Facial NeoplasmsFacial Nerve: The 7th cranial nerve. The facial nerve has two parts, the larger motor root which may be called the facial nerve proper, and the smaller intermediate or sensory root. Together they provide efferent innervation to the muscles of facial expression and to the lacrimal and SALIVARY GLANDS, and convey afferent information for TASTE from the anterior two-thirds of the TONGUE and for TOUCH from the EXTERNAL EAR.Facial Paralysis: Severe or complete loss of facial muscle motor function. This condition may result from central or peripheral lesions. Damage to CNS motor pathways from the cerebral cortex to the facial nuclei in the pons leads to facial weakness that generally spares the forehead muscles. FACIAL NERVE DISEASES generally results in generalized hemifacial weakness. NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION DISEASES and MUSCULAR DISEASES may also cause facial paralysis or paresis.Facial Expression: Observable changes of expression in the face in response to emotional stimuli.Facial Muscles: Muscles of facial expression or mimetic muscles that include the numerous muscles supplied by the facial nerve that are attached to and move the skin of the face. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Facial Nerve Diseases: Diseases of the facial nerve or nuclei. Pontine disorders may affect the facial nuclei or nerve fascicle. The nerve may be involved intracranially, along its course through the petrous portion of the temporal bone, or along its extracranial course. Clinical manifestations include facial muscle weakness, loss of taste from the anterior tongue, hyperacusis, and decreased lacrimation.Tumor Markers, Biological: Molecular products metabolized and secreted by neoplastic tissue and characterized biochemically in cells or body fluids. They are indicators of tumor stage and grade as well as useful for monitoring responses to treatment and predicting recurrence. Many chemical groups are represented including hormones, antigens, amino and nucleic acids, enzymes, polyamines, and specific cell membrane proteins and lipids.Facial Bones: The facial skeleton, consisting of bones situated between the cranial base and the mandibular region. While some consider the facial bones to comprise the hyoid (HYOID BONE), palatine (HARD PALATE), and zygomatic (ZYGOMA) bones, MANDIBLE, and MAXILLA, others include also the lacrimal and nasal bones, inferior nasal concha, and vomer but exclude the hyoid bone. (Jablonski, Dictionary of Dentistry, 1992, p113)Lipoma: A benign tumor composed of fat cells (ADIPOCYTES). It can be surrounded by a thin layer of connective tissue (encapsulated), or diffuse without the capsule.Facial Injuries: General or unspecified injuries to the soft tissue or bony portions of the face.Face: The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.Pancreatic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PANCREAS. Depending on the types of ISLET CELLS present in the tumors, various hormones can be secreted: GLUCAGON from PANCREATIC ALPHA CELLS; INSULIN from PANCREATIC BETA CELLS; and SOMATOSTATIN from the SOMATOSTATIN-SECRETING CELLS. Most are malignant except the insulin-producing tumors (INSULINOMA).Parotid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the PAROTID GLAND.Neoplasms: New abnormal growth of tissue. Malignant neoplasms show a greater degree of anaplasia and have the properties of invasion and metastasis, compared to benign neoplasms.Cystadenoma: A benign neoplasm derived from glandular epithelium, in which cystic accumulations of retained secretions are formed. In some instances, considerable portions of the neoplasm, or even the entire mass, may be cystic. (Stedman, 25th ed)Skin Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SKIN.Tumor Burden: The total amount (cell number, weight, size or volume) of tumor cells or tissue in the body.Neurilemmoma: A neoplasm that arises from SCHWANN CELLS of the cranial, peripheral, and autonomic nerves. Clinically, these tumors may present as a cranial neuropathy, abdominal or soft tissue mass, intracranial lesion, or with spinal cord compression. Histologically, these tumors are encapsulated, highly vascular, and composed of a homogenous pattern of biphasic fusiform-shaped cells that may have a palisaded appearance. (From DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp964-5)Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced new abnormal growth of TISSUES in animals to provide models for studying human neoplasms.Cell Line, Tumor: A cell line derived from cultured tumor cells.Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha: Serum glycoprotein produced by activated MACROPHAGES and other mammalian MONONUCLEAR LEUKOCYTES. It has necrotizing activity against tumor cell lines and increases ability to reject tumor transplants. Also known as TNF-alpha, it is only 30% homologous to TNF-beta (LYMPHOTOXIN), but they share TNF RECEPTORS.Ovarian Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the OVARY. These neoplasms can be benign or malignant. They are classified according to the tissue of origin, such as the surface EPITHELIUM, the stromal endocrine cells, and the totipotent GERM CELLS.Facial Asymmetry: Congenital or acquired asymmetry of the face.Facial DermatosesKidney Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the KIDNEY.Papilloma: A circumscribed benign epithelial tumor projecting from the surrounding surface; more precisely, a benign epithelial neoplasm consisting of villous or arborescent outgrowths of fibrovascular stroma covered by neoplastic cells. (Stedman, 25th ed)Genes, Tumor Suppressor: Genes that inhibit expression of the tumorigenic phenotype. They are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. When tumor suppressor genes are inactivated or lost, a barrier to normal proliferation is removed and unregulated growth is possible.Wilms Tumor: A malignant kidney tumor, caused by the uncontrolled multiplication of renal stem (blastemal), stromal (STROMAL CELLS), and epithelial (EPITHELIAL CELLS) elements. However, not all three are present in every case. Several genes or chromosomal areas have been associated with Wilms tumor which is usually found in childhood as a firm lump in a child's side or ABDOMEN.Hemangioma: A vascular anomaly due to proliferation of BLOOD VESSELS that forms a tumor-like mass. The common types involve CAPILLARIES and VEINS. It can occur anywhere in the body but is most frequently noticed in the SKIN and SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE. (from Stedman, 27th ed, 2000)Immunohistochemistry: Histochemical localization of immunoreactive substances using labeled antibodies as reagents.Adenoma: A benign epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Fibroma: A benign tumor of fibrous or fully developed connective tissue.Leiomyoma: A benign tumor derived from smooth muscle tissue, also known as a fibroid tumor. They rarely occur outside of the UTERUS and the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT but can occur in the SKIN and SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE, probably arising from the smooth muscle of small blood vessels in these tissues.Neoplasms, Multiple Primary: Two or more abnormal growths of tissue occurring simultaneously and presumed to be of separate origin. The neoplasms may be histologically the same or different, and may be found in the same or different sites.Salivary Gland Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the SALIVARY GLANDS.Facial Pain: Pain in the facial region including orofacial pain and craniofacial pain. Associated conditions include local inflammatory and neoplastic disorders and neuralgic syndromes involving the trigeminal, facial, and glossopharyngeal nerves. Conditions which feature recurrent or persistent facial pain as the primary manifestation of disease are referred to as FACIAL PAIN SYNDROMES.Meningioma: A relatively common neoplasm of the CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM that arises from arachnoidal cells. The majority are well differentiated vascular tumors which grow slowly and have a low potential to be invasive, although malignant subtypes occur. Meningiomas have a predilection to arise from the parasagittal region, cerebral convexity, sphenoidal ridge, olfactory groove, and SPINAL CANAL. (From DeVita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2056-7)Liver Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LIVER.Tumor Suppressor Protein p53: Nuclear phosphoprotein encoded by the p53 gene (GENES, P53) whose normal function is to control CELL PROLIFERATION and APOPTOSIS. A mutant or absent p53 protein has been found in LEUKEMIA; OSTEOSARCOMA; LUNG CANCER; and COLORECTAL CANCER.Tomography, X-Ray Computed: Tomography using x-ray transmission and a computer algorithm to reconstruct the image.Neoplasm Proteins: Proteins whose abnormal expression (gain or loss) are associated with the development, growth, or progression of NEOPLASMS. Some neoplasm proteins are tumor antigens (ANTIGENS, NEOPLASM), i.e. they induce an immune reaction to their tumor. Many neoplasm proteins have been characterized and are used as tumor markers (BIOMARKERS, TUMOR) when they are detectable in cells and body fluids as monitors for the presence or growth of tumors. Abnormal expression of ONCOGENE PROTEINS is involved in neoplastic transformation, whereas the loss of expression of TUMOR SUPPRESSOR PROTEINS is involved with the loss of growth control and progression of the neoplasm.Bone Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in bone tissue or specific BONES.Carcinoid Tumor: A usually small, slow-growing neoplasm composed of islands of rounded, oxyphilic, or spindle-shaped cells of medium size, with moderately small vesicular nuclei, and covered by intact mucosa with a yellow cut surface. The tumor can occur anywhere in the gastrointestinal tract (and in the lungs and other sites); approximately 90% arise in the appendix. It is now established that these tumors are of neuroendocrine origin and derive from a primitive stem cell. (From Stedman, 25th ed & Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1182)DNA, Neoplasm: DNA present in neoplastic tissue.Uterine Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the UTERUS.Brain Neoplasms: Neoplasms of the intracranial components of the central nervous system, including the cerebral hemispheres, basal ganglia, hypothalamus, thalamus, brain stem, and cerebellum. Brain neoplasms are subdivided into primary (originating from brain tissue) and secondary (i.e., metastatic) forms. Primary neoplasms are subdivided into benign and malignant forms. In general, brain tumors may also be classified by age of onset, histologic type, or presenting location in the brain.Tumor Suppressor Proteins: Proteins that are normally involved in holding cellular growth in check. Deficiencies or abnormalities in these proteins may lead to unregulated cell growth and tumor development.Meningeal Neoplasms: Benign and malignant neoplastic processes that arise from or secondarily involve the meningeal coverings of the brain and spinal cord.Adenocarcinoma: A malignant epithelial tumor with a glandular organization.Cystadenoma, Serous: A cystic tumor of the ovary, containing thin, clear, yellow serous fluid and varying amounts of solid tissue, with a malignant potential several times greater than that of mucinous cystadenoma (CYSTADENOMA, MUCINOUS). It can be unilocular, parvilocular, or multilocular. It is often bilateral and papillary. The cysts may vary greatly in size. (Dorland, 27th ed; from Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972)Hamartoma: A focal malformation resembling a neoplasm, composed of an overgrowth of mature cells and tissues that normally occur in the affected area.Neoplasm Metastasis: The transfer of a neoplasm from one organ or part of the body to another remote from the primary site.Neuroendocrine Tumors: Tumors whose cells possess secretory granules and originate from the neuroectoderm, i.e., the cells of the ectoblast or epiblast that program the neuroendocrine system. Common properties across most neuroendocrine tumors include ectopic hormone production (often via APUD CELLS), the presence of tumor-associated antigens, and isozyme composition.Soft Tissue Neoplasms: Neoplasms of whatever cell type or origin, occurring in the extraskeletal connective tissue framework of the body including the organs of locomotion and their various component structures, such as nerves, blood vessels, lymphatics, etc.Antigens, Neoplasm: Proteins, glycoprotein, or lipoprotein moieties on surfaces of tumor cells that are usually identified by monoclonal antibodies. Many of these are of either embryonic or viral origin.Adenolymphoma: A benign tumor characterized histologically by tall columnar epithelium within a lymphoid tissue stroma. It is usually found in the salivary glands, especially the parotid.Neoplasm Staging: Methods which attempt to express in replicable terms the extent of the neoplasm in the patient.Adenoma, Pleomorphic: A benign, slow-growing tumor, most commonly of the salivary gland, occurring as a small, painless, firm nodule, usually of the parotid gland, but also found in any major or accessory salivary gland anywhere in the oral cavity. It is most often seen in women in the fifth decade. Histologically, the tumor presents a variety of cells: cuboidal, columnar, and squamous cells, showing all forms of epithelial growth. (Dorland, 27th ed)Adenofibroma: A benign neoplasm composed of glandular and fibrous tissues, with a relatively large proportion of glands. (Stedman, 25th ed)Neoplasms, Cystic, Mucinous, and Serous: Neoplasms containing cyst-like formations or producing mucin or serum.Bronchial Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the BRONCHI.Chondroma: A benign neoplasm derived from mesodermal cells that form cartilage. It may remain within the substance of a cartilage or bone (true chondroma or enchondroma) or may develop on the surface of a cartilage (ecchondroma or ecchondrosis). (Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)Colonic Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the COLON.Heart Neoplasms: Tumors in any part of the heart. They include primary cardiac tumors and metastatic tumors to the heart. Their interference with normal cardiac functions can cause a wide variety of symptoms including HEART FAILURE; CARDIAC ARRHYTHMIAS; or EMBOLISM.Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Non-invasive method of demonstrating internal anatomy based on the principle that atomic nuclei in a strong magnetic field absorb pulses of radiofrequency energy and emit them as radiowaves which can be reconstructed into computerized images. The concept includes proton spin tomographic techniques.Angiomyolipoma: A benign tumor containing vascular, adipose, and muscle elements. It occurs most often in the kidney with smooth muscle elements (angiolipoleiomyoma) in association with tuberous sclerosis. (Dorland, 27th ed)Mandibular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MANDIBLE.Cystadenoma, Mucinous: A multilocular tumor with mucin secreting epithelium. They are most often found in the ovary, but are also found in the pancreas, appendix, and rarely, retroperitoneal and in the urinary bladder. They are considered to have low-grade malignant potential.Dog Diseases: Diseases of the domestic dog (Canis familiaris). This term does not include diseases of wild dogs, WOLVES; FOXES; and other Canidae for which the heading CARNIVORA is used.Retrospective Studies: Studies used to test etiologic hypotheses in which inferences about an exposure to putative causal factors are derived from data relating to characteristics of persons under study or to events or experiences in their past. The essential feature is that some of the persons under study have the disease or outcome of interest and their characteristics are compared with those of unaffected persons.Cell Transformation, Neoplastic: Cell changes manifested by escape from control mechanisms, increased growth potential, alterations in the cell surface, karyotypic abnormalities, morphological and biochemical deviations from the norm, and other attributes conferring the ability to invade, metastasize, and kill.Neovascularization, Pathologic: A pathologic process consisting of the proliferation of blood vessels in abnormal tissues or in abnormal positions.Mammary Neoplasms, Animal: Tumors or cancer of the MAMMARY GLAND in animals (MAMMARY GLANDS, ANIMAL).Thyroid Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the THYROID GLAND.Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental: Experimentally induced mammary neoplasms in animals to provide a model for studying human BREAST NEOPLASMS.Cystadenocarcinoma, Mucinous: A malignant cystic or semisolid tumor most often occurring in the ovary. Rarely, one is solid. This tumor may develop from a mucinous cystadenoma, or it may be malignant at the onset. The cysts are lined with tall columnar epithelial cells; in others, the epithelium consists of many layers of cells that have lost normal structure entirely. In the more undifferentiated tumors, one may see sheets and nests of tumor cells that have very little resemblance to the parent structure. (Hughes, Obstetric-Gynecologic Terminology, 1972, p184)Giant Cell Tumors: Tumors of bone tissue or synovial or other soft tissue characterized by the presence of giant cells. The most common are giant cell tumor of tendon sheath and GIANT CELL TUMOR OF BONE.Breast Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the human BREAST.Tumor Microenvironment: The milieu surrounding neoplasms consisting of cells, vessels, soluble factors, and molecules, that can influence and be influenced by, the neoplasm's growth.Treatment Outcome: Evaluation undertaken to assess the results or consequences of management and procedures used in combating disease in order to determine the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and practicability of these interventions in individual cases or series.Adenoma, Oxyphilic: A usually benign glandular tumor composed of oxyphil cells, large cells with small irregular nuclei and dense acidophilic granules due to the presence of abundant MITOCHONDRIA. Oxyphil cells, also known as oncocytes, are found in oncocytomas of the kidney, salivary glands, and endocrine glands. In the thyroid gland, oxyphil cells are known as Hurthle cells and Askanazy cells.Glomus Tumor: A blue-red, extremely painful vascular neoplasm involving a glomeriform arteriovenous anastomosis (glomus body), which may be found anywhere in the skin, most often in the distal portion of the fingers and toes, especially beneath the nail. It is composed of specialized pericytes (sometimes termed glomus cells), usually in single encapsulated nodular masses which may be several millimeters in diameter (From Stedman, 27th ed). CHEMODECTOMA, a tumor of NEURAL CREST origin, is also sometimes called a glomus tumor.Lymphangioma, Cystic: A cystic growth originating from lymphatic tissue. It is usually found in the neck, axilla, or groin.Osteoma: A benign tumor composed of bone tissue or a hard tumor of bonelike structure developing on a bone (homoplastic osteoma) or on other structures (heteroplastic osteoma). (From Dorland, 27th ed)Lymphangioma: A benign tumor resulting from a congenital malformation of the lymphatic system. Lymphangioendothelioma is a type of lymphangioma in which endothelial cells are the dominant component.Cell Proliferation: All of the processes involved in increasing CELL NUMBER including CELL DIVISION.Neoplasm Recurrence, Local: The local recurrence of a neoplasm following treatment. It arises from microscopic cells of the original neoplasm that have escaped therapeutic intervention and later become clinically visible at the original site.Lung Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the LUNG.Muscle Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer located in muscle tissue or specific muscles. They are differentiated from NEOPLASMS, MUSCLE TISSUE which are neoplasms composed of skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscle tissue, such as MYOSARCOMA or LEIOMYOMA.Granular Cell Tumor: Unusual tumor affecting any site of the body, but most often encountered in the head and neck. Considerable debate has surrounded the histogenesis of this neoplasm; however, it is considered to be a myoblastoma of, usually, a benign nature. It affects women more often than men. When it develops beneath the epidermis or mucous membrane, it can lead to proliferation of the squamous cells and mimic squamous cell carcinoma.Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: All tumors in the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT arising from mesenchymal cells (MESODERM) except those of smooth muscle cells (LEIOMYOMA) or Schwann cells (SCHWANNOMA).Phyllodes Tumor: A type of connective tissue neoplasm typically arising from intralobular stroma of the breast. It is characterized by the rapid enlargement of an asymmetric firm mobile mass. Histologically, its leaf-like stromal clefts are lined by EPITHELIAL CELLS. Rare phyllodes tumor of the prostate is also known.Gastrointestinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT, from the MOUTH to the ANAL CANAL.RNA, Messenger: RNA sequences that serve as templates for protein synthesis. Bacterial mRNAs are generally primary transcripts in that they do not require post-transcriptional processing. Eukaryotic mRNA is synthesized in the nucleus and must be exported to the cytoplasm for translation. Most eukaryotic mRNAs have a sequence of polyadenylic acid at the 3' end, referred to as the poly(A) tail. The function of this tail is not known for certain, but it may play a role in the export of mature mRNA from the nucleus as well as in helping stabilize some mRNA molecules by retarding their degradation in the cytoplasm.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Mutation: Any detectable and heritable change in the genetic material that causes a change in the GENOTYPE and which is transmitted to daughter cells and to succeeding generations.Astrocytoma: Neoplasms of the brain and spinal cord derived from glial cells which vary from histologically benign forms to highly anaplastic and malignant tumors. Fibrillary astrocytomas are the most common type and may be classified in order of increasing malignancy (grades I through IV). In the first two decades of life, astrocytomas tend to originate in the cerebellar hemispheres; in adults, they most frequently arise in the cerebrum and frequently undergo malignant transformation. (From Devita et al., Cancer: Principles and Practice of Oncology, 5th ed, pp2013-7; Holland et al., Cancer Medicine, 3d ed, p1082)Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic: Any of the processes by which nuclear, cytoplasmic, or intercellular factors influence the differential control of gene action in neoplastic tissue.Sarcoma: A connective tissue neoplasm formed by proliferation of mesodermal cells; it is usually highly malignant.Neoplasms, Radiation-Induced: Tumors, cancer or other neoplasms produced by exposure to ionizing or non-ionizing radiation.Mediastinal Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the MEDIASTINUM.Neuroma, Acoustic: A benign SCHWANNOMA of the eighth cranial nerve (VESTIBULOCOCHLEAR NERVE), mostly arising from the vestibular branch (VESTIBULAR NERVE) during the fifth or sixth decade of life. Clinical manifestations include HEARING LOSS; HEADACHE; VERTIGO; TINNITUS; and FACIAL PAIN. Bilateral acoustic neuromas are associated with NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 2. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p673)Cell Division: The fission of a CELL. It includes CYTOKINESIS, when the CYTOPLASM of a cell is divided, and CELL NUCLEUS DIVISION.Transplantation, Heterologous: Transplantation between animals of different species.Tracheal NeoplasmsReverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction: A variation of the PCR technique in which cDNA is made from RNA via reverse transcription. The resultant cDNA is then amplified using standard PCR protocols.Adenocarcinoma, Mucinous: An adenocarcinoma producing mucin in significant amounts. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Neoplasms, Second Primary: Abnormal growths of tissue that follow a previous neoplasm but are not metastases of the latter. The second neoplasm may have the same or different histological type and can occur in the same or different organs as the previous neoplasm but in all cases arises from an independent oncogenic event. The development of the second neoplasm may or may not be related to the treatment for the previous neoplasm since genetic risk or predisposing factors may actually be the cause.Neurofibroma: A moderately firm, benign, encapsulated tumor resulting from proliferation of SCHWANN CELLS and FIBROBLASTS that includes portions of nerve fibers. The tumors usually develop along peripheral or cranial nerves and are a central feature of NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1, where they may occur intracranially or involve spinal roots. Pathologic features include fusiform enlargement of the involved nerve. Microscopic examination reveals a disorganized and loose cellular pattern with elongated nuclei intermixed with fibrous strands. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, p1016)Disease Progression: The worsening of a disease over time. This concept is most often used for chronic and incurable diseases where the stage of the disease is an important determinant of therapy and prognosis.Carcinoma, Squamous Cell: A carcinoma derived from stratified SQUAMOUS EPITHELIAL CELLS. It may also occur in sites where glandular or columnar epithelium is normally present. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Testicular Neoplasms: Tumors or cancer of the TESTIS. Germ cell tumors (GERMINOMA) of the testis constitute 95% of all testicular neoplasms.Immunoenzyme Techniques: Immunologic techniques based on the use of: (1) enzyme-antibody conjugates; (2) enzyme-antigen conjugates; (3) antienzyme antibody followed by its homologous enzyme; or (4) enzyme-antienzyme complexes. These are used histologically for visualizing or labeling tissue specimens.Myxoma: A benign neoplasm derived from connective tissue, consisting chiefly of polyhedral and stellate cells that are loosely embedded in a soft mucoid matrix, thereby resembling primitive mesenchymal tissue. It occurs frequently intramuscularly where it may be mistaken for a sarcoma. It appears also in the jaws and the skin. (From Stedman, 25th ed)Odontogenic Tumors: Neoplasms produced from tooth-forming tissues.Angiolipoma: A benign neoplasm composed of a mixture of adipose tissue and blood vessels. (Dorland, 27th ed)Neurofibromatosis 1: An autosomal dominant inherited disorder (with a high frequency of spontaneous mutations) that features developmental changes in the nervous system, muscles, bones, and skin, most notably in tissue derived from the embryonic NEURAL CREST. Multiple hyperpigmented skin lesions and subcutaneous tumors are the hallmark of this disease. Peripheral and central nervous system neoplasms occur frequently, especially OPTIC NERVE GLIOMA and NEUROFIBROSARCOMA. NF1 is caused by mutations which inactivate the NF1 gene (GENES, NEUROFIBROMATOSIS 1) on chromosome 17q. The incidence of learning disabilities is also elevated in this condition. (From Adams et al., Principles of Neurology, 6th ed, pp1014-18) There is overlap of clinical features with NOONAN SYNDROME in a syndrome called neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome. Both the PTPN11 and NF1 gene products are involved in the SIGNAL TRANSDUCTION pathway of Ras (RAS PROTEINS).Osteoblastoma: A benign, painful, tumor of bone characterized by the formation of osteoid tissue, primitive bone and calcified tissue. It occurs frequently in the spine of young persons. (From Dorland, 27th ed; Stedman, 25th ed)Pilomatrixoma: A tumor composed of cells resembling those of the hair matrix, which undergo 'mummification' and may calcify. It is a relatively uncommon tumor, which may occur at any age from infancy. The majority of patients are under 20, and females are affected more than males. The lesion is usually a solitary deep dermal or subcutaneous tumor 3-30 mm in diameter, situated in the head, neck, or upper extremity. (From Rook et al., Textbook of Dermatology, 4th ed, p2401)Adrenal Cortex Neoplasms: Tumors or cancers of the ADRENAL CORTEX.Neoplasms, Glandular and Epithelial: Neoplasms composed of glandular tissue, an aggregation of epithelial cells that elaborate secretions, and of any type of epithelium itself. The concept does not refer to neoplasms located in the various glands or in epithelial tissue.Sensitivity and Specificity: Binary classification measures to assess test results. Sensitivity or recall rate is the proportion of true positives. Specificity is the probability of correctly determining the absence of a condition. (From Last, Dictionary of Epidemiology, 2d ed)Signal Transduction: The intracellular transfer of information (biological activation/inhibition) through a signal pathway. In each signal transduction system, an activation/inhibition signal from a biologically active molecule (hormone, neurotransmitter) is mediated via the coupling of a receptor/enzyme to a second messenger system or to an ion channel. Signal transduction plays an important role in activating cellular functions, cell differentiation, and cell proliferation. Examples of signal transduction systems are the GAMMA-AMINOBUTYRIC ACID-postsynaptic receptor-calcium ion channel system, the receptor-mediated T-cell activation pathway, and the receptor-mediated activation of phospholipases. Those coupled to membrane depolarization or intracellular release of calcium include the receptor-mediated activation of cytotoxic functions in granulocytes and the synaptic potentiation of protein kinase activation. Some signal transduction pathways may be part of larger signal transduction pathways; for example, protein kinase activation is part of the platelet activation signal pathway.Prognosis: A prediction of the probable outcome of a disease based on a individual's condition and the usual course of the disease as seen in similar situations.Facial Transplantation: The transference between individuals of the entire face or major facial structures. In addition to the skin and cartilaginous tissue (CARTILAGE), it may include muscle and bone as well.Mice, Inbred BALB CRhabdomyoma: A benign tumor derived from striated muscle. It is extremely rare, generally occurring in the tongue, neck muscles, larynx, uvula, nasal cavity, axilla, vulva, and heart. These tumors are treated by simple excision. (Dorland, 27th ed; DeVita Jr et al., Cancer: Principles & Practice of Oncology, 3d ed, p1354)Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays: In vivo methods of screening investigative anticancer drugs, biologic response modifiers or radiotherapies. Human tumor tissue or cells are transplanted into mice or rats followed by tumor treatment regimens. A variety of outcomes are monitored to assess antitumor effectiveness.Lymphoma: A general term for various neoplastic diseases of the lymphoid tissue.Jaw Neoplasms: Cancers or tumors of the MAXILLA or MANDIBLE unspecified. For neoplasms of the maxilla, MAXILLARY NEOPLASMS is available and of the mandible, MANDIBULAR NEOPLASMS is available.Spinal NeoplasmsFibroadenoma: An adenoma containing fibrous tissue. It should be differentiated from ADENOFIBROMA which is a tumor composed of connective tissue (fibroma) containing glandular (adeno-) structures. (From Dorland, 27th ed)Genes, ras: Family of retrovirus-associated DNA sequences (ras) originally isolated from Harvey (H-ras, Ha-ras, rasH) and Kirsten (K-ras, Ki-ras, rasK) murine sarcoma viruses. Ras genes are widely conserved among animal species and sequences corresponding to both H-ras and K-ras genes have been detected in human, avian, murine, and non-vertebrate genomes. The closely related N-ras gene has been detected in human neuroblastoma and sarcoma cell lines. All genes of the family have a similar exon-intron structure and each encodes a p21 protein.Pituitary Neoplasms: Neoplasms which arise from or metastasize to the PITUITARY GLAND. The majority of pituitary neoplasms are adenomas, which are divided into non-secreting and secreting forms. Hormone producing forms are further classified by the type of hormone they secrete. Pituitary adenomas may also be characterized by their staining properties (see ADENOMA, BASOPHIL; ADENOMA, ACIDOPHIL; and ADENOMA, CHROMOPHOBE). Pituitary tumors may compress adjacent structures, including the HYPOTHALAMUS, several CRANIAL NERVES, and the OPTIC CHIASM. Chiasmal compression may result in bitemporal HEMIANOPSIA.
It is a benign tumor. When the bone tumor grows on other bone it is known as "homoplastic osteoma"; when it grows on other ... Osteoma represents the most common benign neoplasm of the nose and paranasal sinuses. The cause of osteomata is uncertain, but ... Larger craniofacial osteomata may cause facial pain, headache, and infection due to obstructed nasofrontal ducts. Often, ...
... described the microscopic appearance of the facial papules as "adenoma sebaceum", thought to be benign tumors of sebaceous ... Sebaceous carcinoma Sebaceous hyperplasia List of cutaneous conditions List of cutaneous neoplasms associated with systemic ... Facial angiofibromas are hamartomas, defined as benign, tumorous nodules of superfluous tissue. - Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance ... Facial angiofibromas were first described in 1885 by Balzer and Menetrier. At this time, they were incorrectly termed adenoma ...
Often, since facial neoplasms have such an intimate relationship with the facial nerve, removing tumors in this region becomes ... Typically, benign tumors should be removed in a fashion that preserves the facial nerve, while malignant tumors should always ... A tumor compressing the facial nerve anywhere along its complex pathway can result in facial paralysis. Common culprits are ... If there is a history of trauma, or a tumour is suspected, a CT scan may be used. Facial nerve paralysis may be divided into ...
Neoplasms can be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). The majority of parotid gland tumors are benign, however 20% ... radical parotidectomy - Typically performed if neoplasm is impinging on facial nerve. Facial nerve excised in addition to ... If a tumor was malignant, many patients are referred to radiation therapy. For benign tumors and slow growing cancers, surgery ... The most common form of benign parotid neoplasms are pleomorphic adenomas. The most common form of malignant parotid neoplasms ...
Brain tumors or intracranial neoplasms can be cancerous (malignant) or non-cancerous (benign). However, the definitions of ... facial paralysis, double vision, or more severe symptoms such as tremors, paralysis on one side of the body hemiplegia, or ( ... There are two main types of tumors: malignant or cancerous tumors and benign tumors. Cancerous tumors can be divided into ... three malignant properties differentiate benign tumors from malignant forms of cancer: benign tumors are self-limited and do ...
... benign neoplasm of Schwann cells affecting the vestibulocochlear nerve Meningioma - benign tumour of the pia and arachnoid ... The cerebellopontine angle is the exit site of both the facial nerve(CN7) and the vestibulocochlear nerve(CN8). Patients with ... It was also identified as a tumor associated gene that is overexpressed in ovarian tumors. Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease an ... Tumor Cerebellopontine angle tumour (junction of the pons and cerebellum) - ...
A juvenile active ossifying fibroma is a benign fibro-osseous neoplasm composed of mixture of stroma and bone characterized by ... The tumors range in size from a few millimeters up to 10 cm. By microscopic evaluation, the tumors are composed of a variably ... facial enlargement and possibly visual changes. When performing imaging studies, bone windows in computed tomography studies ... This tumor is far less common than conventional ossifying fibroma, and is considered a rare tumor. Patients usually come to ...
Because these tumors are benign, metastasis to distal sites does not occur. However, these tumors are highly vascularized and ... benign neoplasm) Rhinosporidiosis (as bleeding point is here too) Malignancy-nasopharyngeal carcinoma, lymphoma, plasmacytoma, ... Frequent chronic epistaxis or blood-tinged nasal discharge Nasal obstruction and rhinorrhea Facial dysmorphism (when locally ... is a histologically benign but locally aggressive vascular tumor that grows in the back of the nasal cavity. It most commonly ...
MEN causes various combinations of benign or malignant tumors in various glands in the endocrine system or may cause the glands ... MEN1 may also cause non-endocrine tumors such as facial angiofibromas, collagenomas, lipomas, meningiomas, ependymomas, and ... Pituitary adenomas represent from 10% to 25% of all intracranial neoplasms and the estimated prevalence rate in the general ... Unlike tumors of the posterior Pituitary, Pituitary adenomas are classified as endocrine tumors (not brain tumors). Pituitary ...
... benign or cancerous tumor of odontogenic epithelium (ameloblasts, or outside portion, of the teeth during development) much ... This type of odontogenic neoplasm was designated as an adamantinoma in 1885 by the French physician Louis-Charles Malassez. It ... Symptoms include painless swelling, facial deformity if severe enough, pain if the swelling impinges on other structures, loose ... Unicystic tumors recur less frequently than "non-unicystic" tumors. Persistent follow-up examination is essential for managing ...
Abdominal neoplasms Aberrant subclavian artery Ablepharon macrostomia syndrome Abnormal systemic venous return Abruzzo-Erickson ... aka Dercum's disease Adolescent benign focal crisis Adrenal adenoma, familial Adrenal cancer Adrenal disorder Adrenal gland ... Amelia cleft lip palate hydrocephalus iris coloboma Amelia facial dysmorphism Amelia X linked Amelogenesis Amelogenesis ... thumb syndrome recessive form Adducted thumbs Dundar type Adenine phosphoribosyltransferase deficiency Adenocarcinoid tumor ...
Often concurrent benign sinonasal tract inflammatory polyps will be seen. Infiltrative, highly cellular spindled cell neoplasm ... Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor, including triton tumor: Distinctive alternating light and dark cellular areas; ... The patient present with non-specific findings, including difficulty breathing, facial pressure, congestion, pain, and mild ... A very rare tumor, although as it is newly described, probably is under reported. Patients present over a wide age range (24-85 ...
Between 60 and 80% of TSC patients have benign tumors (once thought hamartomatous, but now considered true neoplasms) of the ... benign growths such as facial angiofibroma and subependymal nodules), and very rarely, cancerous hamartoblastomas. The effect ... These tumors are composed of vascular (angio-), smooth muscle (-myo-), and fat (-lip-) tissue. Although benign, an ... Rhabdomyomas are benign tumors of striated muscle. A cardiac rhabdomyoma can be discovered using echocardiography in around 50 ...
... premalignant lesions caused by solar damage benign and malignant neoplasm, including tumors, keratoacanthoma, carcinoma Left ... These portions of the ear are supplied by the cervical plexus and a small portion by the facial nerve. This explains why ... vesicles are classically seen on the auricle in herpes infections of the facial nerve (Ramsay Hunt syndrome type II). The ...
Neoplasms - malignant and benign tumors Septal hematoma - a mass of (usually) clotted blood in the septum Toxins - chemical ... Gurney TA, Kim DW (February 2007). "Applications of porcine dermal collagen (ENDURAGen) in facial plastic surgery". Facial ... Nasal muscles - The movements of the human nose are controlled by groups of facial and neck muscles that are set deep to the ... Specific facial and nasal evaluations record the patient's skin-type, existing surgical scars, and the symmetry and asymmetry ...
This system defines five broad categories of salivary gland neoplasms: Benign epithelial tumors Pleomorphic adenoma Warthin's ... For example signs of facial nerve damage (e.g facial palsy) are associated with malignant parotid tumours. Facial pain, and ... salivary gland tumors Hybrid tumors (i.e. a tumor displaying combined forms of histologic tumor types) Hybrid carcinoma Others ... There are many diagnostic methods that can be used to determine the type of salivary gland tumour and if it is benign or ...
Family physicians and orthopedists rarely see a malignant bone tumor (most bone tumors are benign). The route to osteosarcoma ... Overall survival prognosis is about 30%. Deaths due to malignant neoplasms of the bones and joints account for an unknown ... A biopsy of suspected osteosarcoma outside of the facial region should be performed by a qualified orthopedic oncologist. The ... tumor bone. Tumor cells are included in the osteoid matrix. Depending on the features of the tumor cells present (whether they ...
In some cases, the tumors are malignant, in others, benign. Benign or malignant tumors of nonendocrine tissues occur as ... "Cutaneous tumors in patients with multiple endocrine neoplasm type 1 (MEN1) and gastrinomas: prospective study of frequency and ... facial angiofibromas and collagenomas, and thymic, gastric, and bronchial carcinoids also occur. The phenotype of MEN1 is broad ... Many endocrine tumors in MEN1 are benign and cause symptoms by overproduction of hormones or local mass effects, while other ...
The facial nerve should be preserved whenever possible. The benign tumors of the submandibular gland is treated by simple ... Pleomorphic adenoma is a common benign salivary gland neoplasm characterised by neoplastic proliferation of parenchymatous ... Other benign tumors of minor salivary glands are treated similarly. Malignant salivary tumors usually require wide local ... Generally, benign tumors of the parotid gland are treated with superficial(Patey's operation) or total parotidectomy with the ...
They re-defined the tumor as a benign chondroblastoma of the bone that is separate from giant cell tumors. However, ... The work of Aigner et al suggests that chondroblastoma should be reclassified as a bone-forming neoplasm versus a cartilaginous ... as cells with epithelioid characteristics have been observed in lesions of the skull and facial bones. A "chicken-wire" ... Chondroblastoma is a rare, benign, locally aggressive bone tumor that typically affects the epiphyses or apophyses of long ...
... are neoplasms that arise from cells of the endocrine (hormonal) and nervous systems. Many are benign, while some are malignant ... The tumors [of Devil facial tumor disease] have been characterized as a neuroendocrine cancer Kinver, Mark (January 1, 2010). " ... G1 and G2 neuroendocrine neoplasms are called neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) - formerly called carcinoid tumours. G3 neoplasms ... Small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors were first distinguished from other tumors in 1907. They were named carcinoid tumors ...
... pilar tumor, proliferating follicular cystic neoplasm, proliferating pilar tumor, proliferating trichilemmal tumor) Pseudocyst ... Luba MC, Bangs SA, Mohler AM, Stulberg DL (2003). "Common benign skin tumors". Am Fam Physician. 67 (4): 729-38. PMID 12613727 ... Acne with facial edema (solid facial edema) Blepharophyma Erythrotelangiectatic rosacea (erythematotelangiectatic rosacea, ... Glomus tumor (glomangioma, solid glomus tumor, solitary glomus tumor) Granular cell tumor (Abrikossoff's tumor, Abrikossov's ...
... have been reported to occur in various types of neoplastic growths or tumors which may be benign or malignant. The 1p36 region ... The facial features of 1p36 deletion syndrome have been considered to be characteristic, although few patients have been ... The deletion of one or more of these genes can cause malignancy (cancer). Some of the neoplasms involved in the 1p36 are ... Distinguishing features in another study were a large or late-closing anterior fontanelle (up to 85% of patients) and facial ...
ISBN 0-7817-5007-5. Frequency of lymphoid neoplasms. (Source: Modified from WHO Blue Book on Tumour of Hematopoietic and ... The disease characteristically involves the jaw or other facial bone, distal ileum, cecum, ovaries, kidney, or breast. The ... This technique is useful since sometimes benign reactive processes (e.g. infectious mononucleosis) and malignant lymphoma can ... The tumor cells are mostly medium in size (i.e., tumor nuclei size similar to that of histiocytes or endothelial cells). "Small ...
benign and malignant neoplasm, including tumors, keratoacanthoma, carcinoma[5]. Additional images[edit]. *. ... These portions of the ear are supplied by the cervical plexus and a small portion by the facial nerve. This explains why ... vesicles are classically seen on the auricle in herpes infections of the facial nerve (Ramsay Hunt syndrome type II).[1] ...
Brain tumors or intracranial neoplasms can be cancerous (malignant) or non-cancerous (benign). However, the definitions of ... facial paralysis, double vision, or more severe symptoms such as tremors, paralysis on one side of the body hemiplegia, or ( ... There are two main types of tumors: malignant or cancerous tumors and benign tumors.[2] Cancerous tumors can be divided into ... three malignant properties differentiate benign tumors from malignant forms of cancer: benign tumors are self-limited and do ...
Neoplasms of the salivary glands account for fewer than 3% of tumors in the US and only 6% of head and neck neoplasms. ... Parotid tumor size predicts proximity to the facial nerve. Laryngoscope. 2011 Nov. 121(11):2366-70. [Medline]. ... Of parotid neoplasms, 70-80% are benign. Except for Warthin tumors, benign tumors of the parotid gland are more likely to occur ... The most common benign tumor in children is the hemangioma. Of the benign epithelial tumors, the mixed tumor (pleomorphic ...
Although researchers have learned much from the study of this diverse group of tumors over the years, the diagnosis and ... yet they represent a wide variety of both benign and malignant histologic subtypes as seen in the image below. ... Neoplasms that arise in the salivary glands are relatively rare, ... The facial nerve exits the skull via the stylomastoid foramen ... The histology of benign salivary gland neoplasms includes the following:. * Pleomorphic adenoma, or benign mixed tumor: On ...
These tumors are rare, with an overall incidence in the Western world of approximately 2.5 cases to 3.0 cases per 100,000 per ... Incidence and Mortality Salivary gland tumors are a morphologically and clinically diverse group of neoplasms, which may ... Metastasizing mixed tumor Metastasizing mixed tumor is a very rare histologically benign salivary gland neoplasm that ... Extent of primary tumor (i.e., the stage).. *Whether the tumor involves the facial nerve, has fixation to the skin or deep ...
Methods and Results: A 54-year-old woman had a superficial left parotidectomy with facial nerve preservation for pleomorphic ... or molecular parameters exist at the present time that could predict the development of metastasis in these neoplasms. ... Pleomorphic adenoma constitutes the most common benign parotid gland tumor. Local recurrence after surgery has been described ... Background: Pleomorphic adenoma constitutes the most common benign parotid gland tumor. Local recurrence after surgery has been ...
It is a benign tumor. When the bone tumor grows on other bone it is known as "homoplastic osteoma"; when it grows on other ... Osteoma represents the most common benign neoplasm of the nose and paranasal sinuses. The cause of osteomata is uncertain, but ... Larger craniofacial osteomata may cause facial pain, headache, and infection due to obstructed nasofrontal ducts. Often, ...
Salivary gland neoplasms are remarkable for their histologic diversity. These neoplasms include benign and malignant tumors of ... Extent of primary tumor (i.e., the stage).. *Whether the tumor involves the facial nerve, has fixation to the skin or deep ... Metastasizing mixed tumor. Metastasizing mixed tumor is a very rare histologically benign salivary gland neoplasm that ... Some carcinosarcomas develop de novo while others develop in association with benign mixed tumor. This neoplasm is rare; only ...
... astrocytomas are neoplasms of the brain and spinal cord derived from glial cells which vary from histologically benign forms to ... Diffuse tumors are poorly differentiated infiltrating lesions, resulting in thickening of the stomach. In contrast, intestinal ... Typical facial features are similar to Noonan syndrome. They include high forehead with bitemporal constriction, hypoplastic ... CFC syndrome is characterized by a distinctive facial appearance, heart defects and mental retardation. Heart defects include ...
Brain Stem Neoplasms. Benign and malignant intra-axial tumors of the MESENCEPHALON; PONS; or MEDULLA OBLONGATA of the BRAIN ... Clinical features include progressive ataxia, DYSARTHRIA, postural instability, nystagmus, eyelid retraction, and facial ... Primary and metastatic neoplasms may occur in this location. Clinical features include ATAXIA, cranial neuropathies (see ... Primary brain stem neoplasms are more frequent in children. Histologic subtypes include GLIOMA; HEMANGIOBLASTOMA; GANGLIOGLIOMA ...
... described the microscopic appearance of the facial papules as "adenoma sebaceum", thought to be benign tumors of sebaceous ... Sebaceous carcinoma Sebaceous hyperplasia List of cutaneous conditions List of cutaneous neoplasms associated with systemic ... Facial angiofibromas are hamartomas, defined as benign, tumorous nodules of superfluous tissue. - Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance ... Facial angiofibromas were first described in 1885 by Balzer and Menetrier. At this time, they were incorrectly termed adenoma ...
Facial Neoplasms / diagnosis. Facial Neoplasms / metabolism. False Positive Reactions. Humans. Male. Neoplasm Proteins / ... Facial Neoplasms / diagnosis. Facial Neoplasms / pathology. Female. Humans. Male. Middle Aged. Scalp / pathology. Skin / ... Facial Neoplasms / genetics. Frameshift Mutation. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / genetics. Scalp. Skin Neoplasms / genetics. ... Title] Composite tumors associating trichoblastoma and benign epidermal/follicular neoplasm: another proof of the follicular ...
in medicine, common term for neoplasms, or tumors, that are malignant. Like benign tumors, malignant tumors do not respond to ... The abnormalities include low birthweight, facial deformities, and mental retardation, and there appears to be. ..... Click the ...
... invasive procedure reduces the risk of global facial nerve paralysis because only the branches that are near the tumor are ... Parotidectomy for Benign Parotid Salivary Neoplasms:. *Small well-camouflaged incisions for limited parotidectomy ... Pleomorphic adenoma (a.k.a benign mixed tumors) is the most common salivary gland tumor. They are slow-growing tumors often ... Stanford Facial Nerve Center. Stanford Facial Nerve Center. *Conditions. Conditions. *About the Facial Nerve*Acute Facial ...
Study Neoplasms and ALS flashcards from Anna Lee ... benign tumor that starts at the mesoderm (attached to dura) and ... a little benign- actually have a chance at surviving (longer life expectancy): excisable and respond well to chemo ... B cell lymphoma pts or B cell leukemia who have tumor of the bone, bone marrow, cranial sinus ...
... benign tumour mimicking pleomorphic adenoma.. * Resection of this slow growing tumour may result in unnecessary facial nerve ... The frequency of incidence of benign tumours was 81%.. * (1) There were 81% cases of benign neoplasm and 19% malignant neoplasm ... Brain Neoplasms / surgery. Cranial Nerve Neoplasms / surgery. Facial Nerve Diseases / surgery. Neoplasms, Multiple Primary / ... Salivary Gland Neoplasms / surgery. Skull Base Neoplasms / diagnosis. Skull Base Neoplasms / pathology. Skull Base Neoplasms / ...
We also determined the tumor origin, attachment sites, and presence of bony erosion using CT imaging.RESULTS: Benign IPs had a ... The greatest source of maxillary sinus distortion and destruction are neoplasms. Malignant sinonasal and oral cavity tumors ... Heredo-familial syndromic conditions reduce sinus size by impaired facial growth centers, or obliteration by dense ... OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Inverted papillomas (IPs) are benign tumors of the sinonasal tract with a malignant transformation ...
Endometrial Stromal Tumors. Neoplasms of the endometrial stroma that sometimes involve the MYOMETRIUM. These tumors contain ... Endometrial stromal neoplasms are divided into three categories: (1) benign stromal nodules; (2) low-grade stromal sarcoma, or ... Facial trichilemmomas and papillomatous papules of the oral mucosa are the most characteristic lesions. Individuals with this ... surgery may kill any tumor cells that remain after surgery. It is not yet known whether carboplatin and paclitaxel are more ...
Salivary gland neoplasms are rare in children and can be classified as benign tumors, or low- or high-grade malignancies. ... The facial nerve is rarely involved in benign tumors. Removal is recommended due to possibility of malignant transformation ... The most common benign non-vascular tumor of the salivary glands is pleomorphic adenoma, also called benign mixed tumor. ... Benign neoplasms can be categorized as vascular or nonvascular. The most common vascular tumor in children is infantile ...
Benign Neoplasm of Eye. *Benign Tumor. *Blepharitis. *Blind Hypotensive Eye. *Blindness. *Blocked Tear Duct ... Plastic Surgery & Facial Surgery. Accredited by: American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery ...
... odontogenic tumors, facial skin cancer and salivary gland tumors. Immediate and delayed reconstructive surgery techniques also ... which focuses on the surgical management of benign and malignant tumors of this anatomic region. The applicant must possess an ... gains significant experience in the preoperative workup and operative ablation of patients with oral/head and neck neoplasms, ... UT Cancer Institute Head and Neck Tumor Program. Learn more about the Head and Neck Tumor Program on our campus at The ...
Islet Cell Tumors of the Pancreas / Endocrine Neoplasms of the Pancreas. to learn more about. neuroendocrine tumors, visit our ... The benign nerous system tumors include neurofibromas, and the malignant the "malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor." They ... They also can develop distinctive lesions of the skin (hypomelanotic macules and facial angiofibromas), kidney (angiomyolipomas ... Islet cell tumors / pancreatic endocrine neoplasms of the pancreas have a distinct appearance. These tumors tend to form round ...
... benign, non-odontogenic neoplasm of the jaw bones and other craniofacial bones chara.. ... Benign odontogenic tumour; Fibro-osseous lesions. Introduction. Fibro-osseous lesions are a heterogeneous group of benign ... 1]. These benign fibro-osseous lesions can arise from any part of the facial skeleton and skull with over 70% of cases arising ... Based on the patients history and clinical findings, the case was provisionally diagnosed as benign odontogenic tumour in ...
A preoperative cytologic or histologic diagnosis of parotid gland neoplasms is mandatory to decide which surgical procedure ... Major complications such as tumour cell seeding or facial nerve paresis appear extremely rare. Shah et al. [29] analysed 575 ... all parotid neoplasms were treated by a formal parotidectomy: benign parotid neoplasms in the superficial lobe by a superficial ... For malignant neoplasms, it would be also desirable to know the histologic tumour type and grade since for several low-grade ...
Benign neoplasms. Epithelial tumors. Benign epithelial tumors include papillomas and salivary gland-type adenomas, the most ... More advanced lesions may produce symptoms such as anosmia, visual disturbance, diplopia, cranial neuropathy, facial swelling, ... Soft-tissue tumors. Benign soft-tissue tumors of the SN cavities are rare and include nerve-sheath tumors, hemangioma and ... soft tissue tumors, tumors of bone and cartilage, hematolymphoid tumors, neuroectodermal tumors, germ cells tumors and ...
Benign tumors. Malignant tumors. Cranial tumors. Extracranial tumors. Lung. Liver. Pancreas. Prostate. Stereotactic ... Neoplasms, Vascular Tissue. Neoplasms by Histologic Type. Neoplasms. Trigeminal Nerve Diseases. Facial Neuralgia. Facial Nerve ... Diagnosis of benign or malignant tumors or other conditions deemed treatable by stereotactic radiosurgery or stereotactic body ... Neoplasms Arteriovenous Malformation of Central Nervous System Trigeminal Neuralgia Radiation: SRS/SBRT ...
If neoplasm is discovered in this space. Salivary gland tumors can also extend into this space. and nasopharynx can be found ... facial vein nerve and artery. Mucoepidermoid carcinomas. Lymphoma Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma. * Benign: Pleomorphic adenoma ... Benign tumors would include inverted papilloma which arises from the mucous membranes. skull base. which tends to remottle and ... Other types of tumors involving this space may include the variety of salivary gland tumors ranging from mucoepidermoid to ...
  • Compare the recurrence-free survival of patients with stage III or IVA endometrial carcinoma treated with adjuvant chemoradiotherapy comprising cisplatin and tumor volume-directed radiotherapy followed by carboplatin and paclitaxel vs carboplatin and paclitaxel alone. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Avoiding doing this, would not only risk putting tension on the optic nerves during resection of the tumor, but also risk leaving tumor residuals in the optic canals and risk of recurrence of the tumor. (cineuro.org)
  • In our group of patients, facial palsy and vascular spread are the most important factors for survival and recurrence. (isciii.es)
  • This tumor may have a different clinical potential because of the propensity for recurrence, locally aggressive behavior, and in rare cases, malignant transformation. (sidj.org)
  • The majority of the benign lateral skull base tumors can be removed surgically with a low rate of complications and recurrence. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Tailored skull base approach for this type of tumor is a combined petrosal approach which includes a temporal craniotomy and a retosigmoid craniectomy, in order to access the pre-sigmoid area where the posterior petrous bone is at the junction of the middle and posterior cranial fossae. (cineuro.org)
  • which type of tumor it is benign or malignant. (naturalayurvedictreatment.com)
  • In addition, biologic behavior often varies for the same type of tumor in the dog versus the cat. (maxshouse.com)
  • Second, some islet cell tumors / endocrine neoplasms produce large amounts of specific hormones, and the release of these hormones can result in dramatic clinical symptoms. (jhu.edu)
  • It used to be that the majority of islet cell tumors / pancreatic endocrine neoplasms that were discovered clinically were functional, indicating that they elaborate one or more hormonal products into the blood, leading to a recognizable clinical syndrome. (jhu.edu)
  • By convention, functional islet cell tumors / endocrine neoplasms are named according to their predominant clinical syndrome and hormonal product. (jhu.edu)
  • Patients with islet cell tumors / pancreatic endocrine neoplasms of the pancreas with no recognizable clinical syndrome and normal serum hormone levels are considered to have nonfunctional pancreatic endocrine tumors. (jhu.edu)
  • The clinical conditions associated with the unilateral enlargement of the preauricular region include sialolithiasis, tuberculosis, actinomycosis of the parotid gland, lymphadenitis, preauricular cyst, sebaceous cyst and neoplasm. (jcda.ca)
  • In the treatment of the same, clinical type, location and size of the tumor, as the age of the patient, is assessed. (bvsalud.org)
  • Case presentation: A clinical case of a male patient is described, who presents a tumor lesion in the right mandibular branch, with a clinical appearance of a multicystic, fast growing, follicular ameloblastoma, treated at Hospital Universitario del Caribe in Cartagena, Colombia. (bvsalud.org)
  • The objective of this study was to outline the clinical presentation and management of haemangioma in the oro-facial region treated in our Centre. (who.int)
  • Clinical examination revealed the presence of a firm palpable, well-circumscribed tumor mass measuring approximately 1.5 cm in greatest diameter [Figure (sidj.org)
  • Based on the histomorphologic characteristic of the tumor, the clinical facts, and the radiologic findings, the diagnosis of a benign osteoblastoma mandible was established. (sidj.org)
  • This system allows the tumor to be described in exacting detail with regard to its clinical presentation. (maxshouse.com)
  • Islet cell tumors / pancreatic endocrine neoplasms are best divided into those that produce symptoms because they release hormones into the bloodstream ('functional') and those that form a mass but do not cause symptoms by releasing hormones into the blood stream ('nonfunctional). (jhu.edu)
  • Many patients with SN neoplasms are initially imaged with computed tomography (CT), as the presenting symptoms often mimic inflammatory disease. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Unfortunately, many SN neoplasms present with nonspecific signs and symptoms that mimic rhinosinusitis. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Other symptoms such as exophthalmos or nasal blockage can rarely be associated with the tumor depending on its exact location. (cdc.gov)
  • Discuss the pathophysiology, signs & symptoms, and diagnostic tests associated with brain injury & tumors Explain the therapeutic interventions and nursing care associated with the care of patients with brain injury & tumors. (slideplayer.com)
  • Atypical facial pain (ATFP) represents a wide group of facial pain problems which have many different causes but present with common symptoms. (americandoctors.ru)
  • The signs symptoms of brain tumors depend on their size, type, and location. (medicinenet.com)
  • Presenting symptoms depend on the location of the tumors. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Americans lose 550 million work days every year due to symptoms associated with TMJ, with facial pain and headache being the most common complaints. (utmb.edu)
  • She treats patients with a wide variety of rhinologic complaints, including chronic sinus infection or inflammation, sinus disease that has failed medical therapy, sinus disease that has failed prior surgical therapy, cerebrospinal fluid leaks, benign and and malignant sinus and skull base tumors, as well as olfactory disorders. (stanford.edu)
  • Intraoperative frozen section examination allowed a precise diagnosis in 88% of parotid cases and guided the surgical steps to be adopted according to the pathological type and location of the tumor. (who.int)
  • The purpose of the present article was to describe the diagnostic evaluation of, and surgical approaches to, lateral skull base tumors (LSBTs). (spandidos-publications.com)
  • All of these account for the diversity of surgical approaches for removal of lateral skull base tumors (LSBTs). (spandidos-publications.com)
  • The decisive factor that affects the option of the surgical approach is which one will maximize exposure for intact tumor excision while minimizing functional and aesthetic deficits. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • This article describes our 8-year experience of managing these tumors, mainly concerning which current diagnostic evaluation is used for the determination of the operational plan, and our surgical approaches for the removal of LSBTs. (spandidos-publications.com)
  • Surgical history was notable for a prior thyroidectomy for benign goiter and previous subcutaneous lipoma resection. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Introduction: Atypical facial pain (ATFP) is challenging to manage and there are fewproven therapies available.We present a case report describing application of peripheral subcutaneous field stimulation (PSFS) to a patient with chronic intractable ATFP which conventional treatment failed to ameliorate. (americandoctors.ru)
  • Plexiform neurofibromas are benign tumors originating from subcutaneous or visceral peripheral nerves, which are usually associated with neurofibromatosis type 1. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In the cat, tumors of the skin and subcutaneous tissue are second in frequency only to tumors of the lymphoid system and account for approximately one quarter of all tumors in the species. (maxshouse.com)
  • Approximately 20 to 30% of primary tumors of the skin and subcutaneous tissues are histologically malignant in the dog, compared to 50 to 65% in the cat. (maxshouse.com)
  • It is a benign growth, considered to originate from the periodontal ligament and presents as a slow-growing lesion, but may cause deformity if left untreated. (omicsonline.org)
  • 2 ] in 1969 and adopted for the first time in the1971 first edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification of histological typing of odontogenic tumor, jaw cysts, and allied lesion and retained in the 1992 second edition [ 4 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • It is believed that this lesion presents the unique true cementum neoplasm. (bvsalud.org)
  • A subtle middle ear lesion was observed on otoscopy and computed tomographic images demonstrated an osseous middle ear tumor. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The first patient had a benign-appearing lesion on dorsum nasi, and the second patient had an inconspicuous lesion right along the right nasolabial fold. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Here we report a case of hyaline cell-rich apocrine mixed tumor with cytologic atypia, which did not recur for 14 months after excision. (readbyqxmd.com)
  • Our diagnostic tool was the aspiration of frank blood from the tumour which had similar clotting time with the normal blood and our mode of treatment included: injection of sclerosants and excision of the fibrous tissues. (who.int)
  • After complete excision, the histopathological diagnosis was a benign osteoblastoma of the mandible. (sidj.org)
  • The study objective is to optimize the complex therapy of postoperative complications in patients with benign neoplasms of the salivary glands using reflexotherapy, hirudotherapy and drug treatment. (tmj-vgmu.ru)
  • [ 7 ] Minor skin manifestations include facial milia, meibomian cysts in eyelids, as well as sebaceous and dermoid cysts. (medscape.com)
  • These tumors may be clinically monitored, monitored for growth, especially in older patients or those with significant other medical problems. (stanford.edu)
  • Clinically, skin tumors are further classified, utilizing the TNM (tumor-node-metastasis) system devised by the World Health Organization ( J Vet Intern Med 4:242-246, 1990). (maxshouse.com)
  • The relationship with Cowden syndrome is both clinically relevant and pertinent as well due to the heightened predisposition in these patients for a vicissitude of both benign and malignant neoplasms involving the breast, thyroid, dermis, gastrointestinal, genitourinary and central nervous systems, with annual surveillance and screening measures being highly warranted. (appliedradiology.com)
  • particularly in the internal jugular nodes.Carotid Space: This is another major highway through which tumors can race vertically up and down from the skull base down to the aortic arch. (scribd.com)
  • osteomas in the skull -thyroid cancers -epidermoid cysts -fibromas -desmoid tumors in approx. (brainscape.com)