Bibliography as Topic: Discussion of lists of works, documents or other publications, usually with some relationship between them, e.g., by a given author, on a given subject, or published in a given place, and differing from a catalog in that its contents are restricted to holdings of a single collection, library, or group of libraries. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Bibliography of Medicine: A list of works, documents, and other publications on medical subjects and topics of interest to the field of medicine.BibliographyHip Joint: The joint that is formed by the articulation of the head of FEMUR and the ACETABULUM of the PELVIS.Hip: The projecting part on each side of the body, formed by the side of the pelvis and the top portion of the femur.Bibliography, National: A bibliography which lists all the books and other publications published, or distributed in significant quantity, in a particular country. Sometimes the term is used with respect to the new publications published within a specific period, and sometimes with respect to all those published within a lengthy period of many years. It is also used to indicate a bibliography of publications about a country (whether written by its nationals or not) and those written in the language of the country as well as those published in it. (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Bibliography, Descriptive: The area of bibliography which makes known precisely the material conditions of books, i.e., the full name of the author, the exact title of the work, the date and place of publication, the publisher's and printer's names, the format, the pagination, typographical particulars, illustrations, and the price, and for old books, other characteristics such as the kind of paper, binding, etc. It is also called analytical bibliography and physical bibliography. (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip: Replacement of the hip joint.Osteoarthritis, Hip: Noninflammatory degenerative disease of the hip joint which usually appears in late middle or old age. It is characterized by growth or maturational disturbances in the femoral neck and head, as well as acetabular dysplasia. A dominant symptom is pain on weight-bearing or motion.Hip Fractures: Fractures of the FEMUR HEAD; the FEMUR NECK; (FEMORAL NECK FRACTURES); the trochanters; or the inter- or subtrochanteric region. Excludes fractures of the acetabulum and fractures of the femoral shaft below the subtrochanteric region (FEMORAL FRACTURES).Hip Prosthesis: Replacement for a hip joint.Biography as Topic: A written account of a person's life and the branch of literature concerned with the lives of people. (Harrod's Librarians' Glossary, 7th ed)Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic: Works about clinical trials that involve at least one test treatment and one control treatment, concurrent enrollment and follow-up of the test- and control-treated groups, and in which the treatments to be administered are selected by a random process, such as the use of a random-numbers table.Databases, Bibliographic: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of references and citations to books, articles, publications, etc., generally on a single subject or specialized subject area. Databases can operate through automated files, libraries, or computer disks. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, FACTUAL which is used for collections of data and facts apart from bibliographic references to them.HistoryHip Dislocation, Congenital: Congenital dislocation of the hip generally includes subluxation of the femoral head, acetabular dysplasia, and complete dislocation of the femoral head from the true acetabulum. This condition occurs in approximately 1 in 1000 live births and is more common in females than in males.Hip Dislocation: Displacement of the femur bone from its normal position at the HIP JOINT.Libraries, DentalMEDLARS: A computerized biomedical bibliographic storage and retrieval system operated by the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLARS stands for Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System, which was first introduced in 1964 and evolved into an online system in 1971 called MEDLINE (MEDLARS Online). As other online databases were developed, MEDLARS became the name of the entire NLM information system while MEDLINE became the name of the premier database. MEDLARS was used to produce the former printed Cumulated Index Medicus, and the printed monthly Index Medicus, until that publication ceased in December 2004.Hip Injuries: General or unspecified injuries involving the hip.National Library of Medicine (U.S.): An agency of the NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH concerned with overall planning, promoting, and administering programs pertaining to advancement of medical and related sciences. Major activities of this institute include the collection, dissemination, and exchange of information important to the progress of medicine and health, research in medical informatics and support for medical library development.Bioethics: A branch of applied ethics that studies the value implications of practices and developments in life sciences, medicine, and health care.Abstracting and Indexing as Topic: Activities performed to identify concepts and aspects of published information and research reports.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Library Collection Development: Development of a library collection, including the determination and coordination of selection policy, assessment of needs of users and potential users, collection use studies, collection evaluation, identification of collection needs, selection of materials, planning for resource sharing, collection maintenance and weeding, and budgeting.Information Systems: Integrated set of files, procedures, and equipment for the storage, manipulation, and retrieval of information.Libraries, MedicalMEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Evidence-Based Medicine: An approach of practicing medicine with the goal to improve and evaluate patient care. It requires the judicious integration of best research evidence with the patient's values to make decisions about medical care. This method is to help physicians make proper diagnosis, devise best testing plan, choose best treatment and methods of disease prevention, as well as develop guidelines for large groups of patients with the same disease. (from JAMA 296 (9), 2006)Zygapophyseal Joint: The joint that occurs between facets of the interior and superior articular processes of adjacent VERTEBRAE.Chronic Pain: Aching sensation that persists for more than a few months. It may or may not be associated with trauma or disease, and may persist after the initial injury has healed. Its localization, character, and timing are more vague than with acute pain.Clinical Trials as Topic: Works about pre-planned studies of the safety, efficacy, or optimum dosage schedule (if appropriate) of one or more diagnostic, therapeutic, or prophylactic drugs, devices, or techniques selected according to predetermined criteria of eligibility and observed for predefined evidence of favorable and unfavorable effects. This concept includes clinical trials conducted both in the U.S. and in other countries.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Injections, Epidural: The injection of drugs, most often analgesics, into the spinal canal without puncturing the dura mater.Internet: A loose confederation of computer communication networks around the world. The networks that make up the Internet are connected through several backbone networks. The Internet grew out of the US Government ARPAnet project and was designed to facilitate information exchange.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.Cost-Benefit Analysis: A method of comparing the cost of a program with its expected benefits in dollars (or other currency). The benefit-to-cost ratio is a measure of total return expected per unit of money spent. This analysis generally excludes consideration of factors that are not measured ultimately in economic terms. Cost effectiveness compares alternative ways to achieve a specific set of results.United StatesInformation Storage and Retrieval: Organized activities related to the storage, location, search, and retrieval of information.Injections, Intra-Articular: Methods of delivering drugs into a joint space.Risk Factors: An aspect of personal behavior or lifestyle, environmental exposure, or inborn or inherited characteristic, which, on the basis of epidemiologic evidence, is known to be associated with a health-related condition considered important to prevent.Meta-Analysis as Topic: A quantitative method of combining the results of independent studies (usually drawn from the published literature) and synthesizing summaries and conclusions which may be used to evaluate therapeutic effectiveness, plan new studies, etc., with application chiefly in the areas of research and medicine.Hip Dysplasia, Canine: A hereditary disease of the hip joints in dogs. Signs of the disease may be evident any time after 4 weeks of age.Acetabulum: The part of the pelvis that comprises the pelvic socket where the head of FEMUR joins to form HIP JOINT (acetabulofemoral joint).Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.ComputersProsthesis Failure: Malfunction of implantation shunts, valves, etc., and prosthesis loosening, migration, and breaking.Low Back Pain: Acute or chronic pain in the lumbar or sacral regions, which may be associated with musculo-ligamentous SPRAINS AND STRAINS; INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISPLACEMENT; and other conditions.Femur Head: The hemispheric articular surface at the upper extremity of the thigh bone. (Stedman, 26th ed)Nerve Block: Interruption of NEURAL CONDUCTION in peripheral nerves or nerve trunks by the injection of a local anesthetic agent (e.g., LIDOCAINE; PHENOL; BOTULINUM TOXINS) to manage or treat pain.Great BritainOutcome Assessment (Health Care): Research aimed at assessing the quality and effectiveness of health care as measured by the attainment of a specified end result or outcome. Measures include parameters such as improved health, lowered morbidity or mortality, and improvement of abnormal states (such as elevated blood pressure).Databases, Factual: Extensive collections, reputedly complete, of facts and data garnered from material of a specialized subject area and made available for analysis and application. The collection can be automated by various contemporary methods for retrieval. The concept should be differentiated from DATABASES, BIBLIOGRAPHIC which is restricted to collections of bibliographic references.Risk Assessment: The qualitative or quantitative estimation of the likelihood of adverse effects that may result from exposure to specified health hazards or from the absence of beneficial influences. (Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 1988)Femur Head Necrosis: Aseptic or avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The major types are idiopathic (primary), as a complication of fractures or dislocations, and LEGG-CALVE-PERTHES DISEASE.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Risk: The probability that an event will occur. It encompasses a variety of measures of the probability of a generally unfavorable outcome.Reoperation: A repeat operation for the same condition in the same patient due to disease progression or recurrence, or as followup to failed previous surgery.Prosthesis Design: The plan and delineation of prostheses in general or a specific prosthesis.Incidence: The number of new cases of a given disease during a given period in a specified population. It also is used for the rate at which new events occur in a defined population. It is differentiated from PREVALENCE, which refers to all cases, new or old, in the population at a given time.Reproducibility of Results: The statistical reproducibility of measurements (often in a clinical context), including the testing of instrumentation or techniques to obtain reproducible results. The concept includes reproducibility of physiological measurements, which may be used to develop rules to assess probability or prognosis, or response to a stimulus; reproducibility of occurrence of a condition; and reproducibility of experimental results.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Age Factors: Age as a constituent element or influence contributing to the production of a result. It may be applicable to the cause or the effect of a circumstance. It is used with human or animal concepts but should be differentiated from AGING, a physiological process, and TIME FACTORS which refers only to the passage of time.Femur: The longest and largest bone of the skeleton, it is situated between the hip and the knee.Chronic Disease: Diseases which have one or more of the following characteristics: they are permanent, leave residual disability, are caused by nonreversible pathological alteration, require special training of the patient for rehabilitation, or may be expected to require a long period of supervision, observation, or care. (Dictionary of Health Services Management, 2d ed)Range of Motion, Articular: The distance and direction to which a bone joint can be extended. Range of motion is a function of the condition of the joints, muscles, and connective tissues involved. Joint flexibility can be improved through appropriate MUSCLE STRETCHING EXERCISES.Quality of Life: A generic concept reflecting concern with the modification and enhancement of life attributes, e.g., physical, political, moral and social environment; the overall condition of a human life.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Femoral Neck Fractures: Fractures of the short, constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters. It excludes intertrochanteric fractures which are HIP FRACTURES.Joint DiseasesPregnancy: The status during which female mammals carry their developing young (EMBRYOS or FETUSES) in utero before birth, beginning from FERTILIZATION to BIRTH.Bone Cements: Adhesives used to fix prosthetic devices to bones and to cement bone to bone in difficult fractures. Synthetic resins are commonly used as cements. A mixture of monocalcium phosphate, monohydrate, alpha-tricalcium phosphate, and calcium carbonate with a sodium phosphate solution is also a useful bone paste.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Hip Contracture: Permanent fixation of the hip in primary positions, with limited passive or active motion at the hip joint. Locomotion is difficult and pain is sometimes present when the hip is in motion. It may be caused by trauma, infection, or poliomyelitis. (From Current Medical Information & Technology, 5th ed)Acute Disease: Disease having a short and relatively severe course.Cementation: The joining of objects by means of a cement (e.g., in fracture fixation, such as in hip arthroplasty for joining of the acetabular component to the femoral component). In dentistry, it is used for the process of attaching parts of a tooth or restorative material to a natural tooth or for the attaching of orthodontic bands to teeth by means of an adhesive.Femoracetabular Impingement: A pathological mechanical process that can lead to hip failure. It is caused by abnormalities of the ACETABULUM and/or FEMUR combined with rigorous hip motion, leading to repetitive collisions that damage the soft tissue structures.Survival Analysis: A class of statistical procedures for estimating the survival function (function of time, starting with a population 100% well at a given time and providing the percentage of the population still well at later times). The survival analysis is then used for making inferences about the effects of treatments, prognostic factors, exposures, and other covariates on the function.Femur Neck: The constricted portion of the thigh bone between the femur head and the trochanters.Pelvic Bones: Bones that constitute each half of the pelvic girdle in VERTEBRATES, formed by fusion of the ILIUM; ISCHIUM; and PUBIC BONE.
  • Metal on metal hip resurfacing has been shown to eliminate the problems of proximal femoral stress shielding and osteolysis caused by polythylene wear debris associated with traditional hip replacement, virtually eliminates the problems of hip dislocation and significantly reduces the problem of leg lengthening. (glucosamine-arthritis.org)
  • Congenital hip dislocation also known as CHD is a malformation of hip joint that can be detected exactly after the birth. (essay-911.com)
  • It's hard to identify what causes CHD, but clinical studies have shown that congenital hip dislocation runs in families, and affects more women than men. (essay-911.com)
  • To investigate the outcomes of patients undergoing Hackett-Hemwall dextrose Prolotherapy treatment for chronic hip pain. (caringmedical.com)
  • Developed by Mr McMinn and colleagues at the Royal Orthopaedic Hospital in Birmingham, because "[t]he traditional treatment of total hip replacement, though reasonably successful in elderly patients, offers unacceptably poor long term outcomes for young active patients often with an inevitable saga of multiple revisions and associated complications". (glucosamine-arthritis.org)
  • This review aimed to elucidate a diagnostic approach and the surgical treatment options (with associated outcomes) of employing hip arthroscopy in the setting of AC. (painscience.com)
  • Similarities are seen between hip AC and shoulder AC as diagnosis is often a result of ruling out all other possible conditions, and treatment options and outcomes resemble those of the shoulder counterpart. (painscience.com)
  • With successful outcomes harping on timely diagnosis and effective treatment, the use of hip arthroscopy may be of benefit to achieving this. (painscience.com)
  • The main outcomes of interest were hip refracture and death rates within two years of the first hip fracture from a fall in people over 60. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • Dr. Weinstein's research over the last 40 years has been focused on the natural history and long-term outcomes of pediatric orthopedic conditions, primarily spinal deformities and hip disorders. (uiowa.edu)
  • For example, the hip works as a functional unit with the pelvis and indirectly with the lumbar spine, as well as the remainder of the lower extremity. (chiro.org)
  • This study tries to adapt the non-specific post-surgical physiotherapy treatment protocols of the hip to the characteristics of the femoroacetabular impingement and its arthroscopic surgery. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Hip impingement is common, with one NHS trust estimating it affects 30% of people in the UK with higher prevalence among athletes. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • Different types are recognised, according to whether the shape of the head of the femur (cam impingement), the hip socket (pincer impingement) or both (mixed), are shaped slightly differently from normal. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • If participants had impingement affecting both hips, the most affected side was treated. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • In Hip Hop Matters (2005), professor and media scholar S. Craig Watkins labels the increasing interdisciplinary cohort of hip hop academics and scholars as the "hip-hop intelligentsia," and suggests that while this group of individuals may not often been discussed as an entity in and of itself, their existence is, without question, one of the greatest achievements of the hip hop movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers looked at a cohort of hip fracture patients and undertook an interrupted time-series analysis and a regression model of survival. (nihr.ac.uk)
  • 32 To evaluate the effectiveness of Hackett-Hemwall dextrose Prolotherapy, not just on hip pain but on quality of life measures, as well as its ability to reduce or eliminate the need or other medical therapies including total hip replacement this observational study was undertaken. (caringmedical.com)
  • As they should have strength in their lower body, thighs, hips and feet for the longer stride and stability. (pitchvision.com)
  • According to medical researches displasia is a result of abnormal development of the hip when the relationship between the thigh bone, called femur, and shallow socket, called acetabulum is disrupted. (essay-911.com)
  • This thesis will give a idea about quantitative hip assessment for displasia and managemental method for dysplastic hips. (scribd.com)
  • Derek McMinn and Ronan Treacy at the Royal Orthopaedic & Nuffield Hospitals, Birmingham, UK have developed a metal on metal hip resurfacing device which addresses most problems associated with conventional total hip replacement . (glucosamine-arthritis.org)
  • Practicing orthopaedic surgeons will benefit from step-by-step advice and proven surgical approaches for adult hip reconstruction. (aaos.org)
  • Ross Hauser, MD , Hauser M. A retrospective study on Hackett-Hemwall dextrose prolotherapy for chronic hip pain at an outpatient charity clinic in rural Illinois. (caringmedical.com)
  • 5,6 Because of the limited response of chronic hip pain to other traditional therapies, many people are turning to alternative therapies, including Prolotherapy, for pain control. (caringmedical.com)
  • 30,31 While Prolotherapy has been used for chronic hip pain, no study has been published to date to show its effectiveness for this condition. (caringmedical.com)
  • Preliminary evidence suggests that an herbal formula (Ophthacare ) containing rose hip may be useful in the treatment of a variety of eye disorders. (realfoodstore.com)
  • Total hip replacement is a common and successful treatment for degenerative hip disorders, allowing greater range of movement and reduction of pain. (awkolaw.com)
  • Is the rate of revision of 36 mm metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasties with Pinnacle acetabular components related to the year of the initial operation? (nih.gov)
  • The research and teaching in this interdisciplinary field includes analyses of technology, pop culture, linguistics, globalization, geography, race, electoral politics, and a variety of aspects related to contemporary culture, as scholars attempt to critically assess hip hop as a movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • For your first assignment in KNPE 125 you are being asked to put together an annotated bibliography describing 4 primary research articles and what they tell you about the whether or not the treatment being studied is one that appears to effectively treat the disease in question. (majortests.com)
  • In past research work authors found that women with low back pain had limitation of active hip lateral rotation than women without low back ache. (brightkite.com)
  • NPA maintains a bibliography of research articles and studies involving PACE. (npaonline.org)
  • Research suggests that rose hip may decrease symptoms of osteoarthritis. (realfoodstore.com)
  • Future research will provide additional useful information on the use of rose hip for this condition. (realfoodstore.com)
  • Limited research suggests that some compounds isolated from rose hip may have positive effects on immune system function. (realfoodstore.com)
  • Limited research has used rose hip oil to treat skin conditions. (realfoodstore.com)
  • Our students have the opportunity to pursue courses, including small group collaborative faculty-student research with faculty whose teaching and scholarly interests from Civil Rights history to the culture of Hip Hop. (earlham.edu)
  • Specific information included: A brief description of the content of the book, journal, website or video, the intended audience (addressing value for the instrumentalist, keyboardist and/or vocalist), the authors' approach and specific techniques (such as physiological and psychological, when relevant), general research information and bibliography and/or end notes, if included in the book. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Research evidence supported 15 interventions in the treatment of hip OA. (bmj.com)
  • Ten key recommendations for the treatment of hip OA were developed based on research evidence and expert consensus. (bmj.com)
  • Proximal hip geometry is linked to several chromosomal regions: genome-wide linkage results from the Framingham Osteoporosis Study. (framinghamheartstudy.org)
  • What is the Tritanium Hip Implant? (awkolaw.com)
  • Due to it's highly porous surface, the Tritanium components were designed to increase integration with natural bone and thereby increase durability of the hip implant without the use of cement as is used in traditional hip replacement devices. (awkolaw.com)
  • Have you had a hip replacement using the Tritanium Hip Implant? (awkolaw.com)
  • Our attorneys are investigating patient claims related to complications from the Stryker Tritanium Hip Implant. (awkolaw.com)
  • The following clinical parameters were collected: anaesthesia, length of surgical incision, duration of the procedure, lower limb discrepancy, pain, complications, hospitalization time, Harris Hip Score (HHS) and subjective patient satisfaction. (elsevier.es)
  • The fluoridation of drinking water and hip fracture hospitalization rates in two Canadian communities. (slweb.org)
  • Functional results assessed with the Harris Hip Score (HHS). (elsevier.es)
  • Modified Harris Hip Score Questionnaire (mHHS) is used to determine the functionality of the hip. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The mean Harris Hip Score improved from 45.5 preoperatively to 88.6 and last follow-up. (hindawi.com)
  • If you or a loved one has been implanted with the Tritanium hip replacement system and have experienced complications or adverse reactions, contact our attorneys today for a free consultation. (awkolaw.com)
  • You will also learn about the various potential long-term health complications associated with metal hip prosthesis. (jointspecialists.org)
  • Examine the patient walking and watch for antalgic gait, stride length, foot position, average walking speed, stance time,stride time,and any other gait deviations such as circumduction,hip hiking, or steppage gait during the swing phase. (wikidot.com)
  • For example, if a patient has limited AROM and PROM is hip abduction to 30 degrees it could just be due to tight hip adductors. (wikidot.com)
  • However, if the patients AROM is limited in abduction but PROM is within normal limits, this could indicate weakness of the hip abductors muscles. (wikidot.com)
  • If your bone structure only allows a straight figure you might have to struggle in order to get larger hips. (infobarrel.com)
  • The only way you might be able to get larger hips is if you already have the bone structure and your excess fat is covering up your hips. (infobarrel.com)
  • All range of motions can be assessed with the patient in supine except for hip extension range of motion which is measured in prone. (wikidot.com)