Students: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program.Universities: Educational institutions providing facilities for teaching and research and authorized to grant academic degrees.Students, Medical: Individuals enrolled in a school of medicine or a formal educational program in medicine.Student Health Services: Health services for college and university students usually provided by the educational institution.Alcohol Drinking: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of alcoholic beverages, including social drinking.Alcoholic Intoxication: An acute brain syndrome which results from the excessive ingestion of ETHANOL or ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Students, Dental: Individuals enrolled a school of dentistry or a formal educational program in leading to a degree in dentistry.Students, Pharmacy: Individuals enrolled in a school of pharmacy or a formal educational program leading to a degree in pharmacy.Social Conformity: Behavioral or attitudinal compliance with recognized social patterns or standards.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Social Facilitation: Any enhancement of a motivated behavior in which individuals do the same thing with some degree of mutual stimulation and consequent coordination.Motivation: Those factors which cause an organism to behave or act in either a goal-seeking or satisfying manner. They may be influenced by physiological drives or by external stimuli.Alcohol-Related Disorders: Disorders related to or resulting from abuse or mis-use of alcohol.Peer Group: Group composed of associates of same species, approximately the same age, and usually of similar rank or social status.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Risk-Taking: Undertaking a task involving a challenge for achievement or a desirable goal in which there is a lack of certainty or a fear of failure. It may also include the exhibiting of certain behaviors whose outcomes may present a risk to the individual or to those associated with him or her.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Behavior, Animal: The observable response an animal makes to any situation.Mid-Atlantic Region: A geographical area of the United States comprising the District of Columbia, Delaware, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania.Health Behavior: Behaviors expressed by individuals to protect, maintain or promote their health status. For example, proper diet, and appropriate exercise are activities perceived to influence health status. Life style is closely associated with health behavior and factors influencing life style are socioeconomic, educational, and cultural.Binge Drinking: Drinking an excessive amount of ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES in a short period of time.Social Behavior: Any behavior caused by or affecting another individual, usually of the same species.Sexual Behavior: Sexual activities of humans.Teaching: The educational process of instructing.Binge-Eating Disorder: A disorder associated with three or more of the following: eating until feeling uncomfortably full; eating large amounts of food when not physically hungry; eating much more rapidly than normal; eating alone due to embarrassment; feeling of disgust, DEPRESSION, or guilt after overeating. Criteria includes occurrence on average, at least 2 days a week for 6 months. The binge eating is not associated with the regular use of inappropriate compensatory behavior (i.e. purging, excessive exercise, etc.) and does not co-occur exclusively with BULIMIA NERVOSA or ANOREXIA NERVOSA. (From DSM-IV, 1994)Curriculum: A course of study offered by an educational institution.Education, Medical, Undergraduate: The period of medical education in a medical school. In the United States it follows the baccalaureate degree and precedes the granting of the M.D.Psychotherapy, Brief: Any form of psychotherapy designed to produce therapeutic change within a minimal amount of time, generally not more than 20 sessions.United StatesAttitude: An enduring, learned predisposition to behave in a consistent way toward a given class of objects, or a persistent mental and/or neural state of readiness to react to a certain class of objects, not as they are but as they are conceived to be.Social Environment: The aggregate of social and cultural institutions, forms, patterns, and processes that influence the life of an individual or community.Students, Health Occupations: Individuals enrolled in a school or formal educational program in the health occupations.Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice: Knowledge, attitudes, and associated behaviors which pertain to health-related topics such as PATHOLOGIC PROCESSES or diseases, their prevention, and treatment. This term refers to non-health workers and health workers (HEALTH PERSONNEL).Cross-Sectional Studies: Studies in which the presence or absence of disease or other health-related variables are determined in each member of the study population or in a representative sample at one particular time. This contrasts with LONGITUDINAL STUDIES which are followed over a period of time.Sex Factors: Maleness or femaleness as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from SEX CHARACTERISTICS, anatomical or physiological manifestations of sex, and from SEX DISTRIBUTION, the number of males and females in given circumstances.Education, Pharmacy: Formal instruction, learning, or training in the preparation, dispensing, and proper utilization of drugs in the field of medicine.Alcoholism: A primary, chronic disease with genetic, psychosocial, and environmental factors influencing its development and manifestations. The disease is often progressive and fatal. It is characterized by impaired control over drinking, preoccupation with the drug alcohol, use of alcohol despite adverse consequences, and distortions in thinking, most notably denial. Each of these symptoms may be continuous or periodic. (Morse & Flavin for the Joint Commission of the National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence and the American Society of Addiction Medicine to Study the Definition and Criteria for the Diagnosis of Alcoholism: in JAMA 1992;268:1012-4)Adolescent Behavior: Any observable response or action of an adolescent.Mandatory Programs: Programs in which participation is required.Energy Drinks: Beverages consumed as stimulants and tonics. They usually contain a combination of CAFFEINE with other substances such as herbal supplements; VITAMINS; AMINO ACIDS; and sugar or sugar derivatives.Substance-Related Disorders: Disorders related to substance abuse.Ethanol: A clear, colorless liquid rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and distributed throughout the body. It has bactericidal activity and is used often as a topical disinfectant. It is widely used as a solvent and preservative in pharmaceutical preparations as well as serving as the primary ingredient in ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES.Social Identification: The process by which an aspect of self image is developed based on in-group preference or ethnocentrism and a perception of belonging to a social or cultural group. (From APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Schools, Pharmacy: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of pharmacy.Schools, Medical: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of medicine.Midwestern United States: The geographic area of the midwestern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not indicated. The states usually included in this region are Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, Ohio, Oklahoma, North Dakota, South Dakota and Wisconsin.Data Collection: Systematic gathering of data for a particular purpose from various sources, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, existing records, and electronic devices. The process is usually preliminary to statistical analysis of the data.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Behavior: The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.Harm Reduction: The application of methods designed to reduce the risk of harm associated with certain behaviors without reduction in frequency of those behaviors. The risk-associated behaviors include ongoing and active addictive behaviors.Achievement: Success in bringing an effort to the desired end; the degree or level of success attained in some specified area (esp. scholastic) or in general.New England: The geographic area of New England in general and when the specific state or states are not indicated. States usually included in this region are Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Self Concept: A person's view of himself.Prevalence: The total number of cases of a given disease in a specified population at a designated time. It is differentiated from INCIDENCE, which refers to the number of new cases in the population at a given time.Education, Dental: Use for articles concerning dental education in general.Eating Disorders: A group of disorders characterized by physiological and psychological disturbances in appetite or food intake.Health Surveys: A systematic collection of factual data pertaining to health and disease in a human population within a given geographic area.Interpersonal Relations: The reciprocal interaction of two or more persons.Social Perception: The perceiving of attributes, characteristics, and behaviors of one's associates or social groups.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.Southeastern United States: The geographic area of the southeastern region of the United States in general or when the specific state or states are not included. The states usually included in this region are Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, West Virginia, and Virginia.Physiology: The biological science concerned with the life-supporting properties, functions, and processes of living organisms or their parts.Bulimia Nervosa: An eating disorder that is characterized by a cycle of binge eating (BULIMIA or bingeing) followed by inappropriate acts (purging) to avert weight gain. Purging methods often include self-induced VOMITING, use of LAXATIVES or DIURETICS, excessive exercise, and FASTING.Health Education: Education that increases the awareness and favorably influences the attitudes and knowledge relating to the improvement of health on a personal or community basis.Problem-Based Learning: Instructional use of examples or cases to teach using problem-solving skills and critical thinking.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Alcoholic Beverages: Drinkable liquids containing ETHANOL.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Computer-Assisted Instruction: A self-learning technique, usually online, involving interaction of the student with programmed instructional materials.Longitudinal Studies: Studies in which variables relating to an individual or group of individuals are assessed over a period of time.Social Control, Informal: Those forms of control which are exerted in less concrete and tangible ways, as through folkways, mores, conventions, and public sentiment.Schools: Educational institutions.Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Anniversaries and Special Events: Occasions to commemorate an event or occasions designated for a specific purpose.Behavior Therapy: The application of modern theories of learning and conditioning in the treatment of behavior disorders.Suicidal Ideation: A risk factor for suicide attempts and completions, it is the most common of all suicidal behavior, but only a minority of ideators engage in overt self-harm.Body Image: Individuals' concept of their own bodies.Career Choice: Selection of a type of occupation or profession.Marijuana Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke from CANNABIS.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.Street Drugs: Drugs obtained and often manufactured illegally for the subjective effects they are said to produce. They are often distributed in urban areas, but are also available in suburban and rural areas, and tend to be grossly impure and may cause unexpected toxicity.Permissiveness: The attitude that grants freedom of expression and activity to another individual, but not necessarily with sanction or approval.Clinical Clerkship: Undergraduate education programs for second- , third- , and fourth-year students in health sciences in which the students receive clinical training and experience in teaching hospitals or affiliated health centers.Societies, Medical: Societies whose membership is limited to physicians.School Admission Criteria: Requirements for the selection of students for admission to academic institutions.International Educational Exchange: The exchange of students or professional personnel between countries done under the auspices of an organization for the purpose of further education.Affect: The feeling-tone accompaniment of an idea or mental representation. It is the most direct psychic derivative of instinct and the psychic representative of the various bodily changes by means of which instincts manifest themselves.Impulsive Behavior: An act performed without delay, reflection, voluntary direction or obvious control in response to a stimulus.Analysis of Variance: A statistical technique that isolates and assesses the contributions of categorical independent variables to variation in the mean of a continuous dependent variable.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Behavior, Addictive: The observable, measurable, and often pathological activity of an organism that portrays its inability to overcome a habit resulting in an insatiable craving for a substance or for performing certain acts. The addictive behavior includes the emotional and physical overdependence on the object of habit in increasing amount or frequency.Models, Psychological: Theoretical representations that simulate psychological processes and/or social processes. These include the use of mathematical equations, computers, and other electronic equipment.College Admission Test: Test designed to identify students suitable for admission into a graduate or undergraduate curriculum.Psychometrics: Assessment of psychological variables by the application of mathematical procedures.National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (U.S.): Component of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH. It conducts research focused on improving the treatment and prevention of alcoholism and alcohol-related problems to reduce the health, social, and economic consequences of this disease. NIAAA, NIMH, and NIDA were created as coequal institutes within the Alcohol, Drug Abuse and Mental Health Administration in 1974. It was established within the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH in 1992.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Science: The study of natural phenomena by observation, measurement, and experimentation.Education of Hearing Disabled: The teaching or training of those individuals with hearing disability or impairment.Choice Behavior: The act of making a selection among two or more alternatives, usually after a period of deliberation.Educational Status: Educational attainment or level of education of individuals.Feedback, Psychological: A mechanism of information stimulus and response that may control subsequent behavior, cognition, perception, or performance. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed.)Child Behavior: Any observable response or action of a child from 24 months through 12 years of age. For neonates or children younger than 24 months, INFANT BEHAVIOR is available.Holidays: Days commemorating events. Holidays also include vacation periods.Schools, Dental: Educational institutions for individuals specializing in the field of dentistry.Social Media: Platforms that provide the ability and tools to create and publish information accessed via the INTERNET. Generally these platforms have three characteristics with content user generated, high degree of interaction between creator and viewer, and easily integrated with other sites.Intention: What a person has in mind to do or bring about.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.Marijuana Abuse: The excessive use of marijuana with associated psychological symptoms and impairment in social or occupational functioning.Logistic Models: Statistical models which describe the relationship between a qualitative dependent variable (that is, one which can take only certain discrete values, such as the presence or absence of a disease) and an independent variable. A common application is in epidemiology for estimating an individual's risk (probability of a disease) as a function of a given risk factor.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Adaptation, Psychological: A state of harmony between internal needs and external demands and the processes used in achieving this condition. (From APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 8th ed)Central Nervous System Stimulants: A loosely defined group of drugs that tend to increase behavioral alertness, agitation, or excitation. They work by a variety of mechanisms, but usually not by direct excitation of neurons. The many drugs that have such actions as side effects to their main therapeutic use are not included here.Models, Educational: Theoretical models which propose methods of learning or teaching as a basis or adjunct to changes in attitude or behavior. These educational interventions are usually applied in the fields of health and patient education but are not restricted to patient care.Friends: Persons whom one knows, likes, and trusts.Self Report: Method for obtaining information through verbal responses, written or oral, from subjects.Perception: The process by which the nature and meaning of sensory stimuli are recognized and interpreted.Gambling: An activity distinguished primarily by an element of risk in trying to obtain a desired goal, e.g., playing a game of chance for money.Automobile Driving: The effect of environmental or physiological factors on the driver and driving ability. Included are driving fatigue, and the effect of drugs, disease, and physical disabilities on driving.Culture: A collective expression for all behavior patterns acquired and socially transmitted through symbols. Culture includes customs, traditions, and language.Sports: Activities or games, usually involving physical effort or skill. Reasons for engagement in sports include pleasure, competition, and/or financial reward.Psychology, Comparative: The branch of psychology concerned with similarities or differences in the behavior of different animal species or of different races or peoples.Dangerous Behavior: Actions which have a high risk of being harmful or injurious to oneself or others.Feedback: A mechanism of communication within a system in that the input signal generates an output response which returns to influence the continued activity or productivity of that system.Preceptorship: Practical experience in medical and health-related services that occurs as part of an educational program wherein the professionally-trained student works outside the academic environment under the supervision of an established professional in the particular field.Osteopathic Medicine: A medical discipline that is based on the philosophy that all body systems are interrelated and dependent upon one another for good health. This philosophy, developed in 1874 by Dr. Andrew Taylor Still, recognizes the concept of "wellness" and the importance of treating illness within the context of the whole body. Special attention is placed on the MUSCULOSKELETAL SYSTEM.Social Values: Abstract standards or empirical variables in social life which are believed to be important and/or desirable.Stress, Psychological: Stress wherein emotional factors predominate.Parent-Child Relations: The interactions between parent and child.Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Compulsive Behavior: The behavior of performing an act persistently and repetitively without it leading to reward or pleasure. The act is usually a small, circumscribed behavior, almost ritualistic, yet not pathologically disturbing. Examples of compulsive behavior include twirling of hair, checking something constantly, not wanting pennies in change, straightening tilted pictures, etc.Aggression: Behavior which may be manifested by destructive and attacking action which is verbal or physical, by covert attitudes of hostility or by obstructionism.Condoms: A sheath that is worn over the penis during sexual behavior in order to prevent pregnancy or spread of sexually transmitted disease.Exploratory Behavior: The tendency to explore or investigate a novel environment. It is considered a motivation not clearly distinguishable from curiosity.Depression: Depressive states usually of moderate intensity in contrast with major depression present in neurotic and psychotic disorders.Writing: The act or practice of literary composition, the occupation of writer, or producing or engaging in literary work as a profession.Attitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Socialization: The training or molding of an individual through various relationships, educational agencies, and social controls, which enables him to become a member of a particular society.Education, Pharmacy, Graduate: Educational programs for pharmacists who have a bachelor's degree or a Doctor of Pharmacy degree entering a specific field of pharmacy. They may lead to an advanced degree.Student Dropouts: Individuals who leave school, secondary or college, prior to completion of specified curriculum requirements.Personality Inventory: Check list, usually to be filled out by a person about himself, consisting of many statements about personal characteristics which the subject checks.Central Nervous System Depressants: A very loosely defined group of drugs that tend to reduce the activity of the central nervous system. The major groups included here are ethyl alcohol, anesthetics, hypnotics and sedatives, narcotics, and tranquilizing agents (antipsychotics and antianxiety agents).Personality: Behavior-response patterns that characterize the individual.Set (Psychology): Readiness to think or respond in a predetermined way when confronted with a problem or stimulus situation.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Socioeconomic Factors: Social and economic factors that characterize the individual or group within the social structure.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Self-Assessment: Appraisal of one's own personal qualities or traits.Biology: One of the BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE DISCIPLINES concerned with the origin, structure, development, growth, function, genetics, and reproduction of animals, plants, and microorganisms.Self Efficacy: Cognitive mechanism based on expectations or beliefs about one's ability to perform actions necessary to produce a given effect. It is also a theoretical component of behavior change in various therapeutic treatments. (APA, Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 1994)Counseling: The giving of advice and assistance to individuals with educational or personal problems.Educational Technology: Systematic identification, development, organization, or utilization of educational resources and the management of these processes. It is occasionally used also in a more limited sense to describe the use of equipment-oriented techniques or audiovisual aids in educational settings. (Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors, December 1993, p132)Persuasive Communication: A mode of communication concerned with inducing or urging the adoption of certain beliefs, theories, or lines of action by others.Follow-Up Studies: Studies in which individuals or populations are followed to assess the outcome of exposures, procedures, or effects of a characteristic, e.g., occurrence of disease.Child Behavior Disorders: Disturbances considered to be pathological based on age and stage appropriateness, e.g., conduct disturbances and anaclitic depression. This concept does not include psychoneuroses, psychoses, or personality disorders with fixed patterns.Virtues: Character traits that are considered to be morally praiseworthy. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Cultural Diversity: Coexistence of numerous distinct ethnic, racial, religious, or cultural groups within one social unit, organization, or population. (From American Heritage Dictionary, 2d college ed., 1982, p955)Habits: Acquired or learned responses which are regularly manifested.Psychological Theory: Principles applied to the analysis and explanation of psychological or behavioral phenomena.Stereotyped Behavior: Relatively invariant mode of behavior elicited or determined by a particular situation; may be verbal, postural, or expressive.Risk Reduction Behavior: Reduction of high-risk choices and adoption of low-risk quantity and frequency alternatives.Organizational Policy: A course or method of action selected, usually by an organization, institution, university, society, etc., from among alternatives to guide and determine present and future decisions and positions on matters of public interest or social concern. It does not include internal policy relating to organization and administration within the corporate body, for which ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION is available.Deception: The act of deceiving or the fact of being deceived.Students, Premedical: Individuals enrolled in a preparatory course for medical school.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Education, Graduate: Studies beyond the bachelor's degree at an institution having graduate programs for the purpose of preparing for entrance into a specific field, and obtaining a higher degree.Pilot Projects: Small-scale tests of methods and procedures to be used on a larger scale if the pilot study demonstrates that these methods and procedures can work.Guilt: Subjective feeling of having committed an error, offense or sin; unpleasant feeling of self-criticism. These result from acts, impulses, or thoughts contrary to one's personal conscience.Contraception, Postcoital: Means of postcoital intervention to avoid pregnancy, such as the administration of POSTCOITAL CONTRACEPTIVES to prevent FERTILIZATION of an egg or implantation of a fertilized egg (OVUM IMPLANTATION).Maternal Behavior: The behavior patterns associated with or characteristic of a mother.African Americans: Persons living in the United States having origins in any of the black groups of Africa.Statistics as Topic: The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation. The term is also applied to the data themselves and to the summarization of the data.Electronic Mail: Messages between computer users via COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS. This feature duplicates most of the features of paper mail, such as forwarding, multiple copies, and attachments of images and other file types, but with a speed advantage. The term also refers to an individual message sent in this way.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Personal Satisfaction: The individual's experience of a sense of fulfillment of a need or want and the quality or state of being satisfied.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Unsafe Sex: Sexual behaviors which are high-risk for contracting SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES or for producing PREGNANCY.Education, Premedical: Preparatory education meeting the requirements for admission to medical school.Parents: Persons functioning as natural, adoptive, or substitute parents. The heading includes the concept of parenthood as well as preparation for becoming a parent.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Reinforcement (Psychology): The strengthening of a conditioned response.Anatomy: A branch of biology dealing with the structure of organisms.Directive Counseling: Counseling during which a professional plays an active role in a client's or patient's decision making by offering advice, guidance, and/or recommendations.Psychological Tests: Standardized tests designed to measure abilities, as in intelligence, aptitude, and achievement tests, or to evaluate personality traits.Temperance: Habitual moderation in the indulgence of a natural appetite, especially but not exclusively the consumption of alcohol.Interviews as Topic: Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.Self Medication: The self administration of medication not prescribed by a physician or in a manner not directed by a physician.TexasEducation, Nursing: Use for general articles concerning nursing education.Drinking Behavior: Behaviors associated with the ingesting of water and other liquids; includes rhythmic patterns of drinking (time intervals - onset and duration), frequency and satiety.MP3-Player: Portable electronics device for storing and playing audio and or media files. MP3 for MPEG-1 audio layer 3, is a digital coding format.Motor Activity: The physical activity of a human or an animal as a behavioral phenomenon.Factor Analysis, Statistical: A set of statistical methods for analyzing the correlations among several variables in order to estimate the number of fundamental dimensions that underlie the observed data and to describe and measure those dimensions. It is used frequently in the development of scoring systems for rating scales and questionnaires.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.Internal-External Control: Personality construct referring to an individual's perception of the locus of events as determined internally by his or her own behavior versus fate, luck, or external forces. (ERIC Thesaurus, 1996).Education, Veterinary: Use for general articles concerning veterinary medical education.Cognitive Dissonance: Motivational state produced by inconsistencies between simultaneously held cognitions or between a cognition and behavior; e.g., smoking enjoyment and believing smoking is harmful are dissonant.Motivational Interviewing: It is a client-centered, directive method for eliciting intrinsic motivation to change using open-ended questions, reflective listening, and decisional balancing. This nonjudgmental, nonconfrontational interviewing style is designed to minimize a patient's resistance to change by creating an interaction that supports open discussion of risky or problem behavior.MichiganKentucky
"Association of solitary binge drinking and suicidal behavior among emerging adult college students". Psychology of Addictive ... Studies have shown that individuals who binge drink, rather than drink socially, tend to have higher rates of suicidal ideation ... Not only do some studies show that solitary binge drinking can increase suicidal ideation, but there is a positive feedback ... During the first six months of that year, the patients were examined for suicidal behavior including suicidal ideation. The ...
Gonzalez, VM (2012). "Association of solitary binge drinking and suicidal behavior among emerging adult college students". ... events that have been shown to increase risk the greatest are Alcohol abuse Studies have shown that individuals who binge drink ... who experience suicidal ideation with higher alcohol consumption Not only do some studies show that solitary binge drinking can ... During the first six months of that year, the patients were examined for suicidal behavior including suicidal ideation. The ...
... had engaged in binge drinking. First-year college students have been identified as uniquely predisposed to binge drinking. ... and the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey affirming that 70% of participating college students reported consuming ... Studies show that college students engage in this combination of self-imposed malnutrition and binge drinking to avoid weight ... as a tool to compensate for planned binge drinking. Research on the combination of an eating disorder and binge drinking has ...
... college students whose appearance and image contribute to their level of self-esteem may engage in unhealthy behaviors such as ... binge drinking and excessive partying. In addition, past research has shown that people who are more concerned with how others ... In addition, the presence of self-compassion predicted more positive relationship behaviors and less negative behaviors. ... This may result in losing the sense of autonomy, or the sense that one is the originator of one's own behavior and is doing ...
... to work together to reduce situations and environments that would encourage high-risk or binge drinking among students. ... This is a major campus and community partnership demonstration project at ten colleges and universities across the United ... Other projects focus on reducing alcoholic beverage advertising, changing parental behaviors related to alcohol consumption, ...
Nine percent of college students who binge drink drive after binge drinking.[44] Another common risk is a blackout (alcohol- ... One 2001 definition from the publication Psychology of Addictive Behavior states that 5 drinks for men and 4 drinks for women ... College students have been found to be more likely to binge drink than their same age peers who were not enrolled in college. ... Main article: Epidemiology of binge drinking. Binge drinking is more common in men than it is in women. Among students in the ...
A Strategy to Decrease Binge Drinking among College Students". American Journal of College Health. 45 (3): 134-140. doi:10.1080 ... own attitudes and behavior towards binge drinking. While excessive binge drinking is often harmful to the individual, large- ... For example, early research showed that college students frequently misperceive the social consensus on campus binge drinking. ... social psychologists have attempted to reveal the discrepancy between students' subjective perceptions of the drinking norm ...
Nine percent of college students who binge drink drive after binge drinking. Another common risk is a blackout (alcohol-related ... Additionally the risk-taking behavior associated with adolescence promotes binge drinking. Binge drinking has the propensity to ... Binge drinking Binge Drinking on College Campuses Alcohol time bomb set to explode Australia's binge-drinking. ... College students have been found to be more likely to binge drink than their same age peers who were not enrolled in college. ...
Base based on research by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism regarding binge drinking in college students. ... responsible behaviors, and 3. Partnering with the broader community to promote alcohol prevention. 0-0-1-3 stands for: 0 ... 1 drink per hour 3 drinks per evening The first tier included screening of all personnel for binge drinking utilizing a measure ... Alcohol advertising on college campuses Alcohol consumption by youth in the United States "College Drink Prevention Task Force ...
A main concern of binge drinking on college campuses is how the negative consequences of binge drinking affect the students. A ... Tewksbury R, Higgins GE, Mustaine EE (2008). "Binge Drinking Among College Athletes and Non-Athletes". Deviant Behavior. 29 (4 ... Using the popular 5/4 definition of "binge drinking", one study found that, in 1999, 44% of American college students (51% male ... "College Binge Drinking in the 1990s: A Continuing Problem. Results of the Harvard School of Public Health 1999 College Alcohol ...
College binge drinking is a major public health issue and a source of numerous problems for institutions of higher learning." ... three hundred students, on average) is not enough to provide a truthful depiction of student behavior. "It's positively ... Experts argue that the sample size of students surveyed at each college ( ... The term party school is used to refer to a college or university (usually in the United States) that has a reputation for ...
1 - One drink per hour 2 - No more than two drinking sessions per week 3 - Not to exceed three drinks on any one day Binge ... Szalavitz, Maia (14 May 2012). "DSM-5 Could Categorize 40% of College Students as Alcoholics". Time. Retrieved 31 January 2015 ... A single study found that if a society believes that intoxication leads to sexual behavior, rowdy behavior, or aggression, then ... Regular heavy drinking and binge drinking (four or more drinks on any one occasion) pose the greatest risk for harm, but lesser ...
... on college campuses have also shown to increase binge drinking among students. However, it is concluded ... as well as current drinking behavior and intentions to drink (Gentile, 2001). Television advertising changes attitudes about ... The Drink Aware campaign, for example, aims to educate people about how to drink sensibly and avoid binge drinking. The web ... Some drinks are traditionally seen as a male drink, particularly beers[citation needed] and whiskies, while others are drunk by ...
... chance for those who did not pre-drink. Vander Ven, Thomas (2011). Getting Wasted: Why College Students Drink Too Much and ... While addiction experts estimate that 65% to 75% of college-age youths engage in such boozy behavior, a Swiss study concludes ... Seaman, Barrett (August 21, 2005). "How Bingeing Became the New College Sport". Time. Archived from the original on September ... is the process of getting drunk prior to going out socializing, typically done by college students and young adults in the ...
About half of grade 12 students have been drunk, and a third binge drink. About 3% drink every day. One of these social impacts ... College/university students who are heavy binge drinkers (three or more times in the past two weeks) are 19 times more likely ... Educating youth about what is considered heavy drinking along with helping them focus on their own drinking behaviors has been ... If a person drives while drunk or regularly consuming binge drink (more than five standard drinks in one drinking session), ...
... of college students were binge drinkers and that binge drinking peaked at age 21. Approximately three quarters of college ... Across all ages, highest rates for alcohol abuse occur among persons 19 years old due to illegality of their behavior, and peak ... Teen drinking in high school is down 23% since 1983 when the minimum legal drinking age was enacted and binge drinking is down ... Having a legal drinking age of 21 allows for the hope that drinking would become less reckless and the people drinking would be ...
People who valued close friends as a sense of who they are were less likely to want to binge drink after seeing an ad featuring ... Exploring the link between self-construal and distress among african american and asian american college students. Journal of ... Liberman N., Trope Y., Wakslak C., (2007). "Construal Level Theory and Consumer Behavior". JOURNAL OF CONSUMER PSYCHOLOGY, 17(2 ... Research drawing on self-construals now shows ways to reduce the intentions of people to binge drink or engage in dangerous ...
"Results of a Social Norm Intervention to Prevent Binge Drinking Among First-Year Residential College Students". Journal of ... "Most students believe passing out from drinking too much is wrong."), protective/healthy behaviors (i.e., "Most students use a ... For example, the data could show that college students report they consumed 0-4 drinks the last time they partied, but they ... Despite the fact that college drinking is at elevated levels, the perceived amount almost always exceeds actual behavior. The ...
For example, normal college student behaviour may be to party and drink alcohol, but for a subculture of religious students, ... such as binge drinking. However, people at the other extreme (very little alcohol consumption) are equally likely to change ... This is shown in studies done on behavior in psychology and sociology where behavior in mating rituals or religious rituals can ... Durkheim's model of normality further explained that the most frequent or general behaviors, and thus the most normal behaviors ...
For example, normal college student behaviour may be to party and drink alcohol, but for a subculture of religious students, ... such as binge drinking. However, people at the other extreme (very little alcohol consumption) are equally likely to change ... This is shown in studies done on behavior in psychology and sociology where behavior in mating rituals or religious rituals can ... Magolda, Peter; Kelsey Ebben (January 2008). "Students Serving Christ: Understanding the Role of Student Subcultures on a ...
Binge drinking has also, been shown to increase once an individual leaves the home to attend college or live on their own. Most ... Some programs may begin by allowing students to be interactive and learn skills such as how to refuse drugs. This is proven to ... The inclusion of prevention studies into classroom curriculums at a young age have been shown to help to break early behaviors ... For example, 18% of the young adults between the ages of 12-14 year old in US have indulged in binge drinking. According to ...
Estep, H. M., & Olson, J. N. (2011). Parenting Style, Academic Dishonesty, and Infidelity in College Students. College Student ... "Teens and alcohol study: Parenting style can prevent binge drinking". News. Brigham Young University. Retrieved 9 December 2014 ... Often behaviors are not punished but the natural consequences of the child's actions are explored and discussed -allowing the ... Missing or empty ,url= (help) Constantinople, A. A. (1969). An Eriksonian measure of personality development in college student ...
In general, negative co-rumination increased the likelihood that women would binge drink weekly, versus men who would drink ... Does Co-rumination Explain Gender Differences in Emotional Distress and Relationship Satisfaction Among College Students?". ... Co-rumination is a type of behavior that is positively correlated with both rumination and self-disclosure and has been linked ... Worry co-rumination leads to less drinking weekly, while angry co-rumination leads to a significant increase in drinking. There ...
At approximately $2 a can, at this price it has been reported that college students or younger high school students would be ... sexual assault and other behavior. One of the more popular drinks, Four Loko, mixed an amount of caffeine equal to three cups ... "Alcoholic energy drink's ban fuels a buying binge". Washington Post. ,access-date= requires ,url= (help) "FDA Expected to Ban ... Manufacturers have argued that drinking a caffeinated alcoholic energy drink is indistinguishable from drinking a couple of ...
... pastimes such as binge drinking and visits to the City Morgue. Stahl also protests against the Haussmannian renovation of ... Henri Jr was himself a student of Iorga, but not a follower, and alienated Iorga when he stated his preference for rural ... Living abroad during much of the 1920s, he was a graduate of several academic institutions, including the Free College of ... samples of ignominious behavior, and memoirs of parliamentary disputes. During the early 1910s, Stahl made visits to the ...
The Union of Secondary Students (USS) was founded in January 2001 by Shane O'Donnell, Lorcan Fox, Graham Barry, Carly-Anne Gannon and Lyndsey O Connell. With the help of the Union of Students in Ireland, the founders set up a meeting, which took place in University College Dublin on 28 March 2001. USS, the Union of Secondary Students disbanded in August 2008. The Union campaigns for the rights of Students and has a close working relationship with The Department of Education and Science, The National Children's Office, the NYCI, NCCA, NPCPP, CPA, and USI. They are also a member of the Organizing Bureau of European School Student Unions (OBESSU). In April 2004 they voted to accept membership from students in Northern Ireland and, as of 21 May 2005, the Union of Secondary Students has a registered membership of 47,000 students in the Republic of Ireland, ...
... is a diminutive, rural, public junior senior high school located in Ulysses, Potter County, Pennsylvania. It is the sole high school operated by the Northern Potter School District. The School serves the municipalities of Ulysses, Ulysses Township, Genesee, Bingham, and Harrison as well as portions of Allegany Township and Hector Township. In 2015, enrollment was reported as 252 pupils in 7th through 12th grades, with 55% of pupils eligible for a free lunch due to family poverty. Additionally, 17% of pupils received special education services, while 1.5% of pupils were identified as gifted. Northern Potter Junior Senior High School employed 26 teachers. Per the Pennsylvania Department of Education, 21% of the teachers were rated "Non‐Highly Qualified" under the federal No Child Left Behind Act. In 2013, Northern Potter Junior Senior High School officials reported an enrollment of 251 pupils (7th-12th), with 47% from low income homes. According to the ...
The University of Victoria Students' Society (UVSS) is a student society that represents undergraduate students at the University of Victoria. The student's society was founded in 1921 and incorporated in 1964. It provides services and operates business for students through the Student Union Building (SUB), and historically has advocated for special interests on campus. The Board of Directors is the decision-making body for the Society and directs all work of the Society. The board is composed of student representatives elected from the student body. The board is made up of: Five salaried executives: Director of Student Affairs, Director of Finance & Operations, Director of Events, Director of Outreach & Student Relations, and; Director of Campaigns & Community Relations 11 volunteer at-large directors; and, Five advocacy group representatives: The Native Students' Union, UVic Pride Collective, The Students of Colour ...
The Brock University Students' Union (BUSU) is the students' union representing the over 17,000 undergraduate students of Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada. BUSU is a member of the Canadian Alliance of Students Associations and a founding member of the Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance. The Brock University Students' Union executive is made up of four popularly elected students: the President, the Vice President Student Services, the Vice President External Affairs and the Vice President Finance and Administration. The executive is responsible for the day-to-day operations of BUSU as well as for developing strategies to implement policy set by the board of directors and BUSAC (see below) and collectively providing leadership and direction for the organization via the executive committee. The Brock University Students Administrative Council (BUSAC) is a popularly ...
... (CUSU) is the university-wide representative body for students at the University of Cambridge, England. CUSU is a federal body made up of individual college student unions (known as JCRs and MCRs). CUSU should not be confused with the Cambridge Union Society (often referred to as simply 'the Union'); membership of both is open to all students at Cambridge, but the Cambridge Union Society is a private society, whereas CUSU is part of, and funded by, the University of Cambridge. Graduate students at Cambridge University are eligible for membership of CUSU as well as the University of Cambridge Graduate Union, specifically for graduate student affairs. CUSU was founded as the Cambridge Students' Union (CSU) in 1971 to represent all higher education students studying in Cambridge, that is students attending the University of Cambridge plus undergraduates at CCAT (the then ...
A students' union, student government, free student union, student senate, students' association, guild of students, or government of student body is a student organization present in many colleges, universities, and high schools. In higher education, the students' union is often accorded its own building on the campus, dedicated to social, organizational activities, representation, and academic support of the membership. In the United States, student union often only refers to a physical building owned by the university with the purpose of providing services for students without a governing body. This building is also referred to as a student activity center, although the Association of College Unions International (largely US-based) has hundreds of campus organizational members. Outside the US, student union and students' union refer to a ...
Prior to the Chinese Student Protection Act of 1992 (CSPA), President George H.W Bush issued Executive Order 12711 in 1990. This policy implementation was solidified by the actual Act in 1992. The Act's main sponsors were Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) for the House of Representatives and Senator Slade Gorton (R-WA) for the Senate. The Chinese Student Protection Act of 1992 was passed on May 21, 1992 by the Senate, and passed by the House of Representatives on August 10, 1992. President George H. W. Bush signed it into law on October 9, 1992. The Chinese Student Protection Act became Public Law 102-404, 106 Stat. 1969. The Chinese Student Protection Act established permanent residence for Chinese nationals that came to the United States from June 5, 1989 to April 11, 1990. The Act was targeted towards students. The CSPA was prompted by the political repression the Chinese faced after the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. Chinese students who were in the United States during the time ...
... or PUCSC is Students' union consisting of the departmental representatives and other office bearers i.e. President, Vice-President, Secretary and Joint-Secretary along with 114 Departmental Representatives (DRs) directly elected by the students from the various teaching departments on the Panjab University, Chandigarh campus. Further, these elected office-bearers and department representatives elect the remaining five members of the executive of the Council. The Dean Student Welfare is ex officio Chairman of the Council. Elections are held every year in August-September months. There is ban on property defacement for clean elections. Panjab University has over 70% female students but only 15-20% of girl students vote or participate in election process, therefore the Council president's post was never headed by a girl in the history of the university elections. Thus PUCSC politics are dominated by male students only. As ...
... or WLS, is an independent student organisation that is the official student wing and a registered socialist society of Welsh Labour, and the Welsh wing of Labour Students. Welsh Labour Students aim to bring Labour values to campuses and represent students within the Labour Party across Wales. WLS hold regular events namely its Annual Conference in November, which is usually held in the city of one of its "constituent clubs". In addition, members of Welsh Labour Students are often entitled to attend events in Welsh Labour and Labour Students as delegates to represent their organisation. The most active clubs within Welsh Labour Students are; Aberystwyth University Labour Students, Cardiff Labour Students and Swansea Labour Students. The Chair of Welsh Labour Students also sits on the committee of Welsh Young Labour and National Labour ...
The majority of lifelong smokers begin smoking habits before the age of 24, which makes the college years a critical time for tobacco companies to convince college students to pick up the habit of cigarette smoking. Cigarette smoking in college is seen as a social activity by those who partake in it, and more than half of the students that are users do not consider themselves smokers. This may be because most college students plan to quit smoking by the time that they graduate. The prevalence of cigarette smoking by college students increased through the 1990s, but has since leveled off and seen decreases in recent years. Education on the dangers of cigarettes is seen as a leading cause for this decrease. This activity is being seen as less socially acceptable than it was in ...
In Canada, membership in a college or university students' union is mandatory across Canada under various provincial statutes.[citation needed] Included in Canadian students' tuition fees is anywhere from an additional $10-$500 fee to pay for the services of the union. The money raised from dues is often used to support a staff and office. Student elections usually happen around March as the membership elect their unions' executives. Student voter turnout for student elections is low for all institutions. The current largest undergraduate student union in Canada is the York Federation of Students, at the York University, with around 49,000 members.. Most students' unions are charged by their membership to protect their best interests at the university, municipal, provincial and federal government levels. Many students' unions in Canada are members of one of the national student ...
As well as providing facilities and student representation on university committees, the students' association began to provide services and facilities for its members. The first Student Union building, providing meeting rooms, men's and women's common rooms and a cafeteria, was established in 1904 in Allen Hall, which is today the university's theatre department. In the 1960s a much bigger Student Union was built, and in the 1980s an adjoining building was added to house the OUSA offices, Radio One, Critic and Student Job Search. The Clubs and Societies building provides a home to over 100 student clubs and a variety of activities, with fitness and recreation opportunities provided at Unipol, jointly owned with the Otago Polytechnic Students' Association. OUSA also owns the University Book Shop and Student Job Search. Over the years the Students' Association has had its share of controversy, frequently around risqué activities during Capping (graduation) ...
The Ryerson Students' Union (RSU) is the students' union that represents full-time undergraduate and graduate students at Ryerson University. All full-time students are required to be members and pay a levy. This money is used to fund student groups, events for students and campaigning. The Board of Directors set the direction and the executive manage the day-to-day operations of the corporation. Students elect 3 to 7 members from each faculty, depending on the size of the faculty, to the board, in addition to student representatives from the University's Senate, student groups, course unions and residence. The RSU has six Equity Service Centres: The Centre for Women & Trans People, The Good Food Centre, Racialised Students' Collective, RyeACCESS, RyePRIDE, and the Trans Collective. These centres serve as a space for students from different marginalized backgrounds to come ...
Sher highlighted environmental aspects of research conducted on college student drinking. For example, class schedules impact ... Prevention approaches to alcohol-related violence under study include binge-drinking intervention, cue recognition training, ... This includes a program announcement (PA) soliciting applications that focus on the mechanisms of behavior change in the ... NIAAA initiatives on the horizon include a College Drinking Intervention Matrix, a decision-support system to help colleges and ...
Recognition of the importance of the self-change or natural recovery phenomenon with addictive behaviors has led to a ... Vik, P. W., Cellucci, T., & Ivers, H. (2003). Natural reduction of binge drinking among college students. Addictive Behaviors, ... Bezdek, M., Croy, C., & Spicer, P. (2004). Documenting natural recovery in American-Indian drinking behavior: A coding scheme. ... Alcohol Dependence Pathological Gambling Current Review Alcohol Problem Addictive Behavior These keywords were added by machine ...
... because of drinking. The results of this study support the Cultural Theory of behavior in that the students drinking and ... Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine possible changes in drinking patterns and violent behavior related to drinking ... A secondary purpose was to test the Cultural and Subcultural models of behavior. Based on a sample of over 4,000 students, at ... students will follow the trends of society in terms of behaviors such as alcohol consumption and violence related to drinking. ...
"Association of solitary binge drinking and suicidal behavior among emerging adult college students". Psychology of Addictive ... Studies have shown that individuals who binge drink, rather than drink socially, tend to have higher rates of suicidal ideation ... Not only do some studies show that solitary binge drinking can increase suicidal ideation, but there is a positive feedback ... During the first six months of that year, the patients were examined for suicidal behavior including suicidal ideation. The ...
Risk Factors Associated With Binge Drinking Behaviors Among College Students. *Binge Drinking ... Evaluation of Global Smart Drinking Goals Initiative. *Binge Drinking, Underage Drinking, Drinking and Driving, Alcohol-Related ... Therapy for Undergraduate College Students Who Binge Drink and Are Depressed. *Depression ... Binge Drinking Among Youngs is a Risk Factor for Alcohol Use Disorders. *Binge Drinking ...
... those who have attempted suicide are more likely to be solitary binge drinkers. Thus suicide prevention needs to be integrated ... A new study shows that college students who binge drink alone are more likely to attempt suicide than those who are social ... Association of Solitary Binge Drinking and Suicidal Behavior Among Emerging Adult College Students. Psychology of Addictive ... A large portion of college students engage in social drinking. Many young adults who drink socially binge, consuming large ...
Binge drinking has been going on at college campuses forever. Yet, years ago sexual assault on campus wasnt a problem. The ... Youre trying to push off sexual predator behavior by pointing at alcohol as *the* factor. Stop. It. Already. ... Binge drinking might make you drunk, but its not the reason men commit sexual assault. Male and female students (and men and ... Binge drinking might make you drunk, but its not the reason men commit sexual assault. This isnt about having a glass of red ...
... colleges, particularly among first-year students, who are at increased risk for problems. This study tested the efficacy of... ... Turrisi, R., Wiersma, K. A., & Hughes, K. K. (2000). Binge-drinking-related consequences in college students: Role of drinking ... Use of personalized normative feedback and personal strivings with heavy-drinking college students. Addictive Behaviors, 29(2 ... Wechsler, H., Lee, J. E., Kuo, M., Seibring, M., Nelson, T. F., & Lee, H. (2002). Trends in college binge drinking during a ...
Underage (18- to 20-year-olds, 204 men and 225 women) college student drinkers completed measures that assessed the attra ... The authors tested a restraint-based model that binge drinking is a function of being tempted to drink alcohol while also being ... Binge Drinking Among Underage College Students: A Test of a Restraint-Based Conceptualization of Risk for Alcohol Abuse ... Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. 15(4):333-340, DECEMBER 2001. PMID: 11767266 ...
Binge drinking by college students is a problematic behavior. However, data on binge drinking and the reasons for drinking by ... We surveyed the drinking behavior of undergraduate and graduate students at 35 colleges, and examined the association between ... college students in Japan are scarce. We explored the reasons for drinking among college students. The study used a cross- ... The questionnaire addressed 1) frequency of drinking alcohol, 2) amount of drinking per day, 3) frequency of binge drinking in ...
Democrats moved to ban concealed weapons from most areas of college campuses Wednesday as they marched ahead with their gun- ... They binge drink. They experiment with drugs. That s what you do when you go to college not everybody, but statistically, that ... The hearing also featured a debate about whether college students are mature enough to handle guns.. We know statistically that ... kids in this age group engage in risky behavior. ... College officials are aware of Levy s bill but have not taken a ...
The Big Problem of Binge Drinking Maybe youve heard a friend or a college student talk about a night of binge drinking. They ... tell you they started to party and threw down a number of drinks within an hour or two. And this behavior can lead a person to ... Lessons From Under Cover High School Students I was fascinated with a recent documentary series in which the producers followed ... The ease she has with people, coupled with her clinical training and experience makes her a sought after speaker on college ...
The Big Problem of Binge Drinking Maybe youve heard a friend or a college student talk about a night of binge drinking. They ... tell you they started to party and threw down a number of drinks within an hour or two. And this behavior can lead a person to ... Lessons From Under Cover High School Students I was fascinated with a recent documentary series in which the producers followed ... The ease she has with people, coupled with her clinical training and experience makes her a sought after speaker on college ...
... surveyed over 17,000 US college students in 140 colleges and found widespread binge drinking, with 44% of students reporting ... Non-binge Drinking Males (n = 22), Binge Drinking Females (n = 51) and Binge Drinking Males (n = 59). Non-binge drinking ... Binge drinking and the American college student: whats five drinks? Psychol Addict Behav. 2001;15:287-291. [PubMed] ... non-binge drinking males BAL = .086, SD = .028; non-binge drinking females BAL = .085, SD = .033; binge drinking males BAL = . ...
... about 4,700 youth ages 15 and younger drink alcohol for the first time. By middle school, one out of five youth has consumed ... about 4,700 youth ages 15 and younger drink alcohol for the first time. By middle school, one out of five youth has consumed ... Binge drinking is still a problem for college students.. What Are the Consequences of Binge Drinking? Binge drinking comes with ... or suicidal behaviors. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) reports that binge drinking is associated with early sexual ...
... had engaged in binge drinking. First-year college students have been identified as uniquely predisposed to binge drinking. ... and the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey affirming that 70% of participating college students reported consuming ... Studies show that college students engage in this combination of self-imposed malnutrition and binge drinking to avoid weight ... as a tool to compensate for planned binge drinking. Research on the combination of an eating disorder and binge drinking has ...
Incoming college students are never surprised to see drinking on a college campus. However, the culture around drinking has ... binge drinking is about more than just that number - it is indicative of a larger problem with the way college students think ... There is no moderation or portion control when it comes to drinking because the goal is to be drunk. Regular binge drinking is ... Binge drinking and blacking out are supposed to be liberating for college students, like these actions give them powers they ...
Binge drinking and being in a serious dating relationship were linked to less condom use, putting young adults at risk for STIs ... The study also compared the sexual behavior of college students who were single versus those who were seriously dating someone ... Binge Drinking Increases Likelihood of Unprotected Sex Among College Students. by Dr. Trupti Shirole on October 9, 2015 at 6:02 ... For the study, binge drinking was defined as four or more drinks for women and five or more drinks for men. The researchers ...
... may be tied to drinking behavior. In one report, for example, students who binge drink fewer than three times per week have ... Binge Drinking Most research on drinking among college students focuses on the widespread pattern of binge drinking. Many ... binge drinking is more prevalent among college students than nonstudents (1). Binge drinking prevalence varies among campuses ... men and 13 percent of college women who do not binge drink (3). College students reported a decrease in drinking and driving ...
Yet, many prevention efforts targeting college drinkers are expensive, are difficult to implement, use indicated... ... College drinking and its negative consequences remain a major public health concern. ... Binge drinking and the American college students: Whats five drinks? Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 15, 287-291.CrossRef ... The relationship among state-specific college binge drinking, state binge drinking rates, and selected state alcohol control ...
Binge Drinking *This can be considered the most significant health risk behavior among college students. ... report binge drinking. *Binge drinking: A pattern of drinking alcohol that results in a blood alcohol concentration of 0.08 or ... 26.9% of U.S. college students do not drink at all. *One out of every five deaths in the U.S. is caused by a smoking-related ... Why Do Students Drink? *Motivations can be grouped into four different categories. ...
Gonzalez, VM (2012). "Association of solitary binge drinking and suicidal behavior among emerging adult college students". ... events that have been shown to increase risk the greatest are Alcohol abuse Studies have shown that individuals who binge drink ... who experience suicidal ideation with higher alcohol consumption Not only do some studies show that solitary binge drinking can ... During the first six months of that year, the patients were examined for suicidal behavior including suicidal ideation. The ...
Nebraska is a Jesuit college where students, faculty and staff thrive in a community committed to Jesuit values. Learn more ... Our efforts are aimed at reducing high-risk drinking and asking students to abandon binge drinking behaviors. Creighton ... an organization committed to reducing high-risk drinking amongst college students. ... Students are emailed information on how to log on in early August. This is required of all new, first-year students.. ...
This is a time where students engage in higher risk behaviors such as binge drinking and drug use. There are also more ... Party Smarter Week will intervene during the first week of school and educate students on alternative ways to enjoy the college ... it will also work toward providing awareness around prevention and the reduction of binge drinking and drug use among students ... 24, 6-11 p.m. , UAB Hill Student Center (HSC). Dont miss the Hill Student Centers premier kick-off event! Featuring food, fun ...
  • A 2002 study from O'Malley and Johnston reviewed data from the national College Alcohol Study, the Core Institute, Monitoring the Future, and the National College Health Risk Behavior Survey affirming that 70% of participating college students reported consuming alcohol within the prior month and 40% had engaged in binge drinking. (wikipedia.org)
  • The YRBSS includes a) national, state, and local school-based surveys of high school students conducted biennially since 1991, b) a household-based survey conducted in 1992 among a national sample of youth aged 12-21 years, whether enrolled in school, and c) the 1995 National College Health Risk Behavior Survey (NCHRBS) conducted in 1995. (cdc.gov)
  • We will begin working in collaboration with community partner, Asian American Drug Abuse Program, Inc., to increase knowledge and awareness of alcohol, drug and HIV issues, high risk behaviors, attitudes and perceptions among the target population," said CSULA Professor Frances W. Siu, project coordinator. (calstatela.edu)
  • Approximately 98% of marijuana users also engage in other high-risk behaviors while attending college, binge drinking among them. (onlineuniversities.com)
  • For example, many individuals with borderline personality disorder exhibit recurrent suicidal behavior and suicidal thoughts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moreover, these drugs' intended effects, can themselves have unintended consequence of an increased individual risk and collective rate of suicidal behavior: Among the set of persons taking the medication, a subset feel bad enough to want to attempt suicide (or to desire the perceived results of suicide) but are inhibited by depression-induced symptoms, such as lack of energy and motivation, from following through with an attempt. (wikipedia.org)
  • She is also interested in the relationship between stigma and prejudice and suicidal behavior. (rochester.edu)
  • The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) reports that binge drinking is associated with early sexual activity, resulting in higher rates of teen pregnancy. (recovery.org)
  • In fact, The Chronicle of Higher Education reports that binge drinking rates have stayed above 40 percent for the past 20 years, and trends indicate this number will go up. (dailynorthwestern.com)
  • Gambling: An addictive behavior with health and primary care implications. (ncrg.org)
  • Journal of American College Health , 54 (4), 213-218. (springer.com)
  • Information, education, and health behaviors: Evidence from the MMR vaccine autism controversy. (cdc.gov)
  • Julie Carr, a CU-Boulder creative writing teacher, said every semester she has students with mental-health problems. (durangoherald.com)
  • Regular binge drinking is defined by public health officials as "a pattern of drinking that brings blood alcohol concentration (BAC) levels to 0.08 g/dL. (dailynorthwestern.com)
  • Heavy drinking over a long period of time can lead to health problems, such as cirrhosis and various types of cancer. (nih.gov)
  • The Harvard School of Public Health conducted studies on the risks of binge drinking by college students. (ucsb.edu)
  • Party Smart' -- One of several educational sessions during Welcome Week at Creighton University sponsored by Student Health Services and Peer Education at Creighton (PEAC). (creighton.edu)
  • Ongoing Education & Programming -- The Health and Wellness Education office in Student Health Services works collaboratively with Peer Education at Creighton (PEAC) to deliver programming and education for campus. (creighton.edu)
  • Students were usually referred for discipline or sanctions to other university officials rather than formal courts, and were generally not referred to a campus health center for alcohol screening or intervention. (eurekalert.org)
  • Students were generally not referred to the campus health center for alcohol screening or intervention. (eurekalert.org)
  • When facing health threats, there are two popular responses, but neither reflects the science behind behavior change. (statnews.com)
  • But this is the first work to examine the link between the selectivity of the college attended and health behaviors during, and for years after, school. (rwjf.org)
  • Studies were included if (1) the primary components of the intervention were delivered via the Internet, (2) participants were randomly assigned to conditions, and (3) a measure of behavior related to health was taken after the intervention. (jmir.org)
  • For his part, Dr. Scott Krakower, an addiction specialist at North Shore-LIJ Health System in Mineola, N.Y., said he wasn't surprised that there's a potential link between college-age binge drinking and cardiovascular disease. (medicinenet.com)
  • Journal of American College Health 51(4):149-154. (popcenter.org)
  • Journal of American College Health 50:197-201. (popcenter.org)
  • We had been talking about how we could do some kind of brief intervention to ameliorate some of the drinking on campus," said Michael, who also is associate director of clinical services in Appalachian's Institute for Health and Human Services. (newswise.com)
  • The dorm is being set aside for students like Azilee Curl, a first-year studying neuroscience who has taken a pledge - of sorts - to live out her college career at UVM with her health in mind. (npr.org)
  • But grooming health-conscious students might not be the only incentive for UVM. (npr.org)
  • Coordinated by the Rehabilitation Counseling Education Program housed in the University's Charter College of Education, this training program is designed to prepare college students for outreach immersion into their surrounding communities as trained Peer Health Advocates (PHAs) or Veteran Health Advocates (VHAs). (calstatela.edu)
  • Even though college-age white men from middle-to-upper-class backgrounds are more likely to binge drink, their female counterparts suffering from clinical depression or similar mental health issue are considered the riskiest demographic - particularly if they hail from minority and/or low socioeconomic backgrounds. (onlineuniversities.com)
  • Nursing students: medication use, psychoactive substances and health conditions. (medworm.com)
  • CONCLUSION: the findings have implications for the implementation of health promotion strategies among nursing students, in view of lifestyle changes. (medworm.com)
  • Due to the long-term effects of alcohol misuse, binge drinking is considered to be a major public health issue. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health, there has been a steady decline in underage drinking from 2002 to 2013. (naspa.org)
  • Other factors that influence the impact of alcohol in the brain include the age of onset of drinking, the person's age, general health status, and - of course - how much and how often he or she drinks. (mentalhelp.net)
  • Worried About Health Coverage for College Students Traveling on Spring Break? (pr.com)
  • Keeping RIT's value in student health and safety in mind, this protocol is designed to provide education rather than discipline when a student voluntarily contacts University personnel seeking medical assistance related to alcohol or other drugs. (rit.edu)
  • Binge drinking is a serious public health challenge, leading to injury and, in some cases, death for hundreds of thousands of college students each year," said U.S Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. (healthcanal.com)
  • NCHIP aims to bring population health improvement methods to bear on problems affecting student health and plans to organize future collaborative efforts on other health issues. (healthcanal.com)
  • The highlight of the public health program is the semester-long (12 semester hours) internship during the senior year, at a site selected by the student with the approval of the Program Director. (wcupa.edu)
  • The examination is offered through the National Commission for Health Education Credentialing, Inc. Some students may be eligible to take the examination during their last semester in the program. (wcupa.edu)
  • The Department of Health prides itself on giving individual attention and advisement to each student. (wcupa.edu)
  • A faculty member is assigned to advise a student who majors in public health promotion. (wcupa.edu)
  • Osborne has a dual appointment in the School of Social Work in the MU College of Human Environmental Sciences and the Master of Public Health Program. (health.am)
  • In 2011, there were 50,000 hospitalizations due to binge drinking - part of the increased health care costs. (wemu.org)
  • This dynamic plays out with health behaviors in general. (minneapolisfoundation.org)
  • National Public Radio (NPR) reported on recent national surveys of campus therapists who say they have more students than ever seeking psychiatric help, with some estimates as high as 18 million students dealing with mental health issues. (americanthinker.com)
  • As part of Onondaga Community College's 2016-2017 biennial review of alcohol and other drug use data, co-occurring health and safety impacts, and related programming, the College pursued an opportunity for external funding to expand coalition-building, support planning, provide enhanced resources for prevention programming, and ensure ongoing assessment. (sunyocc.edu)
  • and, implement an evidence-based screening, brief intervention, and referral process to promote the health and well-being of OCC students. (sunyocc.edu)
  • The National Institute of Health estimates 15% of Americans have a problem drinking, more men than women. (casapalmera.com)
  • If you are worried about your own or others drinking behavior and think that there may be signs of alcohol addiction, consult a health care professional immediately. (casapalmera.com)
  • The program educates students about the liver and actions that they can take to maximize liver health and ultimately prevent liver disease. (liverfoundation.org)
  • Once a student has participated in this program, s/he will have a greater understanding of the liver's importance and will take the necessary steps to maximize their liver health and prevent the further spread of liver disease. (liverfoundation.org)
  • It is the American Liver Foundation's hope that students will share their knowledge with family and friends, resulting in playing an active role in impacting the liver health of all those around them. (liverfoundation.org)
  • The story quoted Traci L. Toomey, who directs the A lcohol Epidemiology Program at Minnesota's School of Public Health, who recalled visiting a campus that was proud of letting students be in charge of how much alcohol was provided at social events - "as if somehow magically they'd do a great job. (yahoo.com)
  • Binge drinking is drinking to get drunk-the point at which drinking can lead to health or behavioral problems. (ahealthyme.com)
  • Less drinking, in turn, can help reduce alcohol-related public health and safety problems that impact our entire community. (alcoholpolicymd.com)
  • The short and long term effects alcohol has can impair students physically and mentally, impacting their education and health. (educationindex.com)
  • Jay Wren says that before his son's death he begged for a description of his behavior in the dormitory and was told those records were protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, or FERPA, which shields student grades, health and behavior information. (hutchnews.com)
  • A year after a mentally troubled student shot and killed 32 people and himself at Virginia Tech in April 2007, FERPA changed the definition of an emergency situation from an "extreme situation" to a "significant threat to the health or safety of the student or other individuals. (hutchnews.com)