Beta Rhythm: Brain waves with frequency between 15-30 Hz seen on EEG during wakefulness and mental activity.Electroencephalography: Recording of electric currents developed in the brain by means of electrodes applied to the scalp, to the surface of the brain, or placed within the substance of the brain.Circadian Rhythm: The regular recurrence, in cycles of about 24 hours, of biological processes or activities, such as sensitivity to drugs and stimuli, hormone secretion, sleeping, and feeding.Nadolol: A non-selective beta-adrenergic antagonist with a long half-life, used in cardiovascular disease to treat arrhythmias, angina pectoris, and hypertension. Nadolol is also used for MIGRAINE DISORDERS and for tremor.Wine: Fermented juice of fresh grapes or of other fruit or plant products used as a beverage.Heart Rate: The number of times the HEART VENTRICLES contract per unit of time, usually per minute.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.Adrenergic beta-Antagonists: Drugs that bind to but do not activate beta-adrenergic receptors thereby blocking the actions of beta-adrenergic agonists. Adrenergic beta-antagonists are used for treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, angina pectoris, glaucoma, migraine headaches, and anxiety.Double-Blind Method: A method of studying a drug or procedure in which both the subjects and investigators are kept unaware of who is actually getting which specific treatment.Insulin-Secreting Cells: A type of pancreatic cell representing about 50-80% of the islet cells. Beta cells secrete INSULIN.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2: A subclass of DIABETES MELLITUS that is not INSULIN-responsive or dependent (NIDDM). It is characterized initially by INSULIN RESISTANCE and HYPERINSULINEMIA; and eventually by GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE; HYPERGLYCEMIA; and overt diabetes. Type II diabetes mellitus is no longer considered a disease exclusively found in adults. Patients seldom develop KETOSIS but often exhibit OBESITY.Insulin: A 51-amino acid pancreatic hormone that plays a major role in the regulation of glucose metabolism, directly by suppressing endogenous glucose production (GLYCOGENOLYSIS; GLUCONEOGENESIS) and indirectly by suppressing GLUCAGON secretion and LIPOLYSIS. Native insulin is a globular protein comprised of a zinc-coordinated hexamer. Each insulin monomer containing two chains, A (21 residues) and B (30 residues), linked by two disulfide bonds. Insulin is used as a drug to control insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DIABETES MELLITUS, TYPE 1).Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.Islets of Langerhans: Irregular microscopic structures consisting of cords of endocrine cells that are scattered throughout the PANCREAS among the exocrine acini. Each islet is surrounded by connective tissue fibers and penetrated by a network of capillaries. There are four major cell types. The most abundant beta cells (50-80%) secrete INSULIN. Alpha cells (5-20%) secrete GLUCAGON. PP cells (10-35%) secrete PANCREATIC POLYPEPTIDE. Delta cells (~5%) secrete SOMATOSTATIN.Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1: A subtype of DIABETES MELLITUS that is characterized by INSULIN deficiency. It is manifested by the sudden onset of severe HYPERGLYCEMIA, rapid progression to DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS, and DEATH unless treated with insulin. The disease may occur at any age, but is most common in childhood or adolescence.Rhode IslandNeurosciences: The scientific disciplines concerned with the embryology, anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, pharmacology, etc., of the nervous system.Osteogenesis, Distraction: Bone lengthening by gradual mechanical distraction. An external fixation device produces the distraction across the bone plate. The technique was originally applied to long bones but in recent years the method has been adapted for use with mandibular implants in maxillofacial surgery.Brain: The part of CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that is contained within the skull (CRANIUM). Arising from the NEURAL TUBE, the embryonic brain is comprised of three major parts including PROSENCEPHALON (the forebrain); MESENCEPHALON (the midbrain); and RHOMBENCEPHALON (the hindbrain). The developed brain consists of CEREBRUM; CEREBELLUM; and other structures in the BRAIN STEM.Brain Chemistry: Changes in the amounts of various chemicals (neurotransmitters, receptors, enzymes, and other metabolites) specific to the area of the central nervous system contained within the head. These are monitored over time, during sensory stimulation, or under different disease states.Authorship: The profession of writing. Also the identity of the writer as the creator of a literary production.Neurofeedback: A technique to self-regulate brain activities provided as a feedback in order to better control or enhance one's own performance, control or function. This is done by trying to bring brain activities into a range associated with a desired brain function or status.Biofeedback, Psychology: The therapy technique of providing the status of one's own AUTONOMIC NERVOUS SYSTEM function (e.g., skin temperature, heartbeats, brain waves) as visual or auditory feedback in order to self-control related conditions (e.g., hypertension, migraine headaches).Imagery (Psychotherapy): The use of mental images produced by the imagination as a form of psychotherapy. It can be classified by the modality of its content: visual, verbal, auditory, olfactory, tactile, gustatory, or kinesthetic. Common themes derive from nature imagery (e.g., forests and mountains), water imagery (e.g., brooks and oceans), travel imagery, etc. Imagery is used in the treatment of mental disorders and in helping patients cope with other diseases. Imagery often forms a part of HYPNOSIS, of AUTOGENIC TRAINING, of RELAXATION TECHNIQUES, and of BEHAVIOR THERAPY. (From Encyclopedia of Human Behavior, vol. 4, pp29-30, 1994)Stroke: A group of pathological conditions characterized by sudden, non-convulsive loss of neurological function due to BRAIN ISCHEMIA or INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES. Stroke is classified by the type of tissue NECROSIS, such as the anatomic location, vasculature involved, etiology, age of the affected individual, and hemorrhagic vs. non-hemorrhagic nature. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp777-810)Alpha Rhythm: Brain waves characterized by a relatively high voltage or amplitude and a frequency of 8-13 Hz. They constitute the majority of waves recorded by EEG registering the activity of the parietal and occipital lobes when the individual is awake, but relaxed with the eyes closed.Feasibility Studies: Studies to determine the advantages or disadvantages, practicability, or capability of accomplishing a projected plan, study, or project.Tachycardia, Atrioventricular Nodal Reentry: Abnormally rapid heartbeats caused by reentry of atrial impulse into the dual (fast and slow) pathways of ATRIOVENTRICULAR NODE. The common type involves a blocked atrial impulse in the slow pathway which reenters the fast pathway in a retrograde direction and simultaneously conducts to the atria and the ventricles leading to rapid HEART RATE of 150-250 beats per minute.Evoked Potentials, Somatosensory: The electric response evoked in the CEREBRAL CORTEX by stimulation along AFFERENT PATHWAYS from PERIPHERAL NERVES to CEREBRUM.Somatosensory Cortex: Area of the parietal lobe concerned with receiving sensations such as movement, pain, pressure, position, temperature, touch, and vibration. It lies posterior to the central sulcus.Unconscious (Psychology): Those forces and content of the mind which are not ordinarily available to conscious awareness or to immediate recall.Electric Stimulation: Use of electric potential or currents to elicit biological responses.Brain Mapping: Imaging techniques used to colocalize sites of brain functions or physiological activity with brain structures.Consciousness: Sense of awareness of self and of the environment.PubMed: A bibliographic database that includes MEDLINE as its primary subset. It is produced by the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), part of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. PubMed, which is searchable through NLM's Web site, also includes access to additional citations to selected life sciences journals not in MEDLINE, and links to other resources such as the full-text of articles at participating publishers' Web sites, NCBI's molecular biology databases, and PubMed Central.Periodicals as Topic: A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.BooksPublishing: "The business or profession of the commercial production and issuance of literature" (Webster's 3d). It includes the publisher, publication processes, editing and editors. Production may be by conventional printing methods or by electronic publishing.MEDLINE: The premier bibliographic database of the NATIONAL LIBRARY OF MEDICINE. MEDLINE® (MEDLARS Online) is the primary subset of PUBMED and can be searched on NLM's Web site in PubMed or the NLM Gateway. MEDLINE references are indexed with MEDICAL SUBJECT HEADINGS (MeSH).Serial Publications: Publications in any medium issued in successive parts bearing numerical or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. (ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983, p203)Biological Science Disciplines: All of the divisions of the natural sciences dealing with the various aspects of the phenomena of life and vital processes. The concept includes anatomy and physiology, biochemistry and biophysics, and the biology of animals, plants, and microorganisms. It should be differentiated from BIOLOGY, one of its subdivisions, concerned specifically with the origin and life processes of living organisms.Yoga: A major orthodox system of Hindu philosophy based on Sankhya (metaphysical dualism) but differing from it in being theistic and characterized by the teaching of raja-yoga as a practical method of liberating the self. It includes a system of exercises for attaining bodily or mental control and well-being with liberation of the self and union with the universal spirit. (From Webster, 3d ed)Mental Health: The state wherein the person is well adjusted.Anxiety: Feeling or emotion of dread, apprehension, and impending disaster but not disabling as with ANXIETY DISORDERS.Mental Disorders: Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.Anxiety Disorders: Persistent and disabling ANXIETY.Mental Health Services: Organized services to provide mental health care.Mind-Body Therapies: Treatment methods or techniques which are based on the knowledge of mind and body interactions. These techniques can be used to reduce the feeling of tension and effect of stress, and to enhance the physiological and psychological well-being of an individual.Finches: Common name for small PASSERIFORMES in the family Fringillidae. They have a short stout bill (BEAK) adapted for crushing SEEDS. Some species of Old World finches are called CANARIES.Vocalization, Animal: Sounds used in animal communication.Encyclopedias as Topic: Works containing information articles on subjects in every field of knowledge, usually arranged in alphabetical order, or a similar work limited to a special field or subject. (From The ALA Glossary of Library and Information Science, 1983)Songbirds: PASSERIFORMES of the suborder, Oscines, in which the flexor tendons of the toes are separate, and the lower syrinx has 4 to 9 pairs of tensor muscles inserted at both ends of the tracheal half rings. They include many commonly recognized birds such as CROWS; FINCHES; robins; SPARROWS; and SWALLOWS.Learning: Relatively permanent change in behavior that is the result of past experience or practice. The concept includes the acquisition of knowledge.High Vocal Center: Nucleus in the NEOSTRIATUM of bird brains that sends signals for song production and receives auditory input. In some adult SONGBIRDS, research has shown that the size of this nucleus changes seasonally and that it exhibits neurogenesis.

Anaesthetic/amnesic agents disrupt beta frequency oscillations associated with potentiation of excitatory synaptic potentials in the rat hippocampal slice. (1/161)

1. Anaesthetic agents produce disruption in cognitive function typified by reductions in sensory perception and memory formation. Oscillations within the EEG gamma and beta bands have been linked to sensory perception and memory and have been shown to be modified by anaesthetic agents. 2. Synchronous gamma oscillations generated by brief tetanic stimulation in two regions of hippocampal area CA1 in slices in vitro were seen to potentiate excitatory synaptic communication between the areas. This synaptic potentiation, was seen to contribute to a transition from gamma frequency (30 - 70 Hz) to beta frequency (12 - 30 Hz) oscillations. 3. Four drugs having anaesthetic/hypnotic and amnesic properties were tested on this synchronous gamma-induced beta oscillation. Thiopental 10 - 200 microM, Diazepam 0.05 - 1.0 microM, Morphine 10 - 200 microM, and Ketamine 10 - 200 microM were all added to the bathing medium. Each drug markedly disrupted the formation of beta oscillations in a manner consistent with their primary modes of action. Thiopental and morphine disrupted synchrony of gamma oscillations and prevented potentiation of recurrent excitatory potentials measured in stratum oriens (fEPSPs). Neither diazepam, nor ketamine produced such marked changes in synchrony at gamma frequencies or reduction in potentiation of fEPSPs. However, each disrupted expression of subsequent beta oscillation via changes in the magnitude of inhibitory network gamma oscillations and the duration and magnitude of tetanus-induced depolarization respectively. 4. The degree of disruption of fEPSP potentiation correlated quantitatively with the degree of disruption in synchrony between sites during gamma oscillations. The data indicate that synchronous gamma-induced beta oscillations represent a mode of expression of excitatory synaptic potentiation in the hippocampus, and that anaesthetic/amnesic agents can disrupt this process markedly.  (+info)

Investigation of nonlinear ECoG changes during spontaneous sleep state changes and cortical arousal in fetal sheep. (2/161)

We examined the processes of cortical activation and deactivation of the fetal brain during spontaneous sleep state transitions and during central nervous processing of vibroacoustic stimulations (VASs) using nonlinear analysis of the electrocorticogram (ECoG). Tests of nonlinearity and a random shuffling routine revealed deterministic and nonlinear portions in the fetal ECoG. As common nonlinear measures are not applicable to nonstationary time series, we developed an algorithm to estimate the predictability of the ECoG in its time course by means of a point prediction error (PPE). The ECoG was recorded before and during VAS from the maternal abdominal surface in seven chronically instrumented fetal sheep at 0.8 of gestation. The PPE during REM sleep was significantly higher than during NREM sleep. VAS in NREM sleep resulted in an abrupt increase of the PPE not reaching the level of REM sleep. The steep increase of the PPE at onset and its slow decrease after cessation of the stimulus were very similar to the dynamics of spontaneous sleep state transitions, suggesting the involvement of the same cortical activating mechanisms. In conclusion, the stage and the time course of fetal brain activation and deactivation patterns can be clearly shown by PPE techniques. The PPE is a useful complement to spectral analysis. Both techniques describe different properties of the ECoG.  (+info)

Beta activity: a carrier for visual attention. (3/161)

The alpha (8-13 Hz), beta (15-25 Hz) and gamma (30-60 Hz) bands of the EEG have been long studied clinically because of their putative functional importance. Old experimental results indicate that repetitive stimulation of the visual pathway evokes synchronous responses at the cortical level with a gain that depends on frequency; oscillations within relevant bands are less damped at subsequent processing levels than others. Our current results show in the cat that cortico-geniculate feedback has a build-in potentiation mechanism that operates at around the beta frequency and activates thalamic cells thus lowering the threshold for visual information transmission. We have also shown that enhanced beta activity is propagated along this feedback pathway solely during attentive visual behavior. This activity consists of 300-1,000 ms bursts that correlate in time with gamma oscillatory events. Beta-bursting activity spreads to all investigated visual centers, including the lateral posterior and pulvinar complex and higher cortical areas. Other supporting data are discussed that are concerned with the enhanced beta activity during attentive-like behavior of various species, including humans. Finally, we put forward a general hypothesis which attributes the appearance of oscillations within the alpha, beta and gamma bands to different activation states of the visual system. According to this hypothesis, alpha activity characterizes idle arousal of the system, while beta bursts shift the system to an attention state that consequently allows for gamma synchronization and perception.  (+info)

Origins and distribution of cholinergically induced beta rhythms in hippocampal slices. (4/161)

Regional variations and substrates of high-frequency rhythmic activity induced by cholinergic stimulation were studied in hippocampal slices with 64-electrode recording arrays. (1) Carbachol triggered beta waves (17.6 +/- 5.7 Hz) in pyramidal regions of 75% of the slices. (2) The waves had phase shifts across the cell body layers and were substantially larger in the apical dendrites than in cell body layers or basal dendrites. (3) Continuous, two-dimensional current source density analyses indicated apical sinks associated with basal sources, lasting approximately 10 msec, followed by apical sources and basal sinks, lasting approximately 20 msec, in a repeating pattern with a period in the range of 15-25 Hz. (4) Carbachol-induced beta waves in the hippocampus were accompanied by 40 Hz (gamma) oscillations in deep layers of the entorhinal cortex. (5) Cholinergically elicited beta and gamma rhythms were eliminated by antagonists of either AMPA or GABA receptors. Benzodiazepines markedly enhanced beta activity and sometimes introduced a distinct gamma frequency peak. (6) Twenty Hertz activity after orthodromic activation of field CA3 was distributed in the same manner as carbachol-induced beta waves and was generated by a current source in the apical dendrites of CA3. This source was eliminated by high concentrations of GABA(A) receptor blockers. It is concluded that cholinergically driven beta rhythms arise independently in hippocampal subfields from oscillatory circuits involving (1) bursts of pyramidal cell discharges, (2) activation of a subset of feedback interneurons that project apically, and (3) production of a GABA(A)-mediated hyperpolarization in the outer portions of the apical dendrites of pyramidal neurons.  (+info)

Multimodal EEG analysis in man suggests impairment-specific changes in movement-related electric brain activity after stroke. (5/161)

Movement-related slow cortical potentials and event-related desynchronization of alpha (alpha-ERD) and beta (beta-ERD) activity after self-paced voluntary triangular finger movements were studied in 13 ischaemic supratentorial stroke patients and 10 age-matched control subjects during movement preparation and actual performance. The stroke patients suffered from central arm paresis (n = 8), somatosensory deficits (n = 3) or ideomotor apraxia (n = 2). The multimodal EEG analysis suggested impairment-specific changes in the movement-related electrical activity of the brain. The readiness potential of paretic subjects was centred more anteriorly and laterally; during movement, they showed increased beta-ERD at left lateral frontal recording sites. Patients with somatosensory deficits showed reduced alpha-ERD and beta-ERD during both movement preparation and actual performance. Patients with ideomotor apraxia showed more lateralized frontal movement-related slow cortical potentials during both movement preparation and performance, and reduced left parietal beta-ERD during movement preparation. We conclude that (i) disturbed motor efference is associated with an increased need for excitatory drive of pyramidal cells in motor and premotor areas or an attempt to drive movements through projections from these areas to brainstem motor systems during movement preparation; (ii) an undisturbed somatosensory afference might contribute to the release of relevant cortical areas from their 'idling' state when movements are prepared and performed; and (iii) apraxic patients have a relative lack of activity of the mesial frontal motor system and the left parietal cortex, which is believed to be part of a network subserving ideomotor praxis.  (+info)

Long-range synchronization of gamma and beta oscillations and the plasticity of excitatory and inhibitory synapses: a network model. (6/161)

The ability of oscillating networks to synchronize despite significant separation in space, and thus time, is of biological significance, given that human gamma activity can synchronize over distances of several millimeters to centimeters during perceptual and learning tasks. We use computer simulations of networks consisting of excitatory pyramidal cells (e-cells) and inhibitory interneurons (i-cells), modeling two tonically driven assemblies separated by large (>or=8 ms) conduction delays. The results are as follows. 1) Two assemblies separated by large conduction delays can fire synchronously at beta frequency (with i-cells firing at gamma frequency) under two timing conditions: e-cells of (say) assembly 2 are still inhibited "delay + spike generation milliseconds" after the e-cell beat of assembly 1; this means that the e-cell inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) cannot be significantly shorter than the delay (2-site effect). This implies for a given decay time constant that the interneuron --> pyramidal cell conductances must be large enough. The e-cell IPSP must last longer than the i-cell IPSP, i.e., the interneuron --> pyramidal cell conductance must be sufficiently large and the interneuron --> interneuron conductance sufficiently small (local effect). 2) We define a "long-interval doublet" as a pair of interneuron action potentials-separated by approximately "delay milliseconds"-in which a) the first spike is induced by tonic inputs and/or excitation from nearby e-cells, while b) the second spike is induced by (delayed) excitation from distant e-cells. "Long-interval population doublets" (long-interval doublets of the i-cell population) are necessary for synchronized firing in our networks. Failure to produce them leads to almost anti-phase activity at gamma frequency. 3) An (almost) anti-phase oscillation is the most stable oscillation pattern of two assemblies that are separated by axonal conduction delays of approximately one-half a gamma period (delays from 8 to 17 ms in our simulations) and that are firing at gamma frequency. 4) Two assemblies separated by large conduction delays can synchronize their activity with the help of interneuron plasticity. They can also synchronize without pyramidal cell --> pyramidal cell connections being present. The presence of pyramidal cell --> pyramidal cell connections allows, however, for synchronization if other parameters are at inappropriate values for synchronization to occur. 5) Synchronization of two assemblies separated by large conduction delays with the help of interneuron plasticity is not simply due to slowing down of the oscillation frequency. It is reached with the help of a "synchronizing-weak-beat," which induces sudden changes in the oscillation period length of the two assemblies.  (+info)

Movement rate effect on activation and functional coupling of motor cortical areas. (7/161)

We investigated changes in the activation and functional coupling of bilateral primary sensorimotor (SM1) and supplementary motor (SMA) areas with different movement rates in eight normal volunteers. An auditory-cued repetitive right-thumb movement was performed at rates of 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 3, and 4 Hz. As a control condition, subjects listened to pacing tones with no movements. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded from 28 scalp electrodes and electromyogram was obtained from the hand muscles. The event-related changes in EEG band-power (ERpow: activation of each area) and correlation (ERcor: functional coupling between each pair of cortical areas) were computed every 32 ms. Modulations of ERpow and ERcor were inspected in alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (16-20 Hz) bands. Motor cortical activation and coupling was greater for faster movements. With increasing movement rate, the timing relationship between movement and tone switched from synchronization (for 0.5-1 Hz) to syncopation (for 3-4 Hz). The results suggested that for slow repetitive movements (0.5-1 Hz), each individual movement is separately controlled, and EEG activation and coupling of the motor cortical areas were immediately followed by transient deactivation and decoupling, having clear temporal modulation locked to each movement. In contrast, for fast repetitive movements (3-4 Hz), it appears that the rhythm is controlled and the motor cortices showed sustained EEG activation and continuous coupling.  (+info)

Reversibility of the chronic post-stroke state. (8/161)

Forty patients with cerebral infarction associated with occlusion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) or the middle cerebral artery (MCA) were treated with hyperbaric oxygenation (HO). EEG analyses were performed regularly in order to assess the course of the cerebral lesion. Patients in an early post-stroke stage (III B) and patients in a chronic post-stroke stage (IV) had the changes in EEG analysis and neurological distributed evenly between these two groups.  (+info)

*Nancy Kopell

Kopell, N.; Ermentrout, G. B.; Whittington, M. A.; Traub, R. D. (15 February 2000). "Gamma rhythms and beta rhythms have ... She is currently Director and Co-Founder of the Cognitive Rhythms Collaborative, which consists of a group of over two dozen ... "People: Faculty". Cognitive Rhythms Collaborative. Boston University. Retrieved 20 August 2015. Trottier, Leo (21 October 2011 ... Nancy Kopell's home page at BU Nancy Kopell's Publications Cognitive Rhythms Collaborative CompNet Neural Dynamics Group (NaK ...

*Nyctinasty

Beta glucosidase activity is regulated via circadian rhythms. Fluorescence studies have shown that the binding sites of leaf ... Either the leaf opening or closing factor is a glycoside, which is inactivated by hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond via beta ...

*Sundevall's jird

"Body Temperature Daily Rhythms of the Fat Jird Meriones crassus: Effects of Beta and Alpha Adrenergic Blockers." Journal of ...

*Brainwave entrainment

... of music-brain interaction with simultaneous measurement of regional cerebral blood flow and electroencephalogram beta rhythm ... Buszaki G (2006). Rhythms of the brain. Oxford University Press. Nyhus, E; Curran T (June 2010). "Functional role of gamma and ... Thaut, M.H., Schleiffers, S., and Davis, W.B., Changes in EMG patterns under the influence of auditory rhythm. In Spintge, R. ... This tendency has been identified as specifically pertinent to the study of sound and music generally, and acoustic rhythms ...

*Ivabradine

... used for the symptomatic treatment of chronic stable angina pectoris in patients with normal sinus rhythm who cannot take beta ... It may be as effective as the beta blocker atenolol and comparable with amlodipine in the management of chronic stable angina. ... It is used in combination with beta blockers in people with heart failure with LVEF lower than 35 percent inadequately ... This is in contrast to other commonly used rate-reducing medications, such as beta-blockers and calcium channel blockers, which ...

*Arno Villringer

Journal of Neuroscience 30(35):11670-7 Ritter, P., Moosmann, M., Villringer, A. (2009). Rolandic alpha and beta EEG rhythms' ... 1996), combined EEG / fMRI to show fMRI correlates of background rhythms (Moosmann et al. 2003, Ritter et al. 2009) and ... Correlates of alpha rhythm in functional magnetic resonance imaging and near infrared spectroscopy. Neuroimage. 20(1):145-58 ...

*Inappropriate sinus tachycardia

The heart is a strong muscle and typically can sustain the higher-than-normal heart rhythm, though monitoring the condition is ... This approach is very much "trial-and-error". Patients with IST are often intolerant to beta blockers. A new selective sinus ... Some types of medication tried by cardiologists and other physicians include: beta blockers, selective sinus node If channel ... An autoimmune mechanism has been suggested as several studies have detected autoantibodies that activate beta adrenoreceptors ...

*Body reactivity

Four simple periodic rhythms recorded in the EEG are alpha, beta, delta, and theta, which are distinguished by frequency and ...

*Hypercholesterolemia

"The role of glucocorticoids in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of hepatic beta-hydroxy-beta-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A ... beta blockers, retinoic acid, antipsychotics). Genetic contributions are usually due to the additive effects of multiple genes ...

*Prakashanand Saraswati

Maxwell Cade co-developed the "Mind Mirror", a portable EEG machine that could monitor the alpha, beta, delta and theta rhythms ... and agreed to have their brain rhythms measured. In 1976 when he was touring England, Swami Prakashanand Saraswati requested to ...

*Metrik

Beta Recordings, Strictly Rhythm, Shogun Audio, Soma Quality Recordings, Spearhead, Spinnin' and Destined Records. "Metrik (2) ...

*List of MeSH codes (E01)

... alpha rhythm MeSH E01.370.376.300.125 --- beta rhythm MeSH E01.370.376.300.150 --- cortical synchronization MeSH E01.370. ... alpha rhythm MeSH E01.370.405.245.125 --- beta rhythm MeSH E01.370.405.245.150 --- cortical synchronization MeSH E01.370. ... 405.245.175 --- delta rhythm MeSH E01.370.405.245.700 --- theta rhythm MeSH E01.370.405.250 --- electrokymography MeSH E01.370. ... 376.300.175 --- delta rhythm MeSH E01.370.376.300.700 --- theta rhythm MeSH E01.370.376.500 --- magnetoencephalography MeSH ...

*Neural oscillation

... including mu and beta rhythms. A non-inclusive list of types of oscillatory activity found in the central nervous system: Delta ... Oscillatory rhythms at 10 Hz have been recorded in a brain area called the inferior olive, which is associated with the ... These ongoing rhythms can change in different ways in response to perceptual input or motor output. Oscillatory activity may ... Theta rhythms are very strong in rodent hippocampi and entorhinal cortex during learning and memory retrieval, and they are ...

*Cardiology

Medications for a fast heart rate may include beta blockers or agents that attempt to restore a normal heart rhythm such as ... The initial heart rhythm is most often ventricular fibrillation. The diagnosis is confirmed by finding no pulse. While a ... Electrophysiologists work closely with other cardiologists and cardiac surgeons to assist or guide therapy for heart rhythm ... Treatment for cardiac arrest is immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and, if a shockable rhythm is present, ...

*Heart arrhythmia

Medications for a fast heart rate may include beta blockers or agents that attempt to restore a normal heart rhythm such as ... The resulting heart rhythm depends on where the first signal begins: If it is the sinoatrial node, the rhythm remains normal ... it can produce a sustained abnormal rhythm. Rhythms produced by an ectopic focus in the atria, or by the atrioventricular node ... A slow rhythm (less than 60 beats/min), is labelled bradycardia. This may be caused by a slowed signal from the sinus node ( ...

*Colours (Hot Chip song)

... while the drum rhythms were said to "sit between Stereolab and The Beta Band". However, Clickmusic.com said it was one of the " ... "kitschy retro synth stabs and lifeless prog-Krautrock rhythms only starting to really rear into Italo-house tinged life near ...

*Beta wave

... , or beta rhythm, is a neural oscillation (brainwave) in the brain with a frequency range of between 12.5 and 30 Hz ( ... Low Beta Waves (12.5-16 Hz, "Beta 1 power"); Beta Waves (16.5-20 Hz, "Beta 2 power"); and High Beta Waves (20.5-28 Hz, "Beta 3 ... the role of the cortical sensorimotor beta rhythm". Neuroscience. 156 (1): 238-46. doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2008.06.061. PMC ... Bursts of beta activity are associated with a strengthening of sensory feedback in static motor control and reduced when there ...

*Metachronal rhythm

Beta movement Phi phenomenon Edward Aiello and Michael A Sleigh (1972) The metachronal wave of lateral cilia of Mytilus edulis ... Metachronal rhythms may be seen in the coordinated movements of the legs of millipedes and other multi-legged land ... Play media A metachronal rhythm or metachronal wave refers to wavy movements produced by the sequential action (as opposed to ...

*Neuroscience of rhythm

It was concluded that PTNs in the motor cortex directly influence the generation of Beta rhythms. At the moment, recording ... "The rhythm of a game of basketball emerges from the rhythm of individuals, the rhythm among team members, and the rhythmic ... This is rhythm in its most obvious form. Human beings have an innate ability to listen to a rhythm and track the beat, as seen ... The neuroscience of rhythm refers to the various forms of rhythm generated by the central nervous system (CNS). Nerve cells, ...

*Beta-amiloide, a enciclopedia libre

Volicer L, Harper D, Manning B, Goldstein R, Satlin A (2001). "Sundowning and circadian rhythms in Alzheimer's disease". Am J ... Beta-amiloide ou amiloide-beta (Aβ ou Abeta) é o termo con que se designan os péptidos de 36 a 43 aminoácidos que están ... Medición do amiloide beta[editar , editar a fonte]. Micrografía que mostra o amiloide beta (castaño) en placas senís do córtex ... Ritmo circadiano do amiloide beta[editar , editar a fonte]. Un informe de 2009 demostrou que a produción de amiloide beta segue ...

*RAR-related orphan receptor gamma

REV-ERBalpha and beta and non-essential role for Bmal1 cycling in transcriptional regulation of intracellular circadian rhythms ... The RORγ isoform appears to be involved in the regulation of circadian rhythms. This protein can bind to and activate the ... Absent protein in previous studies may be due to the high amplitude circadian rhythm of expression of this isoform in some ... Journal of Biological Rhythms. 20 (5): 391-403. doi:10.1177/0748730405277232. PMID 16267379. Preitner N, Damiola F, Lopez- ...

*Timothy syndrome

Propanolol or beta-adrenergic blockers are often prescribed as well as insertion of a pacemaker to maintain proper heart rhythm ...

*Pacemaker current

... treatment of chronic stable angina in patients with normal sinus rhythm who have a contraindication or intolerance to beta- ... Genetic alterations of HCN4 channels (the molecular correlate of sinoatrial f-channels) coupled to rhythm disturbances have ...

*Insomnia

... but some literature suggests a dysregulation of the circadian rhythm based on core temperature.[47] Increased beta activity and ... Disturbances of the circadian rhythm, such as shift work and jet lag, can cause an inability to sleep at some times of the day ... Chronic circadian rhythm disorders are characterized by similar symptoms.[22]. *Certain neurological disorders, brain lesions, ... parasomnias and circadian rhythm disorders". Journal of Psychopharmacology. 24 (11): 1577-1601. doi:10.1177/0269881110379307. ...

*Atrial flutter

... such as beta blockers or calcium channel blockers) and/or rhythm control with class III antiarrhythmics (such as ibutilide or ... J commonly being enough to cause a return to a normal heart rhythm (sinus rhythm). Exact placement of the pads does not appear ... Because both rhythms can lead to the formation of a blood clot in the atrium, individuals with atrial flutter usually require ... Both rhythms can be associated with dangerously fast heart rates and thus require medication to control the heart rate ( ...

*Pre-Bötzinger complex

Sighs, on the other hand, consist of a slow and large amplitude rhythm. Each type of rhythm is generated by the same neurons in ... They are found within the pre-BötC and act via alpha-1, alpha-2, and beta-noradrenergic mechanisms.NE induces ICAN-dependent ... This complex has been proven to be essential for the generation of respiratory rhythm in mammals. The exact mechanism of the ... Gasping is characterized by a rhythm that has faster rise, shorter bursts, and lower frequency. The pre-BötC is capable of ...
The voluntary step execution task is a popular measure for identifying fall risks among elderly individuals in the community setting because most falls have been reported to occur during movement. However, the neurophysiological functions during this movement are not entirely understood. Here, we used electromyography (EMG) to explore the relationship between EMG-EMG coherence, which reflects common oscillatory drive to motoneurons, and motor performance associated with stepping tasks: simple reaction time (SRT) and choice reaction time (CRT) tasks. Ten healthy elderly adults participated in the study. Participants took a single step forward in response to a visual imperative stimulus. EMG-EMG coherence was analyzed for 1,000 ms before the presentation of the stimulus (stationary standing position) from proximal and distal tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SOL) muscles. The main result showed that all paired EMG-EMG coherences in the alpha and beta frequency bands were greater in the SRT than the CRT
The present study provides a series of observations supporting the view that the VM thalamic nucleus is a critical part of the network contributing to the emergence of the exaggerated high-beta range oscillatory activity in the MCx and BG of the hemiparkinsonian rat during treadmill walking. The transition from inattentive rest to treadmill walking induced an increase in high beta range (30-36 Hz) activity in the VM thalamus of the dopamine cell-lesioned hemisphere relative to the nonlesioned hemisphere. This was accompanied by increases in the synchronization of VM spikes to the local and cortical high beta LFP activity and increased coherence between LFP activity in the VM, MCx and SNpr in the same frequency range. In addition, high beta range LFP power and coherence in the MCx and SNpr were dramatically reduced by blocking GABAA receptor-mediated input into the VM through infusion of the GABAA antagonist picrotoxin or by inhibiting VM activity through local infusion of the GABAA agonist ...
Response time variability (RTV) during cognitive tasks is an indicator of sustained attention abilities in healthy adults. While brain networks that are related to sustained attention abilities have been identified, the relationship between variance in activity in these networks and RTV has seldom been explored. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between variance in activity in key attentional areas and RTV. Forty-four healthy young adults performed a visual sustained attention task while undergoing electroencephalography. We found that variability in the spectral power of parietal beta oscillations, bilaterally, was positively correlated with RTV, while beta power in right parietal electrodes was negatively correlated with RTV. Moreover, beta power was uncorrelated with beta variability, but multiple regression showed that the two interacted to predict RTV, such that high beta power and low variability were better indicators of low RTV than either measure alone. Given the ...
All information about the latest scientific publications of the Clínica Universidad de Navarra. Movement-related changes in oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus: ipsilateral vs. contralateral movements.
Symptoms of schizophrenia (SCZ) are likely to be generated by genetically mediated synaptic dysfunction, which contribute to large-scale functional neural dysconnectivity. Recent electrophysiological studies suggest that this dysconnectivity is present not only at a spatial level but also at a temporal level, operationalized as long-range temporal correlations (LRTCs). Previous research suggests that alpha and beta frequency bands have weaker temporal stability in people with SCZ. This study sought to replicate these findings with high-density electroencephalography (EEG), enabling a spatially more accurate analysis of LRTC differences, and to test associations with characteristic SCZ symptoms and cognitive deficits. A 128-channel EEG was used to record eyes-open resting state brain activity of 23 people with SCZ and 24 matched healthy controls (HCs). LRTCs were derived for alpha (8-12 Hz) and beta (13-25 Hz) frequency bands. As an exploratory analysis, LRTC was source projected using sLoreta. People
Human brain oscillations occur in different frequency bands that have been linked to different behaviours and cognitive processes. Even within specific frequency bands such as the beta- (14-30 Hz) or gamma-band (30-100 Hz), oscillations fluctuate in frequency and amplitude. Such frequency fluctuations most probably reflect changing states of neuronal network activity, as brain oscillations arise from the correlated synchronized activity of large numbers of neurons. However, the neuronal mechanisms governing the dynamic nature of amplitude and frequency fluctuations within frequency bands remain elusive. Here we show that in acute slices of rat prefrontal cortex (PFC), carbachol-induced oscillations in the beta-band show frequency and amplitude fluctuations. Fast and slow non-harmonic frequencies are distributed differentially over superficial and deep cortical layers, with fast frequencies being present in layer 3, while layer 6 only showed slow oscillation frequencies. Layer 5 pyramidal cells and
We used LFP recordings from 252-channel ECoG arrays covering large parts of the left hemispheres of two macaques to analyze the interaction between top-down and bottom-up influences, both quantified by GC. Top-down influences were assessed between area 7a at the top of the visual hierarchy and V1 at the bottom. Bottom-up influences were assessed between V1 and V4, a known feedforward pathway carrying stimulus driven input. 7A-to-V1 GC showed a beta-band peak, which did not require visual stimulation and thus was endogenously generated, which was significantly larger in the 7A-to-V1 than the V1-to-7A direction, and which increased with selective attention. V1-to-V4 GC showed a gamma-band peak, which was stimulus driven, which was significantly larger in the bottom-up than the top-down direction, and which also increased with selective attention. JC between top-down beta-band influences and bottom-up gamma-band influences revealed a positive cross-frequency interaction. This interaction was ...
The model hereby clarifies, for the first time, how the following levels of brain organization coexist to realize cognitive processing properties that regulate fast learning and stable memory of brain representations: single cell properties, such as spiking dynamics, spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), and acetylcholine modulation; detailed laminar thalamic and cortical circuit designs and their interactions; aggregate cell recordings, such as current-source densities and local field potentials; and single cell and large-scale inter-areal oscillations in the gamma and beta frequency domains ...
Laadukkaisiin terveyden ja hyvinvoinnin tuotteisiin ja palveluihin keskittyvä Suomalainen yritys. Tällä hetkellä löydät meiltä koko genomin sekvenssoinnin, kehon toimintaa ja terveydentilaa analysoivat kattavat laboratoriotutkimukset. Storesta löydät
Some of us are looking for an alternative to the traditional centerpiece and main course, and its only fitting that we pair some beer.
Graph analysis of sensorimotor cortex functional networks - comparison of alpha vs beta rhythm in motor imagery and execution, Athanasiou, Alkinoos, Foroglou Nicolas, Polyzoidis Konstantinos, and Bamidis Panagiotis , Society of Applied Neuroscience (SAN) & National Initiative Brain & Cognition (NIHC) Meeting 2014, Utrecht, the Netherlands, (2014) ...
Graph analysis of sensorimotor cortex functional networks - comparison of alpha vs beta rhythm in motor imagery and execution, Athanasiou, Alkinoos, Foroglou Nicolas, Polyzoidis Konstantinos, and Bamidis Panagiotis , Society of Applied Neuroscience (SAN) & National Initiative Brain & Cognition (NIHC) Meeting 2014, Utrecht, the Netherlands, (2014) ...
Downloadable (with restrictions)! We compare the asymptotic relative efficiency of the Exp, Mean, and Sup functionals of the Wald, LM and LR tests for structural change analyzed by Andrews [Andrews, D.W.K., 1993. Tests for parameter instability and structural change with unknown change point. Econometrica 61, 821-856.] and Andrews and Ploberger [Andrews, D.W.K., Ploberger, W., 1994. Optimal tests when a nuisance parameter is present only under the alternative. Econometrica 62, 1383-1414.]. We derive the approximate Bahadur slopes of these tests using large deviations techniques. These show that tests based on the Mean functional are inferior to those based on the Sup and Exp when using the same base statistic. Also, for a given functional, the Wald-based test dominates the LR-based test, which dominates the LM-based one. We show that the Sup- and Mean-type tests satisfy Wieands [Wieand, H.S., 1976. A Condition under which the Pitman and Bahadur approaches to efficiency coincide. Annals of Statistics 4,
EEG can show if there is too little or too much brain activity, which can effect everyday emotions. Call us today to schedule your appointment.
TY - JOUR. T1 - Genome-wide association analysis links multiple psychiatric liability genes to oscillatory brain activity. AU - Smit, Dirk J.A.. AU - Wright, Margaret J.. AU - Meyers, Jacquelyn L.. AU - Martin, Nicholas G.. AU - Ho, Yvonne Y.W.. AU - Malone, Stephen M.. AU - Zhang, Jian. AU - Burwell, Scott J.. AU - Chorlian, David B.. AU - de Geus, Eco J.C.. AU - Denys, Damiaan. AU - Hansell, Narelle K.. AU - Hottenga, Jouke Jan. AU - McGue, Matt. AU - van Beijsterveldt, Catharina E.M.. AU - Jahanshad, Neda. AU - Thompson, Paul M.. AU - Whelan, Christopher D.. AU - Medland, Sarah E.. AU - Porjesz, Bernice. AU - Lacono, William G.. AU - Boomsma, Dorret I.. N1 - © 2018 The Authors Human Brain Mapping Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.. PY - 2018/11. Y1 - 2018/11. N2 - Oscillatory activity is crucial for information processing in the brain, and has a long history as a biomarker for psychopathology. Variation in oscillatory activity is highly heritable, but current understanding of specific ...
The Eagles Nest :: Stevensville, Michigan :: An Empirical Investigation Into the Effect of Beta Frequency Binaural-beat Audio Signals on Four Measures of Human Memory
Product: Understanding Phenotypes and Clinical Subtypes to Use qEEG More Effectively in Planning Neurofeedback - Product: Futurehealth WinterBrain 20 minute plenary presentation by Jay Gunkelman. Abstract: The clinical use of EEG / qEEG is rapidly expanding since the acceptance of the clinical application of qEEG in 1994. This talk will provide a survey of various approaches to diagnosis and treatment planning, as well as having a depth discussion of the phenotype approach for predicting interventions based on EEG/qEEG data.
Dr. Collins provides qEEG brain mapping tests, assessment and evaluation for neurofeedback treatment therapy protocols. Assessment and Evaluation | QEEG Testing | QEEG Brain Mapping
Normal frequencies of the human brain associated states are shown below. These frequencies can be picked up by an EEG (Electroencephalogram) from the surface of the brain, after their amplification, as they are in the range of micro-volts. A mixture of these frequencies is present at any given time. Quantitative Electroencephalography (QEEG) is an extension of the analysis of the visual EEG interpretation which may assist and even augment our understanding of the EEG and brain function. QEEG is a procedure that processes the recorded EEG activity from a multi-electrode recording using a computer and converts it into a brain map showing different brain waves ...
In the article "The History of Twins, As a Criterion of the Relative Powers of Nature and Nurture," Francis Galton describes his study of twins. Published in 1875 in Frasers Magazine in London, England, the article lays out Galtons use of twins to examine and distinguish between the characteristics people have at birth and the characteristics they receive from the circumstances of life and experience. Galton calls those factors nature and nurture. Based on his study, Galton concluded that nature has a larger effect than nurture on development.. Format: Articles Subject: Publications ...
Objective: Local field potential (LFP) oscillations in the 13-30 Hz frequency band are related to the pathophysiology of the basal ganglia of Parkinsons disease with beta activity in LFP being reduced in PD patients during movement or following medication. The current study was performed[for full text, please go to the a.m. URL ...
Otorhinolaryngology teaching and educational resources, ENT procedures and surgery, photos and videos, ENT diseases and treatments, practice tips and tricks, FAQs, academic journals, ENT links, news and events.
The article deals with the study of bioelectric activity of the brain in patients with various forms of migraine, complicated by status migrainosus. The EEG-mapping was performed for 32 patients with diff erent forms of migraine. The EEG registration was carried out between the attacks. Patients were calm and active and performed functional tests. The following frequency ranges were analyzed: delta rhythm, theta rhythm, alpha rhythm, beta rhythm. The spectral powers of the rhythms in the frontal, parietal, temporal, occipital regions of the cerebral hemispheres were evaluated. The results of EEG-mapping showed that patients with diff erent forms of migraine demonstrated a decrease in reactivity of the cerebral cortex as per fast-wave indices, which was even more prominent in a group of patients with migraine without aura, as well as the activation of slow-wave activity in these patients. Analysis of the data of cartograms shows that activation of slow-wave ranges and alpha frequency inhibition ...
The relationship between the electro-encephalographic (EEG) alpha and beta oscillations in the resting condition was investigated in the study. EEGs were recorded in 33 subjects, and alpha (7.5-12.5Hz) and beta (15-25Hz) oscillations were extracted with the use of a modified wavelet transform. Power, peak frequency and phase synchronisation were evaluated for both types of oscillation. The average beta-alpha peak frequency ratio was about 1.9-2.0 for all electrode derivations. The peak frequency of beta activity was within 70-90 % of the 95 % confidence interval of twice the alpha frequency. A significant (p , 0.05) linear regression was found between beta and alpha power in all derivations in 32 subjects, with the slope of the regression line being approximate to 0.3. There was no significant difference in the slope of the line in different electrode locations, although the power correlation was strongest in the occipital locations where alpha and beta oscillations had the largest power. A ...
Cortical oscillations at gamma (30-100 Hz) and beta (10-30 Hz) frequencies are implicated in cognitive tasks. Gamma and beta oscillations evoked in the hippocampal slice in vitro by tetanic stimulation can be synchronised with phase lags faster than the conduction delays expected from the distance between the stimulating electrodes. This led Traub to develop an innovative model based on networks of fast synapses using glutamate and GABA as their transmitters. While this theoretical model is feasible on the basis of the known cellular and network properties of the hippocampus, and may well apply under some experimental circumstances, we now have doubts on its application to tetanically evoked gamma rhythms because of: (1) the spatial extent of the gamma focus means that the actual distance between the oscillating populations is much less than the distance between the two stimulating electrodes (typically ~1-2mm), and (2) new evidence and ideas on the mechanism of tetanically-evoked gamma ...
Many studies have implicated the basal ganglia in the suppression of action impulses (stopping). Here, we discuss recent neurophysiological evidence that distinct hypothesized processes involved in action preparation and cancellation can be mapped onto distinct basal ganglia cell types and pathways. We examine how movement-related activity in the striatum is related to a Go process and how going may be modulated by brief epochs of beta oscillations. We then describe how, rather than a unitary Stop process, there appear to be separate, complementary Pause and Cancel mechanisms. We discuss the implications of these stopping subprocesses for the interpretation of the stop-signal reaction time-in particular, some activity that seems too slow to causally contribute to stopping when assuming a single Stop processes may actually be fast enough under a Pause-then-Cancel model. Finally, we suggest that combining complementary neural mechanisms that emphasize speed or accuracy respectively may ...
Performance improves when participants respond to events that are structured in repeating sequences, suggesting that learning can lead to proactive anticipatory preparation. Whereas most sequence-learning studies have emphasised spatial structure, most sequences also contain a prominent temporal structure. We used MEG to investigate spatial and temporal anticipatory neural dynamics in a modified serial reaction time (SRT) task. Performance and brain activity were compared between blocks with learned spatial-temporal sequences and blocks with new sequences. After confirming a strong behavioural benefit of spatial-temporal predictability, we show lateralisation of beta oscillations in anticipation of the response associated with the upcoming target location and show that this also aligns to the expected timing of these forthcoming events. This effect was found both when comparing between repeated (learned) and new (unlearned) sequences, as well as when comparing targets that were expected after short vs.
Power spectra of epicardial electrograms were studied in 13 anesthetized dogs subjected to occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Electrograms were obtained from a bipolar electrode placed on the epicardial surface of the left ventricle and recorded before and after coronary occlusion. After digitization, power spectra of the first and every 50th subsequent waveform were evaluated and compared with the power spectrum of the average waveform obtained from the baseline recording. In particular, we examined variations in relative power content in three frequency ranges: 150-250 Hz, previously shown to be directly affected by myocardial ischemia; 40-150 Hz, presumably corresponding to the fine notches and slurs on the body surface QRS; and 2-40 Hz, the low-frequency range. Apart from a mild initial rise during the first 50 heart beats, the power in the high-frequency range gradually decreased, reaching 5% of the control value at wave 500. The power in the mid-frequency range ...
II. Review concepts covered in day one and two and practice the conventional EEG and QEEG evaluation of additional patients. Participants are encouraged to bring their own patients raw EEG data for analysis at the workshop ...
Fast, gamma rhythms range from 30 to 100 Hz, and may vary in frequency during a response. The 20-100 Hz range we consider here overlaps the beta band (15 to 30 Hz), but we will ignore the finer points of EEG classification here.
Note to Chairman of Study Group 6 - On draft new Recommendation ITU-R M.[BSMS700] - Specific out-of-band emission limit of IMT mobile stations operating in the frequency band 694-790 MHz for protection of existing services in Region 1 in the frequency band below 694 MHz ...
1 . Damodaran S, Cressman JR, Jedrzejewski-Szmek Z, Blackwell KT (2015) Desynchronization of Fast-Spiking Interneurons Reduces beta-Band Oscillations and Imbalance in Firing in the Dopamine-Depleted Striatum. J Neurosci 35:1149-59 [PubMed] ...
Systems of and methods for stimulation of neurological tissue that may generate stimulation trains with temporal patterns of stimulation is shown and disclosed herein. The temporal patterns of stimulation may include intervals between electrical pulses (the inter-pulse intervals) that change or vary over time. Compared to conventional continuous, high rate pulse trains having regular (i.e., constant) inter-pulse intervals, the non-regular (i.e., not constant) pulse patterns or trains that embody features of the invention may provide a lower average frequency.
Full text for this publication is not currently held within this repository. Alternative links are provided below where available. ...
Food for thought....Power of Suggestion?!?. At my first post surgery visit with my surgeon (3 months) he asked me about leakage. I mentioned I used 1 to 2 pads per day. He said he wanted my off the pads by the next visit in January...I thought it was strange cause I didnt think I had a say in the matter. Two days later on Saturday morning, I thought Id give a no pad day a try. And for what ever reason, I havent used one since. It kind of forced to me to make a mental effort to not leak when I stood up etc.... ...
Do you ever have the feeling that things are not quite going according to plan? You begin to wonder if you have Carb creep. Youve been doing well but suddenly it seems as though the edges are blurred. Something is missing. Whatever it is, you feel as though you are not as focussed as you should be and its really hard to break away from.... for me at least. It takes a lot of mental effort and lifes day to day needs are still there relentless and demanding. We cant go and hide in a cave and work things out. We have to do it on the run. Theres no peaceful retreat to go to where we can be refreshed, re-charged and restored ...
Local field potential (LFP) recordings from patients with deep brain stimulation electrodes in the basal ganglia have suggested that frequency-specific activities correlate with force or effort, but previous studies have not been able to disambiguate the two. Here, we dissociated effort from actual force generated by contrasting the force generation of different fingers while recording LFP activity from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinsons disease who had undergone functional surgery. Patients were studied while on their normal dopaminergic medication. We investigated the relationship between frequency-specific oscillatory activity in the STN and voluntary flexion of either the index or little finger at different effort levels. At each tested effort level (10%, 25%, and 40% of the maximal voluntary contraction force of each individual finger), the index finger generated larger force than the little finger. Movement-related suppression of beta-band power in the STN LFP was
As you know, the state of ones mind may be measured by the state of their brainwaves. Higher-frequency beta waves indicate wakeful alertness, lower alpha waves indicate daydreaming and relaxation, and even lower delta waves indicate deep sleep. Now, knowing this, what happens if you can employ a simple concept in physics called entrainment. Entrainment means that things naturally fall into rhythm with each other -- for example, if you put two grandfather clocks up against the same wall, it wont be long before their pendulums become synchronized. Well, it turns out that if you beam certain frequencies at the brain, the brain will tend to fall into rhythm with these frequencies. So, theoretically, you could make that person sleepy, dreamy, alert or else put them in a state of nervous agitation by beaming the frequencies corresponding to delta, alpha, beta or high beta frequencies ...
We assess the suitability of conventional parametric statistics for analyzing oscillatory activity, as measured with electroencephalography/magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG). The approach we consider is based on narrow-band power time-frequency decompositions of single-trial data. The ensuing power measures have a chi(2)-distribution. The use of the general linear model (GLM) under normal error assumptions is, therefore, difficult to motivate for these data. This is unfortunate because the GLM plays a central role in classical inference and is the standard estimation and inference framework for neuroimaging data. The key contribution of this work is to show that, in many circumstances, one can appeal to the central limit theorem and assume normality for generative models of power. If this is not appropriate, one can transform the data to render the error terms approximately normal. These considerations allow one to analyze induced and evoked oscillations using standard frameworks like statistical
Introduction: We hypothesise that Parkinsonian tremor arises when the caudal zona incerta (cZI) and subthalamic nucleus (STN) are deprived of dopamine and become increasingly responsive to motor cortical alpha and beta frequency oscillations. These oscillations are synchronised and amplified through the basal ganglia thalamocortical loop and entrained into the cerebello-thalamocortical loop via the cZI. Upon receiving potent GABAergic alpha and beta frequency oscillations in cZI afferents, ventrolateral(VL) thalamocortical neurons become hyperpolarised and rebound burst fire, generating 4-6Hz tremor oscillations. We test this hypothesis by stimulating the cZI at alpha and beta frequencies using deep brain stimulation (DBS) in non tremulous parkinsonian patients to see whether a 4-6Hz tremor can be induced. Method: This study included 11 patients with non tremulous PD, who had DBS leads implanted in a range of targets including the cZI, STN, VL nucleus, globus pallidus internus (GPi), ...
Aspects of the social environment, including social conditions (socio-economic status, household situations, chronic illnesses) and social relations (attitude and behaviors of relations) are major determinants of depression among women. This study evaluates the relative power of social relations and social conditions in predicting depression among pregnant women in Pakistan. In the qualitative phase of the study, social environmental determinants were identified through literature search, and experts opinions from psychologists, psychiatrists, gynecologists, sociologists and researchers. Along with this, 79 in-depth interviews were conducted with pregnant women drawn from six hospitals (public and private) and two communities in Karachi, Pakistan. Identified determinants of depression were grouped into themes of social conditions and social relations and pregnancy-related concerns. In the studys quantitative phase, the relative power of the identified themes and categories, based on their scores for
Many studies have implicated the basal ganglia in the suppression of action impulses ("stopping"). Here we discuss recent neurophysiological evidence that distinct hypothesized processes involved in action preparation and cancellation can be mapped onto distinct basal ganglia cell types and pathways. We examine how movement-related activity in the striatum is related to a "Go" process and how going may be modulated by brief epochs of beta oscillations. We then describe how, rather than a unitary "Stop" process, there appear to be separate, complementary "Pause" and "Cancel" mechanisms. We discuss the implications of these stopping subprocesses for the interpretation of the stop-signal reaction time - in particular, some activity that seems too slow to causally contribute to stopping when assuming a single Stop processes may actually be fast enough under a Pause-then-Cancel model. Finally, we suggest that combining complementary neural mechanisms that emphasize speed or accuracy respectively may ...
Bacigaluppi, M., Russo, G. L., Peruzzotti-Jametti, L., Rossi, S., Sandrone, S., Butti, E., . . . Martino, G. (2016). Neural Stem Cell Transplantation Induces Stroke Recovery by Upregulating Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 in Astrocytes. The Journal of Neuroscience, 36(41), 10529.. Beck, M. H., Haumesser, J. K., Kühn, J., Altschüler, J., Kühn, A. A., & van Riesen, C. (2016). Short- and long-term dopamine depletion causes enhanced beta oscillations in the cortico-basal ganglia loop of parkinsonian rats. Experimental Neurology, 286, 124-136. doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.expneurol.2016.10.005.. Huang, C.-W., Chen, Y.-W., Lin, Y.-R., Chen, P.-H., Chou, M.-H., Lee, L.-J., . . . Chen, S.-L. (2016). Conditional Knockout of Breast Carcinoma Amplified Sequence 2 (BCAS2) in Mouse Forebrain Causes Dendritic Malformation via β-catenin. Scientific Reports, 6, 34927. doi: 10.1038/srep34927. Sack, M., Lenz, J. N., Jakovcevski, M., Biedermann, S. V., Falfán-Melgoza, C., Deussing, J., . . . Auer, M. K. ...
Fig. 3.Mean absolute and relative power spectra. The graphs show the effects of ketamine 30 mg/kg (KET), LY379268 3 mg/kg (LY), the vehicle (VEH) and co-administration of ketamine 30 mg/kg + LY379268 3 mg/kg (KET/LY) on the absolute (a) and relative (b) power spectra. For better graphical presentation, data are expressed per 1 Hz as the percent change of their corresponding baseline with ±SEM × 100 / mean power of the corresponding baseline. Thus, all baselines are represented by the X axis (the zero line). Significant differences of mean power within the whole spectral bands of each treatment compared to the vehicle are shown in the upper part of the figure (ANCOVA). The direction of change is indicated by arrows. The ketamine-induced increase of low-gammaand the decrease in delta and theta powerwere reversed by LY379268. The decrease in beta andhighpower in LY379268was also observed in the ketamine + LY379268 treated animals. *** indicates p b 0.001 for ketamine 30 mg/kg vs the vehicle. ‡‡‡
You may want to look into the LFP modelling work of Alain Destexhes lab: http://cns.iaf.cnrs-gif.fr/Main.html and Gaute Einevolls lab: http://compneuro.umb.no/ . They have both been producing some very interesting work on the origin and features of local field potentials. If you are using simplified point neuron models, it may be worth looking at Alberto Mazzonis recent papers on LFPs insimplified models: http://www.iit.it/en/component/profiles ... ile&id=385 ...
Bio-Medical Instruments carries a wide variety of biofeedback and neurofeedback equipment and supplies. We carry a full line of EEG, qEEG, EMG, temperature, GSR and heart-rate products from major manufacturers.
Bio-Medical Instruments carries a wide variety of biofeedback and neurofeedback equipment and supplies. We carry a full line of EEG, qEEG, EMG, temperature, GSR and heart-rate products from major manufacturers.
Auditory novelty detection has been associated with different cognitive processes. Bekinschtein et al. (2009) developed an experimental paradigm to dissociate these processes, using local and global novelty, which were associated, respectively, with automatic versus strategic perceptual processing. They have mostly been studied using event-related potentials (ERPs), but local spiking activity as indexed by gamma (60-120 Hz) power and interactions between brain regions as indexed by modulations in beta-band (13-25 Hz) power and functional connectivity have not been explored. We thus recorded 9 epileptic patients with intracranial electrodes to compare the precise dynamics of the responses to local and global novelty. Local novelty triggered an early response observed as an intracranial mismatch negativity (MMN) contemporary with a strong power increase in the gamma band and an increase in connectivity in the beta band. Importantly, all these responses were strictly confined to the temporal ...
qEEG assessed through the absolutes alpha-power of the two occipital leads [ Time Frame: In each treatment period (1, 2, 3, 4) the measure will be taken on Day 1 prior to dosing of AZD1446 or placebo and1h, 2h, 3h, 6h, and 24 hour after dosing of AZD1446 or placebo ...
Oscillatory fluctuations of local field potentials (LFPs) in the theta (4-8 Hz) and gamma (25-140 Hz) band are held to play a mechanistic role in various ...
I was excited to see that local field potentials were added! Unfortunately I was having trouble getting them to work, likely due to my own ignorance. I have the same code as in my previous post about plotRatePSD, where I create a network with the following populations ...
Robert Kalan is interested in many different things. He has written a book about all kinds of fishes and a book about rain. He has even written a book about jumping frogs!. ...
None of this is surprising. Its easy (and often true to life) to demonize the powers that be. State governments, international organization and cross-continental corporations are targets for scorn and distrust. And especially when were dealing with dystopian futures, of course its the ruling elite that deserve the blame, right?. Maybe.. As technology and globalization march on, I more and more begin to question whether this is the future were headed toward. Is society building itself into the Panopticon?. The State. Theres no doubt in my mind that governments have more monitoring and enforcement capability than they have ever had before. Constant surveillance, DNA testing, satellites, indestructible digital records, theyve got it all. So, yes, governments have more absolute power to spy and kill than in the past.. But they have less relative power, and there are two reasons for that.. The Community. First, the rise of the community. Divine mandate has nearly evaporated from modern ...
Downloadable! This paper sets out to critically examine the adoption of a partnership approach to urban regeneration at neighbourhood level across eight European cities. While all of the cities were committed to the idea of the socially integrated city, significant differences emerged in the conceptualisation and practice of partnership at neighbourhood level. This paper draws on case studies assembled in the course of an EU funded thematic network (ENTRUST) to illustrate, in particular, the challenges associated with (1) mobilising the private sector and (2) engaging the local population in the process. The paper concludes that the experience of partnership at neighbourhood level is largely determined by contextual factors such as local and national institutional structures, political culture and the relative power of potentially competing actors within the urban regeneration system.
Rarely does the career military officer have an opportunity to step back from the daily press of a line or staff assignment and reflect upon the lessons learned from his career. Captain Walter R Thomas, USN, when afforded this opportunity in the form of a National Defense University Research Fellowship, responded enthusiastically. His three essays represent a senior career naval officers observations on various aspects of international law and human conflict. In his first essay, The Inconsequence of Superpower War, Captain Thomas assumes that the possibility of war between the United States and the Soviet Union is remote, at least as long as these two nations maintain their relative power. The greatest danger is viewed as a confrontation which could occur by error, miscalculation, or involvement in someones elses splendid little war. In the next essay, Captain Thomas proposes that Quarantine operations could be adopted as an alternative to war when they are directed by regional ...
Alienation of affections. Claims for insult. Maintenance and champerty. Suits against saloonkeepers for spousal alcoholism. These are just a handful of the many torts that have disappeared, or are presently passing into history. Why Torts Die examines why these and other torts have vanished or are in danger of extinction. The central thesis of Why Torts Die is that the collapse of a tort typically owes to a confluence of compromising conditions or events. Changes in the ambient cultural atmosphere may threaten a tort theory, but the effects of these changes will be magnified or mitigated by several other factors: the nature, quality, and volume of critiques directed against the tort; the interests and limitations of the audiences that decide whether to retain or reject the cause of action; the relative power and influence of the torts opponents and supporters; the availability and desirability of alternatives to the tort; and the intrinsic qualities of the threatened claim itself. To flesh out ...
Personally, I find it a lot easier to be mindful (in the Zen sense) while walking through the park, washing the dishes, lying in bed, or building a chair -- than while analyzing genomic data, working out the details of a new AI algorithm, writing a novel, or debugging complex software code. Subjectively, this feels to me like its because being mindful requires a bit of mental effort at first - to actively pay attention to what my mind and body are doing. Once the effort is done, then mindfulness can flow along effortlessly for a while. But then I may drift away from it, and that little jump of effort is needed to become mindful again. This dynamic of mindfulness drifting and returning, or almost drifting but then not actually drifting after all, seems not to function properly when Im doing something highly cognitively intensive. When Im doing the highly intensive thing, I get deeply "into" the process, which puts me in a wonderful flow state for a while - but then when the flow state ends, ...
Posted on 2017-06-20 in General Practice & Surgery. In many of our lectures and written updates to the veterinary community, we discuss tools and procedures that allow us to achieve improved patient outcomes. This may be a new diagnostic test, a million-dollar imaging unit, a (literally) shiny new surgical implant or a recently-approved medication. Some of what we share does not cost money to acquire, but is instead a novel conceptual approach, for making a particular diagnosis or carrying out treatment; yet there may still be a learning curve. What I offer to you today is free of charge and, once created, is designed to be free of mental effort. I offer you … a checklist.. As many of you may have heard and read (I have not, it is on my to-do list), The Checklist Manifesto, penned by the Harvard surgeon Atul Gawande, espouses the benefits of incorporating checklists into many facets of life. It is in medicine, where the complexity of decision/action are so great, and the stakes of a misstep so ...
... And why is it amazing that the desires of the mind for the enjoyment of beauty are rendered powerless? It is for this reason, certainly, that the temperate Joseph is praised, because by mental effort he overcame sexual desire. Read verse in Revised Standard Version w/ Apocrypha

Frontiers | Shutting Down Sensorimotor Interferences after Stroke: A Proof-of-Principle SMR Neurofeedback Study | Frontiers in...Frontiers | Shutting Down Sensorimotor Interferences after Stroke: A Proof-of-Principle SMR Neurofeedback Study | Frontiers in...

The present study aimed at investigating behavioral and electrophysiological effects of 10 sessions of sensorimotor rhythm (SMR ... The present study aimed at investigating behavioral and electrophysiological effects of 10 sessions of sensorimotor rhythm (SMR ... Pfurtscheller, G. (1981). Central beta rhythm during sensorimotor activities in man. Electroencephalogr. Clin. Neurophysiol. 51 ... FIGURE 2. Time course of sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) power over the neurofeedback training runs, averaged over all 10 NF training ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2016.00348/full

Self-regulation of brain activity - This Is MS Multiple Sclerosis Knowledge & Support CommunitySelf-regulation of brain activity - This Is MS Multiple Sclerosis Knowledge & Support Community

The aim of the neurofeedback training was to increase voluntarily the sensorimotor rhythm (SMR, 12-15 Hz) in the EEG over ... Magnetic resonance spectroscopy evidence for declining gliosis in MS patients treated with ocrelizumab versus interferon beta- ...
more infohttps://www.thisisms.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=31247&p=258870

weaning off beta blockers experience - Heart Rhythm - MedHelpweaning off beta blockers experience - Heart Rhythm - MedHelp

I know the side effects of most beta blockers are tiredness, confusion, irregular heart rhythm etc. I would contact your doctor ... Im eating again but I noticed my dizziness, fogginess, etc, gets a lot better when my beta blocker wears off. today I decided ... Im scared, I have a stress test tomorrow, is life without beta blockers even possible? how do you properly taper off 25 mg? ...
more infohttps://medhelp.org/posts/Heart-Rhythm/weaning-off-beta-blockers-experience/show/3044198

does anyone drink while taking beta blockers? - Heart Rhythm - MedHelpdoes anyone drink while taking beta blockers? - Heart Rhythm - MedHelp

does anyone drink while taking beta blockers? worried784 Lately, I have noticed that when I have a glass of wine, or two, or ... If there was an issue with alcohol and beta blockers I assume he would have told me. That said, I have cut way way back on the ... If there was an issue with alcohol and beta blockers I assume he would have told me. That said, I have cut way way back on the ... does anyone drink while taking beta blockers?. Lately, I have noticed that when I have a glass of wine, or two, or three, while ...
more infohttps://www.medhelp.org/posts/Heart-Rhythm/does-anyone-drink-while-taking-beta-blockers/show/1044520

Parietal low beta rhythm provides a dynamical substrate for a working memory buffer | PNASParietal low beta rhythm provides a dynamical substrate for a working memory buffer | PNAS

... exhibits both beta and gamma rhythms (30, 31), with top-down information in general seen to use the alpha-beta frequency bands ... beta1 rhythms can occur as the concatenation sum of layer 5 beta2 rhythm (20 to 30 Hz) and superficial layer low-gamma rhythms ... Parietal low beta rhythm provides a dynamical substrate for a working memory buffer. Alexandros Gelastopoulos, Miles A. ... We propose that physiological properties of the parietal cortex, which can produce a unique brain rhythm at low beta (12 to 20 ...
more infohttps://www.pnas.org/content/116/33/16613

Beta-blockers reduce mortality in HFrEF with sinus rhythmBeta-blockers reduce mortality in HFrEF with sinus rhythm

Beta-blockers reduced mortality in individuals with HF with reduced ejection fraction in sinus rhythm regardless of ... "Beta-blockers reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with [HFrEF] in sinus rhythm," Dipak Kotecha, PhD, of the Institute of ... "Beta-blockers reduce morbidity and mortality in patients with [HFrEF] in sinus rhythm," Dipak Kotecha, PhD, of the Institute of ... Participants in sinus rhythm randomly assigned to beta-blockers had a lower risk for mortality (HR = 0.73; 95% CI, 0.67-0.79) ...
more infohttps://www.healio.com/cardiology/hf-transplantation/news/online/%7Be2c68d04-1682-40b9-b9c0-0f950083f5f6%7D/beta-blockers-reduce-mortality-in-hfref-with-sinus-rhythm

Beta rhythm legal definition of beta rhythmBeta rhythm legal definition of beta rhythm

What is beta rhythm? Meaning of beta rhythm as a legal term. What does beta rhythm mean in law? ... Definition of beta rhythm in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. ... rhythm. (redirected from beta rhythm). Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.. Related to beta rhythm: ... Beta rhythm legal definition of beta rhythm https://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/beta+rhythm ...
more infohttps://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/beta+rhythm

Does Disruption of Circadian Rhythms Contribute to Beta-Cell Failure in Type 2 Diabetes? | SpringerLinkDoes Disruption of Circadian Rhythms Contribute to Beta-Cell Failure in Type 2 Diabetes? | SpringerLink

The pathophysiology of beta-cell failure in T2DM involves a complex... ... is a complex metabolic disease characterized by the loss of beta-cell secretory function and mass. ... Circadian rhythms Circadian clocks Circadian disruption Hyperglycemia Type 2 diabetes Insulin secretion Beta-cell mass ... Beta-cell deficit and increased beta-cell apoptosis in humans with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes. 2003;52:102-10.PubMedCrossRef ...
more infohttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11892-014-0474-4

Frontiers | Period concatenation underlies interactions between gamma and beta rhythms in neocortex | Frontiers in Cellular...Frontiers | Period concatenation underlies interactions between gamma and beta rhythms in neocortex | Frontiers in Cellular...

... with basic rhythm-generating microcircuits underlying gamma and beta2 rhythms forming the building blocks of the beta1 rhythm ... with basic rhythm-generating microcircuits underlying gamma and beta2 rhythms forming the building blocks of the beta1 rhythm ... When coexpressed rhythms have frequencies that differ by a factor of two or more interactions can be seen in terms of phase ... It is not known how coexpressed rhythms, whose frequencies differ by less than a factor of two may interact. Here we show that ...
more infohttps://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/neuro.03.001.2008/full

Bursts of beta waves, not sustained rhythms, filter sensory processing in brain | Science...'Bursts' of beta waves, not sustained rhythms, filter sensory processing in brain | Science...

... elevated rhythm of beta, but a look trial by trial (lower rows) shows that beta emerges in discrete... ... increases in beta activity did not manifest as a continuously elevated rhythm. Instead, when beta appeared, it quickly spiked ... Bursts of beta waves, not sustained rhythms, filter sensory processing in brain. ... A better idea of beta. While the study helps to characterize the nature of beta in the somatosensory neocortex, it doesnt ...
more infohttp://www.sciencecodex.com/bursts-beta-waves-not-sustained-rhythms-filter-sensory-processing-brain-616791

Motor Imagery Classification Using Mu and Beta Rhythms of EEG with Strong Uncorrelating Transform Based Complex Common Spatial...Motor Imagery Classification Using Mu and Beta Rhythms of EEG with Strong Uncorrelating Transform Based Complex Common Spatial...

This paper shows that the supplementary information of the power difference between mu and beta rhythms obtained using SUTCCSP ... Motor Imagery Classification Using Mu and Beta Rhythms of EEG with Strong Uncorrelating Transform Based Complex Common Spatial ... Recent studies have demonstrated the disassociation between the mu and beta rhythms of electroencephalogram (EEG) during motor ... in order to obtain the mu and beta rhythms from the nonlinear EEG signals. Then, the strong uncorrelating transform complex ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/cin/2016/1489692/abs/

Central Illustration | Heart Rate and Rhythm and the Benefit of Beta-Blockers in Patients With Heart Failure | JACC: Journal of...Central Illustration | Heart Rate and Rhythm and the Benefit of Beta-Blockers in Patients With Heart Failure | JACC: Journal of...

Heart Rate and Rhythm and the Benefit of Beta-Blockers in Patients With Heart Failure ... sinus rhythm but not in (B) atrial fibrillation. Note that all trials excluded patients with bradycardia at enrollment (Figure ... Cleland and Beta-Blockers in Heart Failure Collaborative Group ...
more infohttp://www.onlinejacc.org/content/69/24/2885/F4

Beta Rhythm (Music of the Mind)Beta Rhythm (Music of the Mind)

As Ive learned more about bio-systems, starting from water molecules and working up to synapses and networks of neurons, Ive come to appreciate how incredibly powerful and compact the molecular computing substrate that life is built on top of is. Our most powerful supercomputers take days to calculate how one protein molecule folds, when the simplest bacteria can perform millions of these operations in parallel in seconds. What these simulations give us, however, is insight into exactly what special characteristics each of the proteins has in all of the various shapes it can assume. Building up from this low level understanding, hopefully we will be able to understand what the larger-scale purpose is for each of the various signaling chains and genetic transcriptions that are taking place, and perhaps we may one day be able to model these complex molecular interactions using state machines and logic that allows us to achieve a functionally equivalent set of operations withou ...
more infohttp://betarhythm.blogspot.com/2009/05/

Beta Blockers - Symptoms, Treatments and Resources for Beta BlockersBeta Blockers - Symptoms, Treatments and Resources for Beta Blockers

Treatments and Tools for Beta Blockers. Find Beta Blockers information, treatments for Beta Blockers and Beta Blockers symptoms ... MedHelps Beta Blockers Center for Information, Symptoms, Resources, ... lqt1....... advise needed if can spare a lil min please :) - Heart Rhythm Community ...
more infohttps://www.medhelp.org/tags/show/13897/Beta-Blockers

Theta w | definition of theta w by Medical dictionaryTheta w | definition of theta w by Medical dictionary

beta wave. An electroencephalographic deflection. Its frequency is between 18 and 30 Hz. See: beta rhythm ... beta waves see under rhythm. brain waves the fluctuations of electric potential in the brain, as recorded by ... See also alpha, beta, delta, and theta waves.. C wave in intracranial pressure monitoring, a small rhythmic oscillation in ... See also: rhythm. 2. The elevation of the pulse, felt by the finger or represented in the curved line of the sphygmograph. See ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/theta+w

What are the characteristics of the mu rhythms on EEG?What are the characteristics of the mu rhythms on EEG?

Characteristics of the mu rhythms are as follows: Frequency of 7-11 Hz - Generally in alpha frequency band (8-12 Hz) Location ... Mu and beta rhythm topographies during motor imagery and actual movements. Brain Topogr. 2000 Spring. 12(3):177-86. [Medline]. ... Pfurtscheller G, Stancak A Jr, Edlinger G. On the existence of different types of central beta rhythms below 30 Hz. ... Mu rhythm over the left (greater than right) central region. To be absolutely certain that this is a mu rhythm, reactivity ...
more infohttps://www.medscape.com/answers/1140143-177038/what-are-the-characteristics-of-the-mu-rhythms-on-eeg

Explore Awareness of Information Security: Insights from Cognitive NeuromechanismExplore Awareness of Information Security: Insights from Cognitive Neuromechanism

From Figure 9, we can clearly see that energy ratio of beta rhythm of left hemisphere (FP1, T3, C3, O1) is higher than that of ... For example, δ, θ, α, and β rhythms can be extracted as follows:. ... rhythms will appear in a relaxed state, rhythms will appear in excited state, rhythms will appear in drowsy state, and rhythms ... From Figure 9, we also found that energy ratio of beta rhythm of test task 1 (online payment) is higher than that of test task ...
more infohttps://www.hindawi.com/journals/cin/2015/762403/

Internalized Timing of Isochronous Sounds Is Represented in Neuromagnetic Beta Oscillations | Journal of NeuroscienceInternalized Timing of Isochronous Sounds Is Represented in Neuromagnetic Beta Oscillations | Journal of Neuroscience

2000) Gamma rhythms and beta rhythms have different synchronization properties. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 97:1867-1872. ... Dissociation between beta suppression and rebound. In contrast to the beta rebound, the initial beta decrease after the ... 2009) Beta and gamma rhythms in human auditory cortex during musical beat processing. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1169:89-92. ... 1981) Central beta rhythm during sensorimotor activities in man. Electroencephalogr Clin Neurophysiol 51:253-264. ...
more infohttp://www.jneurosci.org/content/32/5/1791

Waver | definition of waver by Medical dictionaryWaver | definition of waver by Medical dictionary

beta wave. An electroencephalographic deflection. Its frequency is between 18 and 30 Hz. See: beta rhythm ... beta waves see under rhythm. brain waves the fluctuations of electric potential in the brain, as recorded by ... See also alpha, beta, delta, and theta waves.. C wave in intracranial pressure monitoring, a small rhythmic oscillation in ... See also: rhythm. 2. The elevation of the pulse, felt by the finger or represented in the curved line of the sphygmograph. See ...
more infohttps://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/waver

Heart Rhythm DrugsHeart Rhythm Drugs

Class II - Beta-Blockers. Do beta blockers prevent heart rhythm problems?. Class II antiarrhythmics, beta blockers, are the ... Heart Rhythm Drugs. *In Treatment & Recovery. What are heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias)?. An arrhythmia, or heart rhythm ... What are the risks of heart rhythm drugs?. With the exception of beta blockers, the benefits of antiarrhythmic medications must ... It is not fully understood how beta blockers prevent heart rhythm problems: they may have a direct antiarrhythmic effect, or ...
more infohttp://www.simstat.com/heart-rhythm-drugs/

Heart Rhythm Help - Forums and Discussions - MedHelpHeart Rhythm Help - Forums and Discussions - MedHelp

Can you temporarily increase the dosage of your beta blocker? trus75 Hello, Ive been taking bisoprolol in a very small dosage ... Heart Rhythm Community Join others experiencing Heart Rhythm issues. Ask a question, join a conversation, share experiences: ...
more infohttps://medhelp.org/forums/Heart-Rhythm/show/92

List of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Medications and Side EffectsList of Atrial Fibrillation (AFib) Medications and Side Effects

Medications to treat AFib include beta-blockers, blood thinners, and heart rhythm drugs. AFib medications can cause side ... is an abnormal heart rhythm that causes an irregular and rapid heartbeat. ... Beta-blockers. Beta-blockers is a class of drugs that prevent stimulation of the beta-adrenergic receptors responsible for ... What Is AFib? Medications Beta-Blockers & CCBs Heart Rhythm Drugs Blood Thinners Side Effects Doctor Specialists CenterComments ...
more infohttps://www.medicinenet.com/atrial_fibrillation_afib_treatment_drugs/article.htm

Kopell N[au] - PubMed - NCBIKopell N[au] - PubMed - NCBI

Parietal low beta rhythm provides a dynamical substrate for a working memory buffer. ... Top-down beta rhythms support selective attention via interlaminar interaction: a model. ... Neurosystems: brain rhythms and cognitive processing.. Cannon J, McCarthy MM, Lee S, Lee J, Börgers C, Whittington MA, Kopell N ... Dual γ rhythm generators control interlaminar synchrony in auditory cortex.. Ainsworth M, Lee S, Cunningham MO, Roopun AK, ...
more infohttps://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?cmd=search&term=Kopell+N%5Bau%5D&dispmax=50

Imperceptible Somatosensory Stimulation Alters Sensorimotor Background Rhythm and Connectivity | Journal of NeuroscienceImperceptible Somatosensory Stimulation Alters Sensorimotor Background Rhythm and Connectivity | Journal of Neuroscience

2005) On the human sensorimotor-cortex beta rhythm: sources and modeling. Neuroimage 26:347-355, doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage. ... 2009) Rolandic alpha and beta EEG rhythms strengths are inversely related to fMRI-BOLD signal in primary somatosensory and ... Rolandic rhythms.. Since Rolandic rhythms can be hidden under dominating occipital alpha activity, a preselection of "central" ... 2002) Simultaneous EEG and fMRI of the alpha rhythm. Neuroreport 13:2487-2492, doi:10.1097/00001756-200212200-00022, pmid: ...
more infohttp://www.jneurosci.org/content/35/15/5917
  • The present study aimed at investigating behavioral and electrophysiological effects of 10 sessions of sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) neurofeedback in a 74-years-old stroke patient (UG20). (frontiersin.org)
  • Beta waves are often considered indicative of inhibitory cortical transmission mediated by gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), the principal inhibitory neurotransmitter of the mammalian nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • The findings, made with consistency in humans and mice, can not only refine ongoing research into how beta waves arise and work in the brain, Jones said, but also provide guidance to clinicians as they develop therapies that seek to modulate beta waves. (sciencecodex.com)
  • Benzodiazepines, drugs that modulate GABAA receptors, induce beta waves in EEG recordings from humans and rats. (wikipedia.org)
  • We show that the natural beta1 rhythm (12 to 20 Hz) of the PC provides a substrate for an episodic buffer that can synergistically combine executive commands (e.g., from PFC) and multimodal information into a flexible and updatable representation of recent sensory inputs. (pnas.org)
  • The process occurs via period concatenation, with basic rhythm-generating microcircuits underlying gamma and beta2 rhythms forming the building blocks of the beta1 rhythm by a process of addition. (frontiersin.org)
  • The research team, led by graduate student Hyeyoung Shin, acquired the data through a series of experiments in which they measured beta waves in the somatosensory neocortex of humans and mice in the second leading up to inducing (or not inducing) varying amounts of a tactile sensation. (sciencecodex.com)
  • A particularly good example, Shin said, was that in experiments where people were first instructed to focus on their foot, there was more beta power in the hand region of the neocortex. (sciencecodex.com)
  • While the study helps to characterize the nature of beta in the somatosensory neocortex, it doesn't explain how it affects sensations, Jones acknowledged. (sciencecodex.com)
  • We propose that physiological properties of the parietal cortex, which can produce a unique brain rhythm at low beta (12 to 20 Hz), make this cortex an excellent candidate for a substrate of such a buffer. (pnas.org)
  • Beta rhythm reflects a balance between networks of nerve cells projecting from the cortex to other parts of the brain and spinal cord (i. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • What they found, as expected, is that the more beta activity there was in the corresponding region of cortex, the less likely subjects were to report feeling a sensation. (sciencecodex.com)
  • The mu rhythm has been documented on subdural recording of both sensory and motor cortex and shows the same characteristics as that seen on surface EEG, including distribution, morphology, and reactivity. (medscape.com)
  • Functional significance of the mu rhythm of human cortex: an electrophysiologic study with subdural electrodes. (medscape.com)
  • Decreased beta-band power over contralateral motor cortex was associated with a focal shift from relative inhibition to excitation. (elifesciences.org)
  • Over the motor cortex beta waves are associated with the muscle contractions that happen in isotonic movements and are suppressed prior to and during movement changes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The artificial induction of increased beta waves over the motor cortex by a form of electrical stimulation called Transcranial alternating-current stimulation consistent with its link to isotonic contraction produces a slowing of motor movements. (wikipedia.org)
  • We show that cell assemblies shaped by this rhythm have the required properties of a WM buffer, allowing for robust yet manipulable representations of sensory stimuli. (pnas.org)
  • Bursts of beta activity are associated with a strengthening of sensory feedback in static motor control and reduced when there is movement change. (wikipedia.org)
  • When people were trying to block distraction in a brain area, the probability of seeing these beta events went up," said senior author Stephanie R. Jones, an associate professor of neuroscience at Brown. (sciencecodex.com)
  • Pineda JA, Allison BZ, Vankov A. The effects of self-movement, observation, and imagination on mu rhythms and readiness potentials (RP's): toward a brain-computer interface (BCI). (medscape.com)
  • Both rhythms displayed effector-specific modulations, tracked spectral markers of action potentials in the local neuronal population, and showed spatially systematic phase relationships (traveling waves). (elifesciences.org)
  • Results indicate that left hemisphere and beta rhythms of electroencephalogram (EEG) signal are sensitive to the cognitive degree of risks in the awareness of information security, which may be probably considered as the sign to assess people's cognition of potential risks in online financial payment. (hindawi.com)
  • A new Brown University study stands to substantially refine what they thought was going on: What really matters is not a sustained elevation in beta wave power, but instead the rate of specific bursts of beta wave activity, ideally with perfect timing. (sciencecodex.com)
  • With a closer examination, trial-by-trial for each subject, they saw that what really reflected attention and impacted perception were discrete, powerful bursts of beta waves at frequencies around 20 hertz. (sciencecodex.com)
  • Confirming that mice model the human experience means researchers can rely on mice in experiments that delve more deeply into how beta bursts arise and what their consequence are in neurons and circuits. (sciencecodex.com)
  • Shin is already doing experiments to dissect how distinct neural subpopulations contribute to beta bursts and somatosensory detection, respectively. (sciencecodex.com)
  • At times, as shown here, the alpha rhythm can be identified only in very brief bursts and often immediately after eye closure. (medscape.com)
  • Firstly, a single frequency of population rhythm may be amplitude modulated by a coexistent lower frequency, producing a phenomenon referred to as 'nesting' of one frequency in another. (frontiersin.org)
  • The time course of beta decrease after stimulus onset was consistent regardless of the rate or regularity of the stimulus, but the time course of the following beta rebound depended on the stimulus rate only in the regular stimulus conditions such that the beta amplitude reached its maximum just before the occurrence of the next sound. (jneurosci.org)
  • The smaller amplitude, faster frequency waves that replaced alpha waves when the subject opened his or her eyes were then termed beta waves. (wikipedia.org)
  • Low amplitude beta waves with multiple and varying frequencies are often associated with active, busy or anxious thinking and active concentration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although it is known that a regular auditory rhythm can facilitate rhythmic movement, the neural mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain poorly understood. (jneurosci.org)
  • The proposed algorithm in this paper uses a fully data-driven multivariate empirical mode decomposition (MEMD) in order to obtain the mu and beta rhythms from the nonlinear EEG signals. (hindawi.com)
  • Antiarrhythmics work by slowing down the electrical signals in the heart so the heart can resume a regular rhythm. (simstat.com)
  • In this experiment using human magnetoencephalography, 12 young healthy adults listened passively to an isochronous auditory rhythm without producing rhythmic movement. (jneurosci.org)
  • Elucidating the role of circadian clocks in regulating beta-cell health will add to our understanding of T2DM pathophysiology and may contribute to the development of novel therapeutic and preventative approaches. (springer.com)
  • Spontaneous beta waves are also observed diffusely in scalp EEG recordings from children with duplication 15q11.2-q13.1 syndrome (Dup15q) who have duplications of GABAA receptor subunit genes GABRA5, GABRB3, and GABRG3. (wikipedia.org)
  • For this reason, it is possible that, in certain clinical contexts, beta waves could be a general biomarker of GABAA receptor gene overexpression or otherwise aberrant GABAergic transmission. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 10-second segment showing a well-formed and well-regulated alpha rhythm at 9 Hz. (medscape.com)
  • The contrast between the first and second halves of the page illustrates the reactivity of a normal alpha rhythm, with attenuation upon eye opening. (medscape.com)
  • This is an example of an alpha rhythm with a wider distribution than is typical. (medscape.com)
  • The patient's alpha rhythm at 12 Hz is seen in the second half of the sample. (medscape.com)
  • Moving in synchrony with an auditory rhythm requires predictive action based on neurodynamic representation of temporal information. (jneurosci.org)
  • I'm eating again but I noticed my dizziness, fogginess, etc, gets a lot better when my beta blocker wears off. (medhelp.org)
  • Also, been prescribed beta blocker, Carvedilol. (medhelp.org)
  • Can you temporarily increase the dosage of your beta blocker? (medhelp.org)
  • Pfurtscheller G, Stancak A Jr, Edlinger G. On the existence of different types of central beta rhythms below 30 Hz. (medscape.com)
  • The researchers tracked the association of beta power with whether subjects accurately detected, or didn't detect, stimuli. (sciencecodex.com)
  • Then, the strong uncorrelating transform complex common spatial patterns (SUTCCSP) algorithm is applied to the rhythms so that the complex data, constructed with the mu and beta rhythms, becomes uncorrelated and its pseudocovariance provides supplementary power difference information between the two rhythms. (hindawi.com)
  • Implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) and pacemakers are safer and better than drugs for the long-term treatment of serious heart rhythm problems. (simstat.com)
  • The pathophysiology of beta-cell failure in T2DM involves a complex interaction between genetic susceptibilities and environmental risk factors. (springer.com)
  • In recent years, circadian disruption has become increasingly prevalent in modern societies and consistently shown to augment T2DM susceptibility (partly mediated through its effects on pancreatic beta-cells). (springer.com)
  • It remains unclear, however, whether that aggregation could obscure differential contributions of those rhythms to movement selection. (elifesciences.org)
  • IMAGE: On average (top), a research participant might seem to produce a sustained, elevated rhythm of beta, but a look trial by trial (lower rows) shows that beta emerges in discrete. (sciencecodex.com)
  • Previously, antiarrhythmic medications were given to heart attack patients to help prevent heart rhythm problems from occurring in the first place. (simstat.com)
  • There are four classes of antiarrhythmic medications categorized according to how they affect heart rhythm disturbances. (simstat.com)
  • However, many studies now show that these medications are not beneficial and actually increase the risk of dying because they often triggerheart rhythm disturbances. (simstat.com)
  • Since beta-cell failure is essential for development of T2DM, we will review current work from epidemiologic, clinical, and animal studies designed to gain insights into the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying the predisposition to beta-cell failure associated with circadian disruption. (springer.com)