material similar to dissolving sutures, and absorbs completely and naturally into the body over a three-year period. (atlantichealth.org)
  • We continue to advance cardiac science and evaluate new treatment options by participating in clinical trials, as we did for the Absorb stent, which ensures our ability to offer new-to-market therapeutic interventions almost immediately. (atlantichealth.org)
  • The Absorb stent was approved by the FDA on July 5. (atlantichealth.org)
  • WASHINGTON, Oct. 13 Abbott (NYSE: ABT) todayannounced two-year data from 30 patients in its ABSORB clinical trial,demonstrating that its bioabsorbable drug eluting stent successfully treatedcoronary artery disease and was absorbed into the walls of treated arterieswithin two years, leaving behind blood vessels that appeared to move andfunction similar to unstented arteries. (medindia.net)
  • Now you see it, now you don't -- for the first time, we have data inpatients showing that Abbott's bioabsorbable drug eluting stent does its jobtreating diseased coronary arteries and that it is absorbed by two years,"said John Ormiston, M.D., principal investigator in the ABSORB trial andmedical director at Mercy Angiography in Auckland, New Zealand. (medindia.net)
  • The imaging technology data from the ABSORB trial indicate that Abbott'sbioabsorbable stent has the potential to restore vascular integrity andendothelial function to treated vessels after two years," said ProfessorPatrick W. Serruys, M.D., Ph.D., professor of interventional cardiology at theThoraxcentre, Erasmus University Hospital, Rotterdam, and co-principalinvestigator in the ABSORB trial. (medindia.net)
  • With these ABSORB data, we have come fullcircle in interventional time, linking the past, when balloon angioplasty wasused without stents, to the future, when disappearing stents may become thenew standard of care for patients with coronary artery disease. (medindia.net)
  • ABBOTT PARK, Ill., March 24, 2007 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Abbott today announced positive results from ABSORB, the world's first clinical trial evaluating the overall safety and performance of a fully bioabsorbable drug- eluting stent platform for the treatment of coronary artery disease. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The next phase of the ABSORB study will utilize a next-generation bioabsorbable everolimus-eluting stent that incorporates several advancements designed to improve strength and deliverability. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Aim of this study was to assess the incidence of malapposed stent-struts after ABSORB™ implantation as well as the frequency of stent-underexpansion and edge dissections compared to the XIENCE™ stent. (onlinejacc.org)
  • 23 patients after elective implantation of an ABSORB™ scaffold (n=30) were matched with 26 patients after implantation of a XIENCE™ stent (n=30) according to gender, age, stent-diameter and length. (onlinejacc.org)
  • OCT assessment post implantation showed less adverse results concerning the ABSORB™ scaffold compared to the XIENCE™ stent. (onlinejacc.org)
  • In the early phase after implantation the ABSORB revascularises like a drug eluting stent. (richardbogle.com)
  • Three-year results from 101 patients in the second stage of the ABSORB trial have shown that the rate of major adverse cardiovascular events was 10% at three years, similar to a comparative set of data with a best-in-class drug eluting stent at the same follow-up period. (richardbogle.com)
  • The ABSORB stent is now available and patients interested in receiving it should discuss with their cardiologist to see if they are suitable for the device. (richardbogle.com)
  • Specifically, the Absorb naturally dissolving stent has been investigated in single-arm trials and in randomized trials comparing it to a drug-eluting stent (DES). (wikipedia.org)
  • Two days ago Abbott announced that a clinical trial of their drug-eluting PLA absorbable stent is going well. (medgadget.com)
  • Explain to interested patients that this study describes results from a small series of patients treated with an experimental stent that is not available for clinical use. (medpagetoday.com)
  • The PROGRESS-AMS (Clinical Performance and angiographic Results of Coronary Stenting with Absorbable Metal Stents) trial enrolled 63 patients mean age 61 at eight participating centers in the United States and Europe. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Cardiologists in the U.S. and Europe are more willing to use new technologies such as bifurcated and bioabsorbable stents, while Japanese and Latin American cardiologists are more resistant, citing the lack of long-term clinical data, early recoil and technical challenges as drawbacks to these technologies. (cardiovascularbusiness.com)
  • It also provides information about clinical trials in progress, which includes trial phase, trial status, trial start and end dates, and, the number of trials for the key Bioabsorbable Stents (BAS) pipeline products. (marketresearch.com)
  • Market growth of bioresorbable stents is attributed to the growing aging population susceptible to coronary and peripheral artery diseases, rising PCI procedures, increasing focus of companies on clinical trials of bioresorbable stents, increasing adoption of these stents by physicians and patients, and patients' preference for minimally invasive therapies. (prsync.com)
  • These resultsconfirmed earlier positive one-year clinical results with Abbott'sbioabsorbable drug eluting stent. (medindia.net)
  • Abbott is the only company with long-term clinical data evaluating thesafety and performance of a fully bioabsorbable drug eluting coronary stentout to two years. (medindia.net)
  • Abbott Announces Positive Six-Month Results From the World's First,Clinical Trial of a Fully Bioabsorbable Drug-Eluting Coronary Stent ( Abbott's Bioabsorbable Stent Technology. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This study assessed those in our unit who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with a Synergy stent to examine a minimum of 6 months of clinical outcomes after early discontinuation of DAPT. (pcronline.com)
  • The EVOLVE II Trial is part of a rigorous clinical program designed to support U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare (MHLW) approval of the SYNERGY Stent. (genodynamic.ro)
  • Several studies support this concept and indicate that there is no clinical benefit of a permanent stent over time. (richardbogle.com)
  • The report offers a critical evaluation of the key evolution dynamics, promising clinical avenues, imminent investment pockets, and prevailing regulatory frameworks in the global Bioabsorbable Ureteral Stent market. (theslapclap.com)
  • More specifically, there has been an emphasis on upgrading current clinical shortfalls experienced with conventional bare metal stents and drug eluting stents. (springer.com)
  • Peripheral vascular stents including bare metal, drug-eluting, covered and bioabsorbable stents are associated with improved clinical outcomes compared to balloon angioplasty alone. (prnewswire.com)
  • However, as clinical data and appropriate reimbursement and costs are established, adoption of innovative stent technologies such as drug-eluting stents and bioabsorbable stents will increase in the future. (prnewswire.com)
  • Peripheral stenting will continue to increase in the future given the rising prevalence of peripheral artery disease in the lower extremity and improved clinical outcomes compared to balloon angioplasty alone. (prnewswire.com)
  • EMAILWIRE.COM, September 08, 2019 ) Market growth of bioresorbable stents is attributed to the growing aging population susceptible to coronary and peripheral artery diseases, rising PCI procedures, increasing focus of companies on clinical trials of bioresorbable stents, increasing adoption of. (emailwire.com)
  • and two years, with additional annual clinical follow-up for up to five years, as well as an assessment of the acute performance of the bioabsorbable drug eluting stent, including successful deployment of the system. (mediligence.com)
  • Boston Scientific will continue to advance the robust clinical program supporting the SYNERGY Stent with the initiation of the EVOLVE Short Dual Anti-Platelet Therapy (DAPT) Study, expected during the first quarter of 2016. (bostonscientific.com)
  • A variety of stents for different clinical conditions are available in the market. (beforeitsnews.com)
  • Clinical trials have shown the benefits of coronary stenting with bare-metal stents over other methods of angioplasty, including balloon angioplasty and atherectomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Depending on the clinical situation, laryngeal and tracheal stents can be placed transluminally under endoscopic view in the OR by a surgeon or they can be placed under fluoroscopic control in the radiology suite by a radiologist. (medscape.com)
  • Clinical research has shown that resorbable scaffolds, or naturally dissolving stents, offer comparable efficacy and safety profile to drug-eluting stents. (wikipedia.org)
  • But at one year the target lesion revascularization rate was almost six times higher than the rate reported for drug-eluting stents and almost twice the revascularization rate reported with bare metal stents, according to results of the PROGRESS-AMS trial. (medpagetoday.com)
  • SANTA CLARA, Calif.-(BUSINESS WIRE)-April 20, 2004-Guidant Corporation (NYSE:GDT - News) today announced the $6 million purchase of the remaining stake in a company developing fully bioabsorbable drug eluting stent platforms. (synecor.com)
  • GlobalData's Medical Devices sector report, "Bioabsorbable Stents (BAS) - Medical Devices Pipeline Assessment, 2019 provides an overview of Bioabsorbable Stents (BAS) currently in pipeline stage. (marketresearch.com)
  • The present-day research from MarketrResearch.Biz on Global Vascular Stents Market Report for 2019 destined to provide target audience with the latest information on market with the help of refined data and opinions from Vascular Stents Market industry experts. (pharmiweb.com)
  • Beneficial intuition inside crucial technological and market trends impacting the Bioabsorbable Stents market. (openpr.com)
  • The objectives of this study are to define, segment, and project the size of the Fast- absorption Bioabsorbable Stents market based on company, product type, end user and key regions. (qyresearchgroups.com)
  • In the following segment, the Drug-Eluting Bioabsorbable Stents report specifies the products that are currently available in the market along with their cost structures, production volume, requirement and supply analysis, import/export situation and their overall augmentation to the Drug-Eluting Bioabsorbable Stents market revenue globally. (thenewscolumnist.com)
  • The objectives of this study are to define, segment, and project the size of the Bioabsorbable Ureteral Stent market based on company, product type, end user and key regions. (theslapclap.com)
  • Coronary stents was the highest revenue-generating and fastest growing segment in 2015, registering a CAGR of 9.5% during the analysis period, owing to increasing advances in the field of interventional cardiology coupled with the progress of minimally invasive techniques. (beforeitsnews.com)
  • From the simulated output results, an informed understanding can be established in relation to radial strength, flexibility and longitudinal resistance, that can be compared with conventional permanent metal stent functionality, and the results show that it is indeed possible to generate a PLLA stent with comparable and sufficient mechanical performance. (springer.com)
  • First was the balloon stent, then the metal stent, then the drug eluting metal stent. (inventorspot.com)
  • As reported earlier , LEADERS FREE showed that in a European population, high-bleeding-risk patients who received this biolimus-coated stent vs a bare metal stent - both with only 30 days of dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) - had better 1-year efficacy and safety outcomes. (medscape.com)
  • The trial had a single-arm prospective design, he pointed out, because, based on LEADERS FREE, it would have been unethical to randomly assign these patients to a bare-metal stent. (medscape.com)
  • Metal stent candidates are iron, magnesium, zinc and their alloys. (wikipedia.org)
  • The major industry players are adopting the strategies such as agreements and collaborations with other companies to hold the major share in the bioabsorbable stents market. (coherentmarketinsights.com)
  • Slow absorption rate bioabsorbable stents held the major share in the bioabsorbable stents market due to its longer effects of drugs and medicines. (asiapacificmarketresearch.com)
  • The coronary artery diseases accounts for major share in the bioabsorbable stents applications market owing to its increasing prevalence across the Asia Pacific region. (asiapacificmarketresearch.com)
  • It's only a matter of time before the degradable-craze hits the stent market, and Abbott is making the first move. (medgadget.com)
  • Prominent players in the bioabsorbable stent market include Abbott (U.S.), Elixir Medical Corporation (U.S.), Kyoto Medical Co. LTD. (Japan), Reva Medical Inc. (U.S.), Arterial Remodeling Technologies (France), Tepha Inc. (U.S.), Meril Life Sciences Pvt. (marketsandmarkets.com)
  • Dr. Ormiston said he had received honoraria from Abbott Vascular, maker of the BVS polylactic acid stent and is a principal investigator of the first-in-human trial of that stent. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Some prominent companies in the bioabsorbable stents market include Abbott (US), BIOTRONIK SE & Co. KG (Germany), REVA Medical, Inc. (US), Elixir Medical Corporation (US), and Kyoto Medical Planning Co., Ltd. (Japan). (prsync.com)
  • Abbott also will present groundbreaking intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)and optical computed tomography (OCT) imaging data on its bioabsorbable drugeluting coronary stent platform this week at TCT in the "Best of CoronaryInterventions Abstracts" session at 9:20 a.m. (medindia.net)
  • The early success of our bioabsorbable stent marks the dawn of thebeginning of a new era in the history of interventional medical devicetreatment," said John M. Capek, Ph.D., executive vice president, MedicalDevices, Abbott. (medindia.net)
  • Key industry players operating the bioabsorbable stents market includes STENTYS SA, Abbott laboratories, Biotronik, Elixir Medical Corporation, Reva Medical Incorporated, Kyoto Medical Planning Cooperative Limited, Amaranth Medical Incorporated, Boston Scientific Co., and Microsoft scientific corporation. (coherentmarketinsights.com)
  • Three-year data from a trial of 30 patients implanted with a bioabsorbable, drug-eluting coronary stent from Abbott are showing the promise of this alternative stent technology, according to a press release from the company. (mediligence.com)
  • Moreover, he feels it is now time to do another trial where the biolimus polymer-free stent is compared with a new-generation thin-strut reabsorbable polymer or even the XIENCE (Abbott) gold standard, second-generation DES, in high-risk-for-bleeding situations, he continued, "because, as you saw, the target lesion revascularization for biolimus is relatively high. (medscape.com)