Betazole: A histamine H2 agonist used clinically to test gastric secretory function.Ranitidine: A non-imidazole blocker of those histamine receptors that mediate gastric secretion (H2 receptors). It is used to treat gastrointestinal ulcers.Histamine H2 Antagonists: Drugs that selectively bind to but do not activate histamine H2 receptors, thereby blocking the actions of histamine. Their clinically most important action is the inhibition of acid secretion in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers. Smooth muscle may also be affected. Some drugs in this class have strong effects in the central nervous system, but these actions are not well understood.Cimetidine: A histamine congener, it competitively inhibits HISTAMINE binding to HISTAMINE H2 RECEPTORS. Cimetidine has a range of pharmacological actions. It inhibits GASTRIC ACID secretion, as well as PEPSIN and GASTRIN output.Bismuth: A metallic element that has the atomic symbol Bi, atomic number 83 and atomic weight 208.98.Anti-Ulcer Agents: Various agents with different action mechanisms used to treat or ameliorate PEPTIC ULCER or irritation of the gastrointestinal tract. This has included ANTIBIOTICS to treat HELICOBACTER INFECTIONS; HISTAMINE H2 ANTAGONISTS to reduce GASTRIC ACID secretion; and ANTACIDS for symptomatic relief.Famotidine: A competitive histamine H2-receptor antagonist. Its main pharmacodynamic effect is the inhibition of gastric secretion.Duodenal Ulcer: A PEPTIC ULCER located in the DUODENUM.Pharmacology, Clinical: The branch of pharmacology that deals directly with the effectiveness and safety of drugs in humans.Dose-Response Relationship, Drug: The relationship between the dose of an administered drug and the response of the organism to the drug.Gastric Acid: Hydrochloric acid present in GASTRIC JUICE.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Tablets: Solid dosage forms, of varying weight, size, and shape, which may be molded or compressed, and which contain a medicinal substance in pure or diluted form. (Dorland, 28th ed)Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled: The largest family of cell surface receptors involved in SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION. They share a common structure and signal through HETEROTRIMERIC G-PROTEINS.Drugs, Essential: Drugs considered essential to meet the health needs of a population as well as to control drug costs.Suramin: A polyanionic compound with an unknown mechanism of action. It is used parenterally in the treatment of African trypanosomiasis and it has been used clinically with diethylcarbamazine to kill the adult Onchocerca. (From AMA Drug Evaluations Annual, 1992, p1643) It has also been shown to have potent antineoplastic properties.United States Food and Drug Administration: An agency of the PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE concerned with the overall planning, promoting, and administering of programs pertaining to maintaining standards of quality of foods, drugs, therapeutic devices, etc.Baclofen: A GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID derivative that is a specific agonist of GABA-B RECEPTORS. It is used in the treatment of MUSCLE SPASTICITY, especially that due to SPINAL CORD INJURIES. Its therapeutic effects result from actions at spinal and supraspinal sites, generally the reduction of excitatory transmission.Ligands: A molecule that binds to another molecule, used especially to refer to a small molecule that binds specifically to a larger molecule, e.g., an antigen binding to an antibody, a hormone or neurotransmitter binding to a receptor, or a substrate or allosteric effector binding to an enzyme. Ligands are also molecules that donate or accept a pair of electrons to form a coordinate covalent bond with the central metal atom of a coordination complex. (From Dorland, 27th ed)BooksLaryngopharyngeal Reflux: Back flow of gastric contents to the LARYNGOPHARYNX where it comes in contact with tissues of the upper aerodigestive tract. Laryngopharyngeal reflux is an extraesophageal manifestation of GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX.Hypopharynx: The bottom portion of the pharynx situated below the OROPHARYNX and posterior to the LARYNX. The hypopharynx communicates with the larynx through the laryngeal inlet, and is also called laryngopharynx.Halitosis: An offensive, foul breath odor resulting from a variety of causes such as poor oral hygiene, dental or oral infections, or the ingestion of certain foods.Gastroesophageal Reflux: Retrograde flow of gastric juice (GASTRIC ACID) and/or duodenal contents (BILE ACIDS; PANCREATIC JUICE) into the distal ESOPHAGUS, commonly due to incompetence of the LOWER ESOPHAGEAL SPHINCTER.Nose: A part of the upper respiratory tract. It contains the organ of SMELL. The term includes the external nose, the nasal cavity, and the PARANASAL SINUSES.Laryngeal Diseases: Pathological processes involving any part of the LARYNX which coordinates many functions such as voice production, breathing, swallowing, and coughing.Sulfur Compounds: Inorganic or organic compounds that contain sulfur as an integral part of the molecule.Histamine: An amine derived by enzymatic decarboxylation of HISTIDINE. It is a powerful stimulant of gastric secretion, a constrictor of bronchial smooth muscle, a vasodilator, and also a centrally acting neurotransmitter.Receptors, Histamine H1: A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Most histamine H1 receptors operate through the inositol phosphate/diacylglycerol second messenger system. Among the many responses mediated by these receptors are smooth muscle contraction, increased vascular permeability, hormone release, and cerebral glyconeogenesis. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)Parietal Cells, Gastric: Rounded or pyramidal cells of the GASTRIC GLANDS. They secrete HYDROCHLORIC ACID and produce gastric intrinsic factor, a glycoprotein that binds VITAMIN B12.Receptors, Histamine: Cell-surface proteins that bind histamine and trigger intracellular changes influencing the behavior of cells. Histamine receptors are widespread in the central nervous system and in peripheral tissues. Three types have been recognized and designated H1, H2, and H3. They differ in pharmacology, distribution, and mode of action.Receptors, Histamine H3: A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Histamine H3 receptors were first recognized as inhibitory autoreceptors on histamine-containing nerve terminals and have since been shown to regulate the release of several neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)Receptors, Histamine H2: A class of histamine receptors discriminated by their pharmacology and mode of action. Histamine H2 receptors act via G-proteins to stimulate ADENYLYL CYCLASES. Among the many responses mediated by these receptors are gastric acid secretion, smooth muscle relaxation, inotropic and chronotropic effects on heart muscle, and inhibition of lymphocyte function. (From Biochem Soc Trans 1992 Feb;20(1):122-5)Bibliometrics: The use of statistical methods in the analysis of a body of literature to reveal the historical development of subject fields and patterns of authorship, publication, and use. Formerly called statistical bibliography. (from The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Publications: Copies of a work or document distributed to the public by sale, rental, lease, or lending. (From ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p181)Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Gastroenterology: A subspecialty of internal medicine concerned with the study of the physiology and diseases of the digestive system and related structures (esophagus, liver, gallbladder, and pancreas).Publishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Diazepam: A benzodiazepine with anticonvulsant, anxiolytic, sedative, muscle relaxant, and amnesic properties and a long duration of action. Its actions are mediated by enhancement of GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID activity.NebraskaNordazepam: An intermediate in the metabolism of DIAZEPAM to OXAZEPAM. It may have actions similar to those of diazepam.Xenobiotics: Chemical substances that are foreign to the biological system. They include naturally occurring compounds, drugs, environmental agents, carcinogens, insecticides, etc.Diarylquinolines: A class of quinoline compounds defined by the presence of two aromatic ring structures which are attached via a side chain to carbon 3 of the qunolinyl structure. The two aromatic moieties are typically NAPTHALENE and BENZENE. Several compounds in this class are used as ANTITUBERCULAR AGENTS.Vitiligo: A disorder consisting of areas of macular depigmentation, commonly on extensor aspects of extremities, on the face or neck, and in skin folds. Age of onset is often in young adulthood and the condition tends to progress gradually with lesions enlarging and extending until a quiescent state is reached.Point-of-Care Systems: Laboratory and other services provided to patients at the bedside. These include diagnostic and laboratory testing using automated information entry.Software: Sequential operating programs and data which instruct the functioning of a digital computer.LaosHydrochloric Acid: A strong corrosive acid that is commonly used as a laboratory reagent. It is formed by dissolving hydrogen chloride in water. GASTRIC ACID is the hydrochloric acid component of GASTRIC JUICE.Burning Mouth Syndrome: A group of painful oral symptoms associated with a burning or similar sensation. There is usually a significant organic component with a degree of functional overlay; it is not limited to the psychophysiologic group of disorders.Gastric Juice: The liquid secretion of the stomach mucosa consisting of hydrochloric acid (GASTRIC ACID); PEPSINOGENS; INTRINSIC FACTOR; GASTRIN; MUCUS; and the bicarbonate ion (BICARBONATES). (From Best & Taylor's Physiological Basis of Medical Practice, 12th ed, p651)Blogging: Using an INTERNET based personal journal which may consist of reflections, comments, and often hyperlinks.Heartburn: Substernal pain or burning sensation, usually associated with regurgitation of gastric juice into the esophagus.Pruritus Vulvae: Intense itching of the external female genitals.

Effect of amodiaquine on gastric histamine methyltransferase and on histamine-stimulated gastric secretion. (1/2)

1 Amodiaquine was found to be a potent inhibitor in vitro of gastric histamine methyltransferase from human and canine corpus and from pig antrum. The ID50 for the enzyme, purified from pig antrum mucosa by ultracentrifugation and chromatography on DEAE-cellulose, was 2.5 muM. 2 In six dogs with Heidenhanin pouches the maximum secretory response to histamine (40 mug/kg i.m.) was augmented by i.m. injection of amodiaquine. The augmentation depended on the dose of amodiaquine, the optimum effect (40% increase in volume of gastric juice, 80% in acid output) being achieved with 2 mg/kg. The maximum secretory response to betazole was also enhanced by amodiaquine. 3 It was suggested that amodiaquine may enhance the histamine and betazole stimulated gastric secretion by an inhibition of gastric histamine methyltransferase in vivo.  (+info)

Pathophysiological responses to meals in the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome: I. Paradoxical postprandial inhibition of gastric secretion. (2/2)

The gastric acid, pepsin, and secretory volume output in response to a mixed meal were measured in six patients with Zollinger-Ellison syndrome caused by a gastrin-producing tumour proved subsequently at surgery. The patients were all normocalcaemic, and none had previous abdominal surgery. In four of the six patients, ingestion of the meal markedly inhibited the gastric secretory output, which decreased to below fasting levels, returning later to basal values. In two other patients, whose fasting acid output was considerably lower, the secretory output increased after the meal, but some inhibiton of gastric secretion was also apparent for variable intervals of time. The serum gastrin concentration in all patients remained essentially unchanged or increased after the meal. Two patients were restudied after successful removal of the duodenal gastrin-producing tumour, and in each the normal gastric secretory and gastrin-releasing responses were completely restored. Our studies suggest that, in patients with the Zollinger-Ellison syndrome caused by a gastrinoma, physiological regulatory mechanisms triggered by food reduce the continuous stimulation of gastric secretion caused by their tumoural hypergastrinaemia.  (+info)

*Betazole

... (also known as ametazole) is a histamine H2 receptor agonist. Betazole hydrochloride is known as gastramine and ... Betazole is used as a stimulant in preference to histamine because of its specificity for the H2 receptor and its advantage of ... The volume of acid secretion is measured following administration of betazole, diagnosis being secretion greater than 60% of ... Hammond JB, Offen WW (1988). "Effect of nizatidine and cimetidine on betazole-stimulated gastric secretion of normal subjects: ...

*Histamine H2 receptor

The drug betazole is an example of a histamine H2 receptor agonist. Histamine is a ubiquitous messenger molecule released from ...

*Histamine agonist

H2 : Betazole and Impromidine are examples of agonists used in diagnostics to increase histamine. H3 : Betahistine is a weak ...

*List of MeSH codes (D03)

... betazole MeSH D03.383.129.539.120 --- 4,5-dihydro-1-(3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl)-1h-pyrazol-3-amine MeSH D03.383.129.539.200 ...

*ATC code V04

V04CF01 Tuberculin V04CG01 Cation exchange resins V04CG02 Betazole V04CG03 Histamine phosphate V04CG04 Pentagastrin V04CG05 ...

*List of drugs: Be

Betaxon Betazole (INN) Bethanechol (INN) Betiatide (INN) Betimol Betnesol Betnovate Betoptic Pilo Betoptic S Betoxycaine (INN) ...

*Bromazepam

Stacher G; Stärker D (February 1974). "Inhibitory effect of bromazepam on basal and betazole-stimulated gastric acid secretion ...
You can see how much you comprehend about factors that affect teaching thanks to the quiz and corresponding worksheet. Since these tools are...
H2 receptors are positively coupled to adenylate cyclase via Gs. It is a potent stimulant of cAMP production, which leads to activation of protein kinase A. PKA functions to phosphorylate certain proteins, affecting their activity. The drug betazole is an example of a histamine H2 receptor agonist. Histamine is a ubiquitous messenger molecule released from mast cells, enterochromaffin-like cells, and neurons. Its various actions are mediated by histamine receptors H1, H2, H3 and H4. The histamine receptor H2 belongs to the rhodopsin-like family of G protein-coupled receptors. It is an integral membrane protein and stimulates gastric acid secretion. It also regulates gastrointestinal motility and intestinal secretion and is thought to be involved in regulating cell growth and differentiation. Histamine H2 receptors are expressed in the following tissues: Peripheral tissues Gastric parietal cells (oxyntic cells) Vascular smooth muscle Neutrophils Mast cells Heart Uterus Central nervous system ...

Betazole - WikipediaBetazole - Wikipedia

Betazole (also known as ametazole) is a histamine H2 receptor agonist. Betazole hydrochloride is known as gastramine and ... Betazole is used as a stimulant in preference to histamine because of its specificity for the H2 receptor and its advantage of ... The volume of acid secretion is measured following administration of betazole, diagnosis being secretion greater than 60% of ... Hammond JB, Offen WW (1988). "Effect of nizatidine and cimetidine on betazole-stimulated gastric secretion of normal subjects: ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betazole

هيستامين - المعرفةهيستامين - المعرفة

Agonists: Amthamine • Betazole • Dimaprit • Histamine • HTMT • Impromidine • UR-AK49. Antagonists: Cimetidine • Famotidine • ... البيتازول Betazole. وهو مماكب للهيستامين وينبه إفراز المعدة ولكنه لايحدث تأثيرات الهيستامين الأخرى ويستعمل كاختبار لوظيفة ...
more infohttps://www.marefa.org/%D9%87%D9%8A%D8%B3%D8%AA%D8%A7%D9%85%D9%8A%D9%86

Magnesium sulfate - WikipediaMagnesium sulfate - Wikipedia

Betazole. *Caffeine and sodium benzoate. *Cation exchange resins. *Histamine phosphate. *Methylthioninium chloride ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnesium_sulphate

Ranitidine - FDA prescribing information, side effects and usesRanitidine - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses

It appears that basal-, nocturnal-, and betazole-stimulated secretions are most sensitive to inhibition by Ranitidine, ... betazole, and pentagastrin, as shown in Table 2. ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/pro/ranitidine.html

Cimetidine Injection - FDA prescribing information, side effects and usesCimetidine Injection - FDA prescribing information, side effects and uses

When food and betazole were used to stimulate secretion, inhibition of hydrogen ion concentration usually ranged from 45 to 75 ... 3) Intrinsic Factor: Intrinsic factor secretion was studied with betazole as a stimulant. Oral cimetidine 300 mg inhibited the ... Chemically Stimulated: Oral cimetidine significantly inhibited gastric acid secretion stimulated by betazole (an isomer of ... rise in intrinsic factor concentration produced by betazole, but some intrinsic factor was secreted at all times. ...
more infohttps://www.drugs.com/pro/cimetidine-injection.html

DailyMed - CIMETIDINE tablet, film coatedDailyMed - CIMETIDINE tablet, film coated

When food and betazole were used to stimulate secretion, inhibition of hydrogen ion concentration usually ranged from 45% to 75 ... Betazole. 1.5 mg/kg (sc). 300 mg (po). 85% at 2 ½ hours. ... Intrinsic factor secretion was studied with betazole as a ... Cimetidine dosed at 300 mg orally inhibited the rise in intrinsic factor concentration produced by betazole, but some intrinsic ... Cimetidine administered orally significantly inhibited gastric acid secretion stimulated by betazole (an isomer of histamine), ...
more infohttps://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=9483c4be-f0c7-49ea-95d6-d4de6f79ef79

DailyMed - DERAMSILKRX ANODYNEXA PAK- diclofenac sodium delayed release tablets, ranitidine tablets, capsaicin cream kitDailyMed - DERAMSILKRX ANODYNEXA PAK- diclofenac sodium delayed release tablets, ranitidine tablets, capsaicin cream kit

It appears that basal-, nocturnal-, and betazole-stimulated secretions are most sensitive to inhibition by Ranitidine Tablets, ... betazole, and pentagastrin, as shown in Table 2. ...
more infohttps://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/drugInfo.cfm?setid=1b49b08b-8494-3f71-e054-00144ff88e88

Ranitidine Syrup (Ranitidine Oral Solution, USP) - Prescription DrugsRanitidine Syrup (Ranitidine Oral Solution, USP) - Prescription Drugs

It appears that basal-, nocturnal-, and betazole-stimulated secretions are most sensitive to inhibition by ranitidine, ... betazole, and pentagastrin, as shown in Table 2. ...
more infohttps://www.prescriptiondrugs.com/ranitidine-syrup-ranitidine-oral-solution-usp-2/

G Protein-Coupled Receptors as Targets for Approved Drugs: How Many Targets and How Many Drugs? | Molecular PharmacologyG Protein-Coupled Receptors as Targets for Approved Drugs: How Many Targets and How Many Drugs? | Molecular Pharmacology

TABLE 1 One hundred thirty-four GPCRs have FDA-approved drugs. Exceptions are those marked as follows: *, EMA approved; 1, approved in the United Kingdom by the The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA); 2, suramin is not listed in the FDAs Orange Book, but is distributed by the Centers for Disease Control and is listed as an essential medicine by the World Health Organization; and #, GABBR1 and 2 combine to form a single active signaling complex that is activated by baclofen. Entries in bold in indicate GPCRs considered primary targets for the listed drug based on affinity and/or functional response (in the majority of cases, both). Entries not in bold indicate GPCRs targeted by approved drugs but for which such an interaction is not likely a primary aspect of the intended therapeutic use of such drugs. ...
more infohttp://molpharm.aspetjournals.org/content/93/4/251/tab-figures-data

Irritation inside the nose - Doctors respondIrritation inside the nose - Doctors respond

Can betazole be applied on inner edges of nose in case of irritation? ... Betazole: Yes you can use it for your nose, especially if you have nasal allergies. ...
more infohttps://www.healthtap.com/topics/irritation-inside-the-nose

ZANTAC Oral   150 or 300 (ranitidine hydrochloride) Tablets, USP; ZANTAC|sup|®|/sup| 25 (ranitidine hydrochloride effervescent)...ZANTAC Oral 150 or 300 (ranitidine hydrochloride) Tablets, USP; ZANTAC|sup|®|/sup| 25 (ranitidine hydrochloride effervescent)...

It appears that basal-, nocturnal-, and betazole-stimulated secretions are most sensitive to inhibition by ZANTAC, responding ... betazole, and pentagastrin, as shown in Table 2. ...
more infohttps://gsksource.com/zantac_oral

Gastric tubes, meals, acid, and analysis: rise and decline | Clinical ChemistryGastric tubes, meals, acid, and analysis: rise and decline | Clinical Chemistry

Pentagastrin has supplanted secretagogues such as histamine and betazole; meal stimulation, tubeless tests, and other tests of ... Gastric stimulation with histamine, its analog (betazole, histalog), or a synthetic gastrin (pentagastrin)-currently the ...
more infohttp://clinchem.aaccjnls.org/content/43/5/837.long

Code System ConceptCode System Concept

Betazole (substance). Code System Preferred Concept Name. Betazole (substance). Concept Status. Published. ...
more infohttps://phinvads.cdc.gov/vads/ViewCodeSystemConcept.action?oid=2.16.840.1.113883.6.96&code=2125008

Histamine H2 receptor - WikipediaHistamine H2 receptor - Wikipedia

The drug betazole is an example of a histamine H2 receptor agonist. Histamine is a ubiquitous messenger molecule released from ...
more infohttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Histamine_H2_receptor

Code System ConceptCode System Concept

Betazole dihydrochloride Current Synonym true false 387766016 1H-Pyrazole-3-ethanamine dihydrochloride Current Synonym true ...
more infohttps://phinvads.cdc.gov/vads/ViewCodeSystemConcept.action?oid=2.16.840.1.113883.6.96&code=260241009

Human Metabolome Database: Showing metabocard for Nizatidine (HMDB0014723)Human Metabolome Database: Showing metabocard for Nizatidine (HMDB0014723)

The drug also decreases the gastric acid response to stimuli such as food, caffeine, insulin, betazole, or pentagastrin. ...
more infohttp://www.hmdb.ca/metabolites/HMDB0014723

oxatomide - meddicoxatomide - meddic

オキサトミド(Oxatomide)の検索ならお薬検索QLife(キューライフ)。お医者さんが処方する処方薬と、薬局で買
more infohttps://meddic.jp/oxatomide

Cimetidine - Uses, Dosage, Mechanism of Action, Side EffectsCimetidine - Uses, Dosage, Mechanism of Action, Side Effects

When food and betazole were used to stimulate secretion, inhibition of hydrogen ion concentration usually ranged from 45-75% ... Betazole. 1.5 mg/kg (sc). 300 mg (po). 85% at 2 1/2 hours. ... Intrinsic factor secretion was studied with betazole as a ... Oral Cimetidine 300 mg inhibited the rise in intrinsic factor concentration produced by betazole, but some intrinsic factor was ... Oral Cimetidine significantly inhibited gastric acid secretion stimulated by betazole (an isomer of histamine), pentagastrin, ...
more infohttps://healthjade.com/cimetidine/

ranitidine - meddicranitidine - meddic

Certain preparations of ranitidine are available over the counter (OTC) in various countries. In the United States, 75-mg and 150-mg tablets are available OTC. Zantac OTC is manufactured by Boehringer Ingelheim. In Australia, packs containing seven or 14 doses of the 150-mg tablet are available in supermarkets, small packs of 150-mg and 300-mg tablets are schedule 2 pharmacy medicines. Larger doses and pack sizes still require a prescription.. Outside the United States and Canada, ranitidine is combined with bismuth (which acts as a mild antibiotic) as a citrate salt (ranitidine bismuth citrate, Tritec), to treat Helicobacter pylori infections. This combination is usually given with clarithromycin, an antibiotic.. Ranitidine can also be coadministered with NSAIDs to reduce the risk of ulceration. Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are more effective for the prevention of NSAID-induced ulcers.[2]. Ranitidine can be administered preoperatively to reduce the risk of aspiration pneumonia. The drug not ...
more infohttps://meddic.jp/ranitidine

ketotifen - meddicketotifen - meddic

Ketotifen relieves and prevents eye itchiness and/or irritation associated with most seasonal allergies. It starts working within minutes after administering the drops. The drug has not been studied in children under three.[2] The mean elimination half life is 12 hours.[3] Besides its anti-histaminic activity, it is also a functional leukotriene antagonist and a phosphodiesterase inhibitor.. The drug may also help relieve the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.[4]. ...
more infohttps://meddic.jp/index.php/ketotifen

Robert N McClelland - Research Output
     - University of Texas Southwestern Medical CenterRobert N McClelland - Research Output - University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center

Richardson, C. T., Peters, M. N., Feldman, M., McClelland, R. N., Walsh, J. H., Cooper, K. A., Willeford, G., Dickerman, R. M. & Fordtran, J. S., Jan 1 1985, In : Gastroenterology. 89, 2, p. 357-367 11 p.. Research output: Contribution to journal › Article ...
more infohttps://utsouthwestern.pure.elsevier.com/en/persons/robert-n-mcclelland/publications/?ordering=publicationYearThenTitle&descending=false

Find Probiotic Garden Produce - Gro Find MeFind Probiotic Garden Produce - Gro Find Me

Betazole. *Caffeine and sodium benzoate. *Cation exchange resins. *Histamine phosphate. *Methylthioninium chloride ...
more infohttp://grofind.me/2018/01/01/find-probiotic-garden-produce/?rdp_we_resource=https%3A%2F%2Fen.wikipedia.org%2Fwiki%2FSodium_benzoate

Read eBooks online | World Heritage Encyclopedia | MetyraponeRead eBooks online | World Heritage Encyclopedia | Metyrapone

Betazole * Caffeine and sodium benzoate * Cation exchange resins * Histamine phosphate * Methylthioninium chloride ...
more infohttp://worldheritage.org/articles/eng/Metyrapone

The abnormal lower oesophageal sphincter in pernicious anaemia | GutThe abnormal lower oesophageal sphincter in pernicious anaemia | Gut

... no change in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure occurred in patients after stimulation with subcutaneous betazole (1·5 mg/kg ...
more infohttp://gut.bmj.com/content/14/10/767
  • The volume of acid secretion is measured following administration of betazole, diagnosis being secretion greater than 60% of the maximal acid secretion following betazole stimulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, no change in lower oesophageal sphincter pressure occurred in patients after stimulation with subcutaneous betazole (1·5 mg/kg). (bmj.com)