Beak: In some animals, the jaws together with their horny covering. The beak usually refers to the bill of birds in which the whole varies greatly in form according of the food and habits of the bird. While the beak refers most commonly to birds, the anatomical counterpart is found also in the turtle, squid, and octopus. (From Webster, 3d ed & Storer, et al., General Zoology, 6th ed, p491, 755)Platypus: A small aquatic oviparous mammal of the order Monotremata found in Australia and Tasmania.MonotremataTerminally Ill: Persons with an incurable or irreversible illness at the end stage that will result in death within a short time. (From O'Leary et al., Lexikon: Dictionary of Health Care Terms, Organizations, and Acronyms for the Era of Reform, 1994, p780)Critical Illness: A disease or state in which death is possible or imminent.Palaeognathae: A superorder of large, mostly flightless birds, named for their distinctive PALATE morphology. It includes the orders Apterygiformes, Casuriiformes, Dinornithiformes, RHEIFORMES; STRUTHIONIFORMES and Tinamiformes.Saint Lucia: An independent state in the West Indies. Its capital is Castries. It was probably discovered by Columbus in 1502 and first settled by the English in 1605. Contended for by the French and English in the 17th century, it was regarded as neutral in 1748 but changed hands many times in the wars of the 19th century. It became a self-governing state in association with Great Britain in 1967 and achieved independence in 1979. Columbus named it for the day on which he discovered it, the feast of St. Lucy, a Sicilian virgin martyr. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p1051 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p477)Sulfadimethoxine: A sulfanilamide that is used as an anti-infective agent.Rheiformes: An order of large, long-necked, long-legged, flightless birds, found in South America. Known as rheas, they are sometimes called American ostriches, though they are in a separate order from true OSTRICHES.Fees, Medical: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for medical services.Legislation as Topic: The enactment of laws and ordinances and their regulation by official organs of a nation, state, or other legislative organization. It refers also to health-related laws and regulations in general or for which there is no specific heading.Passeriformes: A widely distributed order of perching BIRDS, including more than half of all bird species.Charadriiformes: An order of BIRDS including over 300 species that primarily inhabit coastal waters, beaches, and marshes. They are comprised of shorebirds, gulls, and terns.Heliconiaceae: A plant family of the order ZINGIBERALES, subclass Zingiberidae, class Liliopsida.Birds: Warm-blooded VERTEBRATES possessing FEATHERS and belonging to the class Aves.Feathers: Flat keratinous structures found on the skin surface of birds. Feathers are made partly of a hollow shaft fringed with barbs. They constitute the plumage.Judaism: The religion of the Jews characterized by belief in one God and in the mission of the Jews to teach the Fatherhood of God as revealed in the Hebrew Scriptures. (Webster, 3d ed)Songbirds: PASSERIFORMES of the suborder, Oscines, in which the flexor tendons of the toes are separate, and the lower syrinx has 4 to 9 pairs of tensor muscles inserted at both ends of the tracheal half rings. They include many commonly recognized birds such as CROWS; FINCHES; robins; SPARROWS; and SWALLOWS.Euthanasia: The act or practice of killing or allowing death from natural causes, for reasons of mercy, i.e., in order to release a person from incurable disease, intolerable suffering, or undignified death. (from Beauchamp and Walters, Contemporary Issues in Bioethics, 5th ed)Government Regulation: Exercise of governmental authority to control conduct.National Health Insurance, United StatesPatient Credit and Collection: Accounting procedures for determining credit status and methods of obtaining payment.Mechanoreceptors: Cells specialized to transduce mechanical stimuli and relay that information centrally in the nervous system. Mechanoreceptor cells include the INNER EAR hair cells, which mediate hearing and balance, and the various somatosensory receptors, often with non-neural accessory structures.Feeding Behavior: Behavioral responses or sequences associated with eating including modes of feeding, rhythmic patterns of eating, and time intervals.Mentally Ill Persons: Persons with psychiatric illnesses or diseases, particularly psychotic and severe mood disorders.Legislation, Medical: Laws and regulations, pertaining to the field of medicine, proposed for enactment or enacted by a legislative body.Geraniaceae: A plant family of the order Geraniales, subclass Rosidae, class Magnoliopsida.Insurance Benefits: Payments or services provided under stated circumstances under the terms of an insurance policy. In prepayment programs, benefits are the services the programs will provide at defined locations and to the extent needed.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.United StatesCritical Care: Health care provided to a critically ill patient during a medical emergency or crisis.Finches: Common name for small PASSERIFORMES in the family Fringillidae. They have a short stout bill (BEAK) adapted for crushing SEEDS. Some species of Old World finches are called CANARIES.Pigmentation: Coloration or discoloration of a part by a pigment.West VirginiaMarketing of Health Services: Application of marketing principles and techniques to maximize the use of health care resources.Intensive Care Units: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill patients.Hospital Charges: The prices a hospital sets for its services. HOSPITAL COSTS (the direct and indirect expenses incurred by the hospital in providing the services) are one factor in the determination of hospital charges. Other factors may include, for example, profits, competition, and the necessity of recouping the costs of uncompensated care.Health Care Reform: Innovation and improvement of the health care system by reappraisal, amendment of services, and removal of faults and abuses in providing and distributing health services to patients. It includes a re-alignment of health services and health insurance to maximum demographic elements (the unemployed, indigent, uninsured, elderly, inner cities, rural areas) with reference to coverage, hospitalization, pricing and cost containment, insurers' and employers' costs, pre-existing medical conditions, prescribed drugs, equipment, and services.Health Policy: Decisions, usually developed by government policymakers, for determining present and future objectives pertaining to the health care system.Health Care Costs: The actual costs of providing services related to the delivery of health care, including the costs of procedures, therapies, and medications. It is differentiated from HEALTH EXPENDITURES, which refers to the amount of money paid for the services, and from fees, which refers to the amount charged, regardless of cost.Medicare: Federal program, created by Public Law 89-97, Title XVIII-Health Insurance for the Aged, a 1965 amendment to the Social Security Act, that provides health insurance benefits to persons over the age of 65 and others eligible for Social Security benefits. It consists of two separate but coordinated programs: hospital insurance (MEDICARE PART A) and supplementary medical insurance (MEDICARE PART B). (Hospital Administration Terminology, AHA, 2d ed and A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, US House of Representatives, 1976)Sensory Receptor Cells: Specialized afferent neurons capable of transducing sensory stimuli into NERVE IMPULSES to be transmitted to the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM. Sometimes sensory receptors for external stimuli are called exteroceptors; for internal stimuli are called interoceptors and proprioceptors.Health Expenditures: The amounts spent by individuals, groups, nations, or private or public organizations for total health care and/or its various components. These amounts may or may not be equivalent to the actual costs (HEALTH CARE COSTS) and may or may not be shared among the patient, insurers, and/or employers.Government Agencies: Administrative units of government responsible for policy making and management of governmental activities.Louping Ill: An acute tick-borne arbovirus infection causing meningoencephalomyelitis of sheep.Health Care Sector: Economic sector concerned with the provision, distribution, and consumption of health care services and related products.Sex Characteristics: Those characteristics that distinguish one SEX from the other. The primary sex characteristics are the OVARIES and TESTES and their related hormones. Secondary sex characteristics are those which are masculine or feminine but not directly related to reproduction.CaliforniaCost Savings: Reductions in all or any portion of the costs of providing goods or services. Savings may be incurred by the provider or the consumer.Public Health: Branch of medicine concerned with the prevention and control of disease and disability, and the promotion of physical and mental health of the population on the international, national, state, or municipal level.Fees and Charges: Amounts charged to the patient as payer for health care services.Skull: The SKELETON of the HEAD including the FACIAL BONES and the bones enclosing the BRAIN.Insurance, Health: Insurance providing coverage of medical, surgical, or hospital care in general or for which there is no specific heading.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Health Benefit Plans, Employee: Health insurance plans for employees, and generally including their dependents, usually on a cost-sharing basis with the employer paying a percentage of the premium.Cost Control: The containment, regulation, or restraint of costs. Costs are said to be contained when the value of resources committed to an activity is not considered excessive. This determination is frequently subjective and dependent upon the specific geographic area of the activity being measured. (From Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Emergency Medicine: The branch of medicine concerned with the evaluation and initial treatment of urgent and emergent medical problems, such as those caused by accidents, trauma, sudden illness, poisoning, or disasters. Emergency medical care can be provided at the hospital or at sites outside the medical facility.Ecosystem: A functional system which includes the organisms of a natural community together with their environment. (McGraw Hill Dictionary of Scientific and Technical Terms, 4th ed)State Government: The level of governmental organization and function below that of the national or country-wide government.Policy Making: The decision process by which individuals, groups or institutions establish policies pertaining to plans, programs or procedures.Intensive Care: Advanced and highly specialized care provided to medical or surgical patients whose conditions are life-threatening and require comprehensive care and constant monitoring. It is usually administered in specially equipped units of a health care facility.Medically Uninsured: Individuals or groups with no or inadequate health insurance coverage. Those falling into this category usually comprise three primary groups: the medically indigent (MEDICAL INDIGENCY); those whose clinical condition makes them medically uninsurable; and the working uninsured.DucksCarotenoids: The general name for a group of fat-soluble pigments found in green, yellow, and leafy vegetables, and yellow fruits. They are aliphatic hydrocarbons consisting of a polyisoprene backbone.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.Body Size: The physical measurements of a body.Nitrogen Isotopes: Stable nitrogen atoms that have the same atomic number as the element nitrogen, but differ in atomic weight. N-15 is a stable nitrogen isotope.Insurance Coverage: Generally refers to the amount of protection available and the kind of loss which would be paid for under an insurance contract with an insurer. (Slee & Slee, Health Care Terms, 2d ed)Biological Evolution: The process of cumulative change over successive generations through which organisms acquire their distinguishing morphological and physiological characteristics.Body Temperature Regulation: The processes of heating and cooling that an organism uses to control its temperature.Cost of Illness: The personal cost of acute or chronic disease. The cost to the patient may be an economic, social, or psychological cost or personal loss to self, family, or immediate community. The cost of illness may be reflected in absenteeism, productivity, response to treatment, peace of mind, or QUALITY OF LIFE. It differs from HEALTH CARE COSTS, meaning the societal cost of providing services related to the delivery of health care, rather than personal impact on individuals.Sexual Behavior, Animal: Sexual activities of animals.APACHE: An acronym for Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation, a scoring system using routinely collected data and providing an accurate, objective description for a broad range of intensive care unit admissions, measuring severity of illness in critically ill patients.Intensive Care Units, Pediatric: Hospital units providing continuous surveillance and care to acutely ill infants and children. Neonates are excluded since INTENSIVE CARE UNITS, NEONATAL is available.Poverty: A situation in which the level of living of an individual, family, or group is below the standard of the community. It is often related to a specific income level.Sepsis: Systemic inflammatory response syndrome with a proven or suspected infectious etiology. When sepsis is associated with organ dysfunction distant from the site of infection, it is called severe sepsis. When sepsis is accompanied by HYPOTENSION despite adequate fluid infusion, it is called SEPTIC SHOCK.Respiration, Artificial: Any method of artificial breathing that employs mechanical or non-mechanical means to force the air into and out of the lungs. Artificial respiration or ventilation is used in individuals who have stopped breathing or have RESPIRATORY INSUFFICIENCY to increase their intake of oxygen (O2) and excretion of carbon dioxide (CO2).Water-Electrolyte Balance: The balance of fluid in the BODY FLUID COMPARTMENTS; total BODY WATER; BLOOD VOLUME; EXTRACELLULAR SPACE; INTRACELLULAR SPACE, maintained by processes in the body that regulate the intake and excretion of WATER and ELECTROLYTES, particularly SODIUM and POTASSIUM.Health Promotion: Encouraging consumer behaviors most likely to optimize health potentials (physical and psychosocial) through health information, preventive programs, and access to medical care.Adaptation, Physiological: The non-genetic biological changes of an organism in response to challenges in its ENVIRONMENT.Delivery of Health Care: The concept concerned with all aspects of providing and distributing health services to a patient population.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Commitment of Mentally Ill: Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.Acute Kidney Injury: Abrupt reduction in kidney function. Acute kidney injury encompasses the entire spectrum of the syndrome including acute kidney failure; ACUTE KIDNEY TUBULAR NECROSIS; and other less severe conditions.Health Services Accessibility: The degree to which individuals are inhibited or facilitated in their ability to gain entry to and to receive care and services from the health care system. Factors influencing this ability include geographic, architectural, transportational, and financial considerations, among others.Enteral Nutrition: Nutritional support given via the alimentary canal or any route connected to the gastrointestinal system (i.e., the enteral route). This includes oral feeding, sip feeding, and tube feeding using nasogastric, gastrostomy, and jejunostomy tubes.Prospective Studies: Observation of a population for a sufficient number of persons over a sufficient number of years to generate incidence or mortality rates subsequent to the selection of the study group.Multiple Organ Failure: A progressive condition usually characterized by combined failure of several organs such as the lungs, liver, kidney, along with some clotting mechanisms, usually postinjury or postoperative.Program Evaluation: Studies designed to assess the efficacy of programs. They may include the evaluation of cost-effectiveness, the extent to which objectives are met, or impact.Terminal Care: Medical and nursing care of patients in the terminal stage of an illness.Monitoring, Physiologic: The continuous measurement of physiological processes, blood pressure, heart rate, renal output, reflexes, respiration, etc., in a patient or experimental animal; includes pharmacologic monitoring, the measurement of administered drugs or their metabolites in the blood, tissues, or urine.Smoking: Inhaling and exhaling the smoke of burning TOBACCO.Hemofiltration: Extracorporeal ULTRAFILTRATION technique without HEMODIALYSIS for treatment of fluid overload and electrolyte disturbances affecting renal, cardiac, or pulmonary function.Renal Replacement Therapy: Procedures which temporarily or permanently remedy insufficient cleansing of body fluids by the kidneys.Hemodiafiltration: The combination of hemodialysis and hemofiltration either simultaneously or sequentially. Convective transport (hemofiltration) may be better for removal of larger molecular weight substances and diffusive transport (hemodialysis) for smaller molecular weight solutes.
  • By failing to make laws which guarantee equal access to all, and forcing terminally ill people to brave the trip abroad before they may actually need to end their lives (because they must be able to take the lethal substance themselves), British lawmakers are turning a blind eye to the needs of the most seriously ill. (mywillandwishes.com)
  • One thing you have to remember about healthcare stocks is that they have survived and thrived through the many permutations of the attempted repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and they have continued to soar higher during 2018, even with the removal of the "individual mandate" in the latest tax reform bill. (investorplace.com)
  • Will 2018 Be Twitter's Best Year Yet? (yahoo.com)
  • According to a press statement released by the Supreme Court of Pakistan on June 7, 2018, there are 91terminally-ill prisoners, with life threatening diseases, who remain confined in prisons throughout Pakistan. (com.pk)
  • Maximum and median fluctuations in will-to-live ratings, separated by 12 h, 24 h, 7 days, and 30 days, were calculated for each patient. (nih.gov)
  • A pharmaceutical company offering a drug covered under the bill or a doctor administering the treatment must agree to do so at no cost to the patient. (chron.com)
  • If a nurse if taking the drugs to a patient who is receiving palliative care from home, the law will catch up with them. (newvision.co.ug)
  • Bill 52, which passed with a 94-22 vote, details the conditions under which a terminally ill patient can request to end their life. (bigthink.com)
  • There are currently five U.S. states -- Oregon, Washington, Montana, Vermont, and New Mexico -- where a physician can prescribe life-ending drugs to a competent, terminally ill patient. (bigthink.com)
  • The bill details requirements a physician must meet in order to prescribe the medication to a patient. (wlwt.com)
  • The Government proposes to abandon terminally ill patients once it has signed their suicide permit and the patient has obtained lethal drugs from the the local pharmacy", stated Mr Flynn. (acl.org.au)
  • Many see providing lethal drugs to end the life of the terminally ill as harmful for the patient and the future of the medical profession. (californiafamily.org)
  • Passive enthanasia is a condition where medical aid is withdrawn so that a terminally-ill patient can have a dignified death. (theweek.in)
  • The living will is a document that allows a patient to instruct, in advance, the medical treatments to be administered when he or she is terminally ill and is unable to give informed consent. (theweek.in)
  • The bench was hearing a PIL filed by NGO Common Cause, saying safeguards were needed while taking a decision by medical boards to withdraw life support of a terminally-ill patient. (theweek.in)
  • On January 15, 2016, the Centre had said the 241st report of the Law Commission stated that passive euthanasia should be allowed with certain safeguards and there was also a proposed law-Medical Treatment of Terminally Ill Patient (Protection of Patients and Medical Practitioners) Bill, 2006. (theweek.in)
  • Euthanasia in VIC: Can any terminally ill patient go to state to die? (news.com.au)
  • Oregon was the first U.S. state to make it legal for a doctor to prescribe a life-ending drug to a terminally ill patient of sound mind who makes the request. (washingtontimes.com)
  • But it requires support from NHS staff to administer, and the Sheffield Children's Hospital where William is a patient is not currently using the drug, even though it is freely available in England, subject to Nice approval. (grimsbytelegraph.co.uk)
  • Make a blanket or scarf for a terminally ill Veteran patient. (volunteermatch.org)
  • But Preston said discussions about end-of-life issues between doctor and patient will increase because of the new law, and he thinks that as time goes on more and more doctors who don't have a religious or philosophical opposition will be open to participating. (gainesville.com)
  • According to Channel 12 News, Rep. Steve Israel plans to introduce a bill that would wave those suffering from terminal conditions from having to wait a required five-month period to get benefits. (fleschnerlaw.com)
  • It's unclear whether that initiative will work, but the good news is that Twitter won't need to rely as much on its advertising business -- assuming its data licensing segment keeps posting such strong results. (yahoo.com)
  • For the stock to justify its recent rally, though, Twitter will likely need to pair that good financial news with solid gains in its core audience and engagement metrics. (yahoo.com)
  • On Wednesday, the News Sentinel said it cannot verify the account by Eric Schmitt-Matzen , a Campbell County Santa Claus actor who said a terminally ill child died in his arms. (perezhilton.com)
  • We know the side effect that will occur if they don't access these drugs-they are going to die," said Corieri. (freebeacon.com)
  • His bill, SB 694, would create a new framework to help those with a terminal disease get access to drugs and treatments still in the FDA trial process quickly and safely. (chron.com)
  • In another departure from the Parliament's End of Life Choices Inquiry, "The Government will provide no support for patients as they return home with the drugs, despite the inquiry recommending that persons who have gained access to the lethal medication be provided with a trained case worker", Mr Flynn said. (acl.org.au)
  • They will have to be assessed by two medical specialists and be granted permits to access the yet-to-be-decided lethal medication. (news.com.au)
  • Essentially, the bill seeks to allow dying patients to have access to all forms of marijuana as long as they can get two licensed physicians to sign off on it. (hightimes.com)
  • The Right of Privacy in Choosing Medical Treatment: Should Terminally Ill Persons Have Access to Drugs Not Yet Approved by the Food and Drug Administration? (georgetown.edu)
  • The bill's purpose is to allow terminally ill Florida citizens who have less than 1 year to live to have access legally to marijuana. (todaysglobalnews.net)
  • The motion to disallow, moved by Greens leader Richard Di Natale, will amend changes made to Category A of the Special Access Scheme (SAS) by former health minister Sussan Ley in 2016. (cannabisconnections.tk)
  • I hope this is just the beginning and that soon all Canadians will be able to access psilocybin, for therapeutic use, to help with the pain they are experiencing, without having to petition the government for months to gain permission. (ctvnews.ca)
  • Wednesday, May 10, 2017, the Alabama Senate Health Committee gave a favorable report to a bill, House Bill 373, which gives legally binding authority to a child's advanced directive when not in the hospital. (alreporter.com)
  • A poll released in November 2017 by YouGov shows that over half (53%) of British adults would consider travelling to Switzerland for an assisted death if they were terminally ill, despite the emotional, physical and financial challenges. (mywillandwishes.com)
  • Alva Campbell (pictured), the terminally ill death-row prisoner who survived a botched execution attempt by the state of Ohio on November 15, 2017, has died. (deathpenaltyinfo.org)
  • Protesters show support for Charlie Gard after a British court ruled June 8, 2017, that the hospital could turn off the terminally ill baby's life support. (newsmax.com)
  • The proposed Foreign Influence Transparency Scheme Bill 2017 "could mean five million Catholics would have to go and put themselve. (catholicweekly.com.au)
  • Will to live was measured twice daily throughout the hospital stay on a self-report 100 mm visual analogue scale. (nih.gov)
  • Emergency will for terminally ill client in hospital. (hattonslaw.com)
  • We received a telephone call from a lady who's father was terminally ill in hospital and wanted to make an emergency will. (hattonslaw.com)
  • We attended the hospital, with laptop and printer to take instructions and draft the will to sign all in one appointment. (hattonslaw.com)
  • We went back to the office and drafted the relevant forms enabling them to do this, appreciating that time was of the essence given the clients critical condition, we then went back up to the hospital with the forms for them to sign to affect the severing of the joint tenancy meaning that they could leave a share of the property under their will as they wanted to do. (hattonslaw.com)
  • The hospital where a terminally ill toddler is being treated has said it is 'highly likely' doctors will soon be able to treat the boy with a drug which will help keep him alive. (grimsbytelegraph.co.uk)
  • As reported, after discovering the drug was now free in Britain, Kerry and husband Jason, 47, asked Sheffield Children's Hospital, where William is treated, to give it to their son. (grimsbytelegraph.co.uk)
  • Hospital and hospice staff, families of chronically and terminally ill patients, and the patients themselves can all benefit from the information in this vital book. (foyles.co.uk)
  • Amendments to the current measure provide exemptions to hospitals and aim to protect physicians from being sued - a move that caused the Colorado Hospital Association to shift its opposition to the bill to neutral status, said its spokesman Kevin Downey. (denverpost.com)
  • Refusing to leave the hospital and unwilling to die by a doctor's hand, Foley claims he has been threatened with a $1,800 per day hospital bill, which is roughly the non-OHIP daily rate for a hospital stay. (ctvnews.ca)
  • Crowdfunding to Help my son who is terminally ill, to make memories with a family holiday by giving your financial support. (justgiving.com)
  • A living will is a written document instructing your physician of your wishes for the withholding or withdrawing of life-sustaining procedures in the event of a terminal condition. (lifespan.org)
  • It will uphold these wishes only in situations where your condition is diagnosed as terminal and where you are unable to make or communicate decisions. (lifespan.org)
  • He had expressed a wish to go on a fishing trip with his daughter in June as part of a community project by the Foundation of Rotary Clubs (Singapore) that seeks to grant the wishes of terminally ill adults. (straitstimes.com)
  • While there are various organisations that grant the wishes of critically ill children, those that do so for adults are rare. (straitstimes.com)
  • This is a cause very close to my heart - please sign the petition so we have our voices heard and make a positive change for terminally ill Canadians! (change.org)
  • However, if we nurses cannot prescribe the drugs, yet they are the ones who are always present in our healthcare system, it will have serious limitations on the provision of palliative care in Uganda," Amandua said. (newvision.co.ug)
  • Terminally ill patients with less than six months to live will soon be able to ask their doctors to prescribe them lethal medication in Washington state. (gainesville.com)
  • This division was on an amendment to give a second reading to the Bill in six months' time, rather than immediately. (publicwhip.org.uk)
  • The bill will give the department the tools and flexibility to manage its population, said Inspector General of the Nebraska Correctional System Doug Koebernick in support of the measure. (ne.gov)
  • During checkout we will give you a cumulative estimated date for delivery. (foyles.co.uk)
  • Sir Ernest said the court will give reasons for its decision later today. (aol.co.uk)
  • Please give your finacial support, to help my terminally ill son, to take his children on a family holiday. (justgiving.com)
  • Upon attending we were advised that ladys mother also wanted to make a will and she had recently been diagnosed with dementia. (hattonslaw.com)
  • A six months' delay would make it impossible for the Bill to progress in this session. (publicwhip.org.uk)
  • The members of the Judiciary Committee heard testimony Feb. 1 on a bill that could make certain nonviolent inmates eligible for early or temporary release. (ne.gov)
  • Today, Lord Falconer, the former Lord Chancellor, will table a Private Member's Bill in the House of Lords which if passed later this year, would make 'assisted dying' legal in Britain. (itv.com)
  • A terminally-ill rock legend will make an emotional return to Knebworth Park this summer as part of the Sonisphere 2014 Festival. (whtimes.co.uk)
  • In the time it will take for this issue to make. (wsj.com)
  • We've sorted a venue and the wedding cake, wedding photography and hair and make-up will be done for free. (dailypost.co.uk)
  • He said the defendants had taken the identities of the terminally ill for no other reason than to make money. (dailylocal.com)
  • HOUSTON (AP) - A large fire at a Houston-area petrochemicals terminal will likely burn for another two days, authorities said Monday, noting that air quality around the facility was testing within normal guidelines. (fox59.com)
  • And with the Florida Department of Health reportedly still reviewing applications to determine the eight companies that will cultivate the state's THC-free pot, it is conceivable that qualified patients will not see the program officially up and running until 2016 - two years after the law was passed. (hightimes.com)
  • During this time Hammer has written a book that he says gives him hope in that 'the things that I laid out in this book [for other cancer patients] will last long after I've gone. (mercurynews.com)
  • Supporters say the most critically ill do not qualify for clinical trials and the process to apply for special FDA permission takes so long that many die before their case is reviewed. (ksbw.com)
  • You must be at least eighteen years of age and a resident of Rhode Island for the living will to be legally valid and binding. (lifespan.org)
  • Finally, the bill would expand the definition of programming permitted by the Office of Parole Administration to include evidence-based peer and family support programs. (ne.gov)
  • Star Wars actor Mark Hamill is among those lending his support to a terminally ill fan who wants to see Rogue One: A Star Wars Story before he dies. (aol.co.uk)
  • Toronto Mayor John Tory says that he won't support a bid to host Expo 2025 unless the federal and provincial governments commit to footing part of the bill. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • Yet will it be possible for a 'death-friendly' culture to simultaneously support the lives of those who are most vulnerable - the lives of the terminally ill and disabled? (newsbusters.org)
  • Both Ginal and Joshi said the only opposition they've seen to the bill resulted from concerns from hospitals because they must adhere to federal laws and regulations that exist to ensure that patients are administered safe and appropriate medications. (denverpost.com)
  • We are going to shoot for a much larger recruitment and we are working on a physician resource plan that is going to update the projected need in this province so we will have a more accurate sense," Perret said, adding the resource plan should be ready early next year. (huffingtonpost.ca)
  • As long as there are inmates eligible for re-entry into the community but are unable to do so, the department will continue to lose options to alleviate overcrowding. (ne.gov)
  • William has a twin brother Matthew who is not affected by the condition, type one spinal muscular atrophy, a genetic muscle-wasting disease that has left him unable to move anything but his hands and toes. (grimsbytelegraph.co.uk)
  • Terminally ill Noel Conway has won the first stage of his Court of Appeal bid to challenge a ruling he says denies him a "peaceful and dignified" death. (aol.co.uk)
  • And Glenn warns of what's to come if conservatives don't activate: Chuck Schumer will weaponize the Senate, and the radical Left will launch an all-out assault to ravage the Constitution. (glennbeck.com)
  • A radical new RE curriculum which is unapologetically Catholic will be rolled out in Years 11 and 12 in Catholic schools across NSW beginning this year. (catholicweekly.com.au)
  • Americans find it hard to believe they will die. (pbs.org)
  • 216. We also issued (see Appendix 2) a general invitation at the outset of our inquiry to anyone who wished to write to us, either by letter or by email, to express his or her personal views of the Bill. (parliament.uk)
  • Your email address will not be published. (hightimes.com)
  • Email newsletters will contain a brief summary of our top stories, plus details of competitions and reader events. (gizmodo.com.au)
  • In a series of stepwise regression models carried out at 12 h, 24 h, and 1-4 weeks after admission, the four main predictor variables of will to live were depression, anxiety, shortness of breath, and sense of well-being, with the prominence of these variables changing over time. (nih.gov)
  • New Jersey legislators have tried passing versions of this bill since 2014, but this was the first time the bill went to a vote in the Senate. (fox40.com)
  • If a person applies for sick benefits and is diagnosed as terminally ill they should be able to draw their entitled El benefits for their remaining time living or until their benefits run out. (change.org)
  • that they will be helped, that they will be able to be with their families for a long time, or maybe just for a longer time," Trump said, Xinhua reported. (indiajournal.com)
  • You may revoke your living will at any time, verbally or in writing, without regard to your physical or mental condition. (lifespan.org)
  • However, at the time they owned it as joint tenants, this would mean that the house would automatically pass by the right of survivorship as opposed to under the will. (hattonslaw.com)
  • Sen. Ward said, "At one time everyone had a problem with this bill. (alreporter.com)
  • These should be added to the availability message time, to determine when the goods will arrive. (foyles.co.uk)
  • The memory of his 11-year-old daughter Angel, holding on fast to a fishing rod as big sea waves rocked the boat, will stay with Mr Yong Choon Wee for a long time though photos of the trip are lost. (straitstimes.com)