Glomus Tympanicum Tumor: A rare PARAGANGLIOMA involving the GLOMUS TYMPANICUM, a collection of chemoreceptor tissue adjacent to the TYMPANIC CAVITY. It can cause TINNITUS and conductive hearing loss (HEARING LOSS, CONDUCTIVE).Paraganglia, Nonchromaffin: Several clusters of chemoreceptive and supporting cells associated with blood vessels and nerves (especially the glossopharyngeal and vagus). The nonchromaffin paraganglia sense pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and participate in respiratory, and perhaps circulatory, control. They include the CAROTID BODY; AORTIC BODIES; the GLOMUS JUGULARE; and the GLOMUS TYMPANICUM.Paraganglioma, Extra-Adrenal: A relatively rare, usually benign neoplasm originating in the chemoreceptor tissue of the CAROTID BODY; GLOMUS JUGULARE; GLOMUS TYMPANICUM; AORTIC BODIES; and the female genital tract. It consists histologically of rounded or ovoid hyperchromatic cells that tend to be grouped in an alveolus-like pattern within a scant to moderate amount of fibrous stroma and a few large thin-walled vascular channels. (From Stedman, 27th ed)Ear Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of any part of the hearing and equilibrium system of the body (the EXTERNAL EAR, the MIDDLE EAR, and the INNER EAR).Glomus Tympanicum: A highly vascular ovoid body of chemoreceptive tissue lying adjacent to the TYMPANIC CAVITY. It is derived from NEURAL CREST tissue and is considered part of the diffuse neuroendocrine system. It is the site of a rare neoplasm called a GLOMUS TYMPANICUM TUMOR.Eustachian Tube: A narrow passageway that connects the upper part of the throat to the TYMPANIC CAVITY.Glomus Tumor: A blue-red, extremely painful vascular neoplasm involving a glomeriform arteriovenous anastomosis (glomus body), which may be found anywhere in the skin, most often in the distal portion of the fingers and toes, especially beneath the nail. It is composed of specialized pericytes (sometimes termed glomus cells), usually in single encapsulated nodular masses which may be several millimeters in diameter (From Stedman, 27th ed). CHEMODECTOMA, a tumor of NEURAL CREST origin, is also sometimes called a glomus tumor.Ear, Middle: The space and structures directly internal to the TYMPANIC MEMBRANE and external to the inner ear (LABYRINTH). Its major components include the AUDITORY OSSICLES and the EUSTACHIAN TUBE that connects the cavity of middle ear (tympanic cavity) to the upper part of the throat.X-Ray Intensifying Screens: Screens which absorb the energy in the x-ray beam that has penetrated the patient and convert this energy into a light pattern which has as nearly as possible the same information as the original x-ray beam. The more light a screen produces for a given input of x-radiation, the less x-ray exposure and thus shorter exposure time are needed to expose the film. In most film-screen systems, the film is sandwiched between two screens in a cassette so that the emulsion on each side is exposed to the light from its contiguous screen.Glomus Jugulare Tumor: A paraganglioma involving the glomus jugulare, a microscopic collection of chemoreceptor tissue in the adventitia of the bulb of the jugular vein. It may cause paralysis of the vocal cords, attacks of dizziness, blackouts, and nystagmus. It is not resectable but radiation therapy is effective. It regresses slowly, but permanent control is regularly achieved. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, pp1603-4)Glomeromycota: A phylum of fungi that are mutualistic symbionts and form ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAE with PLANT ROOTS.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Tumor Burden: The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.Mycorrhizae: Symbiotic combination (dual organism) of the MYCELIUM of FUNGI with the roots of plants (PLANT ROOTS). The roots of almost all higher plants exhibit this mutually beneficial relationship, whereby the fungus supplies water and mineral salts to the plant, and the plant supplies CARBOHYDRATES to the fungus. There are two major types of mycorrhizae: ectomycorrhizae and endomycorrhizae.Carotid Body: A small cluster of chemoreceptive and supporting cells located near the bifurcation of the internal carotid artery. The carotid body, which is richly supplied with fenestrated capillaries, senses the pH, carbon dioxide, and oxygen concentrations in the blood and plays a crucial role in their homeostatic control.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Mastoid: The posterior part of the temporal bone. It is a projection of the petrous bone.Glomus Jugulare: A nonchromaffin paraganglion located in the wall of the jugular bulb. The most common tumors of the middle ear arise from this tissue. (Lockard, Desk Reference for Neuroscience, 1992, p114)Nail Diseases: Diseases of the nail plate and tissues surrounding it. The concept is limited to primates.Adenolymphoma: A benign tumor characterized histologically by tall columnar epithelium within a lymphoid tissue stroma. It is usually found in the salivary glands, especially the parotid.Parotid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.Sodium Pertechnetate Tc 99m: A gamma-emitting radionuclide imaging agent used for the diagnosis of diseases in many tissues, particularly in the gastrointestinal system, cardiovascular and cerebral circulation, brain, thyroid, and joints.Adenoma, Pleomorphic: A benign, slow-growing tumor, most commonly of the salivary gland, occurring as a small, painless, firm nodule, usually of the parotid gland, but also found in any major or accessory salivary gland anywhere in the oral cavity. It is most often seen in women in the fifth decade. Histologically, the tumor presents a variety of cells: cuboidal, columnar, and squamous cells, showing all forms of epithelial growth. (Dorland, 27th ed)Adenoma, Oxyphilic: A usually benign glandular tumor composed of oxyphil cells, large cells with small irregular nuclei and dense acidophilic granules due to the presence of abundant MITOCHONDRIA. Oxyphil cells, also known as oncocytes, are found in oncocytomas of the kidney, salivary glands, and endocrine glands. In the thyroid gland, oxyphil cells are known as Hurthle cells and Askanazy cells.Parotid Gland: The largest of the three pairs of SALIVARY GLANDS. They lie on the sides of the FACE immediately below and in front of the EAR.Neuroradiography: Radiography of the central nervous system.GermanyHepatitis, Infectious Canine: A contagious disease caused by canine adenovirus (ADENOVIRUSES, CANINE) infecting the LIVER, the EYE, the KIDNEY, and other organs in dogs, other canids, and bears. Symptoms include FEVER; EDEMA; VOMITING; and DIARRHEA.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Dogs: The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, comprising about 400 breeds, of the carnivore family CANIDAE. They are worldwide in distribution and live in association with people. (Walker's Mammals of the World, 5th ed, p1065)Heterogeneous-Nuclear Ribonucleoprotein D: A heterogeneous-nuclear ribonucleoprotein that has specificity for AU-rich elements found in the 3'-region of mRNA and may play a role in RNA stability. Several isoforms of hnRNP D protein have been found to occur due to alternative mRNA splicing (RNA SPLICING).Diethylstilbestrol: A synthetic nonsteroidal estrogen used in the treatment of menopausal and postmenopausal disorders. It was also used formerly as a growth promoter in animals. According to the Fourth Annual Report on Carcinogens (NTP 85-002, 1985), diethylstilbestrol has been listed as a known carcinogen. (Merck, 11th ed)Research: Critical and exhaustive investigation or experimentation, having for its aim the discovery of new facts and their correct interpretation, the revision of accepted conclusions, theories, or laws in the light of newly discovered facts, or the practical application of such new or revised conclusions, theories, or laws. (Webster, 3d ed)Carotid Body Tumor: Benign paraganglioma at the bifurcation of the COMMON CAROTID ARTERIES. It can encroach on the parapharyngeal space and produce dysphagia, pain, and cranial nerve palsies.Local Lymph Node Assay: The local lymph node assay (LLNA) is an alternative method for the identification of chemicals that have the ability to cause skin sensitization and allergic contact dermatitis. Endpoints have been established so fewer animals are required and less painful procedures are used.Carotid Artery, External: Branch of the common carotid artery which supplies the exterior of the head, the face, and the greater part of the neck.Paraganglioma: A neural crest tumor usually derived from the chromoreceptor tissue of a paraganglion, such as the carotid body, or medulla of the adrenal gland (usually called a chromaffinoma or pheochromocytoma). It is more common in women than in men. (Stedman, 25th ed; from Segen, Dictionary of Modern Medicine, 1992)Vocational Guidance: Systematic efforts to assist individuals in selecting an occupation or suitable employment on the basis of aptitude, education, etc.Parental Leave: The authorized absence from work of either parent prior to and after the birth of their child. It includes also absence because of the illness of a child or at the time of the adoption of a child. It does not include leave for care of siblings, parents, or other family members: for this FAMILY LEAVE is available.Educational Measurement: The assessing of academic or educational achievement. It includes all aspects of testing and test construction.Physicians, Women: Women licensed to practice medicine.Arcus Senilis: A corneal disease in which there is a deposition of phospholipid and cholesterol in the corneal stroma and anterior sclera.Medical Records: Recording of pertinent information concerning patient's illness or illnesses.Education, Medical: Use for general articles concerning medical education.Laryngeal Cartilages: The nine cartilages of the larynx, including the cricoid, thyroid and epiglottic, and two each of arytenoid, corniculate and cuneiform.Hemangioma, Cavernous: A vascular anomaly that is a collection of tortuous BLOOD VESSELS and connective tissue. This tumor-like mass with the large vascular space is filled with blood and usually appears as a strawberry-like lesion in the subcutaneous areas of the face, extremities, or other regions of the body including the central nervous system.Parathyroid Glands: Two pairs of small oval-shaped glands located in the front and the base of the NECK and adjacent to the two lobes of THYROID GLAND. They secrete PARATHYROID HORMONE that regulates the balance of CALCIUM; PHOSPHORUS; and MAGNESIUM in the body.Larynx: A tubular organ of VOICE production. It is located in the anterior neck, superior to the TRACHEA and inferior to the tongue and HYOID BONE.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Artifacts: Any visible result of a procedure which is caused by the procedure itself and not by the entity being analyzed. Common examples include histological structures introduced by tissue processing, radiographic images of structures that are not naturally present in living tissue, and products of chemical reactions that occur during analysis.
Micrograph of a carotid body tumor Glomus jugulare tumor Ectopic functional paraganglioma (glomus jugulare) in a patient with ... there is no test that determines benign from malignant tumors; long-term followup is therefore recommended for all individuals ... Glomus tympanicum and Glomus jugulare: Both commonly present as a middle ear mass resulting in tinnitus (in 80%) and hearing ... They are highly vascular tumors and may have a deep red color. On microscopic inspection, the tumor cells are readily ...
... glomus jugulare tumor MeSH C04.557.465.625.650.700.705.360 --- glomus tympanicum tumor MeSH C04.557.465.625.650.700.725 --- ... giant cell tumors MeSH C04.557.450.565.380.380 --- giant cell tumor of bone MeSH C04.557.450.565.465 --- mastocytosis MeSH ... benign fibrous MeSH C04.557.450.565.590.425.360 --- histiocytoma, malignant fibrous MeSH C04.557.450.565.590.550 --- ... glomus jugulare tumor MeSH C04.557.580.625.650.700.705.360 --- glomus tympanicum tumor MeSH C04.557.580.625.650.700.725 --- ...
... assisted endoscopic management of glomus tympanicum tumors: A case series.(ORIGINAL ARTICLE, Report, Case overview) by Ear, ... including glomus tympanicum tumors. (7) Glomus tympanicum tumors are the most common of the benign middle ear lesions. (8) ... We describe the excision of glomus tympanicum tumors via an endoscopic transcanal technique in 5 patients. Tumor excision was ... tympanicum...-a0570438862. *APA style: KTP-laser--assisted endoscopic management of glomus tympanicum tumors: A case series.. ( ...
I. Glomus Tympanicum (Middle Ear Glomus Tumors) a. Glomus Tumor: middle ear. b. Glomus Tumor: middle ear and mastoid. c. Glomus ... Glomus Tumors (Tympanicum Jugulare). Glomus tumors are the most common benign tumors of the middle ear. They arise from glomus ... Surgery of the Glomus Tympanicum (Glomus Tumor of the Middle Ear). The size and the extent of the glomus tumor determine the ... Home » Learn » Ear Tumors » Tumors of the Middle Ear & Mastoid » Glomus Tumors (Tympanicum Jugulare) ...
They are preferentially located in the neck (carotid body and glomus vagal) and head (glomus jugulare and tympanicum).. ... Paragangliomas are slow growing highly vascular tumor, usually benign, derived from crest-neural cells. ... Home Genes Leukemias Solid Tumors Cancer-Prone Deep Insight Case Reports Journals Portal Teaching X Y 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... Alias: Familial non chromaffin paragangliomas 3; Familial glomus tumor. Disease. Hereditary paraganglioma type 3 (PGL3) is a ...
Glomus tympanicum is classically seen along the cochlear promontory and facial schwannomas will occur along the course of the ... Uncommon benign tumors include hemangiomas and middle ear adenomas. These will generally demonstrate well-circumscribed margins ... however extension into the IAC or rarely IAC tumor without a cisternal component may occur, mimicking a schwannoma. Metastasis ... Paragangiomas (specifically glomus tympanicum), congenital cholesteatomas, and schwannomas are the most common. All three ...
Paraganglioma is a rare neoplasm arising from carotid body usually benign and constitute 0.5 % of all total body tumors. They ... glomus tympanicum, and pheochromocytoma. This is a retrospective analysis of the medical records of carotid body paraganglioma ... location of tumor, extent of tumor, tumor volume, tumor stage and surgical margins. Pharyngocutaneous fistula was observed in ... and phenocopy the tumour microenvironment using tumour explants maintained in defined tumour grade-matched matrix support and ...
Diagnosis: Glomus tympanicum. Key points Glomus tympanicum is a benign hypervascular tumor that arises from glomus bodies ( ... Larger tumors may have a salt and pepper appearance caused by flow voids in the mass.. Glomus tumors occur (in order of ... Branches of the tympanic plexus (and potential locations for glomus tympanicum tumors) occur on the cochlear promontory, near ... Warthin tumor comprises 4%-10% of all parotid tumors. They are the most common bilateral salivary gland tumor with an estimated ...
... glomus tympanicum, other). Glomus tumors arise from tissue that senses gases in the blood and are virtually always benign, non- ... The more limited form of glomus tumors arise in the middle ear and are called glomus tympanicum. ... Management of glomus jugulare tumors is usually by surgery, but radiation may sometimes be employed. Glomus tumors rarely ... A more extensive glomus tympanicum may grow into the mastoid bone and be called a glomus mastoideum. Surgical removal is the ...
What Is A Glomus Tumor?. A glomus tumor is also known as a paraganglioma. it is usually benign and slow growing. It is a rare ... Conclusion and Statistics of Treatment for Glomus Tumors. In a study by Cosetti et al., 2008, their research team recruited 12 ... Can A Glomus Tumor Cause Tinnitus?. Mar 2, 2018 , Tinnitus Causes , 0 , ... For some, there is a definitive cure and one of these cases is when the underlying cause of the tinnitus is a glomus tumor. ...
... glomus tympanicum tumors can now be approached through the ear canal by elevating the eardrum and then destroying the tumor ... Benign tumors of glomus bodies can occur within the middle ear or at other sites: the temporal bone and neck, or within the ... If the glomus tumor appears to be filling the lower half of the middle ear, it can be either a glomus tumor of the middle ear ( ... It is necessary to differentiate between a glomus tumor limited to the middle ear, and a glomus tumor arising from the jugular ...
... with the suspected diagnosis of a glomus tympanicum tumor. Following the otorhinolaryngological examination and imaging an ... Adenomas are very rare tumors of the middle ear. They are benign neoplasms originating from the glandular components of the ... Our study illustrates that the endoscopic approach of combined trans oto and nasal is a good choice for tumor resection of ... In cases with a suitable localization an adequate exposure and removal of this rare tumor can be achieved by a transmeatal ...
... glomus tympanicum paragangliomas or endolymphatic sac tumors (ELST) originating in the vestibular recess. Most tumors are ... Baumgarten P, Gessler F, Schittenhelm J et al (2016) Brain invasion in otherwise benign meningiomas does not predict tumor ... Tumors of the inner ear and adjacent structures. Abstract. Tumors of the inner ear and adjacent structures often present with ... Zu den weniger häufigen tumorösen Läsionen zählen die ektop gelegenen Felsenbeinmeningeome, Paragangliome des Glomus tympanicum ...
The medical charts and radiographic studies of 55 patients with these tumors were reviewed. Women outnumbered men in a ratio of ... was the most sensitive means of demonstrating glomus tympanicum chemodectomas. Magnification angiography was also a sensitive ... Glomus tympanicum chemodectomas are benign neoplasms that develop from normal glomus bodies located along the Jacobson ( ... Glomus tympanicum chemodectomas are benign neoplasms that develop from normal glomus bodies located along the Jacobson ( ...
... benign (non-cancerous) tumors that arise from paraganglia in the middle ear. Conductive hearing loss is common due to the tumor ... Glomus Tympanicum Tumors. Glomus tympanicum tumors (also known as paragangliomas of the middle ear) are highly vascular, ... occurs frequently due to the vascular nature of these tumors. Very large glomus tympanicum tumors may cause vertigo (feeling ... Smaller glomus tympanicum tumors may not produce any symptoms but can be found incidentally as reddish mass lesions under the ...
a benign tumor that originates in the membrane of a nerve trunk. Neurinomas are most often found in the auditory nerve. ... Simultaneous contralateral vestibular schwannoma and glomus jugulare tumor: a case report. INTRODUCTION: A benign tumour of ... Simultaneous occurrence of an acoustic neurinoma and a glomus tympanicum tumor in a patient.. ... a benign tumor that originates in the membrane of a nerve trunk. Neurinomas are most often found in the auditory nerve. ...
... glomus jugulare), in the middle ear (glomus tympanicum) or along the vagus nerve (glomus vagale).. Carotid body tumors are well ... In head and neck, the glomus tumors are seen at the carotid bifurcation (carotid body tumor) as seen in this case, at the ... encapsulated and highly vascular benign tumors and can occur in a wide range of ages, from childhood to the elderly, but the ... These tumors are called extra-adrenal paragangliomas and sometimes as glomus tumors or chemodectomas. The function of ...
Pathology e.g.- Carotid body tumor, Glomus juglare, Glomus tympanicum. *[ sometimes called Glomus tumors* ] ... Not to be confused with Glomangioma which are also called Glomus tumors: benign vascular tumors (75% in hand).. MedicoNotebook ... Important Bone Tumors. Author: Dr Ayush Goel Important Bone Tumors: 1. Osteosarcoma: Age: 10-20 yrs (except when its secondary ... For lung investigation - CT scan is best , except in Pancoast tumour/Superior sulcus tumour where MRI is investigation of ...
Pathology e.g.- Carotid body tumor, Glomus juglare, Glomus tympanicum. *[ sometimes called Glomus tumors* ] ... Not to be confused with Glomangioma which are also called Glomus tumors: benign vascular tumors (75% in hand).. MedicoNotebook ... Most accurate imaging technique for the staging of primary lung tumors - PET. 325. Most common posterior fossa tumor in adult ... intracranial primitive neuroectodermal tumor ( pineal or suprasellar ). 362. T-shaped uterus : seen in cases of in-utero ...
Often found at the skull base (glomus tympanicum, glomus juglare) but can be found along the vagus nerve (glomus vagale) as ... Other Malignant Tumors of the Neck. PNET (Primitive neuro ectodermal tumor): May arise in the soft tissues or from the neural ... Benign well encapsulated fat containing tumors usually in the subcutaneous or submucosal regions. ... The role of CT or MR is not to specify the type of cancer but rather to define the extent of the tumor and to reveal important ...
Liscak R, , Vladyka V, & Simonova G, et al: Leksell gamma knife radiosurgery of the tumor glomus jugulare and tympanicum. ... Lalwani AK, , Jackler RK, & Gutin PH: Lethal fibrosarcoma complicating radiation therapy for benign glomus jugulare tumor. Am J ... Forest JA III, , Jackson CG, & McGrew BM: Long-term control of surgically treated glomus tympanicum tumors. Otol Neurotol 22: ... Carcinoid apudoma arising in a glomus jugulare tumor: review of endocrine activity in glomus jugulare tumors.. Laryngoscope. 90 ...
Glomus Tympanicum Tumor. *Head and Neck Cancer. *Head or Neck Lump or Swelling ... He has particular interests in hearing loss, cochlear implantation and skull base tumors. He earned his medical degree and ...
Micrograph of a carotid body tumor Glomus jugulare tumor Ectopic functional paraganglioma (glomus jugulare) in a patient with ... there is no test that determines benign from malignant tumors; long-term followup is therefore recommended for all individuals ... Glomus tympanicum and Glomus jugulare: Both commonly present as a middle ear mass resulting in tinnitus (in 80%) and hearing ... They are highly vascular tumors and may have a deep red color. On microscopic inspection, the tumor cells are readily ...
Benign & Malignant Tumors. *Cholesteatoma. *Congenital Atresia & Microtia of the Ear. *Glomus Tumors (Tympanicum Jugulare) ... Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) with a contrast dye called Gadolinium can rule out an acoustic neuroma or other brain tumor as ... Tumors of the inner ear nerve (the eighth nerve), especially acoustic neuromas, can also produce similar symptoms. These tumors ... Vertigo is commonly caused by acute labyrinthitis (a viral inflammation of the inner ear), benign positional vertigo (a ...
Neurotology and Skull Base Surgery team is dedicated to treating acoustic neuromas and other tumors of the skull base. ... Glomus tumors (glomus jugulare, glomus tympanicum). *Rare tumors (lipoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, chordoma, chondrosarcoma, ... A Second Opinion Saves Woman from a Spreading Thyroid Tumor. *Teacher Travels from Taiwan for Innovative Treatment ... Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). *Superior canal dehiscence syndrome. *Vestibular neuritis. Request an Appointment ...
... hypervascular tumors that arise within the jugular foramen of the temporal bone. They are included in a group of tumors ... referred to as paragangliomas, which occur at various sites and include carotid body, glomus vagale, and glomus tympanicum ... Type A tumor - Tumor limited to the middle ear cleft (glomus tympanicum) ... Imaging of Head and Neck Glomus Tumors (Paragangliomas) * Benign Tumors of the Middle Ear ...
... hypervascular tumors that arise within the jugular foramen of the temporal bone. They are included in a group of tumors ... referred to as paragangliomas, which occur at various sites and include carotid body, glomus vagale, and glomus tympanicum ... Glomus jugulare tumors may grow slowly and produce cranial nerve palsies that, to a certain point, are benign and mostly ... Tumor volume following surgery was unchanged in 13 patients and was decreased in 8; tumor regrowth occurred in 1 patient. Tumor ...
  • Vertigo is commonly caused by acute labyrinthitis (a viral inflammation of the inner ear), benign positional vertigo (a condition due to abnormally floating crystals in the inner ear that stimulate the nerve endings of the inner ear), delayed symptom of head injury, or result of cervical spine problems. (earsurgery.org)
  • The surgical approach depends on the localization and extension of the tumor. (medscape.com)
  • Type C tumors (see Pathophysiology) require radical resection via a standard combined transmastoid-infratemporal or transtemporal-infratemporal approach with or without internal carotid artery (ICA) trapping, preceded by external carotid artery (ECA) embolization or superselective embolization. (medscape.com)
  • carotid body tumor a chemodectoma of a carotid body , found as a firm round mass at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In this article the authors report on a series of patients with complex glomus jugulare tumors and focus on treatment decisions, avoidance of complications, surgical refinements, and patient outcomes. (thejns.org)
  • The surgical technique was tailored to each patient and each tumor. (thejns.org)
  • Often, glomus jugulare tumors are diagnosed within the sixth or seventh decade of life and can be followed by imaging only and may not need surgical intervention. (medscape.com)
  • OBJECTIVES: To present a case of type 1 glomus tympanicum, its clinical presentations, surgical management and outcome.METHODS:Design: Case ReportSetting: Tertiary Government HospitalPatient: OneRESULTS: A 44-year-old woman with pulsatile tinnitus, vertigo, headache, ear fullness and decreased hearing on the right had a pulsatile reddish mass behind the tympanic membrane and Brown sign. (bvsalud.org)
  • The only way to treat a glomus is through surgical removal . (earandsinusinstitute.com)
  • Surgical recommendations are made on a case-by-case basis depending on the size and location of the tumor, hearing status and whether the nerve is weak or completely paralyzed. (neurotucson.com)
  • Mutations of SDHB play an important role in familial adrenal pheochromocytoma and extra-adrenal paraganglioma (of abdomen and thorax), although there is considerable overlap in the types of tumors associated with SDHB and SDHD gene mutations. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are many types of tumors that may start next to the facial nerve and may involve the nerve. (entcenterutah.com)
  • It is thought that a mutation within the genetic makeup of a paraganglia cell causes uncontrolled growth, eventually leading to a tumor. (earsite.com)