A guanidinium antihypertensive agent that acts by blocking adrenergic transmission. The precise mode of action is not clear.
Bretylium compounds are pharmaceutical agents, primarily used in the treatment of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias, that work by stabilizing the cardiac membrane and inhibiting the release of norepinephrine from sympathetic nerve endings.
A product of putrefaction. Poisonous.
An antihypertensive agent that acts by inhibiting selectively transmission in post-ganglionic adrenergic nerves. It is believed to act mainly by preventing the release of norepinephrine at nerve endings and causes depletion of norepinephrine in peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals as well as in tissues.
Tricyclic antidepressant similar in action and side effects to IMIPRAMINE. It may produce excitation.
A family of iminourea derivatives. The parent compound has been isolated from mushrooms, corn germ, rice hulls, mussels, earthworms, and turnip juice. Derivatives may have antiviral and antifungal properties.
Drugs used in the treatment of acute or chronic vascular HYPERTENSION regardless of pharmacological mechanism. Among the antihypertensive agents are DIURETICS; (especially DIURETICS, THIAZIDE); ADRENERGIC BETA-ANTAGONISTS; ADRENERGIC ALPHA-ANTAGONISTS; ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME INHIBITORS; CALCIUM CHANNEL BLOCKERS; GANGLIONIC BLOCKERS; and VASODILATOR AGENTS.
Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)
NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE service for health professionals and consumers. It links extensive information from the National Institutes of Health and other reviewed sources of information on specific diseases and conditions.
The state of the PENIS when the erectile tissue becomes filled or swollen (tumid) with BLOOD and causes the penis to become rigid and elevated. It is a complex process involving CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEMS; HORMONES; SMOOTH MUSCLES; and vascular functions.
The psychic drive or energy associated with sexual instinct in the broad sense (pleasure and love-object seeking). It may also connote the psychic energy associated with instincts in general that motivate behavior.
The external reproductive organ of males. It is composed of a mass of erectile tissue enclosed in three cylindrical fibrous compartments. Two of the three compartments, the corpus cavernosa, are placed side-by-side along the upper part of the organ. The third compartment below, the corpus spongiosum, houses the urethra.
Literary or artistic items having an erotic theme. It refers especially to books treating sexual love in a sensuous or voluptuous manner. (Webster, 3d ed)
The inability in the male to have a PENILE ERECTION due to psychological or organ dysfunction.

Drinking behaviour in the cat induced by renin, angiotensin I, II and isoprenaline. (1/17)

1. Angiotensin I, II and hog renin, infused into the lateral cerebral ventricles (I.C.V.) of water replete cats, each induced water drinking behaviour. 2. Intravenous infusion of high doses of angiotensin I or II also elicited a drinking response. The dipsogenic effect of I.V. renin was not marked. 3. Drinking in response to I.C.V. angiotensin II was abolished after autonomic ganglion blockade with I.V. hexamethonium or pempidine and was significantly reduced after I.V. atropine methonitrate. 4. The dipsogenic response to I.C.V. angiotensin II was unaffected by either peripheral adrenergic neurone blockade with I.V. bethanidine, alpha-adrenoceptor blockade with phentolamine or beta-adrenoceptor blockade with sotalol. 5. Atropine, atropine methonitrate, hexamethonium and pempidine given I.C.V did not inhibit the diposgenic response to I.C.V. angiotensin II. 6. Bethanidine I.C.V. produced a dose related reduction in the dipsogenic response to I.C.V. angiotensin II. 7. The alpha-adrenoceptor blocking agents tolazoline and phenoxybenzamine given I.C.V did not affect angiotensin induced drinking but the response was regularly inhibited by phentolamine I.C.V. 8. The beta-adrenoceptor blocking agents propranolol and practolol given I.C.V. each inhibited angiotensin induced drinking. The L-isomer of propranolol was a more effective blocker than the D-isomer. 9. Isoprenaline given I.C.V induced drinking in ten of sixteen cats. Subcutaneous administration of isoprenaline also elicited drinking but the onset of the response was delayed and the amount consumed slightly less than after I.C.V infusion.  (+info)

Effects of methyldopa on prolactin and growth hormone. (2/17)

The effects of administration of methyldopa on serum prolactin and growth hormone (GH) concentrations in hypertensive patients were studied. Single doses of methyldopa (750 or 1000 mg) significantly increased serum prolactin levels, peak concentrations occurring four to six hours after drug administrations. Long-term methyldopa treatment was associated with threefold to fourfold increases in basal prolactin levels compared with those in normal subjects. In patients treated with methyldopa for two to three weeks the GH response to insulin hypoglycaemia was significantly greater than in normal subjects and untreated hypertensive patients. In contrast, patients treated for prolonged periods (mean 13-4 months) had a GH reponse indistinguishable from normal.  (+info)

Factors predisposing to postural hypotensive symptoms in the treatment of high blood pressure. (3/17)

Symptoms due to orthostatic and exertional hypotension occurred in 23-4 per cent of 448 hypertensive patients treated with guanethidine, debrisoquine, or bethanidine. Symptoms were significantly more frequent in patients treated with guanethidine than in those treated with bethanidine or debrisoquine. Women rather than men and patients with radiological evidence of cardiomegaly, electrocardiographic evidence of left ventricular hypertrophy, or ST/T wave changes, developed these symptoms significantly more often than other patients. A raised blood urea was found more frequently in patients with postural hypotensive symptoms. Characteristically guanethidine produced early morning postural hypotensive symptoms, wheras hypotensive symptoms caused by bethanidine and debrisoquine occurred at other times of the day and particularly one to two hours after tablet ingestion. Debrisoquine and guanethidine had a significantly greater negative chronotropic effect than bethanidine. It is suggested that negative chronotropic effects of these drugs may potentiate hypotensive symptoms in patients with cardiovascular, renal, or cerebrovascular disease. It should be possible to minimize symptoms of postural hypotension by attention to predisposing factors and selection of treatment accordingly.  (+info)

The response of the circular muscle layer of the guinea-pig isolated vas deferens to transmural electrical stimulation. (4/17)

1 Four preparations are described for the isolation of the response of the circular muscle of the guinea-pig vas deferens. These are the ;Furchgott' strip, the ;Vane' strip, the chain preparation and the perfused preparation.2 The four preparations were stimulated transmurally with pulses of supramaximal voltage. The threshold pulse width to which the strips and the perfused preparation responded was 0.025 ms and the maximum responses occurred at 0.1 ms. The threshold frequency was 2 Hz for strip and perfused preparations, the maxima being 20 or 50 Hz for strip preparations and 100 Hz for perfused preparations. The effect of varying the number of pulses per train was also investigated on the perfused vas. Responses occurred to train lengths of 8, 16, 32, 128 pulses, the maximum response being given at 128 pulses at 100 Hz; 256 pulses per train did not produce a further increase in response. The perfused preparation exhibited an after-response at certain frequencies and train lengths.3 Tetrodotoxin and the local anaesthetics, procaine and lignocaine, reversibly abolished the responses of strip and perfused preparations to transmural stimulation.4 The response to intramural nerve fibre stimulation was abolished by guanethidine or bethanidine; this abolition was reversed by dexamphetamine. Noradrenaline contracted strip preparations of circular muscle and raised the pressure in perfused preparations; noradrenaline was competitively antagonized by thymoxamine. The major part of the motor innervation of the circular layer seems to be noradrenergic.  (+info)

Potassium channel blockade: A mechanism for suppressing ventricular fibrillation. (5/17)

The suppression of ventricular fibrillation by antidysrhythmic drugs is well correlated with their ability to block potassium channels in nerve and cardiac membranes. Blockade of potassium channels reduces electrical inhomogeneities in action potential and conduction parameters that lead to ventricular fibrillation. These actions tend to effectively decrease the electrical size of the heart, which suggests a mechanism for antifibrillatory drug action. The receptor sites for antifibrillatory drug action (IK blockade) appear to be on the outside of the cardiac membrane whereas receptors for antiarrhythmic drug action (INa blockade) appear to be on the inside of the cardiac membrane.  (+info)

Effect of mianserin hydrochloride on peripheral uptake mechanisms for noradrenaline and 5-hydroxytryptamine in man. (6/17)

1. Mianserin seems to have little effect on peripheral noradrenaline (NA) re-uptake mechanisms as shown by its lack of effects on the tyramine dose and NA dose/pressor response. 2. Mianserin has no effect on the hypotensive action of bethanidine. 3. Mianserin in vivo has a significant action on platlet transport (Vmax) of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), which changes toward normal values in depressive patients on the drug. This action is not observed in vitro. 4. It is possible that a metabolite of mianserin is responsible for this effect, and that this may be of therapeutic importance.  (+info)

Cardiovascular responses to mianserin hydrochloride: a comparison with tricyclic antidepressant drugs. (7/17)

1. The cardiovascular responses of mianserin hydrochloride and tricyclic antidepressant drugs were investigated using non-invasive methods of cardiac investigation. A study of the interaction of mianserin and antihypertensive drug therapy is reported. 2. In six normal volunteers, mianserin hydrochloride 20 mg was shown to prolong the corrected Q-T interval at 150 min (P less than 0.001). It did not affect heart rate, systolic time intervals or the peak normalized derivative of the apexcardiogram. Amitriptyline 50 mg increased the corrected pre-ejection period interval (PEPI) and the PEP/left ventricular ejection time (LVET) ratio of the systolic time intervals at 150 min (P less than 0.001). Q-T interval was shortened at 90 minutes. 3. In a double-blind patient study, clomipramine increased heart rate, P-R interval, QRS and corrected Q-T interval in one patient at 2 weeks. Mianserin prolonged corrected Q-T interval at 1 week but this returned to the pretreatment time by 2 weeks in two patients. 4. In an open study, mianserin 20 mg three times daily did not antagonize the hypotensive action of propranolol or propranolol and hydrallazine in three patients. 5. In a double-blind study in three patients with desmethylimipramine 25 mg three times daily, mianserin 20 mg three times daily did not antagonize the hypotensive action of either guanethidine or bethanidine.  (+info)

New drugs in hypertension. (8/17)

Clonidine, propranolol, bethanidine and debrisoquine effectively decrease blood pressure by suppressing renin secretion or interfering with function of the sympathetic nervous system. In man these compounds exert an antihypertensive effect within several hours or days and their duration of action is sufficient to permit administration twice or thrice daily. Clonidine and propranolol are especially useful if sexual dysfunction or postural hypotension is undesirable. Although bethanidine and debrisoquine may produce these adverse effects, they are beneficial in severe hypertension and produce fewer side effects than guanethidine. Clonidine frequently causes sedation, and rebound hypertension may occur with sudden cessation of therapy. Injudicious use of propranolol may provoke heart failure or asthma in susceptible individuals. The combination of a thiazide diuretic with propranolol and one of hydralazine, bethanidine and debrisoquine may be used to treat severe or complicated hypertension.  (+info)

Bethanidine is a non-cardioselective, moderately potent, short-acting antihypertensive drug. It belongs to the class of medications known as ganglionic blockers, which work by blocking the action of certain nerves in the body, leading to a decrease in blood pressure.

Bethanidine is used to treat high blood pressure and has been used in the management of symptoms associated with congestive heart failure. However, its use has declined over the years due to the availability of safer and more effective antihypertensive medications.

Like other ganglionic blockers, bethanidine can cause side effects such as dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, difficulty urinating, dizziness, and weakness. It should be used with caution in patients with certain medical conditions, including kidney or liver disease, narrow-angle glaucoma, and bladder neck obstruction.

It is important to note that bethanidine is not commonly used in clinical practice today due to its potential for serious side effects and the availability of safer alternatives.

Bretylium compounds are a class of medications that are primarily used in the management of life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias (abnormal heart rhythms). Bretylium tosylate is the most commonly used formulation. It works by stabilizing the membranes of certain types of heart cells, which can help to prevent or stop ventricular fibrillation and other dangerous arrhythmias.

Bretylium compounds are typically administered intravenously in a hospital setting under close medical supervision. They may be used in conjunction with other medications and treatments for the management of cardiac emergencies. It's important to note that bretylium compounds have a narrow therapeutic index, which means that the difference between an effective dose and a toxic one is relatively small. Therefore, they should only be administered by healthcare professionals who are experienced in their use.

Like all medications, bretylium compounds can cause side effects, including but not limited to:
- Increased heart rate
- Low blood pressure
- Nausea and vomiting
- Dizziness or lightheadedness
- Headache
- Tremors or muscle twitching
- Changes in mental status or behavior

Healthcare providers will monitor patients closely for any signs of adverse reactions while they are receiving bretylium compounds.

Methylguanidine is not typically referred to as a medical term, but it is a chemical compound that can be found in various biological samples. It is a product of protein breakdown and is commonly elevated in the context of renal insufficiency or failure. Therefore, methylguanidine may be mentioned in medical reports related to kidney function.

The ICD-10-CM (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification) code for "Elevated blood urea nitrogen and/or creatinine" is E87.6, which could include elevated methylguanidine levels as a consequence of renal dysfunction.

In summary, while methylguanidine itself is not a medical term, it can be relevant in the context of medical diagnostics and reports related to kidney function.

Guanethidine is an antihypertensive medication that belongs to the class of drugs known as ganglionic blockers or autonomic nervous system (ANS) inhibitors. It works by blocking the action of certain chemicals (neurotransmitters) in the body, which results in decreased blood pressure and heart rate.

Guanethidine is not commonly used today due to its side effects and the availability of safer and more effective antihypertensive medications. Its medical definition can be stated as:

A synthetic antihypertensive agent that acts by depleting norepinephrine stores in postganglionic adrenergic neurons, thereby blocking their activity. Guanethidine is used primarily in the treatment of hypertension and occasionally in the management of sympathetic nervous system-mediated conditions such as essential tremor or neurogenic pain.

Protriptyline is a tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) medication. It is primarily used to treat symptoms of depression, but it can also be used for other conditions such as anxiety disorders or to help manage chronic pain. Protriptyline works by increasing the levels of certain neurotransmitters in the brain, such as norepinephrine and serotonin, which can help to improve mood and reduce symptoms of depression.

Protriptyline has a sedating effect, so it may also be used to treat insomnia or agitation associated with depression. It is available in immediate-release tablet form and is typically taken two to four times per day. As with all medications, protriptyline can have side effects, including dry mouth, blurred vision, constipation, and dizziness. It may also cause cardiac arrhythmias and should be used with caution in patients with a history of heart disease.

It's important to note that the use of Protriptyline and other tricyclic antidepressants has declined over the years due to the development of newer classes of antidepressants, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), which have fewer side effects and are safer in overdose. However, protriptyline may still be prescribed in certain cases where other treatments have not been effective.

Guanidines are organic compounds that contain a guanidino group, which is a functional group with the formula -NH-C(=NH)-NH2. Guanidines can be found in various natural sources, including some animals, plants, and microorganisms. They also occur as byproducts of certain metabolic processes in the body.

In a medical context, guanidines are most commonly associated with the treatment of muscle weakness and neuromuscular disorders. The most well-known guanidine compound is probably guanidine hydrochloride, which has been used as a medication to treat conditions such as myasthenia gravis and Eaton-Lambert syndrome.

However, the use of guanidines as medications has declined in recent years due to their potential for toxicity and the development of safer and more effective treatments. Today, guanidines are mainly used in research settings to study various biological processes, including protein folding and aggregation, enzyme inhibition, and cell signaling.

Antihypertensive agents are a class of medications used to treat high blood pressure (hypertension). They work by reducing the force and rate of heart contractions, dilating blood vessels, or altering neurohormonal activation to lower blood pressure. Examples include diuretics, beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, ARBs, calcium channel blockers, and direct vasodilators. These medications may be used alone or in combination to achieve optimal blood pressure control.

An encyclopedia is a comprehensive reference work containing articles on various topics, usually arranged in alphabetical order. In the context of medicine, a medical encyclopedia is a collection of articles that provide information about a wide range of medical topics, including diseases and conditions, treatments, tests, procedures, and anatomy and physiology. Medical encyclopedias may be published in print or electronic formats and are often used as a starting point for researching medical topics. They can provide reliable and accurate information on medical subjects, making them useful resources for healthcare professionals, students, and patients alike. Some well-known examples of medical encyclopedias include the Merck Manual and the Stedman's Medical Dictionary.

MedlinePlus is not a medical term, but rather a consumer health website that provides high-quality, accurate, and reliable health information, written in easy-to-understand language. It is produced by the U.S. National Library of Medicine, the world's largest medical library, and is widely recognized as a trusted source of health information.

MedlinePlus offers information on various health topics, including conditions, diseases, tests, treatments, and wellness. It also provides access to drug information, medical dictionary, and encyclopedia, as well as links to clinical trials, medical news, and patient organizations. The website is available in both English and Spanish and can be accessed for free.

Penile erection is a physiological response that involves the engagement of the corpus cavernosum and spongiosum (erectile tissue) of the penis with blood, leading to its stiffness and rigidity. This process is primarily regulated by the autonomic nervous system and is influenced by factors such as sexual arousal, emotional state, and certain medications or medical conditions. A penile erection may also occur in non-sexual situations, such as during sleep (nocturnal penile tumescence) or due to other physical stimuli.

Libido, in medical and psychological terms, refers to a person's overall sexual drive or desire for sexual activity. This term was first introduced by Sigmund Freud in his psychoanalytic theory, where he described it as one of the three components of human personality. Libido is influenced by biological, psychological, and social factors, and can vary significantly among individuals. It's important to note that a low or absent libido does not necessarily indicate an underlying medical issue, but could be a result of various factors such as stress, fatigue, relationship issues, mental health disorders, or hormonal imbalances. If you have concerns about your libido, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional for a proper evaluation and guidance.

The penis is a part of the male reproductive and urinary systems. It has three parts: the root, the body, and the glans. The root attaches to the pelvic bone and the body makes up the majority of the free-hanging portion. The glans is the cone-shaped end that protects the urethra, the tube inside the penis that carries urine from the bladder and semen from the testicles.

The penis has a dual function - it acts as a conduit for both urine and semen. During sexual arousal, the penis becomes erect when blood fills two chambers inside its shaft. This process is facilitated by the relaxation of the smooth muscles in the arterial walls and the trappping of blood in the corpora cavernosa. The stiffness of the penis enables sexual intercourse. After ejaculation, or when the sexual arousal passes, the muscles contract and the blood flows out of the penis back into the body, causing it to become flaccid again.

The foreskin, a layer of skin that covers the glans, is sometimes removed in a procedure called circumcision. Circumcision is often performed for religious or cultural reasons, or as a matter of family custom. In some countries, it's also done for medical reasons, such as to treat conditions like phimosis (an inability to retract the foreskin) or balanitis (inflammation of the glans).

It's important to note that any changes in appearance, size, or function of the penis should be evaluated by a healthcare professional, as they could indicate an underlying medical condition.

Erotica is a genre of literature, art, photographs, films, or other media that depicts sexual subject matter in an artistic or aesthetically appealing way. It is intended to evoke sexual feelings and can be used as a means of exploring one's own sexuality or enhancing a romantic relationship. Erotica differs from pornography in that it generally places greater emphasis on the emotional, romantic, or sensual aspects of sexuality, rather than simply focusing on explicit sexual acts.

It is important to note that what may be considered erotic by one person may not be perceived as such by another, and individual preferences can vary widely. Additionally, while some people find erotica to be a healthy and enjoyable form of sexual expression, others may have reservations about its use due to personal, cultural, or religious beliefs.

In medical contexts, the term "erotica" is not typically used, as it is more commonly found in discussions related to art, literature, and media. However, mental health professionals may discuss clients' experiences with erotica as part of a broader conversation about sexuality, relationships, and personal values.

Erectile dysfunction (ED) is the inability to achieve or maintain an erection sufficient for satisfactory sexual performance. It can have physical and psychological causes, such as underlying health conditions like diabetes, heart disease, obesity, and mental health issues like stress, anxiety, and depression. ED can also be a side effect of certain medications. Treatment options include lifestyle changes, medication, counseling, and in some cases, surgery.

... (or betanidine) is a sympatholytic drug. Phenoxybenzamine Prichard BN, Johnston AW, Hill ID, Rosenheim ML (January ... 1968). "Bethanidine, Guanethidine, and Methyldopa in Treatment of Hypertension: a Within-patient Comparison". British Medical ...
Examples of these agents include bethanidine, bretylium, debrisoquine, guanadrel, guanazodine, guancydine, guanethidine, ...
Bethanidine Bretylium Guanadrel Guanazodine Guanclofine Guanethidine Guanoxan Oxidopamine (6-hydroxydopamine) Prischich, Davia ...
... bethanidine MeSH D02.078.370.141 - biguanides MeSH D02.078.370.141.075 - buformin MeSH D02.078.370.141.100 - chlorhexidine MeSH ...
The molecular formula C10H15N3 (molar mass: 177.25 g/mol, exact mass: 177.1266 u) may refer to: Bethanidine (or betanidine) TC- ...
Bethanidine (or betanidine) is a sympatholytic drug. Phenoxybenzamine Prichard BN, Johnston AW, Hill ID, Rosenheim ML (January ... 1968). "Bethanidine, Guanethidine, and Methyldopa in Treatment of Hypertension: a Within-patient Comparison". British Medical ...
Bethanidine. *Bumetanide (Bumex). *Captopril (Capoten). *Chlorothiazide (Diuril). *Chlorthalidone (Hygroton). *Clonidine ( ...
Detailed drug Information for Duo-Vil 2-25. Includes common brand names, drug descriptions, warnings, side effects and dosing information.
Other names: 2-Benzyl-1,3-dimethylguanidine; Guanidine, N,N-dimethyl-N-(phenylmethyl)-; Bethanidine; 1-Benzyl-2,3- ...
Activity enhancers: BPAP • PPAP; Release blockers: Bethanidine • Bretylium • Guanadrel • Guanazodine • Guanclofine • ...
Cristodorescu R. [Use of bethanidine sulfate in the treatment of arterial hypertension]. Rev Med Interna Neurol Psihiatr ...
Call your doctor about all medications you use, especially apraclonidine, brimonidine, buspirone, bethanidine, bupropion, ...
A strong organic base existing primarily as guanidium ions at physiological pH. It is found in the urine as a normal product of protein metabolism. It is also used in laboratory research as a protein denaturant. (From Martindale, the Extra Pharmacopoeia, 30th ed and Merck Index, 12th ed) It is also used in the treatment of myasthenia and as a fluorescent probe in HPLC ...
Wiki-wiki: a wiki resource centered on human protein-protein interactions
Wiki-wiki: a wiki resource centered on human protein-protein interactions
Descritores em Ciências da Saúde
Bethanidine. CN\C(NCC1=CC=CC=C1)=N/C. 39. Approved. SmallMoleculeDrug. DB09195. Lorpiprazole. [H][C@@]12CCC[C@]1([H])C1=NN=C( ...
Bethanidine [D02.078.370.120] * Biguanides [D02.078.370.141] * Cimetidine [D02.078.370.200] * Creatine [D02.078.370.280] ...
According to a 1996 article in The Journal of Neurochemistry, the promoter region of the SLC6A4 gene contains a polymorphism with "short" and "long" repeats in a region: 5-HTT-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR or SERTPR).[29] The short variation has 14 repeats of a sequence while the long variation has 16 repeats.[27] A second 1996 article stated that the short variation leads to less transcription for SLC6A4, and it has been found that it can partly account for anxiety-related personality traits.[30] This polymorphism has been extensively investigated in over 300 scientific studies (as of 2006).[31] The 5-HTTLPR polymorphism may be subdivided further: One study published in 2000 found 14 allelic variants (14-A, 14-B, 14-C, 14-D, 15, 16-A, 16-B, 16-C, 16-D, 16-E, 16-F, 19, 20 and 22) in a group of around 200 Japanese and Caucasian people.[27] In addition to altering the expression of SERT protein and concentrations of extracellular serotonin in the brain, the 5-HTTLPR variation is associated ...
Methyldopa or bethanidine or debriso- quine, with or without thiazide diuretics vs no treatment. United Kingdom. ,14 d. 4 y. ...
High blood pressure medicines and diuretics (water pills): Atenolol (Tenormin) Bethanidine Bumetanide (Bumex) Captopril ( ...
This product may diminish the antihypertensive effects of guanethidine, bethanidine, methyldopa and reserpine. ...
Bethanidine. The therapeutic efficacy of Iobenguane can be decreased when used in combination with Bethanidine. ...
Bethanidine (MeSH Term). *bietaserpine (Supplementary Concept). *bimakalim (Supplementary Concept). *Bimatoprost (MeSH Term) ...
BETHANIDINE AND ITS SALTS. BLEOMYCINS, THEIR SALTS AND. DERIVATIVES. (C) BOLANDIOL AND ITS. DERIVATIVES. (C) BOLASTERONE. (C) ...
Bethanidine_Sulfate,create,30-MAR-07,(null),(null) C65261,Betiatide,create,30-MAR-07,(null),(null) C65262,Bifeprunox,create,30- ...
Bethanidine Current Synonym true false 2154730010 Betanidine Current Synonym true false 2155737017 Bethanidine Current Synonym ...
Bethanidine Sulfate Narrower Concept UI. M0002445. Registry Number. J4THI5N7O2. Terms. Bethanidine Sulfate Preferred Term Term ... Bethanidine Sulfate Bethanidine, Sulfate (2:1) Pharm Action. Antihypertensive Agents. Sympatholytics. Adrenergic Agents. ... Bethanidine, Sulfate (2:1) Term UI T361044. Date09/13/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1999). ... Bethanidine Preferred Concept UI. M0002444. Registry Number. W8S3YM7AUU. Related Numbers. 114-85-2. 55-73-2. J4THI5N7O2. Scope ...
Bethanidine Sulfate Narrower Concept UI. M0002445. Registry Number. J4THI5N7O2. Terms. Bethanidine Sulfate Preferred Term Term ... Bethanidine Sulfate Bethanidine, Sulfate (2:1) Pharm Action. Antihypertensive Agents. Sympatholytics. Adrenergic Agents. ... Bethanidine, Sulfate (2:1) Term UI T361044. Date09/13/1999. LexicalTag NON. ThesaurusID NLM (1999). ... Bethanidine Preferred Concept UI. M0002444. Registry Number. W8S3YM7AUU. Related Numbers. 114-85-2. 55-73-2. J4THI5N7O2. Scope ...
Bethanidine - Preferred Concept UI. M0002444. Scope note. A guanidinium antihypertensive agent that acts by blocking adrenergic ... Bethanidine Sulfate - Narrower Concept UI. M0002445. Preferred term. Bethanidine Sulfate Entry term(s). Bethanidine, Sulfate (2 ...
Bethanidine. For the treatment of hypertension.. Guanidine. A strong organic base used to treat muscle weakness and fatigue ...
High blood pressure medications (Bethanidine, bumetanide, captopril). *Recreational substances (nicotine, amphetamines, alcohol ...
Bethanidine (Robins) is similar in action to guanethidine, but unlike the latter compound, it is short acting. It is being used ... Because the action of bethanidine lasts only 6 to 8 hours, a smaller dose can be given on arising, and larger doses later in ... Bethanidine also is said to produce less effect on large bowel motility than guanethidine. Propranolol (inderal) is being ... Both bethanidine and propranolol are currently being evaluated in controlled trials by the VA Study Group on Antihypertensive ...
Inform your doctor if you are taking: apraclonidine, brimonidine, buspirone, bethanidine, bupropion, carbamazepine, entacapone ...
Inform your doctor if you are taking: apraclonidine, brimonidine, buspirone, bethanidine, bupropion, carbamazepine, entacapone ...
ADRENERGIC AGENTS BETHANIDINE ADRENERGIC AGENTS BISOPROLOL ADRENERGIC AGENTS BRETYLIUM TOSYLATE ADRENERGIC AGENTS BUPRANOLOL ... AUTONOMIC AGENTS BETHANIDINE AUTONOMIC AGENTS BIPERIDEN AUTONOMIC AGENTS BISOPROLOL AUTONOMIC AGENTS BRONCHOCONSTRICTOR AGENTS ... CARDIOVASCULAR AGENTS BETHANIDINE CARDIOVASCULAR AGENTS BISOPROLOL CARDIOVASCULAR AGENTS BRETYLIUM TOSYLATE CARDIOVASCULAR ... ANTIHYPERTENSIVE AGENTS BETHANIDINE ANTIHYPERTENSIVE AGENTS BISOPROLOL ANTIHYPERTENSIVE AGENTS BRETYLIUM TOSYLATE ...
Copyright© Thomas Jefferson University. All Rights Reserved.. The Thomas Jefferson University web site, its contents and programs, is provided for informational and educational purposes only and is not intended as medical advice nor is it intended to create any physician-patient relationship. Please remember that this information should not substitute for a visit or a consultation with a health care provider. The views or opinions expressed in the resources provided do not necessarily reflect those of Thomas Jefferson University, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, or the Jefferson Health System or staff ...
An antihypertensive agent that acts by inhibiting selectively transmission in post-ganglionic adrenergic nerves. It is believed to act mainly by preventing the release of norepinephrine at nerve endings and causes depletion of norepinephrine in peripheral sympathetic nerve terminals as well as in tissues ...
This graph shows the total number of publications written about "Robenidine" by people in this website by year, and whether "Robenidine" was a major or minor topic of these publications ...
Wiki-wiki: a wiki resource centered on human protein-protein interactions
  • Cristodorescu R. [Use of bethanidine sulfate in the treatment of arterial hypertension]. (medscape.com)
  • Bethanidine (or betanidine) is a sympatholytic drug. (wikipedia.org)