Vestibular Diseases: Pathological processes of the VESTIBULAR LABYRINTH which contains part of the balancing apparatus. Patients with vestibular diseases show instability and are at risk of frequent falls.Vestibular Neuronitis: Idiopathic inflammation of the VESTIBULAR NERVE, characterized clinically by the acute or subacute onset of VERTIGO; NAUSEA; and imbalance. The COCHLEAR NERVE is typically spared and HEARING LOSS and TINNITUS do not usually occur. Symptoms usually resolve over a period of days to weeks. (Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p304)Caloric Tests: Elicitation of a rotatory nystagmus by stimulating the semicircular canals with water or air which is above or below body temperature. In warm caloric stimulation a rotatory nystagmus is developed toward the side of the stimulated ear; in cold, away from the stimulated side. Absence of nystagmus indicates the labyrinth is not functioning.Dizziness: An imprecise term which may refer to a sense of spatial disorientation, motion of the environment, or lightheadedness.Reflex, Vestibulo-Ocular: A reflex wherein impulses are conveyed from the cupulas of the SEMICIRCULAR CANALS and from the OTOLITHIC MEMBRANE of the SACCULE AND UTRICLE via the VESTIBULAR NUCLEI of the BRAIN STEM and the median longitudinal fasciculus to the OCULOMOTOR NERVE nuclei. It functions to maintain a stable retinal image during head rotation by generating appropriate compensatory EYE MOVEMENTS.Cerebellar Ataxia: Incoordination of voluntary movements that occur as a manifestation of CEREBELLAR DISEASES. Characteristic features include a tendency for limb movements to overshoot or undershoot a target (dysmetria), a tremor that occurs during attempted movements (intention TREMOR), impaired force and rhythm of diadochokinesis (rapidly alternating movements), and GAIT ATAXIA. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p90)Neurofibromatosis 1: An autosomal dominant inherited disorder (with a high frequency of spontaneous mutations) that features developmental changes in the nervous system, muscles, bones, and skin, most notably in tissue derived from the embryonic NEURAL CREST. Multiple hyperpigmented skin lesions and subcutaneous tumors are the hallmark of this disease. Peripheral and central nervous system neoplasms occur frequently, especially OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA and NEUROFIBROSARCOMA. NF1 is caused by mutations which inactivate the NF1 gene (GENES, NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1) on chromosome 17q. The incidence of learning disabilities is also elevated in this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1014-18) There is overlap of clinical features with NOONAN SYNDROME in a syndrome called neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome. Both the PTPN11 and NF1 gene products are involved in the SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION pathway of Ras (RAS PROTEINS).Consensus: General agreement or collective opinion; the judgment arrived at by most of those concerned.Consensus Development Conferences as Topic: Presentations of summary statements representing the majority agreement of physicians, scientists, and other professionals convening for the purpose of reaching a consensus--often with findings and recommendations--on a subject of interest. The Conference, consisting of participants representing the scientific and lay viewpoints, is a significant means of evaluating current medical thought and reflects the latest advances in research for the respective field being addressed.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.BooksPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Serial Publications: Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Otolaryngology: A surgical specialty concerned with the study and treatment of disorders of the ear, nose, and throat.Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases: Pathological processes of the ear, the nose, and the throat, also known as the ENT diseases.Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures: Surgery performed on the ear and its parts, the nose and nasal cavity, or the throat, including surgery of the adenoids, tonsils, pharynx, and trachea.Rhinoplasty: A plastic surgical operation on the nose, either reconstructive, restorative, or cosmetic. (Dorland, 28th ed)Faculty, Medical: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in a medical school.Faculty: The teaching staff and members of the administrative staff having academic rank in an educational institution.BrazilResearch: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Pasteurellosis, Pneumonic: Bovine respiratory disease found in animals that have been shipped or exposed to CATTLE recently transported. The major agent responsible for the disease is MANNHEIMIA HAEMOLYTICA and less commonly, PASTEURELLA MULTOCIDA or HAEMOPHILUS SOMNUS. All three agents are normal inhabitants of the bovine nasal pharyngeal mucosa but not the LUNG. They are considered opportunistic pathogens following STRESS, PHYSIOLOGICAL and/or a viral infection. The resulting bacterial fibrinous BRONCHOPNEUMONIA is often fatal.Ships: Large vessels propelled by power or sail used for transportation on rivers, seas, oceans, or other navigable waters. Boats are smaller vessels propelled by oars, paddles, sail, or power; they may or may not have a deck.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Transportation: The means of moving persons, animals, goods, or materials from one place to another.Naval Medicine: The practice of medicine concerned with conditions affecting the health of individuals associated with the marine environment.Colorectal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON or the RECTUM or both. Risk factors for colorectal cancer include chronic ULCERATIVE COLITIS; FAMILIAL POLYPOSIS COLI; exposure to ASBESTOS; and irradiation of the CERVIX UTERI.MicroRNAs: Small double-stranded, non-protein coding RNAs, 21-25 nucleotides in length generated from single-stranded microRNA gene transcripts by the same RIBONUCLEASE III, Dicer, that produces small interfering RNAs (RNA, SMALL INTERFERING). They become part of the RNA-INDUCED SILENCING COMPLEX and repress the translation (TRANSLATION, GENETIC) of target RNA by binding to homologous 3'UTR region as an imperfect match. The small temporal RNAs (stRNAs), let-7 and lin-4, from C. elegans, are the first 2 miRNAs discovered, and are from a class of miRNAs involved in developmental timing.Receptors, CXCR4: CXCR receptors with specificity for CXCL12 CHEMOKINE. The receptors may play a role in HEMATOPOIESIS regulation and can also function as coreceptors for the HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS.Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Cerebrospinal Fluid Proteins: Proteins in the cerebrospinal fluid, normally albumin and globulin present in the ratio of 8 to 1. Increases in protein levels are of diagnostic value in neurological diseases. (Brain and Bannister's Clinical Neurology, 7th ed, p221)Cerebellopontine Angle: Junction between the cerebellum and the pons.Melanoma, Experimental: Experimentally induced tumor that produces MELANIN in animals to provide a model for studying human MELANOMA.Cerebellar Neoplasms: Primary or metastatic neoplasms of the CEREBELLUM. Tumors in this location frequently present with ATAXIA or signs of INTRACRANIAL HYPERTENSION due to obstruction of the fourth ventricle. Common primary cerebellar tumors include fibrillary ASTROCYTOMA and cerebellar HEMANGIOBLASTOMA. The cerebellum is a relatively common site for tumor metastases from the lung, breast, and other distant organs. (From Okazaki & Scheithauer, Atlas of Neuropathology, 1988, p86 and p141)Melanoma: A malignant neoplasm derived from cells that are capable of forming melanin, which may occur in the skin of any part of the body, in the eye, or, rarely, in the mucous membranes of the genitalia, anus, oral cavity, or other sites. It occurs mostly in adults and may originate de novo or from a pigmented nevus or malignant lentigo. Melanomas frequently metastasize widely, and the regional lymph nodes, liver, lungs, and brain are likely to be involved. The incidence of malignant skin melanomas is rising rapidly in all parts of the world. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2445)Neuroma, Acoustic: A benign SCHWANNOMA of the eighth cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE), mostly arising from the vestibular branch (VESTIBULAR NERVE) during the fifth or sixth decade of life. Clinical manifestations include HEARING LOSS; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; TINNITUS; and FACIAL PAIN. Bilateral acoustic neuromas are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p673)Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.World War I: Global conflict primarily fought on European continent, that occurred between 1914 and 1918.Famous PersonsVermontNew HampshireJournal Impact Factor: A quantitative measure of the frequency on average with which articles in a journal have been cited in a given period of time.Questionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Aztreonam: A monocyclic beta-lactam antibiotic originally isolated from Chromobacterium violaceum. It is resistant to beta-lactamases and is used in gram-negative infections, especially of the meninges, bladder, and kidneys. It may cause a superinfection with gram-positive organisms.Skin Diseases, Bacterial: Skin diseases caused by bacteria.Pursuit, Smooth: Eye movements that are slow, continuous, and conjugate and occur when a fixed object is moved slowly.Eye Movements: Voluntary or reflex-controlled movements of the eye.Syndrome: A characteristic symptom complex.Computer Graphics: The process of pictorial communication, between human and computers, in which the computer input and output have the form of charts, drawings, or other appropriate pictorial representation.
Bilateral vestibulopathy - a condition involving loss of inner ear balance function in both ears. This may be caused by certain ... Dysequilibrium arising from bilateral loss of vestibular function - such as can occur from ototoxic drugs such as gentamicin - ... Recent MRI studies also show that humans with bilateral vestibular damage undergo atrophy of the hippocampus which correlates ...
... he was diagnosed with a rare neurological condition called bilateral vestibulopathy, in which the portions of both inner ears ...
... results as the culmination of damage done to both inner ears. Bilateral Vestibulopathy causes problems ... Oscillopsia, visual symptoms of Bilateral Vestibulopathy only occur when the head is moving. For instance, when driving, a ... There are several different causes of Bilateral Vestibulopathy, including Gentamicin toxicity, but the rotary chair test will ... Adv ORL 42:294-300, 1988 Bilateral Vestibulopathy at the American Hearing Research Foundation Chicago, Illinois 2008.. ...
There is also a familial vestibulopathy, familial benign recurrent vertigo (fBRV), where episodes of vertigo occur with or ... bilateral paresthesias, paresis, decreased consciousness and/or loss of consciousness) followed by throbbing headache. Auditory ... or migraine-related vestibulopathy. A 2010 report from the University of British Columbia published in the journal Headache ...
Bilateral Vestibulopathy results as the culmination of damage done to both inner ears. Bilateral Vestibulopathy causes problems ... Oscillopsia, visual symptoms of Bilateral Vestibulopathy only occur when the head is moving. For instance, when driving, a ... There are several different causes of Bilateral Vestibulopathy, including Gentamicin toxicity, but the rotary chair test will ... Adv ORL 42:294-300, 1988 Bilateral Vestibulopathy at the American Hearing Research Foundation Chicago, Illinois 2008.. ...
Bilateral vestibulopathy (BV) is characterized by impaired or lost function of both labyrinths or eighth nerves. The diagnosis ... bilateral vestibulo pathy vestibular evoked myogenic potentials sacculus This is a preview of subscription content, log in to ... Bilateral vestibulopathy (BV) is characterized by impaired or lost function of both labyrinths or eighth nerves. The diagnosis ... 2007) Causative factors and epidemiology of bilateral vestibulopathy in 255 patients. Annals of Neurology 61:524-532PubMed ...
Sparing of anterior-canal function has been linked to aminoglycoside-related vestibulopathy and Menières disease. We ... Sparing of anterior-canal function has been linked to aminoglycoside-related vestibulopathy and Menières disease. We ... Specifically, assessing utricular function may help in the distinction between aminoglycoside-related BVL and bilateral ... Gait imbalance and oscillopsia are frequent complaints of bilateral vestibular loss (BLV). Video-head-impulse testing (vHIT) of ...
Bilateral vestibulopathy is estimated to affect 21 in 100,000 people and in its most severe forms can have profound impacts on ... The diagnosis of bilateral vestibulopathy is often delayed due to patients nonspecific symptoms and clinicians unfamiliarity ... Unlike in unilateral loss of vestibular function where compensation is typical, many patients with bilateral vestibulopathy ... as common diagnoses like diabetes or presbyvestibulopathy also can lead to bilateral vestibular failure. Many cases, however, ...
This paper describes the diagnostic criteria for bilateral vestibulopathy (BVP) by the Classification Committee of the Bárány ... Bilateral vestibulopathy is a clinical syndrome and, if known, the etiology (e.g., due to ototoxicity, bilateral Menières ... Novel subtype of idiopathic bilateral vestibulopathy: Bilateral absence of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in the ... Kang K.W. , Lee C. , Kim S.H. , Cho H.H. and Lee S.H. , Bilateral vestibulopathy documented by video head impulse tests in ...
Bilateral Vestibulopathy. Video of BVP Halmagyi Romberg Manzl No Audio. BVP Halmagyi Romberg Manzl No Audio. Incomplete ... bilateral vestibulopathy. Head-impulse test: When the head is quickly turned to the right, there is a clear refixation saccade ...
What is bilateral vestibulopathy? Causes Symptoms Diagnosis Treatment and management What to expect in the future More ... What is bilateral vestibulopathy?. Bilateral vestibulopathy (BVP) is damage to the vestibular system in the inner ear, which is ... BVP is also known as bilateral vestibular weakness, bilateral vestibular hypofunction, bilateral vestibular failure or ... How bilateral vestibulopathy is diagnosed. BVP may be diagnosed by a primary care doctor, but it is more often diagnosed by a ...
Bilateral vestibulopathy: Diagnostic criteria Consensus document of the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society. ... Susceptibility to Fear of Heights in Bilateral Vestibulopathy and Other Disorders of Vertigo and Balance. ...
... bilateral vestibulopathy, normal-pressure hydrocephalus, and anxiety-related gait disturbance.. Bilateral vestibulopathy. ... Zingler VC, Cnyrim C, Jahn K, et al.: Causative factors and epidemiology of bilateral vestibulopathy in 255 patients. Ann ... Zingler VC, Cnyrim C, Jahn K, et al.: Causative factors and epidemiology of bilateral vestibulopathy in 255 patients. Ann ... Bilateral, usually incomplete peripheral vestibular deficits are often overlooked in patients whose presenting manifestations ...
Impact of Bilateral Vestibulopathy on Spatial and Nonspatial Cognition: A Systematic Review. Dobbels, Bieke; Peetermans, ... Bimodal Hearing or Bilateral Cochlear Implants? Ask the Patient. Gifford, René H.; Dorman, Michael F. ... Service Preferences of Parents of Children With Mild Bilateral or Unilateral Hearing Loss: A Conjoint Analysis Study. ... Factors Affecting Sound-Source Localization in Children With Simultaneous or Sequential Bilateral Cochlear Implants. Killan, ...
Head-Movement-Emphasized Rehabilitation in Bilateral Vestibulopathy.. Lehnen N, Kellerer S, Knorr AG, Schlick C, Jahn K, ...
Bilateral vestibulopathy (genetics):. *Research subjects: Patients with bilateral loss of vestibular function ... and familial vestibulopathy. We have several genetic research studies in progress and are conducting a placebo controlled ...
Bilateral vestibulopathy was documented with quantitative rotational testing. Most patients with bilateral vestibulopathy also ... only a few are associated with bilateral vestibulopathy. No genetic mutations have been identified in families with bilateral ... Suggestive linkage to chromosome 6q in families with bilateral vestibulopathy NEUROLOGY Jen, J. C., Wang, H., LEE, H., Sabatti ... normal hearing.To perform a genome-wide scan for linkage in four families with dominantly inherited bilateral vestibulopathy. ...
Immunosuppressive treatment in bilateral vestibulopathy with inner ear antibodies DEUTSHLANDER A. Acta Otolaryngol. 125, 848- ...
Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with idiopathic bilateral vestibulopathy. 243. (1). ... Unexpected non-linearities in the VOR responses of patients with bilateral loss of peripheral vestibular function. ... Vertical and horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex modifications in Parkinsons disease: unilateral and bilateral simultaneous ...
Bilateral vestibulopathy - a condition involving loss of inner ear balance function in both ears. This may be caused by certain ... Dysequilibrium arising from bilateral loss of vestibular function - such as can occur from ototoxic drugs such as gentamicin - ... Recent MRI studies also show that humans with bilateral vestibular damage undergo atrophy of the hippocampus which correlates ...
Previous Document: Noisy vestibular stimulation improves body balance in bilateral vestibulopathy.. Next Document: Light- ...
bilateral cerebellar hemisphere and vermis pathology often produces the following combination of signs:-. *bilateral limb ... present ++ if the vestibulopathy is acute and unilateral. *often intense and disabling ... with diffuse or degenerative cerebellar disease, the dysmetria is bilateral with little right-left asymmetry ... patients with bilateral vestibular damage are also dependent on visual cues for balance and they may also have a positive ...
Neurophysiological studies demonstrated the bilateral involvement of both branches of the vestibulocochlear cranial nerves. ... We suggest HIV testing for all cases of sudden onset of bilateral hypoacusia. ... A 21-year-old HIV-1 seropositive African man developed an acute febrile illness followed by a sudden sensorineural bilateral ... Idiopathic bilateral vestibulopathy: an autoimmune disease?. *Antonio Greco, Armando De Virgilio, +5 authors Marco de ...
Suggestive Linkage To Chromosome 6Q In Families With Bilateral Vestibulopathy. Neurology, 63(12), 2376-9. ... Suggestive Linkage To Chromosome 6Q In Families With Bilateral Vestibulopathy. Neurology, 63(12), 2376-9. ...
Bilateral vestibulopathy is a clinical syndrome and, if known, the etiology (e.g., due to ototoxicity, bilateral Menières ... Bilateral vestibulopathy: Diagnostic criteria Consensus document of the Classification Committee of the Bárány Society ... Bilateral vestibulopathy is a chronic vestibular syndrome which is characterized by unsteadiness when walking or standing, ... Keywords: Bilateral vestibulopathy, vertigo, dizziness, disequilibrium, vestibular, diagnostic criteria, Bárány Society DOI: ...
Spatial Anxiety and Hippocampal Volume in Bilateral Vestibulopathy. In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, Vol. 10, 139 [PDF, 1MB ... Follow-up of vestibular function in bilateral vestibulopathy. In: Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry, Vol. 79, Nr ...
Bilateral cerebellopontine angle metastatic melanoma: a case report.(Disease/Disorder overview) by Ear, Nose and Throat ... This patient had a rapidly progressive hearing loss, vestibulopathy, and facial nerve dysfunction. Magnetic resonance imaging ... 4 had bilateral disease. (13) Therefore, we report the eighth such case with bilateral melanoma metastases filling the IACs and ... APA style: Bilateral cerebellopontine angle metastatic melanoma: a case report.. (n.d.) >The Free Library. (2014). Retrieved ...
Two patients with bilateral peripheral vestibulopathy had previously been diagnosed with unilateral peripheral vestibulopathy, ... 2 Although bilateral SNHL was present in 78% (18/23) of patients with peripheral vestibulopathy, only 50% (9/18) had bilateral ... The hearing loss was bilateral in the majority (18/20). However, bilateral peripheral vestibulopathy was present in only 55% ( ... This is the first description of either bilateral or progressive vestibulopathy in patients with maternally inherited diabetes ...
Disease-specific sparing of the anterior semicircular canals in bilateral vestibulopathy. Clin Neurophysiol. 2016 Aug;127(8): ... Frequent causes are sensory deficits (bilateral vestibulopathy, polyneuropathy), degenerative diseases (Parkinsons disease), ... the image of bilateral vestibulopathy may present with reduced gain values on both sides. The origin of these findings is not ... Combined peripheral and central vestibulopathy. J Vestib Res. 2014;24(5-6):443-51. DOI: 10.3233/VES-140524 127.. Park HK, Kim ...
  • The results showed that vestibulopathy is related to a diminished ability to control and recover gait stability after an unexpected perturbation, and to a deficient reactive adaptation potential. (forceandmotion.org)
  • Susceptibility to Fear of Heights in Bilateral Vestibulopathy and Other Disorders of Vertigo and Balance. (nih.gov)
  • On the research side we study the causes of dizziness and imbalance with particular emphasis on: vestibular migraine, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere's disease, familial episodic ataxia, and familial vestibulopathy. (uclahealth.org)
  • however, with bilateral vestibulopathy, the neural impairment or loss is generally equal between the two ears, thus not creating the mechanism for vertigo to occur. (mhmedical.com)
  • Distinct vestibular phenotypes depending on the location of COCH mutations were demonstrated, and this study correlates a genotype of p.G38D in COCH to the phenotype of bilateral total vestibular loss, therefore expanding the vestibular phenotypic spectrum of DFNA9 to range from bilateral vestibular loss without episodic vertigo to MD-like features with devastating episodic vertigo. (cdc.gov)
  • Unilateral vestibulopathy can include vertigo, and you may drift to one side when you try to walk in a straight line. (fyzical.com)
  • Bilateral vestibulopathy is generally not associated with vertigo. (fyzical.com)
  • Although it is yet beyond the current image techniques and equipment to solve the enigma in such a case, we suggest an unknown recurrent vasculopathy, rather than M ni re's disease or migrainous vertigo acted on the underlying presumably abnormal microcirculation of the inner ear and left behind the right transient cochleopathy with partial vestibulopathy. (org.pk)
  • Bilateral vestibulopathy is a chronic vestibular syndrome which is characterized by unsteadiness when walking or standing, which worsen in darkness and/or on uneven ground, or during head motion. (iospress.com)
  • Bryan Ward specializes in treating disorders of the ear and skull base, such as chronic ear disease, dilatory and patulous eustachian tube dysfunction, and conditions that cause dizziness such as superior canal dehiscence syndrome, Meniere's disease and bilateral vestibulopathy. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Beyond Dizziness: Virtual Navigation, Spatial Anxiety and Hippocampal Volume in Bilateral Vestibulopathy. (uni-muenchen.de)
  • Regarding the detailed clinical phenotype of the four DFNA9 families with documented vestibular phenotypes, we were able to classify them into two groups: one (p.C162Y variant) with a Meniere's disease (MD)-like phenotype and the other three (p.G38D variant) with significant bilateral vestibular loss without any definite MD symptoms. (cdc.gov)
  • Bilateral vestibulopathy is estimated to affect 21 in 100,000 people and in its most severe forms can have profound impacts on quality of life and lead to increased risk of falls. (frontiersin.org)
  • Although it can occur at any age, bilateral vestibulopathy primarily occurs from 61 to 70 years. (mhmedical.com)